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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 32 • August 6–August 13, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Montana Snowbowl on the road to expansion Soundcheck: El Zombi Gato resurrects old-school lineup Ochenski: Ethics violations dog Schweitzer brothers


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 32 • August 6–August 13, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Montana Snowbowl on the road to expansion Soundcheck: El Zombi Gato resurrects old-school lineup Ochenski: Ethics violations dog Schweitzer brothers


Belgioioso FRESH MOZZARELLA 8 oz.

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Millennium Products ORGANIC KOMBUCHA Selected varieties. 16 oz.

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Jason TOOTHPASTE

Selected varieties. 4.2 to 6 oz.

$3.99 Annie’s Homegrown ALL NATURAL MACARONI & CHEESE

Arrowhead Mills ORGANIC CEREAL

Smith Farm PORK SPARERIBS

Selected varieties. 6 oz.

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Selected varieties. 12 oz.

Naturally raised in Whitehall, MT.

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TIGER BABY WATERMELON 45¢ lb.

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a must-see film, free

Honest Tea BOTTLED TEA

See Food, Inc. and You’ll Never See Dinner the Same Way

16 oz.

In Food, Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner exposes the highly mechanized underbelly of America’s food industry. Such experts as Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation) and Michael Pollan (Omnivore’s Dilemma) reveal surprising truths about what we eat, how it is produced and what it is doing to the health of our families, our natural environment and our local agricultural economies. GFS has 400 free tickets for the film’s August 14th premier at the Wilma, plus we’ll be giving away a $100 shopping spree that evening and sampling the first Dixon Melons of the season. Representatives from Garden City Harvest and the Community Food & Agriculture Coalition (CFAC) will be at the Wilma too talking about our local food system. So please join us. And see a movie that’ll inspire you to eat better than ever and help turn the tables on unhealthy industrial food production.

Mi-Del GINGER SNAPS

Selected varieties. 10 oz.

$2.39

CertiÀed Organic RED OR GREEN SEEDLESS GRAPES

$1.79 lb.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 7:00 pm. For movie trailer, www.foodincmovie.com

www.goodfoodstore.com

Missoula Independent

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1600 S. 3rd St. West

Page 2 August 6–August 13, 2009

99¢

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Sale prices effective through August 11, 2009


nside Cover Story The Blackfoot River has long been a popular—and much valued—destination for whitewater fiends, ardent fly fishermen and casual hikers. But with increased use comes increased wear-and-tear. Litter, vandalism and illegal fishing practices undermine every aspect of the Cover photo by Chad Harder resource the FWP works hard to preserve. Officials like Chris McGrath patrol the Blackfoot several days a week throughout the summer, by truck and raft, enforcing the rules and encouraging recreationists to be respectful. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

From Ireland

GRÁDA

News

Letters Sen. Max Baucus’ health care proposals doomed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Testy Fest and brain damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Stimulating workers, electrifying parks and selling signage . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. Military in Wilderness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Montana Snowbowl on the road to expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski Ethics complaints dog Schweitzer brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range Lessons learned from the Lost Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Agenda Montana fare at the Western Montana Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Beet surrender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 8 Days a Week Don’t get busted by the river rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Mountain High Floating and fungus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Scope The Alaskan piano man rolls through Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Noise Bob Wire, The Builders and The Butchers, Ben Bullington, The Minus Five . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Soundcheck El Zombi Gato resurrects old-school lineup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Film Art in advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Free Will Astrolog y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 This Modern World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder INTERIM CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill EDITORIAL INTERN Megan Gyermek ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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Page 3 August 6–August 13, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

STREET TALK Asked Tuesday afternoon in front of the by Chad Harder Good Food Store in Missoula.

Q:

This week Indy reporter Alex Sakariassen rides along with a river ranger as he patrols the Blackfoot River. What’s your favorite way to beat the heat? Follow-up: What’s the most bizarre thing you’ve ever seen happen on a river?

Phil Difani: Mostly I just stay in the shade and try to get out early in the morning so I can relax in the afternoon. I don’t go to the Blackfoot, no way. It’s too crowded, especially on weekends. Drunken sailors: A bunch of rafters, drinking whiskey about 35 years ago, and that’s why I don’t go back. They were drunk and I thought, I’m not coming back here.

Amanda Eggert: On the river, any river, but preferably the [Alberton] Gorge. I used to be a guide, but no more. Dump him: Well, one of my first trips guiding was a bachelor party, and I was the only girl on the whole trip of about 13 guys. We lost the groom. I mean he just fell out of the boat.

Greg Lind: Whitewater kayaking, on the [Alberton] Gorge, although I don’t get out as much as I’d like. Flip-flopper: That would be a friend, chasing somebody down the trail butt naked at Loon Creek Hot Springs on the Middle Fork of the Salmon.

Sen. Max Baucus holds the responsibility for health care “reform” (see “Power broker,” July 30, 2009). Based on his proposals, government-run health care in other countries and failures of Medicaid/Medicare, his program will be a disaster. Is he living in a Twilight Zone reality, or does he have a self-serving agenda? The United States has state of the art medical care, unsurpassed in the world. Government-managed health care will undoubtedly result in higher costs (higher taxes), limited choice of coverage and physicians, lower quality of care, including rationing (squeezing out the elderly and chronically ill), delayed diagnoses and surgeries, further physician shortages, and broadened government control over our lives. Besides that, we can’t afford it. If folks are troubled by the cost of health insurance that is optional, imagine when essentials like a loaf of bread or a gallon of milk costs $10—20 or more. That is what will happen if the government continues to spend money it doesn’t have—astronomical inflation. The Obama administration’s mode of operation has been to write a massive piece of legislation in secret, tell Congress to hurry up and pass it (before they’ve had a chance to read it) or the sky will fall. Just what part of “We can’t afford it” do they not understand? Since we can’t afford national health care and it has always produced a product inferior to free enterprise, why are the Democrats pushing for this? As with the unions, illegal aliens given amnesty, welfare recipients and so on—expand the entitlement welfare state and you expand the power and electability of the Democratic Party that support these monstrosities. Sen. Baucus will do whatever it takes to expand his power, embracing programs that will sell us out. He does not represent Montanans and needs to be voted out of office. Roland Horst Big fork

Foreign relations

Rebecca Moss: I like the heat, and I don’t want to beat it. I mean I hiked to both the “M” and the “L” yesterday and loved it. Raft that rascal: I went innertubing on the Delaware River near Philadelphia and we saw condoms floating in the river. It’s not the river you want to be in. And there was also this raft stuck in a tree with a kid still in it, too.

Missoula Independent

Can’t afford it

Page 4 August 6–August 13, 2009

This is in response to the Independent issue “Deep Cut” (see June 18, 2009) with Huey Lewis as the centerpiece, and also in response to Peter Rosten’s letter in the proceeding issue. Mr. Rosten addresses several points in his letter, but I think avoids the heated Mitchell Slough topic.

First, I’d like to start with Huey. I think that he knew the slough was private property or at least hoped it was (which is why he put up such a legal and public relations fight) and wanted to keep it that way. He mentions in his interview that, essentially, it shouldn’t be such a big deal because people rarely came to fish in that area anyway. I don’t buy this because that’s basically saying the group of concerned Bitterroot citizens wanting this great fishing area to be public access assembled, researched the area’s historic background and, thus, putting a legal precedent into place, did so just because it happened to be near prop-

“Just what

part of ‘We

can’t afford it’ do they not

understand?

erty owned by Huey Lewis. One point I would like to make is that although I met Huey only briefly, he seemed like a nice guy and from what I’ve heard and read, he cares about the community and the environment. I am not trying to insult his character in any way. Second, going back to Mr. Rosten’s letter, I am responding to it because he offered up a completely different reason (from all the other letters I’ve read) for all the heat that Huey has been taking over the years. He said that Huey is facing animosity from native Montanans (specifically Bitterrooters) who don’t like seeing out-of-staters (specifically Californians like Mr. Rosten and Huey) move to the area they call home. I wanted to respond to this letter in particular because Mr. Rosten is right if you look at that issue on surface level. However, the issue goes a little deeper than Mr. Rosten explains. The opponents to Huey’s private property declaration, in my opinion, were true in their beliefs and mission in fighting for public access for the community, not motivated by some animosity toward him because of his California roots. It is true that some animosity exists here, but this is mainly because of the people who have lived here for so long and seen the

changes occur to the valley, some not so welcome. As a native Montanan, I can sympathize with those who have lived here a lot longer than me, and watched as the population increased, subdivisions sprouted up seemingly from nowhere, and everything from traffic to commotion on the river went up. I don’t necessarily want to see these things in a place that has always been quiet and scenic, but I know things like this happen when a place grows. The growth has to be accepted and it will be, I think, in time. One thing which contributes to this animosity is how out-ofstaters, particularly wealthy ones, arrive with an attitude like they own everything that comes with the land, making area private and buying up huge tracts (the Stock Farm in Hamilton comes to mind; I’ve always wondered what farming goes on there exactly?). This is something that Mr. Rosten and Mr. Lewis have to understand. It’s not that we don’t like people moving and sharing the beauty of the Valley—it’s just that sometimes we get reluctant. Mike McDonald Corvallis

Thanks to Tester True leadership is a willingness to tackle tough issues and find solutions that pave the way for a better Montana tomorrow. Sen. Jon Tester is to be commended for introducing legislation that protects our clean water, improves the health of our forests, and supports local timber mills and their workers (see “Seeing the forest for the trees,” July 23, 2009). He understands that collaboration can lead to winning solutions. He recognized three projects, including the Beaverhead-Deerlodge Partnership—a group of hunters, fishermen, conservationists, loggers and mill workers—had crafted a good start to solving the gridlock over forest management. But despite this hard work, not everyone shared the same willingness to collaborate. Motorized users refused to participate, and some environmentalists refuse to recognize the timber wars are over. That’s when Senator Tester stepped in and decided to move the discussion forward by crafting a bill that represents all Montanans. Thank you, Sen. Tester. Your leadership for the state of Montana makes me proud. Amanda J. Hagerty Dillon

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 Join us August 7th when two artists will share the Betty's walls. Yuan Hua says of her art: "I have always enjoyed reading and traveling, and usually along with these precious experiences and memories, I like to do a few sketches with some notes. I believe in the fantasized world, or another world beyond the one human beings can visualize. My favorite is studying and drawing figures and portraits." Casey Oney evokes his portion of the show with these words: "A minute into their first song they blew out the power to their enormous sound system. 10 minutes later, all was back to normal. They started playing again, but this time, they blew out not only the power in the gym, but also the campus and most of the power in the neighborhood. The streetlights were out and there was darkness. Singer Ozzy Osbourne was only 20 years old at the time. He went into the corner of the gym and started crying. He was shouting, ‘I hate America and I want to go home.’" Cookies and wine will help you absorb the compelling art pieces. 5-8pm.

CERETANA STUDIOS 801 Sherwood St., Phone # The Ceretana Cooperative Gallery and Open Studios: New Works by Resident Artists: Chuck Bordell, Brian Elling, Brook Kittelson, Mathew McCornack, Jonathan Marquis, Shana Matteis, Kim Shirley, Patricia Thornton and Tim Thornton. Paintings, Drawings, Print Making and Mixed Media Pieces.

BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Please join Butterfly Herbs for their First Friday celebration where local photographer DeAndria Gutzmer displays photos of an unknown subject (as of press time, at least.) Whatever the subject, it's sure to be a great display of cool photos. Join us from 5-8pm, 232 N. Higgins Ave.

MISS ZULA'S 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 Paige E. Ulland: I grew up in Bigfork, MT, and received my Bachelor of Fine Art from Montana State University in 2005. I am in love with bright colors and the relationship between negative and positive spaces. "Pinta" is about making sense of my life one painting at a time.

Miss Zula’s Pinta Featuring the Art of

Paige E. Ulland 111 N Higgins Missoula, MT 541-7376

HEALTHY HUMMINGBIRD MASSAGE & ARTS CENTER 725 Alder, Suite 27, 207-6269 Celebrating the work of artists from around Montana flexing their creative muscles to spark the imagination. Featuring a rotating selection of oil paintings, lino-cuts, portraits, and pottery. Healthy Hummingbird Gallery specializes in providing objects for the home and body to relax and invigorate the mind. Located 2 blocks west of St. Pats at the Warehouse Mall. 5-9pm. For more info call: 207-6269 www.healthyhummingbird.com.

MONTANA ART AND FRAMING 709 Ronan St., 541-7100 Exhibition of GIANT acrylic paintings by DON H. MUNDT and art works by BARBARA MORRISON, paintings and drawings by STEPHANIE FROSTAD and NANCY ERICKSON, photographs by CHRISTOFER AUTIO, as well as paintings by RENEE` LONG and digital images by AMY LONG. A reception will be held on FIRST Friday, August 7th, 5-9pm with special hours 9-3pm on Saturday, August 8th. The show will be open through August. The gallery is in Montana Art and Framing at 709 Ronan Street, Missoula, Montana. Call 406-541-7100, e-mail mundt@montana.com, for more information. MONTE DOLACK GALLERY 139 West Front St., 549-3248 Join us at the Monte Dolack Gallery for a reception from 5-8pm on Friday, August 7th during Missoula's First Friday Gallery Night. On view will be Monte’s newest limited edition print Haunted by Waters as well as other limited edition prints and fine art posters inspired by Montana’s world famous blue-ribbon rivers. Also on display will be the work of Mary Beth Percival and the jewelry of Marlene Dolack. www.dolack.com. Open Weekdays 105:30 and Sat 11-5.

Custom matting, framing, & gallery exhibits

Erica 396-6868 Mary 596-5842 Souta 207-6269

First Friday Gallery Opening: Giant Paintings by Don H. Mundt Paintings by Nancy Erickson and Stephanie Frostad Photographs by Christofer Autio

Chair Massages, Beverages, Live Music, Food, & Art! 5pm-9pm

Student Rates: $35/hr $55/1.5hr Gift Certificates Available

725 W. Alder, STE 27 - healthyhummingbird.com

709 RONAN STREET Missoula, MT 59801 • 406-541-7100

New paintings and illustrations by

First Friday August 7th 6-8 p.m. at The Downtown Dance Collective

the pulitzer prize photographs

1964 1993

Robert H. Jackson

Ken Geiger and William Snyder

121 W. Main 406-541-7240 “Rock Creek Afternoon� ~ Acrylic on canvas

August is the DDC Donation Drive! A little help from our friends will go a long way! Call for details!

Capture the Moment

Scott Woodall

Coming August 7 - Oc tober 23, 2009

Framing and design by

The University of Montana

in collaboration with the Gallery of Visual Arts Meloy & Paxson Galleries (PARTV Center) Gallery of Visual Arts (Social Sciences Building) rNVTFVN!VNPOUBOBFEVrXXXVNUFEVNPOUBOBNVTFVN Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs was developed by the Newseum, the interactive museum of news in association with the Business of Entertainment, Inc., NYC, Cyma Rubin, Curator.

Missoula Independent

Page 5 August 6–August 13, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, July 29

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

The Testicle Festival kicks off and quickly lives up to its boom-year hype, resurrecting a line of games like Bullshit Bingo that petered out years ago due to waning crowd numbers. Festival coordinator and Rock Creek Lodge owner Matt Powers says Testy Fest drew an estimated 1,000 more people this year than in 2008.

• Thursday, July 30 Sen. Max Baucus says his powerful Senate Finance Committee won’t pass bipartisan health care reform legislation before the Senate recess begins August 7, pushing the debate into the fall and missing President Obama’s self-imposed deadline for finishing the bill.

• Friday, July 31 Montana settles a lawsuit filed by amateur Missoula boxer Nate “Irish” Riley who sued promoters and regulators after a fight at the Wilma in 2003 left him brain damaged. Riley claimed the Board of Athletics within Montana’s Department of Labor and Industry was negligent. The state agrees to pay Riley $125,000.

• Saturday, August 1 Twenty-year-old Walker Morris dies after he slams into a tree while skateboarding in the early morning. Harris’ friends dropped him off Friday night and when he didn’t show up to a wedding Saturday, they returned to find his body in Sawmill Gulch.

• Sunday, August 2 A 20-foot section of the 3,896-foot-long Mullan Tunnel near Helena collapses, causing Montana Rail Link to delay the tunnel’s opening until next Sunday and place about 90 employees on furlough. Workers were renovating the tunnel when a portion collapsed on July 20, forcing the initial closure.

• Monday, August 3 The Missoula City Council hears public comment on a proposed rule which would require drivers to yield to Mountain Line buses when they re-enter traffic. The council is schedule to vote on the ordinance at their next meeting Aug. 10.

• Tuesday, August 4 Missoula police and fire department personnel respond to a four-car accident near the intersection of Third Street and Reserve Street shortly after 5 p.m. Law enforcement reports no serious injuries, but traffic is backed up on Reserve well into the evening.

Workers stride across the roof of what will soon be a two-story atrium at the University of Montana’s new Native American Center. The $10 million building–the first facility in the nation built specifically to house a Native American Studies program– sits on an historic Salish encampment.

Hunting

Shoshone strategy Necessity is the mother of invention, and for the Mountain Shoshone Indians, hunger was the root of their resourcefulness. The tribe, called the “sheep eaters,” which lived in and around the area now known as Yellowstone National Park, used bighorn sheep horns and bones and the intense heat of the area’s geothermal features to fashion hunting bows. Norman Jacobson of Missoula, 78, a former Hellgate High School science teacher, described the technique August 1 to gatherers at Salmon Lake State Park as part of Montana State Parks’ “Staycation” program, showing off his own bighorn bow that took two years to craft. The Yellowstone natives, Jacobson explains, placed sheep horns in bubbling-hot geyser pools to make them pliable. They then carved the horns using knives made of obsidian—a glasslike volcanic rock taken from Yellowstone’s Obsidian Cliff. After boiling the horns again, the Indians tied them to trees to dry straight. Then, Jacobson goes on, they combined

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Missoula Independent

two horns end-to-end, splinted them using a sheep’s leg bone and fastened it all together using sinew and hide glue—a gel made from boiling animal skin and bone. “I wanted to do the same thing,” Jacobson says, “but the smell got so bad that my wife made me go outdoors. What I ended up doing, I went on the Internet and asked for some suggestions, and a couple fellas said to go down to the grocery story and get some Knox Gelatin, because that’s made from leftovers from the slaughterhouse.” It took the Shoshone up to a year to make one bow. Some weighed as much as 80 pounds. “They could drive an arrow basically completely through a bison with that bow,” Jacobson says. While Jacobson doesn’t use his bow to hunt, he could if he wanted to. “There’s a lot of people who make their own bows out of wood,” says Tim Feldner of Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks. “This is the first time I’ve heard of someone using bone. I’m surprised that there’s enough flexibility. But I guess if the Shoshone used to do it, there must be something to it.” “It’s pretty ingenious,” says Jacobson. “You

Page 6 August 6–August 13, 2009

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did what you had to do to survive.” Matthew Frank

Stimulus

Roundabout pays bills Scott Brown says he’s kinda behind on his bills. It’s cool at 8 a.m. and steam rises off freshpoured asphalt at the intersection of Higgins, Beckwith and Hill. Heavy equipment from Knife River Corporation beeps and belches around what’s looking more and more like a roundabout each day. Brown, 28, works a few sunflower seeds with his lips. Lolo Peak Landscaping and Supply’s business has slowed over the last few months, he explains. He leans on his rake, watching three coworkers pull apart a bungled portion of ceramic wall. “We’ve had a couple hospital jobs and now this, which has kept money in our pockets,” Brown says. “But I think everybody’s slow right now.” Brown’s been with Lolo Peak four seasons. He moved here from Tacoma, Wash., in 2001.

Max Baucus; spare change you can believe in. ~ Steve Crew

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

Kevin Connell, working an adhesive gun on the ceramic bricks, says Brown’s the chattiest guy on the crew. A tiger tattoo peeks over Brown’s shirt collar as he talks. The name “Arianna� is inked on the opposite side. “That’s my daughter,� Brown says. “She’s seven.� Arianna lives with her mom right now, Brown adds, but he spends a lot of time with her. Lolo Peak’s 14-day landscaping project is an example of where federal stimulus dollars are landing locally. The Higgins roundabout alone boasts a budget of $600,000. The paycheck Brown pulls from his job–$26 an hour–will help support Arianna and his 2-year-old son, Khalil. According to The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act website, stimulus funding will create or save 11,000 jobs in Montana in the next two years. “I’m behind,� Brown says. “But this one paycheck from this job alone will help me get all caught up.� Brown isn’t banking on landscaping longterm. He took up boxing at the Dogpound Submission Fighting Academy a few months back, is three-and-two in the ring, and has a kickboxing match in early August. For Brown, the short-lived stimulus boost is perfect, holding him over while he tries to make it as a professional fighter. “Keeps me in the gym,� he says. He spits a seed in the grass and continues raking dirt. Alex Sakariassen

Recreation

Parks powering up Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) has resurrected a series of 2008 proposals to electrify campsites in six state parks, sparking a backlash in the outdoor recreation community. The projects would cost an estimated $801,000 and establish 118 electrical pedestals at Salmon Lake, Placid Lake, Beavertail Hill, Black Sandy, West Shore and Lewis and Clark Caverns state parks. Critics last year railed against similar proposals for a host of reasons. FWP defends the proposals as accommodating a wide array of park users. “Not every campsite under these proposals would be electrified,� says FWP Parks Administrator Chas Van Genderen. “It’s just providing a little bit of additional service for another sector of the population.�

Do you wear

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Tent campers argue electricity enables widescale use of appliances like televisions that cause noise and light pollution. Former Montana legislator Bob Raney says this is just “one more step in the constant development of the parks until they’re no longer parks, until all they become is RV (recreational vehicle) parking lots.� “You may as well be at a KOA,� Raney says. “At least at a KOA they serve breakfast.� Van Genderen counters that the affected parks are already popular among RV users who

typically run loud generators for want of electricity. RV users account for over 50 percent of visitors to Salmon Lake, according to FWP, and Van Genderen says some campers need to power equipment for chronic ailments like sleep apnea. Fees would increase from $15 to $20 per night for electrified sites to cover energy costs. Nearby private campgrounds that cater to RVs could construe FWP electrification as competition, but Sue Heagy of Tamaracks Resort in Seeley Lake says she considers the move “wonderful.� The few RV sites she has–at $28 per night–are usually booked well in advance. “A lot of people complain about that,� Heagy says. “We turn a lot of people away because there isn’t anything left here.� A broader concern is how electrification might impact FWP’s compliance with the 20x10 initiative–Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s mandate that state agencies reduce energy consumption 20 percent by 2010. FWP’s Gary Bertellotti says electrifying campgrounds will create a new vector for energy consumption, but FWP is balancing the effect with added cuts on the transportation and administrative sides. The electrification proposals’ public comment period ends at the concludes of August. Alex Sakariassen

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Mountain Line

32

Ads could boost service In 1986, Montana voters approved I-105 to freeze property taxes. Ever since, Mountain Line’s ability to provide new services has been “pretty much frozen,� says General Manager Steve Earle. A recommendation from the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board may provide Mountain Line with new resources, but at least one councilmember worries that the provision, which allows businesses to sponsor bus shelters, may spur the proliferation of commercial signage in the city. The recommendation from the planning board calls for the city to allow Mountain Line to advertise on bus shelters. The idea, Earle says, is that a business could ask for a shelter near its office. “Maybe we could put a shelter someplace where we couldn’t afford one but we could if a business would sponsor it,� Earle says. In exchange, the business gets advertising and the public gets another shelter to wait in on snowy winter days. In addition, Earle thinks the provision could help with route frequency. “Frequency is what we’re hearing people really want,� he says. “They don’t like having to wait 30 or 40 minutes for the next bus. They’d love to only wait 15 minutes.� But frequency is expensive. Earle says that to double the efficiency of a single route during peak hours would cost about $100,000, and allowing a business to sponsor a bus shelter would help alleviate the financial burden. The advertising provision doesn’t sit well with Ward 1 Councilmember Dave Strohmaier, who worries about the precedent the provision would set as well as the potential visual blight. “I understand that Mountain Line is strapped for cash,� Strohmaier says, “but I’m not convinced that we’ve exhausted all avenues to pay for [increased services].� Strohmaier made a motion during the July 29 Plat, Annexation and Zoning Committee to strike the recommendation, but it failed. Nevertheless, Earle says that even if Mountain Line could allow businesses to advertise on shelters, he’s not yet convinced it would generate much new revenue. “I think [local businesses] are sticking with what they have,� Earle says. “I don’t think there’s a lot of money floating around for marketing right now.� Jesse Froehling

Needed improvements listed in a July 27 report from the American University in Washington, D.C., to fix Montana’s Public Defender System. The report cites a rash of inadequacies in the three-year-old system and says “the agency is adrift.�

etc. Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act has been batted around like a low-hanging bear bag. Some praise the bill for its cooperative spirit, while others bemoan their exclusion from Tester’s salon. The large remainder—ourselves included—haven’t yet made up their minds. Based on three recent examples of collaborative conservation—the Beaverhead-Deerlodge Partnership, the Blackfoot Challenge and the Three Rivers Challenge—the bill attempts to roll the interests of loggers, recreationists and wilderness advocates into one. And it’s pretty easy to discern which players are behind the bill’s provisions. We can safely assume, for example, that the Kootenai Ridge Riders ATV Club probably pushed for the Forest Service to study potential ATV routes in the Three Rivers District of the Kootenai National Forest. But when we happened upon the language allowing limited aircraft landings for military training in the Highlands, a portion of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest slated for wilderness designation, we couldn’t even venture a guess as to who might have lobbied for it. Last time we checked, the U.S. Military was not a member of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge Partnership. Turns out that a military contractor that trains soldiers in mountain warfare pulled the strings. Aaron Murphy, a Tester spokesperson, tells us that Peak Enterprises, a private company in Butte, has an agreement in place that allows them to use the Highlands three to four times per year. Basically, a helicopter flies in, drops off the troops on a mountaintop and picks them up a few days later on a different peak. The Highlands, Murphy says, resemble the mountains of Afghanistan and allow troops to get an idea of the topography they’ll face in Asia. Tester’s bill honors that existing agreement, a direct result of the senator’s effort to listen to the concerns of all kinds of Montanans, Murphy says. Eight helicopter flights per year shouldn’t compromise the wilderness area’s ecology. Allison Stewart, national press officer for the Forest Service, notes that similar exceptions exist in other wilderness areas throughout the country. And we’re glad Tester sought input from stakeholders outside the three partnerships. But we’re still scratching our heads. The 1964 Wilderness Act prohibits all motorized and mechanized transport. That even includes mountain bikes. We’re all for national security, and well-trained troops are much more likely to return home than poorly trained troops. But in the fourth largest state in the country by area, and one of the smallest by population, we’re pretty sure the military can find other nearby stand-ins for the Hindu Kush. Let’s leave wilderness the way the Wilderness Act meant it: “untrammeled� by man.

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Going big Montana Snowbowl on the road to expansion by Matthew Frank

The infamously sinuous Snowbowl Road, about as treacherous for drivers as any of Montana Snowbowl’s black diamond runs, is being widened this summer, paving the way for the resort’s long-planned expansion, which could begin as early as next year. “I suppose there’s a chance that there could be construction in a year from now, let’s put it that way,” says Snowbowl owner Brad Morris. “That would be the best case scenario.”

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), the biggest hurdle to receiving a new SUP from the Forest Service that would almost double the resort’s acreage from the current 1,138 acres to 2,226. The plan calls for the resort to expand onto TV Mountain—immediately west of the existing resort and named for the numerous television, radio and microwave facilities that sit atop it—and build three new lifts, one more than it currently has. Ski run

“Let’s say the draft was out this year,” Morris says. “Depending on the comments, you could proceed fairly quickly after that to the actual construction. If somebody has a major objection to something then that slows things down.” Major objections appear unlikely. The local chapter of the Sierra Club and Friends of Lolo Peak—the two groups most outspoken against the proposed Bitterroot Resort on the flanks of Lolo Peak south of Missoula—haven’t taken a position on the Snowbowl e x p a n s i o n . I n f a c t , Pa u l Shively of the Sierra Club wasn’t even aware of it. His group would probably only oppose it, he says, if it involved extensive real estate development, as is the case with the Bitterroot Resort. The groups don’t say it explicitly, but their indifference to Snowbowl’s expansion may be a function of an argument they made against the Bitterroot Resort—that there isn’t sufficient demand to support it, and any increasPhoto by Chad Harder es in demand could be satisMachinery widens and flattens Snowbowl Road, a project required for Montana fied by expanding existing ski Snowbowl to proceed with its expansion plans. The resort may nearly double in areas in the region. That was size if it obtains a new Special Use Permit from the Forest Service. the specific conclusion of a report conducted three years Morris says the expansion is still in acreage would increase from 240 acres ago by the Forest Service and promotthe permitting process and its comple- to 406. ed by Friends of Lolo Peak. tion years away, but, once finished, “It’s not going to be a huge resort,” “[Ski industry trends] argue against Snowbowl would become one of the says Morris. “We’re hoping to put in the need to increase ski area capacity largest ski resorts by acreage in the state. used lifts with a lower capacity. It won’t to accommodate growth in potential This summer’s work, which be anything like Big Sky or Big destination visitors to ski areas on the requires the road to be closed from 6 Mountain, or even Bridger, for that Lolo and Bitterroot National Forests,” a.m. Mondays through noon on matter. “ wrote the Forest Service’s National Fridays, is the last of the four-phase But once skiers access TV Winter Sports Program Leader Ed road improvement project that began Mountain, the resort, at least in terms Ryberg. “Based on the analysis of local in 2003. Come winter, skiers venturing of acreage, would surpass Bozeman’s and regional ski area capacity, the up the ski hill’s only route should find Bridger Bowl, making it the third existing or approved capacity of these it wider and the curves longer and flat- largest resort in the state behind Big ski areas is adequate to accommodate ter—in a word, safer. In years past, Sky Resort (about 3,800 acres) and projected increases in skier/snowMorris says, as many as 40 vehicles per Whitefish Mountain Resort at Big boarder visits within an acceptable utiseason would careen off the road’s Mountain (about 3,000 acres). lization range. Considerations should edge and into the trees below. Snowbowl currently receives be given to Montana Snowbowl’s pro“As part of the Master Development around 65,000 skier visits in a season, posal to provide a more balanced mix Plan,” says Susan Colyer of the U.S. Morris says. He expects the expansion of terrain to meet the desires of the skiForest Service, which essentially leases will up that number to around 85,000 ing public.” its land to Snowbowl through a special per season, meaning the daily average Still, with an economy that’s use permit (SUP), “it was recognized of about 600 skier visits would jump to slipped like a Ford Fiesta off Snowbowl that if Snowbowl wanted to grow the around 800. Road, a Snowbowl expansion could ski area they didn’t have the parking Skiers and snowboarders shouldn’t easily get snowed under. But, Morris capacity or really the road facilities to start eying TV Mountain’s lines just yet, says, the economy hasn’t been a factor. accommodate the type of visitorship though. If the Forest Service approves “Not so far. We’re okay,” he says. that they’re getting and looking at the EIS—the draft EIS is already about “The weather is the biggest factor that increasing.” two years behind schedule—imple- affects us.” As crews work on the road, mentation would take 11 years, accordSnowbowl works to complete its draft ing to planning documents. mfrank@missoulanews.com

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Troubling pattern



      

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Page 10 August 6–August 13, 2009

Ethics complaints shadow Schweitzer brothers Concerns over ethics violations have dogged Gov. Brian Schweitzer and his brother Walter since almost the first day of his administration. Now, in a week full of bad news for the Brothers Schweitzer, both are once again being questioned for ethical practices ranging from filling agencies with political patronage jobs to shaking down state employees for campaign contributions. Those new to Montana may not recall the 2006 feature story “Walter Ego� by then-Independent reporter John S. Adams. Adams cracked open the tale of how Schweitzer, shortly after taking office, stuck his brother Walter in the Capitol as an intermediary for those wishing to meet and discuss state issues with the governor. The problems Walter caused were many and varied, but primarily revolved around his function in the governor’s office since he wasn’t a state employee—and in fact was prohibited by nepotism laws from serving as one. Nonetheless, Walter, holding no official title, intervened in important governmental issues leaving those who routinely worked on such issues with a lose-lose choice: either deal with Walter or futilely complain about it to his brother. Shortly after the story appeared, Walter quietly disappeared from the governor’s office, but not from Helena political circles, where he remained active. In the meantime, the governor had his own problems to deal with. Complaints of Schweitzer using heavy-handed tactics to “bully� legislators and others continued to surface on a regular basis, with some even making it to the press. But while such allegations are easily dismissed by those in power, what is not so easy to dismiss are lawsuits. Schweitzer soon found himself being investigated for violations of government ethics laws that prohibit using state resources for political purposes. In a strange tale that is not yet over, Dennis Unsworth, commissioner of political practices appointed by Schweitzer, investigated a complaint that the governor had produced an Ag Day radio promotion that included his campaign slogan—“Montana’s on the Move�—and used state resources to do so. An independent review ruled against Schweitzer, a fine was suggested, and the governor immediately said he would pay the fine in an obvious attempt to bury the embarrassment.

But that’s not what happened. Instead, Unsworth ruled that he couldn’t accept the governor’s check until the final disposition of the case and, in a move that defies logic, the governor counter-sued his own appointee in a lawsuit which has yet to be resolved. Following on the heels of this debacle came the governor’s infamous speech to a national gathering of trial lawyers in Philadelphia in which he claimed to have influenced the outcome of the 2006 elections by intimi-

What it all “adds up to is trouble, perhaps big trouble, for the Brothers

�

Schweitzer.

dating vote watchers, muscling a county election official to withhold voting results, and then pressuring the Associated Press to prematurely call the Senate election for Jon Tester. The governor contends it was all a joke and he didn’t really do the things he told the trial lawyers. But once again, the specter of ethics violations shadowed Schweitzer. Zoom forward to August 2009. In an exhaustive article by Eric Newhouse in the Great Falls Tribune, a recent state employee alleges that Walter Schweitzer verbally assaulted her and solicited political contributions in the workplace. Complaining about it, she contends, resulted in her being fired from her position last week. Walter, who was appointed as deputy state auditor by newly elected State Auditor Monica Lindeen, claims he “can’t recall� any such incidents, despite the cancelled checks the employee says she was forced to write to help retire Lindeen’s campaign debt and for a fundraiser for former Democratic Party chief Dennis

McDonald’s campaign to unseat Rep. Denny Rehberg. Ironically, in the article, Unsworth cites the same ethics law that prohibits using state resources or offices for political purposes—the one the governor violated with his Ag Day radio blurbs. Lindeen announced Tuesday that she’s ordering an independent review, but that the Hatch Act wouldn’t apply to the investigation because the agency doesn’t receive federal money. While Walter is busy trying to sidestep his potential ethics violations, Brother Brian is catching significant flak for bringing in his old college roommate Joe Maurier, from Colorado, to be the administrator of the Parks Division of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) two years ago. Schweitzer unceremoniously fired long-time and well-respected FWP director Jeff Hagener and replaced him with Maurier, who immediately and without public input, reorganized the agency. Schweitzer then tossed a political patronage position as FWP Deputy Director to Art Noonan, a Butte Democratic operative who doesn’t hunt and hasn’t had a fishing license in 20 years. Adding to the mess, Maurier just hired an Ohio man to be head of the newly created Fish and Wildlife Division, as reported this weekend in a lengthy story by the Lee Newspaper’s Jennifer McKee. Ohio has only whitetail deer as big game, counts “squirrels and rabbits� as game animals, and has no wild trout. The governor also denounced former FWP Director Hagener, alleging Hagener had refused to reorganize the agency. Hagener, who had decided to “take the high road� and not comment on the significant changes in his former department, spoke out to say the governor had never made any such request to him. What it all adds up to is trouble, perhaps big trouble, for the Brothers Schweitzer. The pattern of shaking down state employees for political contributions, filling state agencies with political patronage positions, and ignoring ethics laws continues to plague them. The governor’s lame duck administration grows lamer—and more distracted—by the minute. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Backcountry basics Lessons learned from the Lost Forest by Chuck Bolsinger

The Scout we were driving across the treeless landscape was coated with dust so thick you couldn’t read the decal identifying us as scientists from a Forest Service Research Station. Had the decal been legible, an observer might have thought we were lost. We weren’t, but the forest that my work-partner Doug and I were heading for was, at least by name: The Lost Forest, a small stand of ponderosa pine and western juniper in the high desert, 50 dusty miles northeast of Silver Lake, Ore. Unlike the sky islands of the Southwestern deserts, the Lost Forest is the same elevation as the desert around it, and there’s no nearby water, spring or oozing seep. Clouding the issue more, the annual precipitation here is less than 10 inches, about half the minimum required by ponderosa pine in most of its range. But there is one major difference: Underneath the Lost Forest, some 3.8 miles long by 1.5 miles wide, sits an island of coarse sand unlike the surrounding sea of fine-textured and clayrich soil that holds moisture near the surface during the early part of the growing season. Sagebrush and its associates—rabbitbrush, wheat grass, fescue and other bunchgrasses—thrive in this medium, but they fight a losing battle in sandy soil where moisture quickly dissipates. What’s not well understood is how pines can germinate in this arid setting and survive until their roots reach the moist depths, and then grow into large, old trees. We visited the Lost Forest to find a plot established 10 years earlier by researchers as part of a nationwide program to keep up-to-date information on our forests. Global positioning systems hadn’t been perfected a decade ago, so we located the plot the old-fashioned way—we followed directions written by previous visitors and consulted aerial photos. As we approached an edge of the Lost Forest, I saw that a large pine had blown down. I climbed up on its huge root and started walking along the trunk,

when suddenly there was a commotion beneath the tree at the spot where I stood. Out jumped a bobcat, which ran leaping and dodging through fallen-tree debris, then, like a stray cat spooked from a porch, it stopped and looked back at me. Except for the fluffy ruffs of its cheeks, it looked like my cat Barney, golden-tawny with white chin and lower cheeks, and brownish “worry lines” over the eyes. It ran off, giving me a broadside view of its mottled back and flank, before disappearing in the pines.

“Global positioning systems hadn’t been perfected a decade ago, so we located the plot the old-fashioned way—we followed directions written by previous visitors and consulted

aerial photos.

I stood on the massive fallen tree in the bright sunshine and let the experience soak in. Wildlife encounters are one of the perks of this job, making up for sub-modest pay, long hours with no overtime, bug bites, bruises, scrapes—you name it. Once we found the forest boundaries, our work began. We had to account for everything that had been previously

recorded and then record everything now present. That would include insects, what little understory vegetation there was, snags and downed trees. New tree diameter measurements showed remarkably high growth rates for an area of such aridity. Height growth was not so great, resulting in exaggerated inverted-coneshaped tree trunks—the kind you see in harsh environments such as the famous cliff-top Jeffrey pines in Yosemite National Park. We n o t e d a l a r g e n u m b e r o f woodrat nests, usually in bushy junipers. Woodrats—aka packrats—are a main entrée of desert bobcats and are also relished by coyotes, hawks, eagles and owls. In one nest I saw the metallic glint of a pop-top, the old kind that came off the can. I reached for it, then jerked back at the sight of a moving reptilian body. Rattlesnakes often occupy woodrat nests, but this particular tenant looked like a western fence lizard. Or maybe a sagebrush lizard—they differ in minor ways you can only observe by catching a lizard and turning it upside down. This one got away before we could try. As we worked, a raven followed us around making gargling sounds, while high overhead a red-tailed hawk repeatedly cried shhhhrrrreeeeee. Turkey vultures also circled overhead—first two, and then several—a cheerful reminder that nothing in nature goes to waste, including us, if we didn’t make it out of the Lost Forest. The single café back in Silver Lake was closed by the time we got in that night. Doug and I dined on sardines and crackers and split an orange and a granola bar. Our experience in the Lost Forest was worth missing a cooked meal, though we made sure to be at the café as soon as it opened the next morning. Chuck Bolsinger is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He writes in Boring, Oregon.

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Way back when, the Western Montana Fair included Montana fare— food from producers and growers that brought local flavor to the fair’s festivities. This year, the focus on local food returns with the debut of the West Lawn Market on Tuesday, August 11. “We are bringing back the concept of what the county fair used to be,” says Genevieve King, director of the Sustainable Business Council, an event sponsor. “There hasn’t really been a food component for a long time and that’s what the fair used to be about. Everybody would bring not only their livestock, but their biggest pumpkin, and the best bounty, and there were contests and it was a real family event.” The West Lawn Market begins at 11 AM and includes vendors selling their locally grown meat, vegetables, fruits and desserts. There’ll be music, grilling competitions and educational sessions on sustainability, four-season gardening, canning and preserving, composting, and even backyard chicken coups. Watch (and smell) as top local chefs Bob

Marshall (Biga Pizza), Bob Zimorino (Chef Designed Kitchens), Sam Risho (Silk Road), Todd Engel (Iron Horse), Richard Kolenda (Brooks and Brown), and Jeremy Engebretson (Riversong Catering) team up with local celebrities like KPAX’s Jill Valley and folk musician Amy Martin as sous chefs in the “Celebrity Locavore Grilling Competition.” Or bring your “Kiss the Cook” apron and meat tongs and participate in the “Public Grill Master Challenge” for a chance at a Big Green Egg—a combination cooker and smoker—donated by Axmen and valued at $1,300. “Everything is local,” says King. —Megan Gyermek

THURSDAY AUGUST 6

6–9 PM each night until Aug. 12. $20/covers cost of reference materials. Call 363-1444 ext. 5.

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010. Tamarack Grief Resource Center, an organization specializing in bereavement camps, has openings for a summer camp up in the Flathead for kids aged 8–14 who are grieving the death of a loved one. Camp dates are Aug. 28–30. Cost TBA. Call Tina Barrett at 721-2860 or visit www.tamarackgriefresourcecenter.org.

SATURDAY AUGUST 8 Those suffering from long-term illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program releasing the creative flow with Annie Allen. Donations appreciated, as is registration. Call 549-5329 or visit www.livingartofmontana.org. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

MONDAY AUGUST 10 Women who need support after being sexually assaulted can find solace at Surviving Sexual Assault, an 8–10 week support group for women 17 and up at the YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Registration for the closed group ends today. Meeting time TBA. Call 5436691 to register. I certainly don’t envision being able to buy my own house, but maybe you do. If so, head over to a First Time Home Buyer Class at the Human Resource Council Building, 316 N. Third St. in Hamilton, from

Taste local flavors at the Western Montana Fair August 11 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Western Montana Fairgrounds at 1101 South Avenue West. The West Lawn Market space is located near the Russell Street entrance directly south of the hockey rink.

Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080.

TUESDAY AUGUST 11 While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like— and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 3277834. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

THURSDAY AUGUST 13 Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - State police arrested Lonnie Meckwood, 29, and Phillip Weeks, 51, for robbing a gas station in Kirkwood, N.Y., after their getaway car ran out of gas. Police arrested fugitive Evariston Tenorio, 48, after they found him hiding in tall grass in Woodburn, Ore., when his cell phone rang, alerting officers to his whereabouts. DON’T HAVE A COW - When Tammy Nuttelman called 911 because some cows had escaped from her farm near Juneau, Wis., she began swearing at the dispatcher who told her escaped cows weren’t an emergency. “I got seven fucking cows out, maybe going to the fucking highway, and you need to let everybody know that there are loose cows out there!” Nuttelman said, according to the transcript. “They’ll probably cause a major fucking accident, you hear me?” The dispatcher finally called a sheriff’s deputy, who came to Nuttelman’s house to cite her for misuse of 911. Afterwards, Nuttelman told Milwaukee’s WTMJ Radio News that she overreacted, explaining, “I mean, who doesn’t when you call 911?” After sheriff’s deputies in King County, Wash., stopped two men for tying a rope around a bull’s neck, attaching the rope to a 1989 Buick Century and dragging the animal for at least a half-mile along the road, driver Jonas Arnbrister, 75, explained they were moving the bull to a new pasture and always moved the bull like this because “he is stubborn.” Sgt. John Urquhart told the Seattle Times that passenger Terrance Neff, 57, added, “You have to be that way with cows.” BAD GREED VS. GOOD DEED - After learning that Massachusetts drivers challenged more than 250,000 tickets last year, state legislators voted to charge drivers $25 to contest citations in the future, regardless of whether charges are dismissed or upheld. Lawmakers estimate the surcharge will add $5 million to state revenue, not counting any money collected from fines. Explaining the change was necessary to offset an $18 million shortfall by the state’s trial courts, State Sen. Stephen M. Brewer told the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, “Is it something I’m happy about? Heck no. But there’s a mountain of things we’re not happy about.” The sheriff’s office in Livingston Parish, La., announced it was “discontinuing its participation in the parish’s photo enforcement program, commonly referred to as ‘the speeder van,’” after the Carroll Baptist Church had a photo radar van towed from church property. It had been parked without permission. The sheriff’s statement noted that the representative of Australia’s Redflex Traffic Systems, whose vehicles issue automated tickets for between $100 and $464, objected to paying the towing fees to recover its vehicle and made “improper comments” to the towing company employees. Since parish officials approved the contract with Redflex a year ago, residents had complained because it parked its unattended vehicles on private property, including on lawns. Law enforcement officials didn’t embrace Redflex, either, ticketing its vehicles for petty but valid violations. In April, the sheriff’s office had to refund 2,488 tickets after Redflex unfairly set its speeder van where the speed limit suddenly dropped from 70 to 60 mph. IRONIES ILLUSTRATED - Online bookseller Amazon.com used the wireless network that sends digital books to its Kindle readers to remotely delete some digital editions of two titles without notice from the Kindles of customers who bought them. One of the books was 1984, George Orwell’s novel where government censors erase all news articles embarrassing to Big Brother. The other was Orwell’s Animal Farm. People who bought the rescinded editions reacted with indignation, according to the New York Times. “I never imagined that Amazon actually had the right, the authority or even the ability to delete something that I had already purchased,” Charles Slater, who bought the book last month, said. Fire interrupted a cremation in Hampton, N.H. Foster’s Daily Democrat reported intense heat from the crematorium apparently sparked the blaze, which spread through the wooden roof structure of the Remick & Gendron Funeral Home. Three days after completing a 4,200-mile trip across the United States on his motorcycle, Jon Canady, 69, was riding in downtown West Palm Beach, Fla., when a car struck and killed him. Police Lt. Michael Roggin told the Palm Beach Post that Canady, who died where he fell, was not wearing a helmet. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Police in Treasure Island, Fla., charged Bonita P. Miller, 59, with domestic battery after they said she struck her live-in boyfriend with a can of air freshener and a potted plant. The St. Petersburg Times reported she then jabbed him in the back with a key. FECUNDITY JUSTICE - Ex-pro football player and convicted cocaine trafficker Travis Henry, 30, faced 10 years in prison and a $4 million fine when he walked into a Billings, Mont., courtroom, but U.S. District Judge Cebull, calling Henry “a heck of a football player,” sentenced him to just three years in prison and five years’ probation. The Denver Post reported that Cebull waived the fine because Henry, who according to court documents has fathered 11 children by 10 women, could not afford it. PROBLEM PLUS SOLUTION EQUALS PROBLEM - Faced with a rise in the number of automated teller machines blown up with explosives—from 54 in 2006 to 387 in 2007 and nearly 500 last year—South African banks turned to a new security feature designed to thwart robbers. According to the Mail & Guardian Online, the technology uses cameras to detect people tampering with the ATM’s card slots, while another machine ejects pepper spray to stun the culprit as police rush to the scene. During a routine maintenance check at one of the new ATMs in Fish Hoek, the pepper-spray device accidentally activated, requiring three technicians to seek medical treatment. Bank official Patrick Wadula said the pepper spray also “spread into the shopping center where the ATMs are situated.” FOSSIL OF THE WEEK - Australian scientists have found the world’s oldest penis in an ancient fish specimen. The team previously located fish from the Devonian era that paleontologist John Long told ABC Science Online had “some structures in the pelvic fin that suggested copulation.” But, he added, “we hadn’t found the business end of how they were doing it.” The 400-millionyear-old reproductive organ turned up in an extinct class of armored fish called placoderms, which had a long clasper, made entirely of bone, “with a knobbly end” said Long, explaining male fish used the clasper to grip inside the female while they were mating.

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8

:47 a.m., Saturday July 11, 2009: Chris McGrath roars into the deserted parking lot of the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) office off Spurgin Road in Missoula, and kicks open the driver door of his silver Dodge pickup. He’s wearing sleek black sunglasses and a faded threadbare cap. The silver badge on his short-sleeve FWP uniform commands attention: “ex officio warden.” A single leather case on his belt holds a small can of pepper spray. Clouds cover the valley, but the temperature is rising noticeably and it looks like it’ll be a busy day on Missoula’s waterways. McGrath rifles around boxes of rescue gear and fishing pamphlets inside the truck’s cab, looking for an industrial-sized green thermos. He gives himself a long pour of coffee. Traffic on Interstate 90 is quiet as we head toward Bonner. Most of Missoula is either sleeping off a rowdy Friday night or miles up the Blackfoot River Corridor already. McGrath and

his citation book will catch up with the latter eventually. The former will catch up with him by noon. McGrath pulls off Highway 200 to fill up at the Town Pump. He waves to a river guide standing next to a 10,000 Waves van before getting back on the highway. “I used to work there,” he says, pulling a tin of chewing tobacco out of his jeans pocket. “I was a whitewater guide for five summers. Actually, the first time my current girlfriend and I lived together, we lived in a tent down near Red Lodge.” McGrath, 27, seems quiet at first but grows more talkative with each swig of coffee. Hunkered forward in his seat, he watches the road over one hand while stroking the corners of his black goatee with the other. This is his second summer with FWP as one of the few full-time rangers exclusive to the Blackfoot River and he approaches the job with a relaxed confidence. At his first stop at Angevine, McGrath makes small talk with an early-morn-

ing fisherman–whose license is in order–then jumps back into the truck. The day sounded long when McGrath described it over the phone; now it sounds longer. Eighty-five miles of river, from Weigh Station to Brown’s Lake, all fall under McGrath’s charge. We’ll stop at campsites and access points along the way, checking angling licenses and issuing warnings or citations to anyone abusing the resource. And out here, on a hot summer Saturday, things can get tricky fast. “I should probably show you how to work the radio,” he tells me, “in case anything happens to me.”

River revelry Norman Maclean put the region’s rivers in the most poetic perspective in the opening of his novella, A River Runs Through It, first published in 1976: “In our family, there was no clear line between religion and fly fishing. We lived at the junction of great trout rivers in western Montana, and our father was a Presbyterian minister and

a fly fisherman who tied his own flies and taught others. He told us about Christ’s disciples being fishermen, and we were left to assume, as my brother and I did, that all first-class fishermen on the Sea of Galilee were fly fishermen and that John, the favorite, was a dry-fly fisherman.” The Blackfoot River has long been a popular—and much valued—destination for whitewater fiends, ardent fly fishermen and casual hikers. But with increased use comes increased wear-and-tear. Litter, vandalism and illegal fishing practices undermine every aspect of the resource the FWP works hard to preserve. Officials like McGrath patrol the Blackfoot several days a week throughout the summer, by truck and raft, enforcing the rules and encouraging recreationists to be respectful. In 2008, the number of vehicles recorded at the Johnsrud Park access site alone totaled 18,000 between May and August. Though cumulative vehicle numbers per season have declined

Photo by Chad Harder

Norman Maclean wrote fondly of his days fly fishing the Blackfoot River near Missoula in his renowned novella A River Runs Through It. The river has changed much over the subsequent decades. Fly fishing is most often done by raft, and tubers constitute a large percentage of users on lower stretches of river.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 August 6–August 13, 2009


Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Ranger Chris McGrath checks a trio of fishing licenses at Corrick’s River Bend on the Blackfoot River. Unlicensed fishing is one of the tamer infractions McGrath runs into during his patrols.

since 2005, Johnsrud still receives more than 20,000 visits a year–over 60 percent of which are neither floaters nor anglers, but simply partiers. McGrath dishes out citations for glass bottles—outlawed on the river for the safety of both wildlife and users—and for negligence in paying camping fees, as well as for any commercial fishing outfits that don’t have proper permits for river access. “People would see right through it if I didn’t say it was challenging,” says Chet Crowser, Region 2 river recreation manager for FWP and McGrath’s predecessor on the Blackfoot. “There are definitely days up there when it’s the last place you really want to be. It’s extremely dusty, it’s hot, you’re dealing with people who aren’t really with it and are extremely intoxicated. It can get really overwhelming after a while.” Crowser, 30, worked the Blackfoot from 2005 to 2007, at a time when disorderly conduct hit its height. During that time, FWP and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agents teamed up with an increasing Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department presence to crack down on violations. More patrols led to more citations and more arrests.

“It seems like when I started working there on the Blackfoot, things had ramped up to a level where you were expecting to see a very social atmosphere with a likelihood of drunkenness and disorderly conduct,” Crowser says. “You were hardpressed to find much in the way of families with small kids. You could, but it really wasn’t a place you wanted to take kids.” That’s something local authorities wanted to fix. “There’s just not enough space on that river for everyone that wants to use it,” says Lieutenant Brad Giffin of the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department. “When you leave big crowds of people like that alone and they think it’s a no-enforcement zone, they just kind of go crazy.” Crazy just barely scratches the surface. Rangers and wardens still talk about “interesting” displays of public nudity, about wild costumes and wilder attitudes all occurring at a time of day they call the “tuber hatch.” Crowser remembers a New York City transit bus filled with speakers parked at Johnsrud. The revelers unloaded recliners and couches, propped open the windows of the bus, and launched a full-on party.

“It was definitely one of those occurrences at the height of that time when people were identifying that area as a place not to take families, and there were definitely families there looking at it like, ‘This is not a controlled environment,’” says Crowser. “We’re not there to be the fun police and crack down on everything. But we want it to be a safe environment for the whole gamut of people who love to use the Blackfoot.”

Calm before the storm 9:35 a.m.: “Man, it’s quiet.” Johnsrud Park is dead, no evidence of the party McGrath said went down the previous weekend. The Fourth of July saw hundreds of tubers crowding the beach, beers in nearly every hand. A sound system spat music so loud you could hear it from the highway a halfmile away, McGrath says. He and a few other rangers, some with FWP and some with BLM, spent a bulk of their afternoon just at Johnsrud, taming the throng as best they could. A few drunks got riled up when the officers requested the music be turned down and the confrontation neared a point McGrath considers uncomfortable. Wardens with FWP and BLM don’t have authority to

Photo by Chad Harder

Rangers on the Blackfoot River have a nickname for the droves of young people that float the river: the “tuber hatch.” Crowds usually show up in the early afternoon, aluminum beer cans in tow, and can get pretty rowdy by the time they reach the beach at Johnsrud Park.

Missoula Independent

Page 16 August 6–August 13, 2009

make arrests. Rangers like McGrath don’t even carry pistols or batons. “I do the best I can to avoid a bad situation,” McGrath says. “Drunk people can get angry really fast. I don’t carry anything but this can of pepper spray, and I will use it. But if I’m in danger, I’ll back away and get the hell out. That’s why we make sure to park our trucks so we can’t get blocked in. You have to look out for number one first, your fellow rangers second, and the resource third.” Those words still hanging in the cab, McGrath radios Missoula County dispatch and gives them my name and my position with the Independent. Then he gets out to check the restroom. “It’s a mess,” he says. “Can’t leave it like that.” He takes a few minutes with a set of pinchers to bag a pile of used toilet paper, then throws the bag in the back of the truck. Down at the landing, three guys are busy inflating fishing rafts. McGrath gabs a moment, and a man in obnoxiously orange shorts recognizes him. “You used to work at Bob Wards, didn’t you?” He did, but he stays focused on the licenses. They’re all in check, but a duo at the other side of the site isn’t so lucky. The younger of the two men hands McGrath a slip of paper. “Huh, you don’t look like a Diane,” McGrath says, amused. The man tells McGrath he must have grabbed his wife’s by mistake. “Well, either you’re going to have to call somebody and have them bring it out to you, or you’re going to have to stow the pole in your truck,” McGrath says, trying to sound congenial. Just to make sure the man complies, McGrath sets to work pulling apart a stone fire ring set up on the beach. He takes his time, lugging the blackened rocks to the water and bagging the charred bits of log. Back in the truck, McGrath watches the man glance back up the hill. “Yeah, I’m up here,” McGrath whispers. “Quit staring at me and bring your pole up.” Finally the man hikes to his car and we take off.

Home river 11:13 a.m.: McGrath’s coffee mug is running low. He says he prefers these early hours before the tuber hatch. As far as he’s concerned, the less action the better. “Mornings are definitely the best for me,” McGrath says. “Everyone who’s doing something wrong is hungover, so they’re not too fast.” But stopping to check in with the odd group of campers helps break the monotony. We drove through Thibodeau campground at a crawl a half hour ago to collect campsite payments from the tall iron deposit box. There, a woman with thick blonde curls beckoned McGrath to a set of five rubber tubes, four tied in a square around the fifth. “Would you suggest we tie them together like this?” Christina Posey


asked. Her daughter, 11-year-old Evelyn Sparks, lingered near their tents. “If I were you, I wouldn’t tie a bunch together like that,” McGrath said. “You can get hung up on a rock, and if that happens someone’s going to have to get out in the middle of the river. These ropes can get caught on rocks. It can get really dangerous really fast.” McGrath grew up in Helena, surrounded by politics and outdoor excursions. His father, Mike McGrath, served as Montana’s attorney general for eight years and is now chief justice of the Montana Supreme Court. “The first time I camped out was on the Blackfoot,” McGrath says. “I went on my first multi-day trip here.” The Blackfoot hasn’t been the only river McGrath’s floated. He worked six seasons as a whitewater rafting guide. Most of the gigs were with Missoulabased operations like 10,000 Waves, but McGrath spent one summer guiding trips in Oregon and California. A few years back he ran Beartooth Whitewater out of Red Lodge. Now he’s right where he wants to be, patrolling a river he’s known all his life. Down at Corrick’s River Bend, McGrath bumps into Dave Shively, his old geography professor from the University of Montana. McGrath majored in history and political science, when he wasn’t busy fishing or rafting rapids. Shively’s name came up earlier in the truck, under the topic “favorite professors at UM.” “This morning I was looking for my wallet,” Shively says, handing his license over to McGrath. “I was thinking, ‘I need my license. I’m going to bump into somebody today.’” Later, McGrath scribbles a note in a small notebook at one of the abandoned campsites, tears it out and leaves it next to a wine glass with a pink flamingo for a stem. The group paid for one camper unit for two nights, but they have four units on site. “The 14 bucks they paid is not going to be enough to fix the impact of this large a group of people,” McGrath says. He pokes around another site. Nobody’s home. The fire pit is full of blackened Coors Light cans. A bottle of R&R Canadian whiskey sits on the table next to McGrath as he writes another strongly worded message. The bottle’s three-quarters empty. “They won’t be too happy about that note,” he says as we head back to the rig. He takes pictures of the cars, so

Photo by Chad Harder

The stretch of Blackfoot River between Whittaker Bridge and Johnsrud Park stands out as the most popular corridor for casual day-trippers on inflatable tubes. Roughly 90 percent of visitors to the Whittaker landing are floaters, who frequently bob down the river with coolers full of beer.

he has makes and license plates on file if he needs to write a ticket. At the beach, Jana Hornibrook asks McGrath what the fish are biting on. Hornibrook, an East Missoula resident, calls the Blackfoot her “home river.” She’s already caught a nine-inch cutbow today.

asked to haul the bodies out to keep bear from feeding on them, not a task McGrath considers the most glorifying in a ranger’s routine. Minutes later, we sweep through the Roundup landing at the head of the corridor. McGrath spots a lady wandering on the fringes of the parking lot

report states 90 percent of visitors to the Whittaker landing were floaters. It’s been a popular recreation corridor for decades, says Caroline Byrd, Western Montana program director with the Nature Conservancy. Byrd remembers kayaking there in the 1980s when “everybody knew every kayaker in

“Bet that’ll make a perfect ending to your story. Everyone telling you all day how great the river is now, how much it’s improved. Then the last time we stop, the last damn time, there’s a guy passed out drunk and a family with a bunch of little kids watching.” —Chris McGrath, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks “This is my favorite river to fish,” she says. “It’s close by, it’s easy to walk. I have bad knees, so Rock Creek and others aren’t so great for me.” As we head back through River Bend, past the empty campsites and McGrath’s informal warnings, McGrath tells me about 15 elk that broke through the ice on this stretch of river sometime in the winter. Carcasses popped up on the banks near campgrounds periodically in late spring. McGrath and some FWP guys were

and asks if she lost anything. She says no, she’s just looking for a place to pee. McGrath points to the outhouse not 15 feet away. Sometimes, he says, he just can’t understand what people are thinking.

Conservation and cracking down One of the busiest stretches of the Blackfoot lies between Whittaker Bridge and Johnsrud Park. FWP’s 2008 Blackfoot River Recreation Management

town.” Now Whittaker is the place on a hot Saturday to see swarms of tube-toting floaters descend like stoneflies. “The biggest problem we have is Johnsrud Park and Whittaker Bridge,” says Lt. Giffin with the Sheriff ’s Department. “The parking areas up there are not large enough to support the numbers of people who want to use the river. The weekdays, it’s usually not too bad. But I’m not exaggerating when I say on the weekends there’s between 500 and 1,000 people that

want to use that stretch of river to float.” Without the Nature Conservancy, however, the story might go differently. The nonprofit bought much of that swath in the late 1990s from Plum Creek Timber, Byrd says, hoping to stave off development in the corridor. They gradually passed the land to the BLM for continued protection, as the Nature Conservancy itself has no field presence on the Blackfoot. The purchase is a prime example of the wideranging conservation efforts that have kept the Blackfoot River what it is: a lush, uncultivated area in need of supervision by officials like McGrath. “On the Blackfoot,” Byrd says, “there’s this really unique and successful collaborative effort that’s been going on for a long time in bringing together nonprofits, conservation organizations, agencies, land owners, businesses and having everyone sit down at a table and communicate.” Specifically, Byrd refers to the Blackfoot Challenge, a broad partnership of which FWP and the BLM are vital members. Contributions from partners differ. The Nature Conservancy focuses on purchasing land and securing conservation easements to maintain a verdant wilderness for recreationists to pass through. “They’ve stemmed development that other valleys have been unable to beat away, with the Bitterroot being the obvious example,” says Bruce Farling, executive director of Blackfoot Challenge partner Montana Trout Unlimited. “The Blackfoot’s always been sort of a backyard party river for Missoula…It’s one river that the people own.” While the Nature Conservancy’s purchase of the Whittaker-Johnsrud stretch wasn’t directly responsible for the increase in river recreation, Byrd says it did ensure the area’s continued availability for public access and enjoyment. The kind of unruly and disrespectful behavior McGrath often encounters is anything but appreciative of these efforts. But experts say recreationists seem to have responded to stepped-up patrols. It’s been a group effort, with no one agency having the resources to enforce river regulations on its own. “The first year we were up there, we had a lot of arrests,” Giffin says, “for MIP [Minor in Possession], disorderly conduct, drunk driving, littering. It was pretty rampant. The years following that, it declined because people recognized we were up there.”

Photos by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent

Page 17 August 6–August 13, 2009


Crowser says by his second year as a Blackfoot ranger, enforcement officials had really “turned the corner on a lot of that stuff.” Traffic counts at Johnsrud were still high, according to the FWP’s 2008 report, and aluminum can litter was on the rise. But the number of participants in Blackfoot River cleanup efforts had increased. There remained a certain amount of questionable behavior, but anecdotal evidence from men like Crowser indicates their attempts to calm the river were gaining ground. “It was still busy,” he continues. “We saw our use numbers continue to be high. But the likelihood of disorderly types of behavior, public safety concerns, was on the decline. Then, the last year in the position, we were actually starting to get calls both to the sheriff ’s office and FWP from families saying, ‘Hey, I can take my family back there again. It’s still busy, but I’m not as concerned about safety.’”

The tuber hatch 2:03 p.m.: After patrolling the river up to Clearwater Junction, we head back down the corridor the way we came. Now the landing at Whittaker Bridge looks like a beach scene from Jaws, with hoards of tubers pushing

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Ranger Chris McGrath grew up camping and rafting on the Blackfoot River with his father, Chief Justice of the Montana Supreme Court Mike McGrath. Enforcing respect for the resource through his work with Fish, Wildlife and Parks keeps McGrath connected to a valued part of his childhood.

and nudging their way into the Blackfoot. McGrath stops to issue a Fishing Access Site ticket to a commercial guide. That particular company, which McGrath declines to name, has been a repeat problem this season. Above the landing, BLM Warden Tony Lue paces in the dirt. His belt is weightier than McGrath’s, with a gun, badge and spare ammunition. Lue says he’s worked the Blackfoot since 1999.

Photo by Chad Harder

A family at Johnsrud Park loads a flotilla of rubber tubes onto their car for a trip back up the Blackfoot River. Vehicle activity at Johnsrud reaches up to 20,000 visitors a summer.

Missoula Independent

Page 18 August 6–August 13, 2009

Back then he was one of the few officials patrolling the Blackfoot with much authority. Now the sheriff ’s department is a regular presence. “It used to be a lot more of a party atmosphere, a lot wilder,” Lue says. “Lots of drinking, lots of drug use, lots of college students swearing. Now it’s a lot more tame. Lots of families. That’s an encouraging sign. They feel more part of the river.” FWP Warden Aaron Berg agrees. He shows up in plain clothes, with two ammo clips and a pair of handcuffs attached to his belt. Berg grew up in Turah, just east of Bonner, and remembers floating and fishing the Blackfoot as a teenager in the 1990s. Back then, he says, you might easily find yourself the only person on the river. “When I used to recreate up here as a kid, you didn’t see aluminum cans littering the shore and the bottom of the river,” Berg says. “I’ve got a personal stake in keeping this river nice for me and for my kid.” But when he started patrolling with FWP, “families were non-existent, as far as families with children. The place was just too obnoxious for kids to be in.” “I actually ended up pulling out my collapsible baton because people were after us,” Berg says of an incident that erupted at Johnsrud. “It’s a mob mentality. You get a bunch of intoxicated people in 100-degree heat, all dehydrated, and things get real grumpy. One person starts and the whole group gets empowered.” As the tuber hatch thins out, McGrath and the group head back to their vehicles and head to Johnsrud. “It’s a social scene,” Berg says. “People think, ‘It’s July, the river is where we go.’ And it’s fine if they remember to follow the rules. But if they break the rules they should expect to be hearing from somebody.” The scene downriver isn’t as bad as it could be. McGrath credits an overcast day, and the fact we spent an hour at Whittaker Bridge. Berg calls in the sheriff ’s deputy to issue a Minor in Possession to a girl with a glass bottle. She’s cooperative, so FWP backs off the glass bottle citation.

On the beach, a bachelorette party lounges around holding a large inflatable penis. They’ve dubbed it “Ron Jeremy” in black Sharpee. One of the girls lost it during their float to Johnsrud, but someone returned it. “We might have to put a phone number on it in case we lose it again,” she says. McGrath jokes that might not be such a good idea. It turns out the lady who found Ron Jeremy is Christina Posey, the woman with five inner tubes at Thibodeau, who’s now kicking back with her 11-year-old daughter, Evelyn Sparks, by the river. Sparks can’t stop talking about their float, about the bald eagle they saw and the leech Posey found on her leg. She’s up from San Diego for the summer to spend time with her mother, who moved to Missoula in May. She seems unfazed by the inflatable find. “Down in California, that cliff would be covered in graffiti,” Posey says, indicating the rocks across the Blackfoot. “The river? There’d be junk floating in it. You wouldn’t want to swim in it. This is just beautiful.”

Wouldn’t trade a day The first time Bruce Farling caught a fish on the Blackfoot was 1972. He doesn’t remember what kind, but he’s sure it was a trout. With Trout Unlimited, his work maintaining abundant fisheries has kept him close to those same waters year-in and year-out. Yes, he’s seen the crowds. Yes, the river’s a summer party bonanza. But there’s a broader awareness these days of the rules, he says, and if you can’t stand the crowds, it’s easy to find a calmer piece of the Blackfoot. “I don’t go to Johnsrud on a hot day in the summer,” Farling says, “but I don’t begrudge people who do, who go up there and have a good time. Christ, when it’s 90 or 100 degrees, when you have a river in your backyard and the public is allowed to use the public’s river, I have no problem with it. People just have to practice some self-constraint in terms of how they behave and how they affect other people’s experience up there. That’s what Fish, Wildlife and Parks is struggling with right now.” Crowser is proud of the strides Blackfoot River enforcement has made–and continues to make. Although he doesn’t have specific statistics for this stretch of the Blackfoot, he says officials agree that violations are down. It’s a nice boost to an already rewarding job. “If it’s not during those particularly busy times, if the water and the air temperatures don’t happen to be just perfect, it can be a great place to go fish or hang out or whatever you want to do,” Crowser says. “Working there and calling that your office is a pretty desirable thing at those times.” Crowser feels firmly settled in his current office position. A native of Rapid City, S.D., Crowser went to the University of Idaho before working a


number of rivers in Idaho. Most of those were wilder—rapids, not parties—than the Blackfoot. “This is the career that I’ve worked for a while to be working in,” Crowser says. “I’m committed to that. I’m working right now on finishing up a draft recreation management plan for the Blackfoot. We’ve been working as an agency with a citizen’s advisory committee for about two years…Those kinds of things are really cool, and of course they’re a little bit visionary. They’ll be in place for a long time and I’d like to be here to see how the implementation goes. I love rivers. I float on them as much as I can, even though I work on them. I wouldn’t trade a day fishing even on the places I work.” The way McGrath talks about his job as a ranger, you’d think he was Crowser’s clone. He relishes long hours near a cool river chatting with recreationists about the pursuits he loves, and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

Nature of the beast 7:39 p.m.: Two students stand stoop-shouldered and damp by the side of the highway near K. Ross Toole. This is our last big stop on the way to town, and the approach is telling. As McGrath pulls down the hill, someone rushes back along the trail toward the river. “Person running back into the trees,” McGrath mutters. “That’s a

great sign. Guess we’re getting out again.” McGrath’s patrol log sums up the ensuing scene: “Guy passed out—student in boat.” We meet a UM student from Indiana who says his name is David. There’s a large blue raft sitting in the middle of the trail. In it, a kid we’re introduced to as Reid is passed out with his legs up over the gunwale. There’s a bloodied scrape on his forehead and a long scratch under one eye. The right side of his face, turned down in the raft, is gradually swelling, the skin on his cheek purpling. David shakes him. “Reid, wake up and talk to the Fish and Wildlife officer. Reid…” Reid only mumbles. “You better get some water in him. Some bread of some kind and some water,” McGrath suggests. Watching the whole scene from 20 feet away is a family of five. The mom holds a baby while a boy and a girl sit in small folding chairs, happily munching a peanut butter and jelly dinner. “It’s a bit sketchy to say the least,” the mom says. McGrath heads back to the truck, contemplating radioing the sheriff about the drunk student. “Bet that’ll make a perfect ending to your story,” he says. “Everyone telling you all day how great the river is now, how much it’s improved. Then the last time we stop, the last damn time, there’s a guy passed out drunk

and a family with a bunch of little kids watching.” McGrath said it best earlier—that the definition of fun on the river changes dramatically depending on who you ask. That’s just the nature of the beast. McGrath’s job, like the Blackfoot itself, is fluid, unpredictable, lacking in guarantees. Progress in enforcement isn’t a complete lack of disorderly conduct but a greater

respect among river users for the resource, for those patrolling it and for others seeking to enjoy it. Most people are courteous, McGrath insists. They’re cooperative and friendly, even the drunks. But on a hot day, when cool water screams relief to anyone in a bikini or waders, all bets are off on the Blackfoot. asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Photo by Chad Harder

McGrath scans the masses at Johnsrud Park for glass containers and disorderly behavior. Carrying a glass bottle on the Blackfoot will get you an $85 fine, McGrath says. And there’s always a ranger somewhere on the river.

the $$–$$$...$15 and over Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. • 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner 7 days a week 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 We're open 7 days a week at 7 AM. Serving breakfast, unbelievable espresso, and sumptuous lunch. Our menu

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uses local ingredients and varies seasonally. Try our renowned tomato-lime tortilla soup or freshly made pastries and desserts. $-$$

attentive service. Getting ready for outside seating? So are we. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Missoula Independent

Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway • 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$

Page 19 August 6–August 13, 2009


August

COFFEE SPECIAL

Sumatra Mandheling $9.75 lb. Sumatra CO2 Processed Decaf. $9.75 lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

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Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day.

Missoula Independent

Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and

Page 20 August 6–August 13, 2009

eMpanadas 728-2030 www.empanadalady.com eMpanadas are back! Indulge in your favorites at the Clark Fork River Market this Saturday, 8am to 1pm and at Downtown Tonight, Caras Park, Thursdays, June-August 5:308:30pm. Baked to perfection with fresh, local ingredients, 10 exquisite varieties of Argentine-style empanadas await you: Carne de búfalo, lamb, pollo, humita, and more. $ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors - Russian teacakes, pizzelles, baci di dama, as well as cupcakes, scones, specialty breads, with new specialties added daily. Get bread fresh from the oven between 3 & 5PM. Open M-F 7AM to 6:30PM, Sat 7AM-4PM. We're just around the corner from Bamboo Chopsticks. Stop in today. $ Junga Juice 1132 SW Higgins In Russell Square 830-3231 Junga Juice offers premium fruit and vegetable smoothies, juices and espresso drinks and an adventure that will keep you wanting more. Go wild…Get healthy with a nutritional Jolt you choose to meet your needs. Try Amazing Grass, Zrii, Acai, Natrual Vitality or Nutrisoda. Meet the NEW OWNER. Open 7-7. $

Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European handcrafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $


by Ari LeVaux

Beet surrender Alain Passard, founder and head chef at L’Arpege in Paris, pulled meat from his menu in 2001 because, he announced, he wanted more culinary challenges. “One day I woke up and asked myself, ‘What have I done with a leek, with a carrot?’ Nothing, or maybe just 10 percent of what can be done with a carrot.” Some of his dishes are complex—a chocolate avocado soufflé, a three-layered nasturtium soup—and others are the culinary equivalents of sniffing a flower, uncomplicated bites that present the morsel’s true flavor. A beet baked inside a solid pyramid of salt, for example, provides a striking but unobstructed journey into the depths of beetitude. This is a realm worth exploring, but the rewards don’t always come easy. Tom Robbins, in his novel Jitterbug Perfume, calls the beet “the most intense of vegetables…deadly serious.” Its texture ranges from wood to jelly. Its flavor is dirt and sugar. It stains anything you cook it with, and anything else it touches, including your insides. Most people are at a loss at what to do with beets, and simply boil or roast them. But there are many finer things to do with beets that are just as easy. Here’s a trio of recipes to help set you on a beeten path less traveled. All are simple, use just a few ingredients, and give striking results. In addition to my version of Passard’s beet in a salt pyramid, there are beets in chocolate sauce (dedicated to Tom Robbins) as well as the workingman’s beet, the one for dinner tonight: braised in vinaigrette. While I’m focusing here on the beet part beneath the ground, the leaves are also worth eating in almost any context, including steamed, sautéed, in salads, etc. For raw use, you may want to trim the stems, which behave more like roots, with strong flavor and staining potential. Since I can’t bear listening to myself trying to pronounce “betterave rouge en croute de sel,” I call

Ask Ari:

if you like. The beet from a messy pile will taste exactly the same. Preheat the oven to 300 and bake the salt/beet pyramid for two hours (an hour and a half for medium or small beets). Remove the beet from the oven and let it cool for 30 minutes. The salt will have hardened into a granular shell, so use a hammer and chisel to open the tip of the pyramid, revealing the beet in its cavity of salt. Remove it and brush off any salt clinging to the skin. Cut the warm vegetable into wedges and drizzle with aged balsamic vinegar. The vinegar lends acidic sweetness and a subtle, forest-like complexity that interacts with the musky beet in a marriage not unlike the pairing of wine and meat.

Beets are also perfectly at home on the sweeter side of the flavor profile, and go especially well with chocolate. I’ve played around with brownies, cakes and cookies, and improved many a recipe or mix with grated beet. These days I prefer the easy way: beets in chocolate sauce. Slice beets into quarter-inch rounds and boil in just enough water to cover them, adding more water as necessary. When cooked to your desired tenderness, add chocolate chips, preferably dark. Keep adding chocolate until the sauce is as thick as you like it. Adding a little heavy cream is a good option here—it will vanish without a trace into the deep chocolate beet blackness. Don’t forget to drink the chocolate beet sauce at the end, with or without milk. The above recipes are simple, yet so spectacular they seem like an event. But at home, when I just want some pedestrian, low-profile beet for dinner, I keep it simple. Trim and slice a beet, sprinkle with salt and pepper, add equal parts balsamic vinegar and safflower oil to generously cover the bottom of the pan. Place the pan in the oven, about six inches beneath the flame, and broil until the beet slices are soft, flipping them at least once. Serve with the crème of your choice—a dollop of chevre or sour cream, perhaps, or a big glop of mayo (my favorite mayo is actually fake mayo: Grapeseed Oil Veganaise). Minus the vinaigrette, this is how I usually cook red meat. So it comes as less of a surprise to me that the salt and pepper braise brings out the beet’s meaty earth tones. Not many vegetables are versatile enough to taste sweet like candy one moment and rich like meat the next. Just watch your step, because beets can be moody. It’s a vegetable that’s part mineral, and you’d think part animal when you see it bleed. While it isn’t exactly high maintenance, the beet demands to be treated right, and that includes making it the center of the universe. The beet doesn’t play well with others. It wants all of your attention.

Did the pickle kill the compost pile?

I’m worried that tossing pickling liquids into my compost could affect it in negative ways. Can a quart of pickle juice damage the compost’s bacteria? —In a pickle

Q

You should taste your pickle juice before tossing it. The good stuff can be used in salad dressings, soups, or even sipped—some are calling it the new electrolytereplacement drink, especially cider vinegarbased pickle juice. If you added mustard seeds to your pickles, they can be ground into mustard. Or refill that jar of pickle juice with more vegetables and put it in the fridge to make easy fridge pickles.

A

Passard’s beet dish “Blood on the Snow,” though it isn’t mine to name. Since I can’t get my hands on Passard’s sel de Guérande, which is brown-ish, my white coarse sea salt looks more snow-like. Mix four cups of coarse salt with a cup of water, stirring until it reaches the consistency of wet snow. Build an inch-plus base of salt in an oiled cast-iron skillet. Clip the beet stems just above the tuber, and snip the thin taproot. Place the beet firmly upon the salt pedestal, and pack more wet salt around it. Use a putty knife to shape and smooth the salt into a perfect pyramid,

If you’re determined to dump your pickle juice, the quantity you’re talking about won’t be a problem, according to several online discussion threads. But a farmer friend, an expert on compost, begged to differ. “The goal of pickle juice is preservation,” he said, “and the goal of compost is breakdown, the opposite.” Then he told me about his newly installed septic system, and how the septic guy put some enzymes in his plumbing to charge the new system. “The guy said, ‘Okay. All done. You’re all good to go. Just don’t pour any pickle juice down the sink for a few days.’” If anyone else wants to face the pickle-juice disposal dilemma, here’s a pickle brine that

works on any vegetable, and can be tailored to specific veggies. Add turmeric and extra sugar to the brine for bread and butter pickles, for example, or add pickling spices like dill for cucumber brine or oregano for the jalepeno/carrot/onions jar. The brine is 50/50 water to vinegar, with the vinegar portion composed of 50/50 cider and white wine. Add a tablespoon of salt and two tablespoons of mustard seeds, brown and yellow ideally, to each sterilized jar before packing your product to be pickled. Follow the canning directions that come with the jars or lids.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day) www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Missoula's Original Bright Idea For Breakfast & Lunch www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 3pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

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the

Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Page 21 August 6–August 13, 2009


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings August 6–August 13, 2009

THURSDAY August

06

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010. Tamarack Grief Resource Center, an organization specializing in bereavement camps, has openings for a summer camp up in the Flathead for kids aged 8–14 who are grieving the death of a loved one. Camp dates are Aug. 28–30. Cost TBA. Call Tina Barrett at 721-2860 or visit www.tamarackgriefresourcecenter.org. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Steve Fetveit Heidi Meili

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Keep your young ones busy while you toil away for “the man” at Kidsfest 2009, a kid-oriented celebration at Caras Park from 11:30 AM–4 PM that features, games, arts & crafts, music, vendors, a dunk tank, climbing wall and more. Free. Call 721-PARK or visit www.missoulaparks.org. Make something functional out of clay, be it a cup or water pipe (or maybe just skip the pipe) during The Clay Studio of Missoula’s Open Instructed class which runs today through Oct. every Thu. from 1–4 PM, except for Aug. 13. All classes occur at the Clay Studio headquarters, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/8 week session. Call 543-0509.

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Aug. 7, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

A walk in the snow after a puff off the ol’ peace pipe does Steve Earle some good. Catch the social commentator and musician when he plays a solo acoustic set at the University Theatre Wed., Aug. 12, at 8 PM. $33 plus fees. Call 243-4051 or visit www.griztix.com.

Times Run 8/7- 8/13 Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Away We Go Nightly at 7 & 9 Thurs 8/13 at 7 ONLY

Summer Hours (NR) Nightly at 7 & 9 Fri 8/7 & Thur 8/13 at 9 ONLY

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Page 22 August 6–August 13, 2009

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

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It’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:15 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. I doubt they’ll be using the M.I.A. song “Paper Planes” to teach your youngster about those little paper toys, but perhaps they’ll use the song as background music when the SpectrUM Discovery Area, located in Room 166 of UM’s Skaggs building, presents the program Super Paper Planes from 3:30–7 PM. $3.50/free under 4. Call 243-4828 or visit spectrum.umt.edu. Get out of the heat and into the indoors when food, video games and fun ensue as the Missoula Public Library presents Game On! for teens grades 7–12 at 3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-2665. Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4–8 PM, as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5–7:30 PM.

nightlife

ing the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Folk under the influence of blues takes over Hamilton when Ryan Bundy (and no, he isn’t related to Ted Bundy) plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Daly St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Our gardens serve as inspiration for Stumptown Studio’s First Thursday Gallery exhibit Garten with a reception/fundraiser art auction from 6–9:30 PM at Stumptown Studio, 145 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Proceeds from the auction go to purchase equipment for the art center. Call 862-5929.

Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. The editor and contributors of All Our Stories Are Here, a collection of essays on Montana literature, celebrate the release of their book at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-2881. Expect the tones of handbells to spiral through your eardrums when Strikepoint, apparently one of the world’s top handbell ensembles, plays a concert at the First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St., at 7 PM. $8 suggested donation. Call 370-2097. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:30 PM during Hip Hop Class. Call 5417240 for pricing.

Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

Capitalism gets questioned and the almighty dollar gets sliced ‘n diced in Kate Hunt’s mixed media pieces, featured at Whitefish’s Jest Gallery, 305 E. Second St. in Whitefish, during an art opening from 6–9 PM. Free. Call 862-5777.

You best believe there’ll be hoards of middleagers reliving the Summer of ‘69 in 2009 when classic rockers Hot Tuna take the stage at the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM. $24 plus fees at Rockin’ Rudy’s, 800-965-4827 or www.ticketweb.com.

All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, viking metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound dur-

Photos and digital artwork by Corrie Colbert and Neil Stuber take hold of your iris during a gallery opening at The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. in Whitefish, from 6–9 PM. Free. Call 863-2787.

Independent scholar Michael Delaney impersonates Mark Twain and his travels to Montana during the late 1800s at Fort Owen State Park, 25 miles south of Missoula on U.S. 93 to the Stevensville Junction, and

Missoula Independent

then about 1 mile east on cutoff road 269, at 8 PM. Free. Bowling and karaoke go together like Republicans and health care reform during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Start down the path that ends in a Las Vegas dressing room every Thu. at 8:30 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Show Girl 101. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, crunk, electonic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every Thu., where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $2. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Guttural screams of terror and death/thrash metal guitar licks invade Missoula when the Bay Area’s Geryon storms the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Opening support from Beefcurtain. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of hip-hop, breakbeat, tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Psychedelic bluegrass with a rock tinge hits the Top Hat when Voodoo Horseshoes take the stage at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Page 23 August 6–August 13, 2009


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FRIDAY

07

August

There won’t be a First Friday reception at St. Patrick’s Hospital for Richard Scott Morgan’s plein air and oil paintings (so don’t even think about trying to score free wine), but his work will be on display on the third floor of the hospital’s Health Sciences Center, 500 W. Broadway St., Mon.–Fri. from 8 AM–5 PM until Aug. 31. Call 327-8984. It may be 90 degrees outside, but that doesn’t mean the Cabin Fever Quilters haven’t been busy, so go see the product of their obsession during A Barn Raisin’ Good Time quilt show, from 10 AM–6 PM today and tomorrow at the Superior High School multipurpose room, 410 Arizona Ave. in Superior. Free. Call 649-2582. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, Lies (And the Lying Liars Who Tell Them): A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right by Al Franken. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to play on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife

Noël Phillips • NSCA-CPT • RYT • Certified Personal Trainer 105 SW Higgins, Suite 3 • Missoula

The Kettlehouse’s Northside tap room, 313 N. First St. W., hosts an art exhibit from 5–7:30 PM from Eleanore’s Project Inc. featuring glass pieces by Larry Burton, artwork from kids in Missoula, as well as displays of photos from Peru and Jordan taken by Eleanore’s Project staff. Free. Local artist Marc Moss navigates “collective memory and emotional patina” in a First Friday exhibit of assemblage pieces using rusted metal, glass and photos as well as old love letters and post breakup emails at Noteworthy Paper & Press, 101 S. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Features music by Caseyjo. Local photographer DeAndria Gutzmer displays photos of an unknown subject (as of press time, at least) during an exhibit at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Feast your eyes on the United States’ largest display of Pulitzer Prize winning photos, from the shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald to the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima, during Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs at the Meloy and Paxson Galleries in UM’s PARTV Center, from 5–8 PM. Free. The exhibit shows through Oct. 23. Call 243-2019.

Missoula Independent

Page 24 August 6–August 13, 2009

Mr. Crazy Eyes needs a drink. Will you buy him one? This ceramic piece by Kathie Dewitt is one of several on display during a First Friday reception on Aug. 7 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A, from 5—9 PM. Free. Call 543-0509.

There’s bound to be some arresting, intriguing and non-mainstream leaning art when the Ceretana C o o p e r a t i v e G a l l e r y , 8 01 Sherwood St., hosts a First Friday show from 5–9 PM featuring new works by Chuck Bordell, Brian Elling, Mathew McCornack, Brook Kittelson, Patricia Thornton, Tim Thornton, Kim Shirley, Shana Mattheis and the Indy’s own Jonathan Marquis. Free. UM graduate art students Sarah Melville and Steph Johnsen display their most recent works at the Catalyst, 111 S. Higgins Ave., from 5–7 PM. Free. Like father, like son, like paintings with coruscating colors. See what I mean when father/son artistic duo Tom and Jacob Boelman show off their art wares at a First Friday opening at Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W., at 5 PM. Free. Sip on something boozy and view an array of photos with people smiling, skiing and talking (including President Barack Obama) during a First Friday exhibit by Ar thur Mouratidis at Yellowstone Photo, 321 N. Higgins Ave., at 5 PM. Free. Hobnob with regional artists and gander at their innovative works while gulping down beer and wine from 5–8 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., during First Friday with Montana Triennial Artists, which also features talks from Triennial artists as near as Hamilton and as far as

Billings. Free. Call 728-0447, or visit www.missoulaartmuseum.org. Expect art that touches on fantasy worlds and what could be a combination of Black Sabbath and Ozzy Osbourne worship when artists Yuan Hua and Casey Oney show off their works at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 721-4777. Haggered looking dudes and western landscapes are all the rage in Alan Graham McQuillan’s exhibit Out West during a showing/reception at Big Sky Embroidery, 610 S. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Check out art made outdoors with the element of surprise, aka Mother Nature’s whims, during the Western Montana 7th Annual ‘Plein Air’ Exhibition at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM when the gallery presents the work of local, regional and international artists who participated in the gallery’s plein air paintout in July. Free. Call 721-3154. View pictures of female subjects “made serendipitously” when National Geographic photographer William Albert Allard shows his exhibit Her Picture In A Frame at a reception at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography’s Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 543-0171. Clay pieces of all shapes, sizes and colors are bound to catch your eye when the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A, presents its First Friday exhibit


with works from students and community artists from 5:30–9 PM. Free. Resident artists will also be giving lectures at 8 PM. The work of local artist and graphic designer Scott Woodahl hits the floor of the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., from 6–8 PM. Free. Call 541-7240. Iron Lasso, dubbed as “real bluegrass for real people” picks ‘em hard by the deck of the Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., from 7–11 PM. Free. Soak down that steak and vino with the sensitive soundscapes of guitarist John Floridis, who plays the Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, at 7 PM. Free. Come see the fruits of labor of 26 students who’ve been acting, singing and dancing for the past several weeks as part of the Missoula Children’s Theatre’s Next Step Prep, The Academy For Musical Theatre during a final theater performance at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., at 7 PM. Free, show is first come first served. Twiddle your thumbs and sip on some fermented grape juice when local folk guitarist Isaac M. plays a show at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5. BBQ will be available for purchase. Call 541-8463. Two step your way down to Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 U.S. Hwy. 93 N. in Florence, when Cathy Clark presents the First Friday dance class Intermediate 2 Step starting at 7:30 PM. $5/person. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com The Big Sky Film Series presents Art & Copy, a film documenting the lives of prominent and influential advertisers in America over the last few decades (like the guy who came up with ads for the iPod), at 7:30 PM in the Wilma Theatre. Free. The Boonester returns, aka Missoula folk fav David Boone and his band The Mercenaries, who play a show at Littlebird’s in Seeley Lake, 110 Larch Lane, at 8 PM for a special outdoors show. $12. Call 677-FOOD or 728-1117. Trap it, snap it and get down to it when The Wild Coyotes play at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. at 8 PM. Free. Slap on that cowboy shirt and dance to the Americana of Andrea Harsell and Louie Bond, who play the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free.

It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

Hip hop, minimal techno and dubstep beats to make you shake ‘dat azz reign supreme under the fingers of special guests Kris Moon and Alistair (aka former Missoulian Alistair McKenzie), as well as weekly vet Brand One during tonight’s installment of Friday Night Delights at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Free. The goths come out during Dark Dreams, an event featuring DJs ir8prim8, HAuLi and Raven spinning electronic body music, drum ‘n bass, industrial, fetish, powernoise and futurepop at Club Q at the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. $5/18+.

Grab yer gun, er, I mean leave it at home and grab your wallet and soak yourself in the sounds of Son of a Gun, who play Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 U.S. Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Rockabilly and country get a recession special when Russ Nasset and the Revelators play a free show at Trixie’s Bar in Ovando, off Highway 200, at 9:30 PM. Free. He’s your favorite country crooner, right next to Russ Nasset, so check Bob Wire & The Magnificent Bastards when they play a release show for their new album Buffaload

Eric Moe creates riveting sounds out of an instrument that’s been used and abused for hundreds of years. The unconventional approach from the Pittsburgh, Penn., composer treads between consonance and dissonance. Pieces like Three Ways to Relieve Tension feature cascading and ascending notes that span several pitches in a matter of measures, while odd time-signature changes occur in rapid succession. It gets slightly chaotic, but Moe plays with tempo and dynamics, gliding back and forth from jarring intensity to peacefulness. It’s fitting that Moe, who teaches composition and music theory at the University of Pittsburgh, co-directs a concert series called “Music on the Edge.” You can tell the guy loves experimentation.

Juried art, jewelry, and handmade furniture find good company with bird houses, hand sewn items, food and more during Sandpiper Gallery’s 38th Annual Outdoor Art Festival at the Polson Courthouse Lawn, 106 Fourth Ave., from 10–5 PM. Free. Call 883-0802. Those suffering from long-term illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program releasing the creative flow with Annie Allen. Donations appreciated, as is registration. Call 549-5329 or visit www.livingartofmontana.org.

Who: Eric Moe What: Solo Piano Performance Where: Missoula Art Museum When: Sat., Aug. 8, at 1 PM How Much: Free

Obviously, his work isn’t filled with piano ditties for the weak hearted. But Moe’s music isn’t arduous, nor is it inaccessible. When he plays a gig in Missoula on Saturday you might have a

When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I90. Free. Call 370-3200. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” backwards and forwards like the star that you aspire to be when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Former Missoula indie rock dudes Danny’s Dilemma reunite for a special show at the Badlander at 9 PM. $5. Opening support from Velcro Kicks, Hunter Hero and The Meth-Ups.

Pony rides, bounce houses and snacks mingle with indoor childthemed garage sales and more at a Fun ‘Draiser hosted and run by Prince of Peace Daycare, 2512 Sunset Lane, from 9 AM–3 PM. Free. Call 549-0123. Show your little one the importance of physical activity during SoccerTots, an eight week class at the SHEC Community Center, 1919 North Ave., that runs until Aug. 29 and teaches your kid simple motor and physical skills through soccer. Classes start at 9:10 AM and vary in the time they start, depending on age. $80/$72 for siblings, plus a $20 annual registration fee. Call 207-1963 or visit www.soccertots.net/locations/info.asp?id=150.

SPOTLIGHT avant ivories

In fact, Moe recently delved into the realm of combining short stories with compositions during “Tri-Stan”—a 2005 performance based on David Foster Wallace’s short story Tri-Stan: I Sold Sissee Nar to Ecko.

down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample.

few hair-raising moments, but remember this, an open mind toward what he’s doing is essential. Moe paves the way for heady piano music, and should find welcome company with those of us who appreciate classical music that’s intentionally dissimilar. —Ira Sather-Olson

Find a remedy for stress via beer and the country, pop and rock of the Elixir Band, who play the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, at 9 PM. Free.

at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. (See Noise in this issue.)

Reno, Nev.’s Dave Manning, aka “The Alaskan Piano Man,” will be fingering the ivory keys and pleading with you for just “one more beer” when he plays Sean Kelly’s at 9 PM. Cost TBA. (See Scope this issue)

Get a whiff of the stanky stuff when Reverand Slanky brings their crowd pleasing funk antics to the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

It’ll be an acoustically pickin’ good time with the Americana/Country swagger of Whitefish’s Canyon Creek Ramblers when they play at show at the Stonefly Lounge in Coram, 10154 Hwy. 2, at 9 PM. Cost TBA. E-mail tracy@montanabear.com.

He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY

08

August

Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head

1/4 FC P25Missoula Independent

Give your kid a snack or two and shuffle them off to Preschool Story Time at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St., when storyteller Sally Blevins presents “camping fun” from 10:30–11:30 AM. Free. Call 363-1670. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Learn how to put that ancient weedwacker or gas guzzling lawn mower you’ve had in your garage back to use during a MUD class on the basics of small engine repair with Christopher Preston at the MUD site, 629 Phillips St., at 1 PM. $20/$10 members. Call 721-7513. Straddle the line of melodic consonance and dissonance when composer, pianist and University of Pittsburgh music prof Eric Moe performs a solo piano concert at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., at 1 PM. Free. (See Spotlight in this issue.) The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com.

Page 25 August 6–August 13, 2009


Summer in Missoula is probably the best time to travel around on a bike, but if you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to make your own recycled bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St W., on Saturdays at 2:30 PM. Call 800809-0112. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834. Teens entering grades 7–12 get to dissect and examine The Diary of Anne Frank to their heart’s content during “Those Literary Kids,” a teen book club that meets at 3 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-2665. Details are scant, but there’s a Summer Arts Camp movie and art show happening at the Hot Springs Senior Center, 101 Main St. #1, from 3–5 PM. Cost TBA. Call 741-2344.

DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass heavy, booty busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free.

nightlife Bluegrass meets the digiridoo and drinks some microbrews with rock ‘n roll when Voodoo Horseshoes play the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468.

Gender and orientation don’t matter at Club Q, but smooth moves are a must during a dance at 9 PM at Club Q in the basement of the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. Cover TBA. Call 5490542.

Seattle’s theater simple troupe comes to the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton, for one night to perform Myth Understandings, an alternative look at famous stories and myths, at 7 PM. The catch is that the story takes place in the future, as two scientists try out an iHed, or a personal thinking machine. $14/$8 children. Call 3759050 or visit www.hamiltonplayers.com.

Stop reading that copy of the Montana Firearms Freedom Act and delve into another weapon inspired endeavor when Son of a Gun plays Florence’s High Spirts Lounge & Casino, 5341 U.S. Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free.

Heartbreak off all kinds gets explored by the likes of Judy Blunt, Mavis Lorenz, Josh Slotnick, Crissie McMullan, Tom Roy and Gary Delp at “You Broke My Heart” an impromptu storytelling session at the PEAS farm, 3010 Duncan Dr., at 7 PM. Free. (See Spotlight in this issue) It’s always a titillating, spicy time during Hot Salsa Nights at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. at 8 PM. $7. Dance lessons start at 8:30 PM. Call 549-0542. Tame it one more time, especially if you missed them last night, when The Wild Coyotes play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. They might be brothers from anotha motha but they sure can play the blues: Catch Brother Music when they play a show at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. You best be finding yourself a sweet spot on the lawn of the Head Start School playground, 1001 Wordon Ave., around 8:57 PM when the Missoula Outdoor Cinema continues its summer movie series this week with the classic ’80s flick ET The Extraterrestrial. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free.

Page 26 August 6–August 13, 2009

The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200.

Rockers of all shades represent at the Palace Lounge when Missoula’s El Zombi Gato, Birds Mile Home and Tyson Ballew share the stage with Billings’ Noise Noise Noise and The Budgets at 9 PM. $5.

Russ Nasset and the Revelators bring their country and rockabilly riffage to customers of the Town and Country Lounge, 1616 S. Third St. W., during a customer appreciation party at 7 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent

Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free.

Ponder the meaning of life, or the meaninglessness of life, with a drink or two and music by The Lifers, who play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. The most liberal city in Texas, aka Austin, brings mellow folk and rock poppiness to zootown when Nelo plays the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cost TBA.

SUNDAY August

09

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street.

Your day of rest becomes a Latin-flavored rhythmic dance party when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts a Zumba Workshop from 10:30 AM–noon. $15. Call 541-7240. Get your pool cues and drink some brews when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, offers free pool all day every Sun. Call 370-3200. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “Bloody Marys are my medicine!” Free. Call 543-7154.

nightlife Hear light classics and perhaps some pop tunes conducted by the cooly named Darko Butorac during the Missoula Symphony Orchestra’s Symphony in the Park at Caras Park at 7 PM. Free. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night


48 TH ANNIVERSARY

RUN-OFF Sale ends Saturday, August 8th

To celebrate Vann’s 48th year in business we are bringing back Pete’s favorite promotions like the "Run-off" promotion.

Free $50 Gift Card to With purchase of $599 or more, receive a gift card to a local sporting goods store ($50 value).

Limit one gift card per household. In-store and vanns.com offers may vary. Lose yourself in a crowd of likeminded Missoulians while under the command of Uncle Darko—Darko Butorac, that is. Catch the conductor while he waves his hands in the air and musicians care during the Missoula Symphony Orchestra’s “Symphony in the Park” on Sun., Aug. 9, at Caras Park at 7 PM. Free.

welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 9 PM with a live jazz band at 10. Free. The weekend isn’t over until you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, where Landslide hosts at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when happy hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Screamo and pop punk take hostage of the Garden City with a range of emotion when Seattle’s Your Divine Tragedy plays with support from Abstract Anthem and Green Sickness at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $5/$7 under 21.

Two sessions of the popular World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class take place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon.: At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5:15. $30 per month/drum rental: $15 per month. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot.

It’s hard to know if they’ll be able to drink us under the table, but Ireland’s Grada sure can bust out some mean Irish acoustic folk, especially when they play a show at Sean Kelly’s at 10 PM. Cost TBA. 542-1471.

MONDAY

What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992.

10

Women who need support after being sexually assaulted can find solace at Surviving Sexual Assault, an 8–10 week support group for women 17 and up at the YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Registration for the closed group ends today. Meeting time TBA. Call 543-6691 to register. Teens and kids aged 11–16 can utilize their days off creatively, and not in front of a television, during a weeklong wheel throwing workshop at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A, from 9 AM–4 PM today through Aug. 14. $160/workshop. Scholarships are available. Call 543-0509. Kids between the ages of 8–13 get to explore the darker side of their personalities from 1–3 PM at Monster Mash, a four-day art camp where local ceramicist Shalene Valenzuela helps kids create maddening 3-D monster sculptures and masks. The camp starts today and runs until Aug. 13 at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447.

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Children aged 11–17 mix their dance moves when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Dance Combo every Mon. at 6 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing. I certainly don’t envision being able to buy my own house, but maybe you do. If so, head over to a First Time Home Buyer Class at the Human Resource Council Building, 316 N. Third St. in Hamilton, from 6–9 PM each night until Aug. 12. $20/covers cost of reference materials. Call 3631444 ext. 5. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. You’ll probably want to take out those metallic studs when you head to Gothic Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 6:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/per month for each class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000.

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Page 27 August 6–August 13, 2009


You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080. There’s a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers

engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Swing keeps you cool during the hot month of August every Mon. this month when Cathy Clark leads a West Coast Swing class at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 West Main St. $28/all 4 classes or $7/class. Call 360-8763. The music is always free, but you’ll definitely have to pay for the beer and wine, when The Acousticals play the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open W a y M i n d f u l n e s s C e n t e r, 70 2

Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Experience momentum, balance, and timing tuned with a strong drummer-dancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

An array of electronic DJs and styles await your booty during the Palace Lounge’s Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week. Free. Music of an unknown kind takes over the Badlander when Flowetry plays with rock support from Modern Savage and The One and Onlys at 9 PM. Free. Bring a bicycle with a big hook in it to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can troll for cars from the bar while you watch the show. Free.

TUESDAY

11

August

While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Trade war stories with carnies, hop on rides that may or may not make you puke, eat tater pigs and check out music by Sawyer Brown and Patricia Ryan during the 2009 Western Montana Fair, which opens its gates to the public at 11 AM and runs through Aug. 16. Ticket prices vary, Call 721-3247 or visit www.westernmontanafair.com. Strengthen the body and mind of your child during Family in Motion at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., at 11 AM. Call 541-PLAY for pricing and registration. Sate your senses in all things locally harvested when the Western Montana Fair presents its West Lawn Market, which features locavore-oriented food demonstrations, grilling competitions, music and more from 11 AM–7 PM on opening day of the fair, on the west lawn of the fairgrounds. Free. (See Agenda in this issue.) See if the poppy folk rock of Jenn Adams helps you digest your spamwich when she plays Hamilton’s Legion Park, S. Second and Bedford streets, during “Tuesday at 12,” which starts at noon. Free. You and your kids get to make crafts in the company of consumerism during the Southgate Mall Kids Klub craft activity at Sears Court in the mall from 4–7 PM. Free. Call 721-5140.

nightlife Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Missoula Independent

Page 28 August 6–August 13, 2009

Get your fresh fruits and veggies from local farmers in the Flathead while listening to the jazzariffic sounds of Barrel Stove Combo during the Whitefish Downtown Farmers’ Market, at Depot Park on the north end of Central Avenue, from 5–7:30 PM. Free. Call 862-2043. Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Beginners can try, but those more experienced might catch on quicker during Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in Room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. It’ll be a poppy-good time when punk and indie that’s not afraid to appeal to the masses takes reign as Every Avenue, Cash Cash and Valencia make a stop off the Van’s Warped Tour to Missoula for a show at the SHEC Community Center, 1919 North Ave. W., at 6 PM. Opening support from Places and ShyForShy. $15/$12 advance at Rockin’ Rudy’s, Ear Candy Music and www.brownpapertickets.com. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/class or $35/four classes. Call 549-7933. Learn the language of the United States’ neighbors to the south during six weeks of Spanish language classes that end Sept. 3 at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., from 6:30—8 PM. Cost TBA. E-mail espanolmt@gmail.com. Are you feeling lonelier than normal? Remedy that when Singles of Missoula, a group for singles age 45 and over, meets Tue. at 6:30 PM at the bicycle trailhead behind Conlin’s Furniture, 1600 North Ave. W., for a bike ride. Free. Call Cletius at 541-2333. M i s s o u l a ’ s Y W C A , 1 1 3 0 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Stop playing games with yourself— Game Night featuring “mostly Scrabble” takes place at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. 6:45 PM. Free.


You never know what you’ll find— except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at a new time of 7 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 8, every Tue. at the Badlander. $7/per class per person. I’m not sure if bluegrass and hip hop would make a happy marriage, but find out when Spostah plays from both genres during Kalispell’s Picnic in the Park Series at Depot Park, Center and Main streets, at 7 PM Free. Call 758-7717. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s the name of a festival in rural Kentucky that glorifies sweet potatoes? (Find the answer in the Calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Whitefish musicians trade their skills for free drinks as the Great Northern Bar hosts Open Mic Night, which begins at 8 PM with an acoustic jam circle, heads into an electric set at 9:30 and features fine hosting by members of the Canyon Creek Ramblers. Free. Call 862-2816. You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot. It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real every Tue. at 8 PM, when Hip Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. You can bet your sweet ass that there will be a balanced budget of punk rock, and no shortfalls, when Sacramento, Calif.’s Boats! plays a show at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 8 PM. $5. Opening support from local punkers Train Song,

Birds Mile Home and Thug Nasties. Call 549-0542. Traditional Irish music from the emerald isle that sports a contemporary edge invades the Whitefish when Grada, who just might be able to drink you under the table, plays the O’Shaughnessy Cultural Arts Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish, at 8 PM. $27/$20 adults, $15/children under 12. Call 862-5371 or visit www.whitefishtheatreco.org. The hits of Broadway duo Kander & Ebb grace Whitefish when the Alpine Theatre Project presents The World Goes ‘Round at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St., at 8 PM each night (except for Aug. 17) until Aug. 23. $ 37/ $ 30 a d u l t s , $ 16 / s t u d e n t , $12/child under 12. Call 862-SHOW or visit www.alpinetheatreproject.org. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with —every Tue. at 9 PM Jerry Reeb— with happy hour until 10 at the AmVets Club. Free. Our local clan of skate park enthusiasts host the Beauty and the Beast After Smash party which features garage rock and punk from locals Rooster Sauce, TSMF and Green Sickness at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. East Coast hardcore punk with vocals on the poppier side visits the Palace Lounge when New York’s Racing Exit 13 plays with Norwegian punks Wrist Rocket at 9 PM. $5/$7 under 21. Backup support from locals Arrested Adolescence and Hangover Saints. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue., Wed., Thu. and Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798.

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Missoula Independent

Page 29 August 6–August 13, 2009


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In this case, you’re expected to gander when you check out Her Picture In A Frame, an exhibit of photos, like the one above, by National Geographic photographer William Albert Allard on First Friday, Aug. 7, at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography’s Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave, from 5–8 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY August

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Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, familyfriendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free.

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Your weekly lunch date with almost everyone comes at 11 AM at Caras Park during Out to Lunch, which features food vendors, kids’ activities and music this week by ShoDown. Free. Call 543-4238. Art projects, educational games and storytime activities aim to stimulate your 3–7 year-old’s mind (and help them pass the literacy level of people like Sarah Palin) during Ready Set Read at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., at 11 AM. Call 541-PLAY for pricing and registration. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Wed. at noon. Call 5417240 for pricing.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to shine all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200.

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Page 30 August 6–August 13, 2009

There’s no doubt this man is prolific: Catch Missoula’s country king Russ Nasset when he plays a show at Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this and every Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her AfroBrazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Blue Argon plays “eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve

Sellars and Jim Clayborn” every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Red Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Wednesday night presents you with another activity besides drinking and live music during the Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group’s Watershed Wednesdays, where you’ll learn about native plants/wildlife to the area and participate in restoration activities from 6–8:30 PM. Meet at the Bugbee Nature Area, off of Missoula Avenue in the lower Rattlesnake. Call Andrew at 531-2527. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. Passionate about beer and the environment? Your monthly meet-up begins at 7 PM at Sean Kelly’s, where an informal chug-n-chomp known as Green Drinks takes place the second Wed. of each month. Come find a job, make a friend, develop a plan for world domination or simply find joy at the bottom of a pint glass. Free. Learn to do the Peacock Dance, the Red Ribbon and impress your date with the smooth moves of the Bamboo Hat Dance when Ming Yan Cui of the Guanxi Region of China teaches Chinese Folk Dance at the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre, 2704 Brooks St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-5155.


Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:30 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 5417240 for pricing. Release that mid and late week stress during Tai Chi Chuan classes every Wed. at 7:30 PM and every Sat. at 10 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. 3rd St W. $10/class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Country and roots music with a liberal edge finds welcome company in Missoula when Steve Earle plays a solo acoustic show at the University Theatre at 8 PM. $33 plus fees. Call 243-4051 or visit www.griztix.com. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Lyrical Class every Wed. at 8:30 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: That yearly event which celebrates the sweet potato like it was Jesus is called Tater Day and takes place in Benton, Ky. I’m guessing they make some damn good sweet potato fries. We all know alcohol helps our memory with pop culture knowledge, right? Well, maybe not. See for yourself if PBR and shots of whiskey help churn the memory machine during eight rounds of trivia at Death By Quiz at the Badlander at 8 PM. Free. Portland brings the indie heat with banjo, guitar, mandolin and more when The Builders and The Butchers deliver the goods at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $8. March of the Black Queen opens and plays their last show, ever. (See Noise in this issue.) Fight for the right to belt out a semi-coherent version of “Jessie’s Girl” every Wed. during Combat Karaoke at Rowdy’s Cabin, 4880 N. Reserve St., at 10 PM. Free. Call 543-8001.

THURSDAY August

13

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Your youngin gets a dose of art and culture from those in the know during Playdate With An Artist at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., at 11 AM. Call 541PLAY for pricing and registration. Make something functional out of clay, be it a cup or water pipe (or maybe just skip the pipe) during The Clay Studio of Missoula’s Open Instructed class which runs today through Oct. every Thu. from 1–4 PM, except for Aug. 13. All classes occur at the Clay Studio headquarters, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/8 week session. Call 543-0509. It’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous.

$10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:15 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. Molecular weight might be a heady concept for kids, but they can still learn about it when UM’s SpectrUM Discovery Area, Room 166 in the Skaggs Building, presents Chromatography from 3:30–7 P M. $3.50/free under 4. Call 243-4828 or visit spectrum.umt.edu. Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4-8 PM, as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5–7:30 PM.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, viking metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. It’s time for dinner and a show with hundreds of your fellow friends during this week’s installment of Downtown ToNight, which features food, kids’ activities and music from No Shame and starts at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 543-4238. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Contemporary folk with touches of country goes down with the suds of pale ales and more when Betty and the Boy plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224.

Your government at work. Construction Bids Page 44

Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. Author Jay Cowan pays tribute to America’s late great gonzo journalist when he reads and signs copies of his book Hunter S. Thompson: An Insider’s View of Deranged, Depraved, Drugged- Out Brilliance at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins, at 7 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent

Page 31 August 6–August 13, 2009


It’s official, jamming isn’t just relegated to hippies on drugs anymore, especially during Jamophilia, a family-friendly jam sesh for kids of all ages led by YMusic instructors at the Missoula Boys and Girls Club, 617 S. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Bring down your instrument of choice, be it something to play or your voice. Call 721-YMCA. Exercise your powers of organizational thinking when Margaret Wheatley, an expert in the field, leads a discussion on The Power of Community in Uncertain Times at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., at 7 PM. $5 suggested donation. Call 244-2247. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:30 PM during Hip Hop Class. Call 5417240 for pricing. Acoustic pop and folk via Tacoma and Olympia, Wash., respectively, hits Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when Dave Hannon and Mike Fekete play solo sets at 7:30 PM. $5. BBQ will be available for purchase. Call 541-8463. Bowling and karaoke go together like Republicans and health care reform during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Start down the path that ends in a Las Vegas dressing room every Thu. at 8:30 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Show Girl 101. Call 5417240 for pricing. Grab the hairspray, tight spandex, obligatory cocaine (just kidding, you knew that!) and rock a metal mullet during Rock Back to the ’80s, a fundraiser for United Way at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 8:30 PM. Cost TBA. Call 549-0542. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip hop, crunk, electonic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every Thu., where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $2. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Seattle’s Rishloo brings an emerald mix of metal and rock to the Palace

Lounge during tonight’s installment of Metal Militia night at 9 PM. $3. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of hiphop, breakbeat, tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Expect an explosion of blues and folk when California’s Sarah McCoy & The Zippidy Yeah’s bring their Califlavored sounds (and vocals vaguely reminiscent of Fiona Apple) to the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Greetings calendar compadres and comrades. Things have been moving a little smoother down here in the calendar department these days. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed this week’s installment, as I’ve tried to fill it with enough live music, art openings, theater performances and miscellaneous arts-related minutia to keep you busy after a strenuous day at work, or occupied during your days off. As always, be sure to inform me of events coming through the pipeline by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Aug.7, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

SPOTLIGHT bleeding hearts It sucks to get your heart broken. There’s almost nothing worse than that nauseous, sinking feeling you get in your chest after you get dumped or break bonds with a friend, or lose someone special.

This Month’s Featured Artist:

Scott Fieldhouse

For six Missoulians on Saturday, the cathartic process of telling stories of heartbreak comes to an audience during “You Broke My Heart”—an impromptu storytelling session where participants recount their loss in 10 minutes, without notes. “These stories are going to start fast, they’re going to get big in a hurry, and I’d hope that every one makes you laugh, gasp, and maybe even cry, in a different way,” says Jeremy N. Smith, MC of the event.

WHAT: “You Broke My Heart” WHERE: PEAS Farm WHEN: Sat., Aug. 8, at 7 PM HOW MUCH: Free A diverse group of storytellers promise to expunge their emotions including local author/professor Judy Blunt, the PEAS farm’s Josh Slotnick, Grow Montana’s Crissie McMullan, long time Environmental Studies professor Tom Roy and Sustainable “home wrecker” Gary Delp. Mavis Lorenz, the 81-year-old hunter profiled by the Indy last October, will also share a story of loss.

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Page 32 August 6–August 13, 2009

Specifically, Lorenz will ruminate about a time when she was headed to Minneapolis by train, got stuck in a snowstorm in Eastern Montana, and was faced with questions of life or death, not only her own, but her dog’s as well.

Judy Blunt

And while the ending to that story might be somber, that’s exactly the point. “People should come have their minds open and hearts broken,” Smith says. —Ira Sather-Olson


Summer’s swelter has finally hit us, which means most of us are finding cool comfort on a river, bouncing up and down on inner tubes with beer in tow, soaking up the sun’s rays. Whatever your outdoor pleasure, the Calendar Playa has a week chock full of events for you in Missoula and the Flathead, from wildlife appreciation parties, backpacking trips and lectures to fungi identification and more. Hey ladies! Let’s kick off the week with an event for you. The Women’s Whitewater Weekend at the Alberton Gorge starts at a TBA time Fri., Aug. 7 and rolls through Sun., Aug. 9. The trip costs $250 and includes camping, meals and equipment. Women ages 18 and up receive whitewater rafting instruction from Gena Moore and Yael Girard, two river guides who have extensive whitewater rafting experience from various rivers around the country, including the Potomac River back east and the Kings River in California’s Central Valley. No experience is necessary, so jump on in. Call 777-4837 or 240-8060 to register and ask for Bernice or Gena. If you’ve had your water fill, Friday offers a volunteer backpacking trip, part of the Wilderness Institute’s series of conservation trips to the Sapphire and Blue Joint Wilderness Study Areas. Packers will head off to the Nez Perce Pass to travel the state line trail up to Reynolds Lake. Once there, you’ll cram your brain with information so you can help monitor invasive species, native plants, recreation impacts and wilderness character. Call 243-5361, e-mail wi@cfc.umt.edu or click over to www.cfc.umt.edu/wi. On Saturday, you can slap your cerebral cortex around with enough fungi knowledge to perhaps carry on a convo with mushroom guru Larry Evans during the program Learn About Mushrooms at Salmon Lake State Park. It’s five miles south of Seeley Lake off Highway 83 at 8 PM. Free. Glen Babcock of Garden City Fungi will enlighten you with discussions of local fungi, the lifecycles of mushrooms and how to identify the little buggers in the wild. He’ll also tell you how to grow mushies in your own back yard. (Not those kind.) If the fungus effects have subsided by Sunday, skip church and head back to the river for a few hours of partying with the Ninemile

Wildlife Workgroup, which hosts the Ninemile Wildlife Celebration and Community Appreciation Party at the Ninemile Community Center at 25620 Nine Mile Road in the Ninemile/Huson area. It’s from 4–7 PM. Free. Bring friends, family and a potluck dish to share and expect good food, presentations, and games for the kids. After a full weekend of play, Monday brings even more for kids and adults alike. Little skater punks aged 7–11 can rejoice in the fact that they can still join the Montana Skatepark Association’s ongoing Mobash Sk8 clinics, which kick off Monday with a sesh from 8:30–11 AM and run through Friday at the MOBASH skatepark in McCormick Park, where your little skater will get expert instruction on skateboard safety and skills. Also note that they’ll be required to wear helmets, and bringing protective gear is recommended. However, if your little guy or gal doesn’t have a skateboard or equipment, don’t panic, they’ll provide it. $78/$65 with resident discount card, scholarships are also available. Call Jason with Parks and Rec at 552-6271. If you’re a skater hater, you and your kid can instead sharpen your skills at hitting around fluorescent rubber balls during Youth and Adult Tennis Camps at Playfair Park, which run Monday through Aug. 20. Instructor Sarrah Carlson, who’s certified by the United States Professional Tennis Association, will train your hands and your mind in

the art of spatial accuracy during this introductory course. The youth camp, for ages 6–17, runs Monday through Thursday mornings at various times and costs $35. Adult camps are Mon.–Wed. from 5:30–7 PM and cost $47. Call 721-PARK. After a long Monday, relax with a beer and then head down for a dip at Splash Montana’s After Hours Adult Swim from 7:30–9 PM at Splash Montana in Playfair Park, where you’ll be able to float away the day on the lazy river or play water polo with your buds. $5.75/ or $4.50 with a resident discount card. Call 542-WAVE. Tuesday night offers something for those hardcore female bicyclists during one of the Montana Dirt Girls mountain bike rides, which this week takes pedalers up the Ravine Trail in the Grant Creek area. Plan to meet at the Ravine Trail at 6 PM, 4.6 miles up Grant Creek Road. The trail parking lot is on your left side. E-mail Julie Huck at jhuck@adventurecycling.org. Whew! What a week, eh? Here’s a toast to another one filled with muscle building, endorphin pumping, brain busting and conservation minded activities, all in the name of enjoying Mother Nature. So, Photo by Chad Harder once again, please keep sending me those e-mails, snail mail and phone calls when you hear of any outdoors events in our area by 5 PM on Fri., Aug. 7. Until then, don’t be cursing the scorching sun. It’ll be gone before we know it. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 33 August 6–August 13, 2009


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Sing us a song The Alaskan piano man rolls through Montana by Erika Fredrickson

Pianist Dave Manning considers himself perpetually on tour. He stores his belongings at a friend’s place in California. He picks up his mail every few months from a cardboard box at the post office in Reno, Nev. And he spends his days driving a 1965 VW microbus named “Vincent” from Alaska (where he’s from originally) through the Pacific Northwest and on down south—and back again—booking gigs along the way and staying in campgrounds or with friends. When he returns a call from the Indy for an interview, he’s finally found cell phone service and is contentedly sipping coffee in a campground out-

between Kris Kristofferson, Bruce Springsteen and Tom Waits, all of whom he counts as influences. Over the years, Manning’s slowly shed his obligations to embrace his nomadic lifestyle. At first, in fact, music was merely a hobby. After majoring in television and video production, Manning worked as a videographer for “Heartbeat Alaska,” a show about Alaskan natives, which has aired on PBS and the Discovery Channel. Summers meant re-runs for the program, and Manning spent those months traveling and playing music. He finally quit the job to move to Reno with his girlfriend and play music

“whirlwind romance” with a dog musher from Germany who built her own cabin in the woods. “She had to take care of 120 dogs a day, which is a lot of carrying buckets of food and shoveling shit,” he says. “And so the song is about hanging out with her, but it’s kind of a collage. The point of the song was, there was a place up in Olympia National Park, a place a lot like where I’m camped now, so quiet that if you smoked a cigarette you could hear it burning.” Manning’s most recent album, Vincent Rolls, is a tribute to his VW bus, which he first acquired when he was 17 years old and which, he says, at its 50-mph

Dave Manning, aka “The Alaskan Piano Man” travels around in his bus named Vincent playing boogie woogie and blues piano. “Whenever something moves me I write a song about it,” he says. “I’ve definitely become comfortable in my skin as a musician.”

side of Yellowstone National Park. “I have some old friends in Missoula so I’m coming through there,” he says. “I’m kind of the embodiment of that joke: What do you call a musician who doesn’t have a girlfriend?” After a pause he humors me. “I thought everyone knew this one. Homeless.” Manning, 35, aka “The Alaskan Piano Man” started playing piano in college after growing up playing the clarinet in his hometown of Anchorage. “When I got to college I started writing poetry and then I heard some old Bob Dylan stuff, some simple stuff, and I said, ‘Geez, I can do that.’ I took the poetry I was writing and would make up a song. For a long time it was easier for me to write my own songs than figure out other people’s songs because I wasn’t that good on the piano.” He is now. Manning plays festivals, gets radio play, and twice his songs were finalists for the “Alaska Song of the Year” contest. He describes his style as a “piano blues boogie-woogie revue,” where he plays blues-based, country ditties and tells stories in between—if the audience seems open to it. His rough-edged voice sounds something in

Missoula Independent

Page 34 August 6–August 13, 2009

more steadily. But it wasn’t until their subsequent breakup two years ago that he took his music on as a full-time affair. In early 2005, Manning played Folsom Prison just shortly after the institution—famous for Johnny Cash’s live show there—revived its music program. Unlike Cash’s visit when he played to a whole room of prisoners, Manning played to a few rooms of about thirty inmates each in Ward A and Ward C, since the prison no longer lets so many assemble in one room together. “When I was playing in the A ward I wasn’t sure how long I was supposed to play. I played half an hour or 45 minutes. There was this guy named Jim who made sure we went through all the right gates and [oversaw] the room. So I looked up at Jim and I said, ‘Hey Jim, how much more time we got?’ And before he could answer, this guy in the corner went, ‘Life.’” Manning’s stories and songs stem from such simple observations—poignant sometimes humorous, moments of truth about people and the road on which he travels. “Cigarette Burns,” for instance, is about his

pace, has taught him a lot about how to approach life. “It’s a hell of a first car,” he says. “I guess I kind of missed the memo where you’re supposed to get a new one every few years.” Manning doesn’t plan to retire Vincent anytime soon. Sometimes, he says, he dreams of making it big as a musician, enough to “beef up the retirement fund.” But planes and agents aren’t really his style. And he’s not really ready to give up Vincent, especially since a friend of his recently built him a new motor with just 10,000 miles on it. “There’s a line in one of the songs about how Vincent has taught me lessons that I already had inside me. And when people are like, ‘When are you going to be in town?’ I’ll be like, ‘Well, tomorrow or the next day. It depends on how many garage sales there are.’ I’ve learned to slow down. I’ve learned to not take the interstates.” Dave Manning plays Sean Kelly’s Friday, Aug. 7, at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. He plays Lolo Hot Springs Saturday, Aug. 8, at 8 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Bob Wire Buffaload self-released

Bob Wire crafts stories of bars, cars, guitars and love like a good alt-country singer should. In Sentimental Breakdown, his 2008 album, he adeptly tongue-and-cheeked his way through songs about Jesus and wild women, and his latest, Buffaload, snares some of that same quirky humor. Songs like “Sh*t List” (about, among other things, his neighbor’s dog taking dumps on his lawn) carry just enough witticisms to be smart, not cheesy. And “Vision in Neon”—sung with local favorite Tom

The Builders and The Butchers

Salvation Is a Deep Dark Well Gigantic

If your band comes to town crying hellfire and damnation, rocking a mandolin, a banjo, and at least two percussionists a-banging on various objects, I’m listening. At least I can bet you’ll be good live. Portland’s The Builders and The Butchers not only promises to put on a show: They’ve produced an exceptional new album. Epic and exhilarating from start to finish, Salvation Is a Deep Dark Well opens with “Golden and Green” a slice of big-time, operatic metal—Iron Maiden or Black Sabbath—rendered all acoustic. Ryan Sollee’s voice—whining, taunting, proclaiming, witnessing—seems affected at first, but his words will make you a believer. An intense, slow

Ben Bullington White Sulphur Springs self-released

Ben Bullington is first and foremost a doctor, in the little town of White Sulphur Springs, Mont. Don’t be misled, though; he’s not one of those strum-my-guitar-on-the-weekend hacks who records tracks in his basement. Recording in Nashville, Bullington can boast having country music greats Rodney Crowell and Tracy Nelson not only as contributors on the album, but as friends and champions as well. This album is exactly what a folk-country album

The Minus Five Killingsworth Yep Roc

Ah, the supergroup side project. Self-indulgent? Sure. An outlet for big-time musicians looking to loosen up and recharge their stores of inspiration by playing with other talented folks? That too. For over 15 years, The Minus Five, with its revolving lineup, has remained the epitome of a supergroup side project. This time around, M5 mainstays Scott McCaughey (The Young Fresh Fellows) and Peter Buck (REM) join forces with Portland pedal steel guitarist Tucker Jackson plus members of The Decembrists, the She Bee Gees, and The Posies to produce Killingsworth, a notably Portland-centric but otherwise forgettable album.

Catmull—perfectly exemplifies deadpan storytelling with a wink. Thing is, I like my Bob Wire tossed with sass and sarcasm. I do. But it’s when he plays it more serious in an “American-Pie” or “Hands-on-the-Wheel” way that he blows me away. In “Bread,” for instance, he sings, “Millions of Americans are livin’ off the grid, we don’t give a damn how the stock market did.” And in “Out on the Salt” (sung with local Richie Reinholdt) he lopes through a story of first jobs, pick-up trucks and “a beauty” named Amanda. Buffaload wouldn’t be Bob Wire without barbed one-liners and ridiculous scenarios. But his songs of recession and the desert-emptiness of lost love give him depth without shedding his defiant charm. (Erika Fredrickson) Bob Wire plays his CD release party at the Union Club Friday, Aug. 7, at 9:30 PM. Free. bridge builds to a climax of revivalist furor at the center of the catchy gospel tune “Short Way Home.” “Down in This Hole” channels Tom Waits’ vocabulary and lyrical rhythms: “Dancing while the devil taps his dirty fingernails… The innocent and kind are rounded up and thrown in jail.” The Builders and The Butchers has something to offer anyone with an appreciation for the dusty, broken side of beauty. Readers of Cormac McCarthy, acolytes of Goya and Blake, kids with V.C. Andrews novels hidden under the mattress: This is the soundtrack of your dreamworld. (Ali Gadbow) The Builders and The Butchers play the Palace Wednesday, Aug. 12, at 9 PM with March of the Black Queen. $8. should be—straightforward, plaintive and perceptive. Bolstered by sparse instrumentals (provided by a first-rate Nashville session band) Bullington sings about America’s working class, waitresses and drifters, but also Montana’s wide-open spaces, ranch dogs and the ring around the moon. His startlingly poetic lyrics paint a picture of a man who has “been all over this country”—working an oil field in North Dakota, catching fish in Alaska—but who still “ain’t found it yet.” And, while his lyrics might seem like pretty fiction coming from a doctor, they’re actually true. Bullington spent years as a wandering laborer before turning to medicine. In one of the best liner note quotes I’ve seen, Rodney Crowell puts it well: “The guy’s a pretty damn good doctor for a songwriter.” (Melissa Mylchreest) With M5, the question is: What’s in it for the fans? Portlanders might be psyched to see several of their high-profile local favorites loving it up on stage, but the recorded version—while loose, good-natured, melodic, and professional—is kind of a yawn. The lyrics are clever and fun, the instruments sound nice, the voices mesh wonderfully, but the songs sound identical. On the album’s only standout tune, “I Would Rather Sacrifice You,” singers trade verses and join sweetly on the chorus of the Carter Family-style gospel sing-along, finally translating some of that fun they seem be having to the listener here at home. (Ali Gadbow)

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Cat’s meow El Zombi Gato resurrects old-school lineup by Erika Fredrickson Smoothies Juice Espresso Tea

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Missoula Independent

Page 36 August 6–August 13, 2009

Punk-styled garage rock band El Zombi Gato shots of booze and after-hours parties rocked into named itself after a dead cat. But the name also the wee hours of the morning seven days a week. seems apt because, when the band formed in late “I had a reputation there for years of being some October 2008, the process was something akin to dumb, fallen down drunk,” says Lynch. “When Five resurrecting a lost spirit. For some band members it in the Face practiced or played a show we’d get as had been at least five years—if not a decade—since drunk as we could. It was fun. But I did a lot of stuthey’d seriously played in a band. Guitarist Wendy pid things.” Maltonic, for instance, played in a stoner rock group In the Golden Rose Bar on a Friday evening, called Bolt Action back in Ohio, but that was before Lynch, 41, and Thompson, 36, talk about getting old. her 1999 move to Missoula. Bassist Millie It’s only 8:30 p.m. and both say they feel like they’re Thompson hadn’t played consistently since her winding down for the night. At their last show at the band Sasshole broke up in 2005. And Scott Moore, Elk’s Lodge, they played a punk rock version of the drummer for Thee Hedons in the late ’90s—during “Laverne & Shirley” theme song. Almost nobody the heyday of Missoula’s legendary, now-defunct knew it. But that didn’t faze them. punk rock venue Jay’s Upstairs —wasn’t even sure where parts of his drum set were anymore. Frontman Dennis Lynch told Moore he had a drum kit and promised to scavenge some parts for him. The kit was collecting dust in Lynch’s garage loft ever since his former band, Five in the Face, had broken up six years ago. “I brought my kick drum down,” Lynch says, Photo by Chad Harder “and it was full of El Zombi Gato includes, from center clockwise, Dennis Lynch, garbage. It had an old Millie Thompson, Dan Strachan, Scott Moore, Mike Doerner and wool blanket, a beer bot- Wendy Maltonic. tle and a whisky bottle in it. I was like, ‘Well, I better clean it out for him.’ But “One of the cool things about our band is that when I start cleaning it out, I see something weird in we’re old school,” says Thompson, “because we’ve there. I pull it out and it’s a dead cat. For all I know, been around Missoula so long. But we’re also old.” it was in there while Five in the Face was still playing. She smiles. “And I think it’s pretty bad ass.” Over the years, things have changed for both It was completely mummified. And that’s how we musicians. Thompson’s been sober for eight years got our name.” El Zombi Gato sounds like a grimy, gang-vocal now and finds her songwriting abilities more focused. concoction of Zeke and Dead Moon, with the kind of Lynch owns a tiling business. When El Zombi Gato sick and silly humor of old-school punk hooligans practices, it isn’t just centered on drinking. And, Schlong. They play songs about anything that makes though they’ve only played a couple of shows, the them laugh including burritos, and they vent about band has written enough material and garnered Keno players who use their earnings to buy meth enough praise to be chosen for Total Fest VIII this year, a highly competitive local rock festival that gets and, in general, people who do stupid things. “I was hit by a drunk driver in December and we hundreds of applications from across the country. “I want everything to sound good,” Lynch says. got a song out of that,” says Thompson. “And the song ‘Special Place,’ that’s about knowing that “It’s helped my vocal timing, not getting drunk, and there’s a special place waiting for the evil people in it’s made a big difference. Don’t get me wrong. I still the world. And we all know there’re plenty of them.” enjoy a drink. But I’m definitely not the Dennis I was In many ways, El Zombi Gato can’t escape being 10 years ago.” When asked what became of the dead cat that a novelty since most of the members have long standing reputations as musicians in the rock community. inspired their name, Lynch proves his point. “You know, 10 years ago, at Jay’s, we probably Lead guitarist Dan Strachan currently plays drums for the pop group Secret Powers, but is well known as would have made a banner out of it and hung it the drummer for the longstanding band Oblio Joes. across the front of the drum kit,” he says, laughing. Keyboardist/saxophone player Mike Doerner also “But seeing as we’ve gotten older and wiser, it went in the garbage.” played in a band, Cicada, in the mid-90s. And Jay’s lore, though starting to fade, continues El Zombi Gato plays the Palace Saturday, Aug. to be a topic of conversation (much to the chagrin of younger scenesters) for the band members and any- 8, at 9 PM with Noise Noise Noise, The Budgets, one who played or saw bands there. The floor of the Birds Mile Home and Tyson Ballew. $5. smoky venue wobbled up and down under the efredrickson@missoulanews.com weight of crowds, raucous bands downed flaming


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13 Year

Got art?

Anniversary

Sales Event

Film explores the creativity of capitalism

Mon 8.17 thru Sat 8.22

by Andy Smetanka

Live Music Teas & Treats Free Giveaways Save 20%

One side effect of not owning a television is ly calculated sentimentality, played a significant that, when you do get around one, at a friend’s part in getting Ronald Reagan re-elected in 1984. house or while staying at a motel, the advertise- Will Democrats be more forgiving on learning ments all seem clever and screamingly funny. For that Riney himself, who also created Gallo’s the first hour, at least. On a related note, when- Pachelbel-powered wine-schmaltz campaign in ever I go to a bigger city like Portland or Seattle, the ’80s, was raised by absentee parents and so the billboards and banners on the sides of busses has spent most of his career conjuring the family all seem hipper, the humor more selective and he always wished he had? often racy. It must be said that Missoula is still And now the huge corporations are increasfairly provincial in these matters. Also, billboards ingly turning to ad agencies to tell them who they in outlying Missoula areas need to be rotated are and what they stand for. They spend huge more frequently. This dawned on me a few years sums of money on “creatives” to pinpoint and ago when I noticed I was developing an unwhole- define their corporate identity for them. Scary, some, squirmy kind of attraction to a pair of but terrific watching. trashy girls on an anti-meth billboard on seemSprinkled liberally throughout Art & Copy are ingly permanent display in East Missoula. Art & Copy, a whirlwind documentary tour of American advertising in its post-World War II heyday, takes a fairly surprising stance on its topic: namely, that advertising is not necessarily always a blight on the landscape or a caustic solution Roto-Rooting into the minds of our children to the tune of—what was that statistic again?—something like 20,000 TV ads per year. A lot of people would say that television Cliff Freeman, creator of the “Where’s the Beef?” slogan, advertisements in particular are kicks it with his vintage radio collection in the documentary Art & Copy. the lowest form of art: fifteensecond blurts of sound and image calculated to part you from your money, some of American advertising’s greatest hits (“I probably for something you don’t need. Here’s a can’t believe I ate the whole thing.”) and radical documentary that dares to say maybe advertising breakthroughs (Apple’s 1984-themed Superbowl is worthy of appreciation and is willing to portray spot to introduce the Macintosh), but the movie the people who create it as something besides is more than just a Clio Awards trip down memowhores to capitalism. ry lane. Director Doug Pray is admirably even“Art in service of capitalism,” says one subject handed with the material, stopping well short of interviewed. “Entertaining culture with its prod- making a case for TV commercials as high art, but ucts,” opines another, creating a “mass communal showing us plenty to admire, or at least consider. happening” when a “Where’s the beef?” or a “Got He clearly respects his interview subjects, all milk?” or a “Fahrvergnugen” burrows deep into unabashed in their love of advertising but some popular culture, mutates into “Got weed?” or decidedly less circumspect than others. “Fukengruven” and everyone knows where it As a counterpoint to the millionaire ad heavcomes from. As we learn from Art & Copy, some of ies who mostly populate the interviews, Art & the most memorable catchphrases in American Copy returns frequently to one of advertising’s advertising history were complete flukes. You’ll be lowly foot soldiers: a fourth-generation billboarddownright amazed to learn the inspiration behind paster, or “rotator” as they’re called nowadays. “Just do it,” perhaps even more so by its creator’s Like his father, grandfather and great-grandfather aptitude for spinning it into advertising gold, his before him, he’s never been out of work. rare gift for recognizing “a likable human emotion As for billboards standing at the outskirts of in parallel with a corporate mission.” Missoula: When I first saw pictures of São Paulo These “creatives,” as they’ve long been after that Brazilian city hauled down some 16,000 known by their corporate clients, have several billboards after a 2007 ban on outdoor advertisthings in common. As interview subjects, they’re ing, I thought it was an Adbusters prank. Now I engaging and articulate. They worship at the think it’s perhaps the one thing Missoula could altar of their own creativity, and most of them are learn from a city with 20 million people. pretty full of themselves. And they’re all equally gifted at shrugging off insinuations that advertisArt & Copy shows at the Wilma Theatre as ing also has some serious—and, for many, part of the Big Sky Film Series Friday, August grave—effects on society and politics. Hal Riney’s 7, at 7:30 PM. Free. “Morning in America” campaign, for example, oozing what seems on the surface to be cunningarts@missoulanews.com

(except Dr. Hauschka)

180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice's 728.0543 M-F 10-6 Sat 11-5

Missoula Independent

Page 37 August 6–August 13, 2009


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home. Screens at the Wilma nightly at 7 and 9, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 and 10:15 Also showing at the whose response to possible deportation–she’s Village 6 at 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 and 10:15 Canadian, okay?–is to order the hapless chap to with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. GI JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA THE COLLECTOR Showing at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:45, marry her. Then they have to play it off in front of Blatant militarism gets championed as Dennis Quaid and Marlon Wayans, along with other mem- A handyman ex-con tries to repay a debt to his ex- 4:05, 7:10 and 9:35 with midnight shows on Fri. his folks. Anybody see the train coming at us through the tunnel? Screens at the Carmike 10 at bers of G.I. JOE work to crush Destro and his eso- wife but then falls into the hands of a “collector” and Sat. 1, 4, 7 and 9:40. Also plays at the Stadium 14 in teric Cobra organization. Screens at the Carmike who traps him in a maze of sorts during this hor- HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD Kalispell at 1:25, 4:10, 7:05 and 9:40, with midPRINCE ror/suspense film directed by Marcus Dunstan. 10 at 1:30, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:45. Also shows at the Village 6 at 1:30, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:45. Also Screens at the Village 6 at 12:40, 5:30 and 10:15. Ding! Round six! All your faves are back, every- night shows on Fri. and Sat. screens at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton nightly at Also screens at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 9:30 thing’s more dangerous and hormonal–especially PUBLIC ENEMIES Hermione–and somewhere someone’s getting all Johnny Depp plays 1930s gangster John Dillinger 6:50 and 9:10 PM with Wed., Sat. and Sun. mati- with midnight showings Fri. and Sat. hunted by the newly formed FBI’s top agent, nees at 3 and no Sun. show at 9:10. Additionally Christian Bale, and his cohorts in a wild ride screening at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12, complete with betrayals, slick gunfights, car chas1:05, 3, 4:05, 6, 7:05, 8:50 and 9:50 with mides and aspirations for power. Showing at the night shows Fri. and Sat. Also shows at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 3 and 9:10 with midMountain Cinema in Whitefish at 4, 6:45 and 9, night shows Fri. and Sat. with Fri., Sat. and Sun. show at 1:30 Shows at TRANSFORMERS: the Showboat Cinema in Polson at 4, 7 and REVENGE OF THE FALLEN 9:15. Autobots wage their battle to destroy the evil JULIE & JULIA forces of the Decepticons in this sequel to Food freaks take note of this adaptation of two 2007’s fast-moving blurfest that sexploitationally memoirs in a story that revolves around cooking, showcases Megan Fox. Wanna know the truth? I blogging about cooking and the quest to walked out. Screens at the Carmike 10 at 12:30, become a culinary master, all thanks to cook3:45, 7 and 10:15. Also screens at the Stadium books by Julia Child. Screens at the Carmike 10 14 in Kalispell at noon and 6 with midnight at 1:30, 4:15, 7 and 9:45. Also shows at the shows on Fri. and Sat. Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:05, 4, 7 and 9:50. THE UGLY TRUTH Additional screenings at the Mountain Cinema in Thrust yourself into yet another sappy romantic Whitefish at 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with a Fri., Sat. and comedy when you witness morning show proSun. show at 1:45. ducer (Katherine Heigl’s) quest to find Mr. Right. A PERFECT GETAWAY Along the way, her reality is turned upside down Steve Zahn and Milla Jovovich head to Hawaii for some honeymoon fun, but their plans get Meryl Streep explores the ins and outs of bird anatomy in Julie & Julia–which opens at the when Gerard Butler dishes out the “ugly truth” about relationships. Screens at Carmike 10 at spoiled when they run into hikers who warn Carmike 10, Stadium 14 in Kalispell and Mountain Cinema in Whitefish on Friday. 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:10 and 9:25. Additionally them of a recent murder. Screens at the Village steamed up about witchcraft’s glorification in the FUNNY PEOPLE showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 6 at 1:45, 4:30, 7:10 and 9:35. Also showing at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, Judd Apatow’s newest flick follows a comedian mainstream media. Shows at the Carmike 10 at 9, with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 PM and who has a near-death experience and features act- 12:30, 3:45, 7 and 10:15. Also shows at the no 9 showing on Sun. Also showing at the Stadium 7:25 and 9:45 with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. ing from Jason Schwartzman, Adam Sandler and Village 6 at 12:30, 3:45, 7 and 10:15. Screens at 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:35, 4:55, 7:30 and 9:45, SUMMER HOURS This French flick explores the dynamics of familial the Wu-Tang Clan’s RZA. Screens at the Carmike the Pharaohplex in Hamilton nightly at 7 only and as well as midnight on Fri. and Sat. Also showing at tension when the mother of three siblings dies 10 at 1, 4:05, 7:10 and 10:15. Also shows at the Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:15 the Mountain Cinema in Whitefish at 4:15, 7 and and leaves behind a valuable art collection, and Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:15, 4:30 and 8:30 show on Sun. Also showing at the Stadium 14 in 9:15, as well as 1:45 on Fri., Sat. and Sun. consider chucking away the family house and all with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. Also shows at Kalispell at 12:15, 3:45 and 7:15 with Fri. and Sat. UP 3-D its belongings. Screens at the Wilma Fri. and Thu. the Pharoahplex in Hamilton at 7 only with Wed., showings at midnight. Additionally showing at the Aging balloon salesman Carl Fredricksen takes his house on a helium-powered expedition to South Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Showboat in Polson at 3:45, 6:45 and 9:25. at 9 only, and all other nights at 7 and 9. America, only to discover he’s got a stowaway Sun. Also screening at the Mountain Cinema in ICE AGE: DAWN OF THE DINOSAURS Whitefish at 4, 6:45 and 9:30 with Fri., Sat. and This animated children’s comedy, the third install- Cub-Scout equivalent on board. Also shows at the NOW PLAYING ment in the series, follows Manny and his friends Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:30, 4 and 6:35. Sun. shows at 1:15. ALIENS IN THE ATTIC as they navigate life through adult-oriented topics This kid-friendly comedy, which stars Kevin Nealon G-FORCE Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Tim Meadows, follows a band of kids on vaca- Guinea pigs take up spy work for the United States like falling in love, starting a family and going and Ira Sather-Olson. tion who try to ward off attacks from alien invaders government in order to take down a billionaire bent extinct. Voiceovers include cameos by Queen on world takeover in this 3-D kid’s comedy. Latifah and Denis Leary. Screens at the Carmike bent on taking over the world. Screens at the Village 6 a 1:05, 3:15, 5:25, 7:35 and 9:45. Also Screens at the Carmike 10 at 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 10 at 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10 and 9:30. Shows at the Moviegoers be warned! Show times are screens at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 7:05 and 9:20. Also shows at the Pharaohplex in Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:15, 2:40, 5, 7:20, good as of Fri., July 31. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, 2:25, 4:40, 6:50 and 9, with midnight shows Fri. Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. mati- 9:35 with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. ORPHAN despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself nees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Shows at the and Sat. Also shows at the Pharoahplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9, with Wed., Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:10, 2:30, 4:45, 6:55 Vera Farmiga and Peter Sarsgaard realize that the any grief and/or parking lot profanities by callseemingly innocent girl they’ve adopted has some ing ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: and 9:10 with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. matinees at 3 and no Sun. show at 9. THE HANGOVER demonic tendencies. Screens at the Village 6 at Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; Wilma— AWAY WE GO Four gents on a Las Vegas bachelor party expedi1:30, 4:20, 7:10 and 10. Also screens at the 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton—961This romantic comedy, based on a screenplay by Dave Eggers and Vendela Vida, explores the lives tion scramble to answer the morning-after ques- Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 9:30, with midnight FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton—363-5141. S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l - — 75 2 - 78 0 4 . of a couple John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph, tion, “What happened?” and get the groom back to showings on Fri. and Sat. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan about to have their first child and documents their L.A. in time for some nuptials. Sick lyrical cameo by THE PROPOSAL Sandra Bullock is Ryan Reynolds’ ball-busting boss, Mike Tyson. Screens at the Carmike 10 at 12:40, and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130. cross country search for the perfect place to call

OPENING THIS WEEK

The Kingfisher’s Weekly Fishing Report: Week of Aug 6th

This fishing report brought to you by

Bitterroot

Can you say, "happy cloudy junk"??? Thoughtcha could! Yeah, good stuff on all the local rivers as the sun backs off for a few days and some cloud cover and more humid weather moves in. The PMDs are still going strong and bringing lots of fatties to the surface and the cooler weather will do nothing but help in this regard. The lack of direct sunlight will also make for better midday fishing in general so the hoppers, beetles and attractors you've been fishing will work even better. The caddis and yellow sallie stones are still getting the fishes' attention later in the day and the morning trico hatch is coming on strong as well. The lower river which is usually technical and a tough choice in the sun should become a much more user friendly option over the next few days.

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Missoula Independent

fish, but your significant other my begin to believe that there's some hope for you after all. What a misassessment that'll be. In any event, the cloud cover we're expecting over the next few days should do good things for the Blackfoot. Look for increased mayfly activity and fish more willing to move into shallower water to feed. Your streamer prospects should be much better out of the direct sunlight as well and who knows, the cooler weather may weed out all but the most generously padded of the tubber brigade . . .which based on personal observation means . . .well, nevermind. PMDs, yellow sallies, caddis and leggy hopper and attractor patterns will still reign supreme up here.

Clark Fork

The smoke from a couple of forest fires combined with the cooler and cloudy weather on tap should breathe new life into the midday fishing on this Blackfoot It's time to set aside that Wrath of Kahn, Bird of river. Yellow sallie and golden stone imitations have Prey Star Trek model you've been working on and been working well for us as have SMALLER hopper hit the damn river. Not only will you catch some and ant patterns. The tricos aren't as strong, in gen-

eral, as they have been in years past, yet. . . but they are coming off in relevant numbers particularly on the midriver stretches around Petty Creek. Caddis continue to be the name of the game for a few amazing hours before and right at dark. A #12 or 14 Goddard or elk hair "waked" across brushy or rip wrap banks will do ugly things to the slippery goofballs towards the end of the day.

Rock Creek

Easy access and wading conditions combined with solid hatches & fish looking up for 'em is making for no brianer fishing on the creek these days. PMDs, yellow sallies, hoppers, caddis all have the fish moving to the surface along pretty much the creek's entire length. Lower flows are now making it possible to cross from bank to bank in many areas allowing for a day spent wading the west bank area that sees significantly less pressure. If you'd rather fish subsurface stuff, you're in luck there too, since the nymphing and streamer fishing has been just about as good as the dryfly action.

Smaller buggers in the size 8 to 10 range are working well (the rusty squirrel sculpins have been the devil) as are smaller flashy nymphs like olive flashback p-tails in a 16 along with similarly sized copper johns & brassies. Beware of the speed trap that's ALWAYS somewhere in the vicinity of mm 3 to 9.

Missouri

The cloud cover & added humidity should doo good things for you if the wind stays down to a dull roar. Hatches of PMDs and pseudos should have the fish looking up all day long. It should still be warm enough to get the evening caddis popping as well so the potential is there for a LONG day of dryfly action. For those of you who prefer the subsurface game, expect the nymphing to be even better than usual with the standard Missouri suspects under an indicator. Slow moving streamers off the banks and to midriver high spots will likely produce some fatty browns for you as well. Stick with more muted colors in the clouds. Today's flow Below Holter is 4820.

Winston Fly Rods - atoms organized in a highly desirable way!

Page 38 August 6–August 13, 2009


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Deadline: Monday at 5PM

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Avoid the lines, and enjoy your summer! The state’s new motor vehicle registration system called MERLIN has caused longer lines at the courthouse. Missoula County doesn’t want you to wait in line. You can REGISTER your car online. app.mt.gov/vrr/renewal To TITLE your new vehicle you can reduce your wait time by calling ahead and making an appointment. Call the County’s Motor Vehicle Department at 258-4747. Bright Daycare

Beginnings ——Now Enrolling

ages 6 weeks-12 years—Licensed facility Call 493-6397

ly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484

FORT BENTON PEDDLER’S FAIR, Saturday August 15, 8:00 am to 3:00 pm on Front Street Levy. Crafts, Antiques, Farmers Market. For info call 406-622-5536

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888583-2101. www.continentalacademy.com

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-475-0876

THE GREEN ECO SHOW. www.greenecoshow.com August 22-23, 9-5. Missoula Fairgrounds. Fashion Show, Music, Speakers, Organic Food. Sponsor: Herman’s Eco Inc. Anna 846-1252

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For More Information

www.wallaceidahochamber.com 208-753-7151 I-90 Exit 61 & 62

Found Mountain Bike near Higgins and Hazel on June 5. Call to ID 542-2833 Lost Fuji Digital Camera Lost on Wednesday, July 22nd at either Bonner Park or at the Orange Street Food Farm. Brand new Blue FujiFilm Digital camera, 10MP. If not willing to return the camera, at least email me the pics & videos. (425) 894-5653 or email s.fleischman@hotmail.com. Thank you. LOST KAYAK Red sit-on-top kayak lost in Blackfoot River above Angevine access area. 406-251-2641 LOST Wedding Ring (reward) I lost my wedding ring on Saturday, August 1 in downtown Missoula. Most likely on Higgins/Farmer’s or People’s Market/Break Espresso/Macy’s. Ring is silver mens ring with Celtic pattern. Ring has low monetary value and extremely high sentimental value! 406-207-7953

Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

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Electric kiln. Large wooden cabinet. Large oil tank. Call 549-2119 LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

ANNOUNCEMENTS “Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm-8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more information: dianne.getbetternow @gmail.com 406-225-8504 PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of

the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825. Recycled Recumbent Bike Building Build your own for FREE when you Volunteer for 2 hrs at local free cycles. HAPPENING @ Missoula Free Cycles SATDURDAYS 2:30pm For More Info. Contact “BobSquatch” @ 800809-0112 or see http://missoulaareaevents.ning.com

VOLUNTEERS Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

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Saturday September 12th at Caras Park. Need vendors & volunteers. Go to

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Zoe Usually our Siamese cats just fly out the door, Zoe however has been a resident for some time now. All the while, raising her royalty status with each passing day. She has a princess bed, (with two levels) she expects star treatment at all times, demanding room service and only the best cuisine. If she wants something, you’ll hear about it until she gets it! Zoe needs a home and a family willing to serve under her. The Humane Society is now open Tues.-Fri. 1-6p.m. and Sat. 114p.m.

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ADVICE GODDESS

EMPLOYMENT $600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL! Helping the Government, PT. No experience. No selling. Call: 1888-213-5225, Ad Code: A32 AUTO DETAILER WITH BUFFER EXP. F/T Msla. Employer is seeking an experienced auto detailer. Must have previous auto detailer experience. Must have auto body buffing experience. Must also be bondable. Must have a valid drivers license. Will be working 8 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday through Fridays. Starting pay will be $8.75 to $12.00 range, DOE. #2976016 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking applicants for a full time Receptionist/Abortion Counselor position. Excellent customer service skills and peer counseling experience preferred. Must be higly motivated, pro-choice individual. Send resume to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California, Missoula, MT 59802 Attn:Annie BODYGUARDS WANTED. FREE Training for members. No Experience OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time. Expenses Paid When you Travel. 1-615-2281701. www.psubodyguards.com CASHIER-STORE CLERK– P/T,Lolo. Lolo employer is seeking a part-time CASHIER / STORE CLERK. DUTIES INCLUDE: Operate cash register, stock product, complete phone orders, assist set up orders for delivery and inventory as needed. Must be at least 18 years old to be considered legal age to sell packaged liquor. Computer skills are helpful. Employer will schedule 2 weeks of intensive training before working independently. Work schedule is either from 9:00 am to 2:30 pm OR from 2:30 pm to 8:00 pm. Flexible hours may be possible. Work hours should average 3035 hours per week. Work days are Monday-Saturday (will include Saturdays, but business is closed on Sundays and standard holidays.) Starting pay will be $7.25 an hour, with raises given for proven ability. #2976013 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 CONV. STORE MGR, ASS’T MGR,- F/T, Msla. Convenience store is seeking an experienced MANAGER, and ASSISTANT MANAGER. Manager and Assistant manager positions will work full-time and require previous experience. Pay is open depending on experience and qualifications. Store will be opened from 6 A.M. to 10 P.M. daily. Will be required to rotate on weekends. Will also sell beer and wine products. #2976009 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 Dance Instructor Needed for a well establisted non-profit childrens performing art studio. We are seeking an individual to teach Jazz and possibly some Modern Dance classes for the upcoming school year. Please email cover letter and resume with references to balletbitterroot@gmail.com no phone calls please. Pay is DOE DISHWASHER, PREP COOK, LINE COOK- F/T & P/T, Msla. A local golf club is seeking part & fulltime dishwashers/prep cooks/line cooks. Primary responsibility will be washing dishes, cutlery, cooking utensils, pots & pans. Will also assist with light prep work and cleaning kitchen area. Line cook must have previous restaurant cooking experience. There are both part & fulltime positions. Work days will vary. Pay range is from 7.25 an hour to $10.00 an hour DOE. #2975974 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 DRUG/ALCOHOL COLLECTORP/T, Msla. Drug & Alcohol Collector: This part-time job as drug/alcohol collector requires person to be on call 6:00 am to 6:00 pm with flexible schedule to

drive to sites to do drug and alcohol collections. Must have reliable transportation, driver’s license, insurance, and live in Missoula. Pay is $10 per test and paid mileage. Testing of math, spelling, and handwriting required. Application and testing at Job Service. #2975996 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HEALTH CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE– F/T, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a customer service representative. Duties include answering calls from plan participants, group contacts, and providers, records all calls, meets with clients as necessary to explain benefits, logs faxed claims, assists claim examiners as requested, and other duties as required. Full job description is located at the front desk. Must have High School Diploma or GED. Previous experience with computer software applications is required. Must be proficient in Word, e-mail applications and Internet navigation. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. Benefits include medical, dental, prescription, 401K, profit sharing. Certified results from four tests must be included with application. Tests include basic reading comprehension, typing 3 minute - on screen, writing thank you, and call center listening skills - audio. #2976004 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HOTEL HOUSEKEEPERS – P/T, F/T Msla. Missoula hotel is seeking full-time and part-time HOUSEKEEPERS. DUTIES INCLUDE: Clean guest rooms, hallways, lobby, corridors, elevators, stairways and other public areas. Vacuum, dust, remove and replace linens, empty wastebaskets, clean restrooms and other duties as assigned. Must have reliable transportation. Shift starts at 9:00 am and goes until assigned areas are cleaned. Must be available on Saturdays and Sundays. Schedule to be discussed at interview. Wage starts at $7.25/hour, work will be parttime to full-time #2976014 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 JOBS, JOBS, JOBS. Part-time job! Full-time BENEFITS-to include medical and dental. If you are 1742 years old, The Montana Army National Guard has many positions available starting at over $10.00/hr. $20,000 Enlistment Bonus, $80,000 for College Education, $20,000 for Prior Service. For more information call 1-800-GO-GUARD LEGION BASEBALL COACH. Belgrade Bandits American Legion Head Coach. Respond by Aug. 30. Send resume to Belgrade Bandits Board of Directors, P.O. Box 221, Belgrade, MT 59714 LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE? In need of a “cool” job in a hot climate? Want to make a difference by using your education? fishrls@yahoo.com 406-7283268 Maintenance Engineer Downtown Missoula Business Improvement District. Duties include garbage collection; graffiti, snow & ice removal; sidewalk, alley and tree grate cleaning and décor maintenance. Must have a valid DL. $13/hr. Cover letter, resume & 3 references by August 7 to: Downtown BID; 218 E. Main St, Ste C; Missoula, MT 59802. Full description and qualifications can be found at: www.missouladowntownbid.org Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 NEED STARVING CARTOON ARTIST Looking for cartoon artist that is hungry!! Funky, quirky design concepts fax sample with contact information to 406/273-6408 - if we like your concepts we will contact you! OFFICE MANAGER/ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT. For complete job description: mcarthurcpa.com

Deadline: 8/21/09. Resume: Kenneth McArthur, CPA, P.O. Box 695, Choteau, MT 59422, E-mail: kmac31@3rivers.net 406-4662070 POOL/RV ATTENDANT- F/T,Lolo. Lolo area resort seeking a FullTime POOL/RV ATTENDANT. Pool duties include but are not limited to: Cashiering, customer relations, keeping the pool area and bathrooms clean, keeping up on laundry, other duties as assigned. MUST know how to clean! RV duties: MUST have exceptional customer service skills! Duties include: Running the RV Park office, taking reservations, handling cash, both house keeping and yard keeping, oversee the operations of the RV park. Some late nights. Your duties will be split between the Pool and the RV Park. Days and hours will vary and will be discussed at the interview. Wage is $7.25 per hour. #2976010 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 SECRETARY II/ - F/T, Msla. Local agency is looking for a Secretary. Successful applicant will be responsible for filing, Medicaid and insurance billing, answer phones, take and deliver messages and general office work as assigned. Must have insurance verification and claims follow-up experience. Will be checking insurance eligibility for clients, keep insurance client book current, Medicaid data entry, medical chart maintenance, and should have thorough knowledge of Microsoft Word. Job Service typing test required of at least 45 WPM and Data Entry Alpha Numeric skills of at least 6000 strokes/hour as evidenced by certified Job Service test. Starting wage is $10.00/hour or higher depending on experience with excellent benefits. #2976005 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

TRANSPORTATION SECURITY OFFICERS: Trinity Technology Group seeks professional and career oriented individuals in Lewistown, Havre, Glasgow, Wolf Point, Sidney, Glendive and Miles City for the following positions: Supervisory Transportation Security Officers; Lead Transportation Security Officers and Transportation Security Officers. Candidates must have High School diploma, GED or equivalent; be proficient in English; pass pre-employment medical evaluation, background and credit checks; are required to attend and successfully complete TSA Dual Function Passenger/Baggage training and maintain all certifications through recurring training requirements as dictated by TSA and the Training Coordinator. Ideal candidates must posses strong work ethic, excellent customer service skills, keen attention to detail and take initiative to rectify deficiencies. Excellent salary and full benefits package. Many positions parttime with flex hours. Visit www.trinitytechnologygroup.com or send resume to MT7@trinitytechnologygroup.com. Indicate in subject line position for which you are applying. E.O.E. Unlimited earning potential New company looking for motivated distributors. Call to reserve your spot. 406-2817005

PROFESSIONAL Debt Collection Agent Missoula based debt collection company seeks experienced debt collector. Full time, variable hours, hourly plus commission. Debtcollection@live.com

Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE! www.missoulanews.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Do you love the Missoula Independent? Are you an enthusiastic, motivated, self-starter? Then we want to talk to you! The Missoula Independent is looking for an Account Executive for magazine, newspaper and online ad sales. Requires strong organization and communication skills. Media sales experience preferred, BUT NOT REQUIRED. Great benefits and work environment.

Send resume and a cover letter SELLING YOURSELF to: pkearns@missoulanews.com or to PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807

By Amy Alkon

WIMP MY RIDE I’ve often had a woman sit across from me on some form of a date and tell me she just broke up with her boyfriend and isn’t interested in getting involved. That’s usually followed by how she’s too busy with work, lacks the emotional energy for a relationship, etc. This time, the woman was on our charity bike ride planning committee. I was testing the course, and she asked to ride with me. During our ride, she asked for biking tips. I gave her suggestions and said I’d e-mail her specifics (which I did). She thanked me and asked to do another ride with me. After that ride, she told me she’d just broken up and all the rest about how unready she was to get involved. So, why be out with me? Her response: Women can have male friends, and I’m a “safe” person to be with. —Joe Spokest When a woman you aren’t in a relationship with says you make her feel “safe,” think back a few minutes. Unless you just fended off a mountain lion or helped her escape from a terrorist compound, she’s probably thanking you for helping her escape any chance of ever having to have sex with you. You didn’t ask this woman on a date; you found yourself on “some form of a date,” which sounds like some form of a pattern for you. If it is, it’s probably because you’re too wimpy to ask a woman out, at least on what would sound to her like an actual boy-likes-girl evening. Maybe you hope if you just hang around her life long enough, you’ll graduate from loiterer to boyfriend. Instead of dates, you have schemes to keep her on the hook: acting as her tour guide, e-mailing her a book report on how to be a better biker, and…what’s that? She’s not ready for a relationship…but would you mind emptying the litter box and reshingling the garage on your way out? Of course, you and ten thousand other wimpy guys are now screaming, “What could possibly be wrong with going on a bike ride with a woman?” And yeah, she asked. And wasn’t it sweet of you to type up all those bike tips? No, it was not. Sweet is bringing the little old widow next door a bowl of soup. If I’m right about you, you put out for women you barely know (in goods and services, anyway), not because you’re a wonderful person, but because you want something in return—girlfriendly attention. In other words, you’re a male prostitute—just without the sex.

A guy generally does this because he feels like too big a loser to be enough of a draw on his own, just over drinks. Women sense this, and drop-kick him into the friend (or friendly eunuch with bike tools) zone fast, when he otherwise might’ve had a chance. In this case, for example, things might’ve turned out differently if you’d invited the woman for a post-ride drink. In the future, if you’re at all interested in a woman, ask her out; don’t ask how you can help her out. Instead of giving in to your fear of rejection, seek rejection—the sooner the better. Not only will this keep you from wasting your time, the longer you wait to ask a woman on a date, the less likely she is to go out with you—which doesn’t necessarily mean she’ll stop seeing you. (Little Bo Peep has lost all her…”emotional energy for a relationship,” and she’d really appreciate it if you’d round up her sheep so she can save her physical energy for the guy she does have a date with.)

STARE WAY TO HEAVEN I read your column, so I get that men are visual creatures. But, I’m wondering, when is it okay for a woman to be jealous over her boyfriend looking at other women? —Piqued There are men who make you feel like the only woman in the world and men who make you feel like the only thing standing between them and a clear view of some other woman’s jigglies. Lynne Truss, in her book on manners, Talk to the Hand, writes that “manners are based on an ideal of empathy, of imagining the impact of one’s own actions on others.” In other words, while all men look, rude men let themselves get caught. So, the question really isn’t when to be jealous, but when to be on your way. The responsibility here is yours: to choose the guy who’ll take the occasional visual freebie that crosses his path, but lose the guy whose body language says he’d trade you to passing Bedouins for five minutes with her…and he’ll just duck out to the parking lot to see if there are any men looking for parking spaces for their camels.

Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r Av e , # 28 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent page 41 August 6–August 13, 2009


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): I expect that you will soon stumble upon a key secret to your next masterpiece. And I’ll be surprised if you don’t discover a healing agent that will be effective in correcting an old mistake. In fact, Aries, I prophesy that in the coming week, you will have a sense that you’re doing the smart thing at least 90 percent of the time. Sorry: I’m afraid to say that I have no sad, bad, or mad news to deliver. If you’re the type of person who thrives on cynicism, your immediate future may be pretty boring. If you’re on the fence about the question of whether life is a gorgeous feast or a chaotic mess, your ability to deal with outbreaks of goodness will be supremely tested. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In Salmon Rushdie’s story The Prophet’s Hair, a greedy man intentionally cripples his four sons when they’re young, hoping to turn them into beggars who elicit profound sympathy and large cash donations. The plan is successful. His sons earn him a good income. Later, however, he comes into possession of a potent talisman—a strand of hair from the prophet Mohammed—and it magically heals the sons’ ailments. They’re no longer able to pull in big bucks, and grief descends upon the family. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I think there’s a variation on these themes at work in your own life. A “magic charm” is available that could reverse or at least neutralize an old handicap. Do you have the pluck to surrender the questionable rewards that your impairment has brought you? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It should be an excellent week for potato chip breakfasts, rapid mood shifts, and short-duration flirtations. The abundance of superficial exchanges that will be available to you could actually add up into something resembling meaningful breakthroughs. You will have the chance to explore the art of the five-minute epic conversation, as well as the science of giving a single look that speaks a million words. You cannot possibly plumb the bottomless depths of casual, frivolous, lightweight diversions, but you should try anyway.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): On the one hand, you may find yourself unable to flow as freely as you’d like to in the coming week. I foresee the possibility that your streaming currents will get dammed up in places, or else shunted into narrow conduits that constrict your natural surge. On the other hand, this could compel you to make more practical use of your emotional assets. The applicable metaphor is the harnessing of a turbulent river to produce massive amounts of hydroelectric power.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you really knew how much you were loved, you would never cry again. A sublime relaxation would flood your nervous system, freeing you to see the beautiful secrets that your chronic fear has hidden from you. If you knew how much the world longs for your genius to bloom, the peace that filled you would ensure you could not fail. You’d face every trial with eager equanimity. You would always know exactly what to do because your intuition would tell you in a myriad of subtle ways. And get this, Leo: A glimpse of this glory will soon be available to you.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): First of all, my friend, you don’t need any second-hand anything, let alone second-hand love. Second of all, dearest, you are hereby ordered not to hang around any third-rate situations where you feel like a fifth wheel. You understand? Thirdly, wonderful one, keep in mind that any eight ball you may fantasize that you’re behind is just a figment of your own delusions. Fourthly, lover, I assure you that your sixth sense can now lead you—if you cleanse it of its superstition—to a place that is, if you have a good imagination, a suburb of the seventh heaven.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I got an interesting spam today. A company that said it was very proud of its high-quality work offered to sell me phony credentials that are impossible to distinguish from the real thing. What caught my attention the most were the degrees from Harvard and Stanford. I wouldn’t mind having one of those up on my wall. But in the end, I decided that instead of paying the company $230 for one of its excellent fakes, I’d simply make one myself. And instead of creating a degree from Harvard, I would have it be from a place where I have actually matriculated, namely the Raving Maniac Academy of Crazy Wisdom, which is the unruly school where I often find myself during my lucid dreams. I bring this up, Libra, because it would be an excellent time for you to make yourself a fancy fake diploma from whatever your equivalent is to my academy—you know, the source that has been providing you with so much great teaching, even though it’s not an official institution of higher education.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A Slovenian adventurer named Martin Strel swam the length of the Amazon River in Brazil. It took him over nine weeks to travel more than 3,000 miles. Previously he had breast-stroked his way down the entire Yangtze River in China, a distance of almost 2,500 miles. He scoffed at the idea of conquering the River Nile in Egypt, however. “It’s long, but not challenging enough,” he said. “It is just a small creek.” That’s the spirit I hope you will summon in yourself during the coming weeks, Scorpio: a determination to take on only the most invigorating tests that require heroic levels of resourcefulness. Skip the lesser trials.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ideally, you wouldn’t even be reading this. You’d be white-water rafting along the Franklin River in Tasmania, or riding on “the train at the end of the world” in Tierra del Fuego, or observing Golden Bamboo lemurs in the rainforest of southeastern Madagascar. Ideally, Sagittarius, you’d be far away from any newspaper that carries my column. In fact, you’d be out of touch with all media, period. But since you are reading this, you must not be doing the ideal thing. So please do the next best thing: Flee as far as possible from your usual haunts, your habitual influences, and your customary comforts.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Make sure that no one except you will be able to tear asunder what you join together in the coming days. Tie knots that will never slip. Build bridges that can’t be burned. Send emails that cement new alliances and plug yourself into networks that are crackling with high-energy connections. Stock up on safety pins, staples, nails, tape, and glue. Be sticky, Capricorn! Just one caution: Do not marry your fortunes to anyone unless they are willing to be your devoted, synergistic warrior as much as you are their devoted, synergistic warrior.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t whine and complain just because your guardian angel seems to be driving hard bargains lately. You’re actually on better speaking terms now than you’ve been in some time. Before the sweeter talk can begin, though, the two of you still have to work out kinks left over from previous miscommunications. Besides, there’s a method in your guardian angel’s madness, a reason why she or he is driving hard bargains: She or he is testing you to see if you’re willing and able to stretch your imagination to accommodate the rowdier blessings you’ll soon be tempted with.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Underdogs are on an upsurge. Topdogs are on a downswing. The rebels have something resembling God on their side. The masters merely have money and propaganda. It’ll be an excellent week to launch strikes, boycotts, and protests. It’ll be prime time to say no to smiling manipulators. The best efforts, whether coming from you or the people you want to be close to, will always have at least a tinge of cheekiness. So now that you’ve read my spiel, please answer me this: Are you going to sit there passively and grin as some feel-good tyrant tries to break off a chunk of your soul? Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 42 August 6–August 13, 2009

EMPLOYMENT TREATMENT SERVICE SPECIALIST– F/T, Msla. Treatment Service Specialist needed to provide direct services to youth and families in Support Service Programs. May help with assisting youth in developing coping skills, social & recreational skills, independent living skills, mediation and conflict resolution skills, and problem solving skills. May assist parents by providing short-term respite care. Communicates behavioral and emotional observations to treatment team. Documents relevant data. Participates in program planning. Must be available to respond to problems on a 24hour basis. Requires the ability to assess and respond to the needs of youth and foster parents and an understanding of community resources and how to access services. Knowledge of Strength Model perspective necessary. Requires a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services plus one year of direct work experience with youth who are emotionally challenged and who experience learning differences. Will work Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm for 40 hours per week. Pay $12.26/hr. CLOSES 08/11/09 @ 5:00 pm. #2976007 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR FARM MECHANIC POSITION, Central Ag Research Center, Moccasin, MT. Info: Job Service o r www.montana.edu/level2/jobs.h tml ADA/EEO/AA/Vet Pref Employer. MONTANA BASED TRUCKING COMPANY is looking for quality owner operators. Western 7, coast to coast or Midwest. Dedicated runs available. Call 406-266-4210 SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC LEAD, F/T Msla. Family owned/operated Missoula business is seeking a Lead Small Engine Mechanic. Requires at least 4 years experience with small engine repair OR Associates degree in small engine repair and 2 years experience OR equivalent experience or education in heavy equipment, farm machinery or military equipment repair equaling 4 years experience. Must have own tools and toolbox. Will troubleshoot and repair all types of lawn and garden equipment. Need high level of skill & knowledge. Must have computer skills, ability to read online manuals, and read & understand electrical and hydraulic schematics. Need strong customer service skills, ability to learn about all types of equipment, follow directions, work effectively with a team, and enjoy mechanic work. Must be flexible with duties, organized, efficient, dependable & hardworking. Those with longterm employment goals encouraged to apply. Monday - Friday 9:00am-6:00pm and Saturday 9:00am-1:30pm. Pay starts at $10.00 to 12.50/hr. plus commission. More experience and ability, more pay. Employer offers Veteran’s hiring preference. #2975986 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 SPRINKLER REPAIR/LAWN MAINT. WORKER - F/T, Msla. Missoula area employer is seeking a full-time SPRINKLER REPAIR/LAWN MAINTENANCE WORKER to repair commercial lawn sprinklers & general lawn maintenance when needed. Individual needs to have 2 years of sprinkler repair and lawn maintenance experience, a valid driver’s license, clean driving record, ability to work independently, and willing to get the job done. Work days: Monday thru Friday, 8:00am - 5:00pm. This is a 40 hour per week position. Pay is $8-10./hr. #2976008 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION No exp needed. Paid training, good salary & benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call MonFri 800-437-6044 FIREFIGHTER Paid training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 1734. Financial secu rity, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vaca tion/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-095 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGER- F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time Training & Development Manager for organization in Missoula. Duties include managing a team of classroom trainers, conduct some classroom training, evaluate effectiveness of training, and contributes to the overall success of the training department function. Provides employee coaching to enhance skill development. Participates in activities designed to improve customer satisfaction and business performance. Provides input to training curriculum, based on classroom experience. Reviews and revises training material to ensure teams are meeting performance-based criteria. A degree in education or equivalent experience is required. Salary is $40,000 to $80,000 depending on experience. #2976006 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 WAREHOUSING TRAINEE Good pay, regular raises, great benefits, $ for school, vacation. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289

HEALTH CAREERS DIETARY MANAGER– F/T, Msla. Long Term Care and Assisted Living center in Missoula is seeking a Dietary Manager to manage overall dietary department operations. Will be a working manager, including cooking. Requires at least a year of experience as a dietary manager in an institutional setting. Responsible for managing staff, overseeing all department activities and reporting, and planning menus using business guidelines. Must be able to follow dietary guidelines and work effectively in a team environment with management and staff. Need basic computer skills. Background check will be conducted; integrity a must. Pay is $12.50/hour depending on experience, plus benefits. Business is on bus route. EOE. #2976002 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE OR MEDICAL ASSI-F/T, Msla. Missoula County is seeking a regular, FULL-TIME LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE or MEDICAL ASSISTANT to perform duties and provide nursing care for Partnership Health Center in clinical care of patients and clinic

B, M & S maintenance. LPN requires graduation and certification from state approved school of nursing with state accreditation at the time of graduation; current license as practical nurse in State of Montana; one year experience in nursing practice that includes doing clinical data collection. Experience in medical office or ambulatory care center preferred. Medical Assistant: Requires national certification or registration as a Medical Assistant, CMA, or RMA. One year experience in clinical service preferred. Experience in medical office or ambulatory care center which included drawing blood and clinical data collection preferred. #2975989 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS - On Call- P/T, Msla. PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS needed to provide personal care services for residents in assisted living facility. Training is available, and experience will earn you a higher hourly wage. DUTIES INCLUDE: Monitor medication and dispense times, monitor blood sugar levels, bathe, assist residents in and out of bed, daily living activities and other duties as needed. Work will be varied Days and Shifts with a shift differential for evening and night shifts work. There is also a great opportunity to get more hours. This position requires a preemployment drug screening. #2976012 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 REGISTERED NURSE - CASE MANAGEMENT- P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a half-time CASE MANAGEMENT REGISTERED NURSE to complete assessments & developing individual plans of care for clients under the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). Other duties include case management of assigned clients, assesses medical problems, engages client and family in decision making, acts as a patient advocate and other duties as contained in the full job description available at the Missoula Job Service. Employer requires a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in nursing and three years of professional nursing experience, plus two years of long-term care experience. This is a half-time position. This is a wage for this position is $19.00$21.16/hour depending on experience. Open until Wednesday, August 12, 2009. #2976003 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SALES Give Yourself A Raise P/T Hours-Long Term Skills. See if you too qualify at http://www.dailyinternetincome.net

OPPORTUNTIES

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 Barefoot deep tissue. Deep compression massage great for relieving neck, shoulder and back pain. 406-360-8746 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Herbals — Highland Winds Shop is at 1520 S. 7th St, Missoula. Open Saturdays. 541-7577. Healing Linseed Salve, Massage Oil, more. Also sold at Good Foods Store on 3rd. LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Professional in-home/on-location massage therapy. 18 years experience. Deep Swedish Massage, Sports Massage, and Therapeutic Aromatherapy Massage. Danielle Packard, CMT 2743221. Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Reiki Retreat Laser Reiki Cosmic Energetic Healing- 4 day seminar & retreat. October 1-4th, located in the beautiful Potomac Valley on 40 acres of pristine beauty. $375 includes workshop, lodging, and 1 meal/day. Limited space, reservation deadline 9/15. Call 549-0289 for more info or to schedule a Theta or Laser Reiki healing session. Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

Lost your grandmother's diamond ring?

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Shear Art Salon 1804 North Ave $5 OFF exp 8/13/09

For free confidential help after an abortion Call Word of Hope at

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Giclee Art - Highland Winds Inner Tulip; Giclee, photographic; signed, limited. 24x30. Mint. Artist Jason Kainz; Sale:$750. Highland Winds Shop, 1520 S. 7th St, Missoula. Open Saturdays. 541-7577

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COLLECTOR GUN AUCTION, Thursday, August 27, 2009, 2:00 pm. Location: Billings, MT Holiday Inn Convention Center,

ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

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FOR HIRE: Your very own 5-piece blues band. From your backyard get together to corporate blowouts. Horn section extra. Frank N. Furter 406-381-3629 Peavey Ecoustic Amps (2) Perfect for small venues! Amps feature 2 channels – 1 for guitar, one for microphone, builtin reverb & EQ, direct balanced ouput. Excellent condition, with original covers. $300 each or both for $550.00. 406-8824399.

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Thrift Stores 1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252 New Arrivals!

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30,000 BU. ELEVATOR IN PEERLESS. Front and rear pits, dry. Deeded land. Asking $9,000. Sale also includes salvage remains of four 20,000 bu. steel bins. Easily make two 10,000 bu. bins from remains. Nash Bros. 406-895-2607

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Antiques Living Estate Sale 2700 South Third WestNear Caras Nursery - Thursday thru Saturday, August 6th 7th & 8th, 9:00 a.m. Antiques, collectibles, sterling silver, vintage books, dolls, fishing, military, local art, braid rugs, hide-a-bed, washer/dryer, king-size bed, coffee tables, dressers, tools, Pendleton items and much more! Conducted by Stuff & Such Antiques, Philipsburg

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MARKETPLACE

CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

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Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

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HIKING, CAMPING BIKING & BOATING Buy/Sell/Trade

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25% off through OCT. 31 The Multi Item Store 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

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CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 126 & 168 . Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting August 17th, 2009 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to August 20t h, 2009, 4:00 P. M . Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

(intersection of Kensington & Bow)

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Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins)

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

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Open 10-6 Tuesday-Saturday

Missoula Independent Page 43 August 6–August 13, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT Dr. Dana Headapohl and Dr. Lawrence Martin requested a hearing before the Missoula City-County Board of Health regarding a Notice of Violation and Order to Take Corrective Action that the Department issued on May 12, 2009 and then amended after an Administrative Hearing on June 1, 2009. At issue are two buildings installed in the floodplain at 4740 South Ave West, constituting an increased use to a septic system in the floodplain in violation of the Missoula City-County Health Code, Regulation 1. The Department ordered the buildings to be removed or a septic system, in full compliance with the Health Code, to be installed to serve the buildings. The Board will hold the hearing on Thursday, August 20, 2009 at 1:00 p.m. or soon thereafter in the second floor conference room at the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. Public comment will be accepted by the Board at the hearing. More information is available on the web at www.co.missoula.mt.us/envhealth or at the Health Department. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF HEARING CREATING A SEELEY LAKE RESORT AREA DISTRICT The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on a proposal that the County place before the voters in the proposed resort area district on the November 3, 2009 ballot, the question of creating a Seeley Lake Resort Area District. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Public Meeting on August 12, 2009, at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by

e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Missoula County Election Office, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or by phone at 258-4911. DATED THIS 22nd DAY OF JULY, 2009 /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF HEARING- NEW OR EXPANDING INDUSTRY TAX BENEFITS APPLICATION FOR ROSEBURG FOREST PRODUCTS The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on an application from Roseburg Forest Products, for tax benefits for a new or expanding industry for Biofilter and RTO systems operations. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Weekly Public Meeting on Wednesday, August 26th, 2009, at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us. A copy of the application is available for inspection at the Commissioners Office. Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Dale Bickell, County Chief Administrative Officer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by phone at (406) 258-4229; or by e-mail at dbickell@co.missoula.mt.us DATED THIS 3rd DAY OF August, 2009. /s/ Bill Carey, Chair Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ANNEXATION TO MISSOULA

RURAL FIRE DISTRICT. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that a public hearing will be held on the 12th day of August, 2009 beginning at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, on a petition for annexation into the Missoula Rural Fire District for the following area: SUID : 714202. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: South East _ South West _ North East _ Section 08, Township 13 North, Range 21 West, Plat C Parcel XXX. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3100 Emma Gulch Trail, Missoula, MT 59804, Missoula County, MT. (For complete legal descriptions, see map on file in the Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 200 West Broadway, 2nd Floor.) AND THAT all interested persons should appear at the above mentioned time and place to be heard for or against said petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioner’s Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula, Montana 59802, prior to the hearing day. BY ORDER of the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer By Kim Cox, Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder/ Elections, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241. Date: July 22, 2009 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of Mount Jumbo Little League Parking Lot will be received by the Missoula County Auditor’s Office, Attn: Barbara Berens, on the second floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 until 9:00 AM local time on August 18, 2009 and then publicly opened and read aloud. The project consists of the construction of approximately 29,500 SF of grass paving for a parking area for Mount Jumbo Little League ball fields in the Missoula Development Park. The project includes an additive alternate which includes 14,000 SF of grass paving for the parking area. The contract documents consisting of

Sustainafieds

drawings, specifications, and bidding documents may be examined or obtained at the office of Professional Consultants, Inc., 3115 Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. The required deposit is $ 35.00 per set, which is non-refundable. In addition, the drawings and project manual may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. CONTRACTOR and any of the CONTRACTOR’S subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. CONTRACTOR is not required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project, but must have registered prior to execution of the Construction Agreement. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of Missoula County and the State of Montana. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula County, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a Labor and Materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Sealed bids shall be marked Missoula Development Park Mount Jumbo Little League Parking Lot. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 9:00 AM, local time, August 18, 2009. The right is reserved to reject any or all

proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the OWNER. The Contractor is required to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Board will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program on Thursday, August 20, 2009 at 12:15 p.m. or soon thereafter. The Board meets in the second floor conference room at the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The Air Board will consider proposed changes to Chapter 4 “Missoula County Air Stagnation and Emergency Episode Avoidance Plan”; Chapter 6 “Standards for Stationary Sources”; Chapter 9 “Solid Fuel Burning Devices”; and Chapter 14 “Enforcement and Administrative Procedures.” In April, the Department proposed changes to clarify administrative procedures and to address the health-based federal PM2.5 standard, which was lowered in the fall of 2006. Missoula is close to violating the standard, and the Department recommends the revisions to prevent Missoula from becoming a federal non-attainment area for PM2.5. The Air Board will take public comments at the hearing and again on September 17, 2009 before making a decision. Written comments may be submitted on or before September 9, 2009 by mailing them to Air Comments, MCCHD, 301 W Alder St., Missoula, MT 59802; faxing them to (406) 258-4781 or emailing them to aircomments@ho.missoula.mt.us. The Air Board intends to decide whether to amend the air regulations at their meeting on September 17, 2009. For more information, a copy of the proposed regulations or to sign up for the Interested Parties mailing list, visit www.co.missoula.mt.us/airquality or call 258-4755.

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-09-779 Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of David James Martinez, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from David James Martinez to David James Jordan. The hearing will be on August 13, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED: June 24, 2009. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By Amy M. Day, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-09-132 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BEVERLY JOYCE FELTON a/k/a B. JOYCE FELTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Daphne J. Felker and Darby J. Sharp have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 27th day of July, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, CHRISTIAN SAMSON & JONES, PLLC MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-09-719 NOTICE OF HEARING FOR PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN RE THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF ALGIS TOMAS CAPLENAS. ALGIS TOMAS CAPLENAS, Petitioner. NOTICE IS HEREBY given that a hearing on the Petition of Algis Tomas Caplenas for a change of name to Tommy Algis Caplenas will be held in the District Courthouse of Missoula County on the 27th day of August, 2009 at the hour of 9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard.

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-139 Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JEAN COMTE KING, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Michael R. King, Personal Representative, at 1063 Breckenridge Street, Helena, MT 59601 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 3rd day of August, 2009. /s/ Michael R. King, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Robert L. Deschamps III Dept. No. 2 Case No. DV-09-780. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Robert Allen Wandler, Petitioner. This is a notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Robert Allen Wandler to Robert Allen Barnhouse. The hearing will be on August 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County, Montana. /s/ Christopher W. Froines, Geiszler & Froines, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K., Missoula, MT 59803 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Trustee will on SEPTEMBER 10, 2009, at the hour of 11:00 o’clock A.M., at the front steps of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, the following described property: Lot 1 of Lolo Shopping Center, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. TOGETH-

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DATED this 23rd day of July, 2009. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Donna M. Duffy

For More Information Contact: John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group • Custom Portfolios 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A • Shareholder Advocacy Missoula, MT 59803 • Community Investing (406) 543-0708 • Screening johnfaust@pwfinancial.net Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

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Missoula Independent Page 44 August 6–August 13, 2009

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PUBLIC NOTICES ER WITH a nonexclusive easement as disclosed by Easement Agreement recorded February 10, 1987 in Book 254 of Micro Records, Page 1920. Said property is subject to a Montana Trust Indenture recorded December 4, 2008, under Document No. 200826679, records of Missoula County, Montana, from TONY M. CERASANI, a/k/a Anthony M. Cerasani, as GRANTOR, TITLE SERVICES, INC., as TRUSTEE, and KARL L. ROESCH, as to an undivided 50% interest, and JOHN S. COWAN TRUST, as to an undivided 50% interest, as BENEFICIARY. Christy L. Brandon is the Successor Trustee pursuant to an Appointment of Successor Trustee dated May 1, 2009, and duly record in the land records of Missoula County, Montana. Grantor’s default consists of failure to pay monthly payments from and after January 4, 2009 in the amount of $1,562.50 each and to comply with the terms of the Promissory Note and Trust Indenture. The total sum owing on this obligation is $125,000 principal balance plus accruing interest at the rate of 15% per year ($52.08 per diem) totaling $7,812.50 as of May 4, 2009, and $1,595.00 other fees and costs. The Beneficiary may disburse amounts as may be required to preserve the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, they will be added to the obligation secured by the Montana Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale. Beneficiary elects to declare all amounts under said Note and Trust Indenture to be immediately due and payable in consequence of the Grantor’s default. Beneficiary directs that Trustee sell the real property above described for the satisfaction of the obligation. This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed and will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances. The sale purchaser is entitled to possession of the property on the tenth day following the sale. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff,

reinstatement or any other circumstance that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damage. The Grantor or any person having a subordinate lien upon the subject property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due under the trust indenture and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. This sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED this 1st day of May, 2009. /s/ Christy L. Brandon, Successor Trustee, P.O. Box 1544, Bigfork, MT 59911, (406) 837-5445. THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/17/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200612400, Bk 775, Pg 363, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John M. Brazier III a married man as his sole and separate estate was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract A8-1 of Certificate of Survey No. 2534 located in the Southwest one-quarter of Section 10, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to E*Trade Bank. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the

Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 10, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $589,270.93. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $565,000.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 19, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may

also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.04078) 1002.125866-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/26/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200512952, Bk 753, Pg 896, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John H. Hill was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: The Southeast 7 feet of Lot 16, all of Lots 17 and 18 in Block K of C.P. Higgins Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 440 Page 2175 Micro Records. Parcel II: Lots 19 and 20 in Block K of C.P. Higgins Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 2, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $534,329.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $517,950.39, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale pro-

ceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 13, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03814) 1002.125062-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/04/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200508130, Bk 750, Pg 763, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marielle M. Kitch, a single woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Group One Lending was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as fol-

lows: Lots 2 and 3 in Block 7 of West Riverside Addition No. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 2, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $126,662.59. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $121,883.64, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 13, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than

such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03253) 1002.124997-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 3, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $707,837.61. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued inter-

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PUBLIC NOTICES est, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 13, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/02/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200421823, Bk 737, Pg 257, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John P. McDonald was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Home Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract D of Thibodeau and Poitras Tract Amending Block 1, a platted subdivision located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 2009006025, Bk 835, Pg 859, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 5, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $271,436.62. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $256,368.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 13, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.18626) 1002.125082-FEI

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200521653, Bk 758, Pg 830, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Domenic R. Sette, Jr. was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3, Block 3, of El Mar Estates Phase 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for Wells Fargo Home Equity Trust 2005-3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 19, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $187,605.35. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $180,613.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 27, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.04463) 1002.126531-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/03/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200610241, Bk 773, Pg 990 and re-recorded on 6/23/06 as Instrument No. 200615530, Bk 777, Pg 703, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Daniel Godinez, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Equifirst Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 20A of Daly’s Addition No. 2, Block 85, Lots 20A & 20B, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Structured Asset Securities Corporation Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, 2006EQ1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $118,389.64. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $110,760.14, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow

installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 16, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.10504) 1002.125552-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200731369, BK 809, Pg 1270, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kelly D. Price and Beverly B. Price, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Montana Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 21 and 22 in Block 14 of East Missoula Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County Montana, according to the official plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 15, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $177,125.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,073.22, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 23, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.04824) 1002.126366-FEI

Missoula Independent Page 46 August 6–August 13, 2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/07/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200805582, Bk 815, Pg 0157, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Micah Campbell McGhee and Kenneth Delos McGhee, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Assurity Financial Services, LLC was Beneficiary and United General Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded United General Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Certificate of Survey No. 93, located in the Southeast one-quarter of Section 23, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian Montana, Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 18, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $154,974.76. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $147,025.73, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 26, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.19874) 1002.126552-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 5, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: N1/2 SW1/4 NW1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DISCLOSED IN BOOK 107 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 69 ALSO TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DISCLOSED IN BOOK 661 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1388 Lyle L Brown and Anita Brown, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration .Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 24, 2007 and,recorded.on September 28, 2007 at 4:11, o’clock P.M., in Book 806, Page 847, under Document No 200725694. The beneficial interest is currently held by First Horizon Home Loans, A division of First Tennessee Bank. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded, in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by falling to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $5,002.52, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan.

The total amount due on this obligation as of June 12, 2009 is $647,733.78 principal, interest at the rate of 7.8750% now totaling $65,403.24, late charges in the amount of $2,120.85, escrow advances of $10,098,84, other fees and expenses advanced of $211.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $139.75 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-ie basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 26, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On May 26, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3205398 08/06/2009, 08/13/2009, 08/20/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 22, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: ALL THAT CERTAIN PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA AND STATE OF MONTANA AND BEING DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED 11-15-1993 AND RECORDED 11-24-1993 IN BOOK 398 ON PAGE 1584 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH ABOVE AND REFERENCED AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 70 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 2, COUNTRY HOMES ADDITION NO. 2; PARCEL ID NUMBER: 823782. Joseph B Halldorson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company of Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Wachovia Bank of Delaware, National Association, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust, dated May 21, 2002 and recorded June 3, 2002 as document number 200215696, BK 682, Pg 1992. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,178.76, beginning January 15, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 24, 2009 is $119,117.84 principal, interest at the rate of 8.5600% now totaling $5,271.50, late charges in the amount of $153.31, escrow advances of $-336.78, and other fees and expenses advanced of $7.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.94 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed

of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 15, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On May 15, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the, same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3191759 07/23/2009, 07/30/2009, 08/06/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 22, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 1 and 2 in Block 29 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Albert D Sharbono and Deanna M Sharbono, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Mark E Noennig, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 26, 2007 and recorded on February 1, 2007 in Book 791, page 716, under Document No 200702695. The beneficial interest is currently held by Saxon Mortgage Services Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,031.85, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 5, 2009 is $155,171.20 principal, interest at the rate of 7.5% now totaling $7,886.10, late charges in the amount of $412.72, escrow advances of $3,029.00, suspense balance of $-51.59 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,060.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.88 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the

deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 15, 2009 Charles J. Paterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On MAY 15, 2009, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 3/28/11 ASAP# 3191765 07/23/2009, 07/30/2009, 08/06/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 22, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The South 60 feet of Lots 9 and 10 in Block 22 of LOW’S ADDITION, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Travis R. Jakeway, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 31, 2005 and recorded September 9, 2005 at 4:12 o’clock P.M. in Book 759, Page 1334, as Document No. 200523727. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Loan Services, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $921.92, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 14, 2009 is $119,000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $6,097.90, late charges in the amount of $322.30, suspense balance of $-750.43 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,337.72, plus accruing interest at the rate of $21.49 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 15, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On May 15, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steokler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3191755 07/30/2009, 08/06/2009, 08/13/2009


RENTALS Missoula County Government

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, August 19, 2009, in Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by the Missoula Seventh Day Adventist Church for a Special Exception to build a new church building, as required by Resolution 76113, Section 2.10 (F). The subject property is located at 1100 Clements Rd., legally described as LOT 13 OF ROSELAND ORCHARD TRACTS NO 3 and it is zoned C-RR2 Residential. See map H.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request, you may contact Ana Aronofsky at the same number or by e-mail at opg@co.missoula.mt.us.

CLARK FORK STORAGE

PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

APARTMENTS 1957 8th: 1-bedroom, hook-ups, dishwasher, big storage, woodstove, parking, $565, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpm-mt.com

JONESIN’ HOUSES 1272 River St 3Bd/2Ba House $1200 garage, W/D, Dog? Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

619 E. Beckwith- 2BD/2BA. Available now! $1350/mo. Across from University. 1 car garage, fenced, W/D hookups. Missoula Property Management251-8500

Call PPM for all your rental needs

2 BR house. Westside. Nice and cozy but spacious. $850 per month. Jared 370-5911

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

COMMERCIAL

406-721-8990

4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990

Stuido Space for Rent Teranga Arts School. 1300 sq.ft. maple floors, mirrors with curtains. $15/ hour. Please call 7213854.

Dog Welcome: 911 Pullman, 2bdrm, storage, hook-ups, eating area, $675 GCPM 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

Lost your grandmother's diamond ring?

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 126 & 168 . Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting August 17th, 2009 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to August 20th, 2009, 4:00 P.M . Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Professional Property Management

6002 Hobson Lane- 3BD/2BA, $1695/mo. Available ~8/20. Newer house in Maloney Ranch, 3 car garage, W/D. Missoula Property Management- 2518500

CERETANA ARTISTS STUDIOS has artists studios NOT APARTMENTS for rent. No live ins! $85 + Utilities. 801 Sherwood St. 207-1210

Amazing 2nd floor office space for lease in award winning building. 1000 square feet with incredible views. $1260 per month. Call 728-0543

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com

GardenCity Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana!

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707 1bd Apt 113 Johnson $500/mo. 2 BD Apt 4355 Birdie Ct. $685/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $575/mo. 2 BD House 1250 3rd St $825/mo.

MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent! Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

1&2

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Post a lost & found notice for

free on

www.missoulanews.com

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

“Sausage Party”–can you find the missing link? by Matt Jones

MISSOULA

2804 Dublin St 3Bd/2Ba House $1300 fireplace, garage, W/D, deck Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

3320 Great Northern Apartments-Rent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 7218990

Beautiful new green lofts 2 bdrm, 2/12 bath, Elevator, intercom, w/d, energy efficient. 10’ ceilings, green finishes. 2 off street parking spaces, patio, rooftop deck. $1200/month, 1 year lease, $500 security deposit, w/g/s paid. Open house wed & fri 4-6. 721-5484

Expect the best from

C r o s s w o r d s

DOWN

AC ROSS 1 Want really bad 6 Stock-and-gelatin dish 11 Crematorium vessel 14 Fox News "Red Eye" contributor Alison 15 Khan who is "every woman" 16 Weddings page word 17 In any way 18 Less stale 19 Actor Shepard of "Idiocracy" 20 High-vitamin oil source 22 Part of a sign at a historical inn 24 "Dirty Sexy Money" star Peter 25 Less substantive 28 Bus. conference 29 Business biggies 32 "It's freezing out!" 35 Is talented in, with "for" 37 It may be made for dessert 39 Numskull 40 "___ tuned!" 41 Michelob beer variety 43 Charlemagne's realm, for short 44 "On the Road" author 45 A.M.A. members 48 Elevator creator Otis 50 Thin porridges 54 "Monty Python's Life of ___" 56 Kid who's lived in many states, perhaps 58 Stimpy's smarter half 59 Preface 62 Metamorphosis stage 63 Crazy way to go? 64 iPod varieties 65 Like boisterous crowds 66 Neither mate 67 Kofi Annan's home country 68 Word that can follow the ends of 20-, 35-, 41- and 56across

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

Last week’s solution

1 "___ Is Wack" (anti-drug slogan) 2 Helicopter part 3 Carne ___ grilled steak (Taco Bell option) 4 Paper from mammal skin 5 Take a recruiter's offer 6 Skin problem 7 He-Man's twin sister 8 Cat's foot 9 Eisenhower's nickname 10 Woozy from the ride 11 Sworn to tell the truth 12 Gather, as crops 13 Waiting room call 21 Be idle, with "out" 23 Panetta and Trotsky, for two 26 "There, there" follow-up 27 Tom Clancy protagonist Jack 30 Tar Heels' st. 31 Scottish terrier breed 32 "Space Ghost Coast to Coast" simpleton 33 Capital on the Tiber 34 He was a real Meathead on TV 35 Moonshine 36 Circle segment 38 "Kiss My Axe" fusion guitarist Al Di ___ 39 Financial degs. 42 Making a total mess of 45 Film studio that introduced Droopy 46 Prohibition-era rule 47 Outback manufacturer 49 Composer Copland 51 What computers repeat out loud while shooting sparks, in old sci-fi movies 52 Exudations from eruptions 53 One end of a maze 54 Antithesis of kids' cereal with cartoon mascots 55 Property taken back 57 Civil rights figure Parks 60 "Don't think so" 61 Strip club offering, for short ©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0426.

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 47 August 6–August 13, 2009


AUTOMOTIVE

SERVICES

DOMESTIC

VANS

2003 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, 4cyl, auto, 82,000 miles.....$5,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

2003 Kia Sedona van LX, V-6, auto, 53,000 miles.....$6,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

IMPORTS 1991 Jaguar XJ6, 115,000 miles, 4dr, sunroof.....$2,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com Your Key to Automotive Savings 1991 Subaru for parts 1991 Subaru Loyale parts $500. In good shape with new fuel pump? Please call 728-5194, Heather.

4X4 1985 Ford 1/2T 4x4 Only 130,000 on the original 300 Cleveland 6cyl. Has some leaks & needs a valve cover gasket. Body in ok shape. Interior good. $750 obo.

SPORT UTILITY 1999 GMC Yukon SLT, 117,000 miles, 4x4.....$6,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 2001 Hyundai Santa Fe SUV, FWD, 4cyl, auto, 4dr.....$4,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

For Sale: Short cab camper top. Good condition, brown. 5298125.

Northwest Homes “The Affordable Choice...”

NOTHING OVER

$7,995!

Here Are Just Some Of The Cars On Our Lot! '06 Chrysler PT Cruiser, 30,000 miles . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '06 Ford Taurus SE, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '05 Neon SXT, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '05 Ford Taurus, low miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 4dr, leather . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Buick Century, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport, auto, air . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Kia Sedona Minivan, Very Nice! . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Pontiac Grand Prix GT, 4dr, leather . . . . . . . . . .SOLD '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded! . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Mercury Sable GS, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mitsubishi Montero Sport LS, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD '02 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, auto, air . . . . .$5,995 '02 Mitsubishi Diamante, 4dr, loaded . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '02 Saturn, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge 1/2T, short, 2wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 01 Pontiac Grand Am, 2dr, 4cyl, 5spd . . . . . . . . . $5,995 '01 Dodge Grand Caravan, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Pontiac Grand AM, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 VW Jetta GLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Ford Escort, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4cyl, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 GMC Yukon, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Honda CVR, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD '99 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, loaded . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Toyota Camry, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Dodge 1500 Cargo Van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '98 Pontiac Transport Minivan, auto, air . . . . . . .$3,995 '98 Volvo Wagon XC, AWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '98 Ford Taurus 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD '97 Chevy Tahoe, 4dr, 1 owner, 2wd . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '97 Honda Accord LX, 4dr, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '96 Ford Explorer, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '96 Chevy S-10 Blazer, 4dr, 4x4, nice . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '96 Honda Civic EX, 4dr, auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '95 Chevy 1/2T 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, Concourse, loaded . . .$3,995 '94 Chevy Suburban, 3 seats, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '94 Ford F-150 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '94 Mercury Grand Marquis, 4dr, auto, air . . . . .$2,995 '94 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '93 Ford Explorer, 2dr, 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,495 '92 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,995 '92 Cadillac Sedan Deville, 4dr, auto . . . . . . . . . .$1,995 '92 Ford Explorer, 4dr, 5spd, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,495 '92 Buick Road Master, 350 V8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,995 '91 Lincoln Towncar, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,995

r De lte sign e Sh Your local s yurt company

Mark Hamilton 546-1837 NorthwestHomesMT.com

Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com Your Key to Automotive Savings 1986 Mercury Cougar Has a 1992 V6 engine with 100,000 miles. Very nice condition inside and out. Needs muffler repair. $760 obo

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Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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BUSINESS SERVICES Duet- Personal concierge DUET Personal concierge service FOR: Anniversary or birthday flowers and gifts (Gift wrapping additional) Grocery shopping Dry cleaning drop off or pick up General errands when you don’t have time Need help setting up for an event or party? “When a little help is music to your ears.” Call for pricing: - 381-3398

CARPENTRY Affinity Environmental is proud to offer affordable asbestos surveys for contractors and homeowners. Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

CLEANING

Rivera Works All-around Handyman & Home Improvement Services

Christian Rivera

529-8125

HOUSE CLEANING. Personal house cleaning service. Professional ~ High Quality. Confidential. One time or regular scheduled appointments available. References. $20/hour (some flat rates). (406) 546-7386

CONCRETE Improving Your

Outlook!

Saddle Mountain Construction Remodels & Additions Kitchens, baths, barns, & more Licensed General Contractor

880-6211

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251-3222

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JW Masonry & Stone Works Chimneys, Fireplaces, Custom Mantles and more using Cultured Stone, Natural Stone, Block or Brick. Licensed and Insured. Free Estimates. Jim Weaver C 207-6166 H 726-4651

HOME IMPROVEMENT Affordable asbestos surveying. Quick turnaround time. Design & clearance testing. DEQ accredited Inspectors. Affinity Environmental Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

FLOORING Ceramic Tile Ceramic Tile Setter- Reasonable rates, references. Showers, floors, etc. Ron542-2933.

INSPECTION Affinity Environmental offers asbestos, lead, and mold inspections. Call us for surveying & testing. Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

MISCELLANEOUS Getuwet Sprinklers Tired of dragging around a hose? Tired of brown spots on your lawn? Call Frank @ 406-218-8831 for a free estimate on a sprinkler installation. Saves time and money. I’m a licensed contractor

NEW ERA PLUMBING & HEATING Missoula's Alternative Plumber

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546-5541

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1216 S. 5th W. $209,900 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1333 Toole #C-13 $120,000 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500/up. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House M-F 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

$210,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

& Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

3 Bed / 2 Bath in Potomac area on 10 acres. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. $264, 900. MLS# 902389. Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12592 for pics

4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $424,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy1 to 74362, or visit...

35 acres in 3 tracts, creek frontage, springs, access to several cabin sites, remote, off the grid in the Garnet mountains 75 miles east of Missoula, $120,000. More lots available from $27,500 to $45,000. Montana International Realty 406-883-6700

20 acres in Blackfoot Valley. Beautiful fenced pasture land, great recreation area, trees and seasonal stream. $149,900. MLS#905366. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12589 for pics

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting.

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin

www.mindypalmer.com

4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $424,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy1 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Missoula Independent Page 48 August 6–August 13, 2009

5 bdrm, 2 baths, centrally located with hardwood floors, large yard, garage & 2 fireplaces. $265,000 MLS 809246 Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12596 for pics 900 & 902 LONGSTAFF. New and updated. Both 2 bedroom houses for one price. $349,900. 543-8873 921 S 4th St W. $239,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 A Career in Real Estate with Access Realty, we offer training, great commission split and support. 406-5443098 www.AccessRealty.net Beautiful home with large rooms. 3 bed/3 bath/2 Car Attached Garage. Large fenced yard with mature trees, bushes and UG sprinklers. $339,900. MLS 905462. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED WINDSOR PARK HOME. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, hardwood floors, fenced yard, unfinished basement, and more. $210,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy7 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Classic U-area home 3 bd plus 2 bd in basement apt., hardwood floors, 1940’s character, garden, fireplace. $380,000. 308 North Ave. E. Call John at 5469402.

more. $234,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GREAT DOWTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $349,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

GORGEOUS LOLO AREA HOME. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, crown moldings, decks and patios, and much

New home in Riverwalk Estates with no steps and easy maintenance, 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6549 Kiki Court, Missoula. $339,500.

www.mindypalmer.com

MLS#808566. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net One block to the U!! Gardens, arbors, fruit trees and more. 4 bed/2 bath. 737 Evans, Missoula. $399,870. MLS#902594. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689


REAL ESTATE Quaint home on 2 lush lots with apples, grapes, currants, raspberries, cherries, and flowers. 2 bed/1 bath. 1852 8th West St., Missoula. $179,900. MLS#904867. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 UNIVERSITY DISTRICT 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, off-street parking, hardwood floors, fenced yard, built-ins, fireplace, and more. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Beautifully updated, great floor plan, mountain and valley views. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362, or visit...

Lorin & Amy

The Realtor® who speaks your language.

Peterson

a father daughter team

Ask me about the $8000 first time homebuyer credit!

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223

www.mindypalmer.com

Upper West Rattlesnake 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Fully remodeled bath & kitchen. Large fenced yard. $324,000. 531-5582 Lara@lambros.com Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185. www.AccessRealty.net

Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE! 

Turn key cabin in the Garnet Mountains, 24.49 acres, off the grid, gated access, spring water, new propane appliances, 9 miles south of Helmville. $140,000. Montana International Realty 406883-6700

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406721-1444; 800-999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

4617 Bordeaux Blvd Sweet 3 Bedroom mls# 904072

370.7689

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

370.7689

Buying or selling a home

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

is one of the most important decisions of your life

& I take pride in providing a positive, professional experience.

1379 Quiet Pines Missoula, MT MLS# 902424 $115,000 Awesome 1 acre lot located minutes from Missoula, the Blackfoot River, Canyon River golf course and hiking trails! Beautiful mature Ponderosa Pines scattered throughout this wonderful property. Beautiful homes neighbor this lot, in this quiet little culde-sac. Utilities are in, and includes well and septic approval, gas, electric and phone. Bring your builders.

Anna Nooney WHS, CNE, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com www.BuyInMissoula.com

Grant Creek Log home on 26+ private acres $525,000 Borders Lolo National Forest. Ski out your back door, drive 10 minutes to Snowbowl Ski area, or take a hike in 3 different directions in the summer! Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula!The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! www.11815benchrd.com

LET US HELP YOU PURSUE YOUR MONTANA DREAM. 11307 Melody Lane Big Flat area 4 bedroom, 3 and one half bath home on more than an acre, end of road very private. Open floor plan. ONLY $575,000

Price Reduced $100,000 Nine Mile Creek Frontage 2300 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 10 acres with barn. Possible split. A BARGIN AT $270,000

2424 Burlington Totally Remodeled Home New Kitchen, roof, furnace, air conditioning, and rock. End of road privacy w/ shop, newly landscaped, a must see! ONLY $209,900

Price Reduced O'Brien Creek 2350 Clydesdale One Owner Like New 3bdrm, 2bth home, 24x42 RV Garage plus triple car garage on 2.5 acres. ONLY $399,900

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

2 Bath home in the Canyon Creek Village. Built in 2003 this home has a wonderful floor plan with Master Bedroom on the main floor and an additional 2 bedrooms on the upper level. Charming covered front porch for enjoying the summer evenings. Home has been very well maintained and is priced to sell quickly. Home qualifies for many programs - human resource silent 2nd,RD, FHA. For a private showing or more information please call Mary Marry 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Nice newer 3 bedroom 2 full bath home on the North side. Very Close to bike/walking path. FOR RENT 908 Defoe Approximately 1,100 Sq. Ft. built in 2005. Includes all appliances and washer/dryer. Small unfenced yard. $1,050 a month. Year lease.

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Mike Wamsley :: Broker/Owner 501 Brooks Missoula 406-721-0620 :: 360-6362 www.wamsleyrealty.com

Joy Earls Riverwalk Estates Close to town, river, and golfing.

Check my website for more info & listings.

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Priscilla Brockmeyer

www.missoulanews.com

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

www.LorinAndAmy.com

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $249,999. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy5 to 74362, or visit...

Two 5 acre parcels

Finished Home • 6549 Kiki Court Move in ready, easy living. MLS#808566 • $339,500

New Home/Land Package 6605 West Kiki Court Joy Earls 531-9811 MLS#903596 • Starting at $299,970

joyearls.mywindermere.com

RICE TEAM

Real estate opportunities Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com • Cute two bedroom mobile • 4 beatiful acres, great for horse • Large double detached garage • Plenty of room for toys and animals • $186,000 • MLS#905771 Text:44133 Message: 12884 for pics

• 28x26 Liberty Meadow Brook • 2 mobile rental spots $175 each • 1 bed/1 bath apt. $400 • 1 Bedroom House $500 • $299,900 • MLS#903836 Text:44133 Message: 12882 for pics

• 3 Bed / 2 Bath on 3 Acres • Bitterroot home with great views • Low maintenance vinyl siding • Large double car garage • $249,000• MLS# 902482 Text:44133 Message: 12890 for pics

• Wishard View lots (20+acres) • Meadows & Trees near Potomac • One has a pole barn • Plenty of room for horses or cows • $159,000-$189,900 MLS# 900454 Text:44133 Message: 12888 for pics

are ripe for Polson and Flathead Lake, Montana's Jewel! The market adjusted to mean more affordability. Inventory by class & in every price range is plentiful. If you've been on the fence, jump in!... Smell the roses and pick the cherries!

Savoir Faire Properties..." to know." 109 3rd Ave E, across from WF Credit Union • 883-3346 Missoula Independent Page 49 August 6–August 13, 2009


REAL ESTATE 5 Bedroom Home • 1 Bedroom Apartment MLS# 904336 • $295,000 • www.2626oshaughnesy.com

This 5 bedroom home on corner lot with a fenced yard and a full finished basement features a separate one bedroom apartment that rents for $625/month. That equals LOW House Payments! Sellers offering $3000 for closing costs

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 544.3098 www.AccessRealty.net 1 3 9 7 0 S a p p h i r e D r. L o l o $274,900 • MLS 905480

Incredible 4 bed/3 bath home with 2 car garage and outstanding master suite that could also be used as a Mother-in-law apartment. Sweeping mountain & valley views. New carpet, radiant heat, skylights, over 2000 sf home on 1.66 acres and much more.

Call Pat for a tour today.

First Time Homebuyer Tax Credit Webinar! When:

Where:

Thursday, August 6th from 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Log in at www.greatermontana.blogspot.com

What:

More Info:

Learn how to take advantage of the $8000 first time homebuyer tax credit!

Sheri Jones, Broker/Owner • 406-369-1047 Sheri@GreaterMontanaRE.com

For all your home mortgage needs call

Leslie Largay leslie@landlmortgage.com

360-2906 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

Missoula Independent Page 50 August 6–August 13, 2009

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

#228,230


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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 51 August 6–August 13, 2009



Missoula Independent