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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 29 • July 16–July 23, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Montana’s Firearms Freedom Act “goes viral” Ochenski: Losing patience with Dems across the board Scope: Cast of characters brings Best Bar to big screen


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 29 • July 16–July 23, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Montana’s Firearms Freedom Act “goes viral” Ochenski: Losing patience with Dems across the board Scope: Cast of characters brings Best Bar to big screen


Missoula Independent

Page 2 July 16–July 23, 2009


nside Cover Story The West has tremendous cultural tolerance for experimenters. Westerners are ready and willing to try new ideas that are sometimes a little crazy, and we are energetic about shooting off in new directions—not hampered by musty, cobwebbed, traditional thinking, the way New Cover illustrated by Kou Moua England and the Midwest and the South can sometimes seem. So let’s honor this Western trait—and make good use of it. Here’s a small sampling of the many Westerners who are shaking up things right now. ......................................................................................................................14

News Letters More All Huey, all the time ..............................................................................4 The Week in Review Wolves, runners and new bike lanes ........................................6 Briefs Mitchell Slough, secondhand ammo and dead sheep ......................................6 Etc. NCAA sets a meeting for Griz playoff decision .....................................................7 Up Front Montana’s Firearms Freedom Act goes “viral” .............................................8 Up Front Open Space Bond protects 752 acres near Frenchtown .............................9 Ochenski Losing patience with Democrats across the board ...................................10 Writers on the Range How a small Montana town resembles Facebook ................11 Agenda Hunting down Bicycle Benefits.....................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Sizing up squash blossoms ............................................................20 8 Days a Week Thinking up some new ideas............................................................21 Mountain High Breathe deep, summer enthusiasts .................................................27 Scope Cast of characters create bold Best Bar in America .......................................30 Soundcheck An idiot’s guide to the coral, er, Choral Festival..................................31 Books Grandmother’s secret reveals tangled family tree ..........................................32 Film Harry Potter’s not a little kid any more.............................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films....................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk ....................................................................................................................4 In Other News............................................................................................................13 Independent Personals.............................................................................................35 The Advice Goddess..................................................................................................35 Free Will Astrolog y ...................................................................................................36 Classifieds...................................................................................................................37 Crossword Puzzle......................................................................................................41 This Modern World ...................................................................................................46

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder INTERIM CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olsen STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill EDITORIAL INTERN Megan Gyermek ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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- The Emerald Casino Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

A classy and secluded gambling facility with a professional staff, featuring the all new I-Rewards Cash For Play System!

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The perfect stop before heading to the lake or a party!

4951 N. Reserve Street Just south of the I-90 Reserve St. Exit 830-3210 www.seankellys.com Missoula Independent

Page 3 July 16–July 23, 2009


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Asked Tuesday afternoon in front of Break Espresso in downtown Missoula.

Q:

by Chad Harder

This week the Indy’s feature story looks into some of the important inventions coming out of the West. What new-ish gizmo do you find most valuable? Follow-up: What inventions are you still waiting for?

Mic Smith: Well, the cell phone is obvious, but probably coffee grinders. I love coffee, and if I didn’t have a grinder I’d have to go find coffee at a store—like I just did right now. Hired help: I could say faster travel, but I really like traveling and don’t really need to speed it up. So probably something that would cook for you, and have your food ready for you when you get home.

Diana Davison: I’d have to say my single vision contact lenses, because they allow me to not have to wear my glasses anymore. No sweat: A machine that would run for me, but would allow me to get all the exercise and all the benefits of the workout. That way I wouldn’t have to spend the time running.

Huey the everyman

Huey the anti-celebrity

This is a letter in support of Huey Lewis for those of you that don’t know the man personally (see “Deep cut,” June 18, 2009). I have been good friends with Huey and his wife Sidney and their children for the past 17 years. Huey is a kind, caring man who has helped this valley in many ways. He donated to the 911 Center, the Corvallis School Needy Program, Victor School and many, many others. He has been called the rich guy from California, but what does that matter? He seems to share his good luck and talent with everyone. I went to New York with my daughter, granddaughter and two friends last year to see Huey in Chicago. Huey treated us as if we were the celebrities while we were there. He arranged for us to have third row center seats, which were fantastic. He wanted his cast to meet his “Montana friends.” I have taken care of the family’s horses over the past 17 years, as well as pasturing some of my horses on his ranch, and have never heard a harsh or negative word from Huey. He always asks my opinion on what’s best for the horses. If you know Huey personally, you’d know what a wonderful person he is, as well as his family. He has never treated me differently because he is a celebrity. He just wants to be a Montana neighbor and friend and have some privacy. Linda Olbert Victor

With all the negative hearsay people have been spreading about Huey Lewis, I have decided to say a few positive things that I know to be fact. Huey is a nice, down-to-earth person who no one would know as a “celebrity” if they didn’t know otherwise. He treats people with respect if they so deserve and he has been very generous to many people in this valley. How do I know this to be fact? I know Huey personally. Come on, everyone, there is enough negativity going around. Unless we know all the facts, let’s be nice. Autumn Evanoff Hamilton

Huey the dad

Brooklyn Walter: It’d have to be a food processor, or blender. Being able to puree anything is pretty awesome. No, wait! A vaporizer. It made me want to quit smoking pot. It just gives you too much in one hit. Beam me up: I’m still wanting in on the teleporter thing. I moved here from the coast and I just gotta get my friends on that thing so they can come out to Montana.

Miky Tupek: It’d have to be something related to music, but I don’t want to say iPods. I’m not saying that it totally changed my life, but they really opened me up to a lot of things musically. Dreamweaver: I’d want something that records dreams and plays them back to you when you’re awake so you can see what you saw. It’s a little scary, but I’d really want to see it.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 July 16–July 23, 2009

I have known Huey Lewis since he moved to the Bitterroot Valley. I had the pleasure and privilege of teaching both of his children and watching them grow into the amazing adults they are today. I know him as a kind, down-to-earth human being that cares more about his surroundings and those around him than anything else. He is not some “Hollywood hot shot.” He is a decent, devoted “Dad”. I know him as the “soccer dad,” the guy who would pick his kids up from school. The dad who truly cared about his children’s education and helped them or the school in any way he could. Once you are in the public eye, as he has been for 30 years, people forget that you have a human side. Yes, he has a very special musical talent to share with all of us, but let’s not forget that he is first and foremost a person just like you and me with a family that chose to live and enjoy a quiet, peaceful life in the Bitterroot. Caron Reinke Corvallis

I have been “with him when fishermen have stood in the Mitchell Ditch and cussed him out and called him every dirty name they could think of for putting up ‘No Trespassing’

signs.

Huey the neighbor Huey Lewis is a property owner who deserves privacy and respect. Huey has invested his own money into a beautiful piece of real estate that most people are hard-pressed to find in today’s market. When Huey purchased the property, Mitchell Slough was represented as a private waterway and in turn was improved for the benefit of the fish and wildlife—not public access. What a wonderful person to care enough about the local wildlife (or lack thereof ) and attempt to improve it. Huey is and will always be a wonderful friend, neighbor and asset to the Bitterroot Valley. Criticizing Huey’s actions on his own private property is unnecessary, so let us simply thank him for the habitat he has created for the fish and wildlife. We all should be

so lucky to have someone like Huey living next door to us. Robert and JoyceAnne Jodsaas Stevensville

Huey the boss I am Albert Douglas, and I came to be a caretaker for Huey’s Wildlife Ranch in 1992. I told him in our first interview that I work as though working for the Lord, and whatever I do, I do it with all my might; if that is not good enough, I’ll be on my way. I have worked for a number of different employers after I left home in my teens before I came to Valley Springs Ranch and none of them have been as nice, generous, easy to work for and appreciative as Huey Lewis has been! I have been with him when fishermen have stood in the Mitchell Ditch and cussed him out and called him every dirty name they could think of for putting up “No Trespassing” signs. He just stood there patiently and didn’t reply in a like manner. I marveled at his coolness. I know he has spent well over $50,000–$60,000 having large excavators clean out mud bars, narrow the channel and line it with gravel to make it good spawning grounds and plant trees for shade on the log pools he has put in for the brown trout. Some of the fishermen have commented, “This is sure a lot better fishing than it used to be!” I wonder why! He has allowed me to use his time and equipment to grade neighborhood roads, mow pastures and roadsides, and spray weeds for the neighbors. You will not find a more conservationminded or thoughtful and generous man in the Bitterroot Valley than Huey Lewis! The 17 years I have spent working for this man have been some of the best of my life. Thanks Huey. Albert Douglas Stevensville Corrections: Last week’s 96-page Best of Missoula issue included a few mistakes. The names of Michael Gallacher, runner-up in the Best Photographer category, and Tim Huffman, owner of Best Video Rental winner Crystal Video, were misspelled. Kettlehouse Brewery, winner of Best Microbrewery, should have been listed on Myrtle Street. And Pipestone Mountaineering, winner of Best Store for Mountaineering Gear, sells items by Black Diamond (not Black Mountain) and Arc’teryx (not whatever the heck we spelled). The Indy regrets the errors.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 KELLER

Yes, it's obvious that he's old, thin, and blind, but what doesn't show so easily is that he is also very sweet and well behaved. He'd love to be some elderly person's lap dog and companion, so that he could spend the rest of his life in a loving home.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

549-3934 We don't know much about Lucky except that her owners left her behind when they moved. A neighbor found her and brought her to us. She is an older Cocker Spaniel, who holds no grudges. She loves people, and just wants someone to hang out with.

ANNA

Just because you can't guess her breeds by looking at her, doesn't mean Anna isn't a fabulous dog! In fact she is quite special, her behavior gives you the most clues. She is super smart, she loves to swim, play, and herd! Any ideas?

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD Located in Stephens Center, behind Holiday Village

SPENCER

Spencer is sporting a snazzy lion cut as a summer hairdo, but his luxurious coat will be back in time for cooler weather. This Spaniel/Aussie X is a great size for a family dog, and we think he has the most expressive eyes we've seen in a while!

LUCKY

GIMLI

He's named after a character in "The Lord of the Rings" because he does indeed look like a dwarf, and he has the same feisty personality as the literary Gimli. Crossing a Basset Hound with a Rottweiler does produce interesting results.

PAT R I C K

Patrick was just a youngster when he was adopted last year, but now he's grown up to be a big, handsome fellow. His human mom developed allergies, so now he's back at the shelter to try to find the truly perfect home.

J . T.

This week has been a bit sad for J.T. You see his longtime companion got adopted without him, and now he feels a bit lonely without her. Even though he is happy she went to a wonderful home, he wants it to be his turn. J.T is a perfect older gentleman who loves people and other dogs.

MR. PRINGLES

Unfortunately it can sometimes be tough for us to find homes for our older cats. Mr. Pringles has quite a bit to say about that! I'm not kidding, he can be pretty convincing. He argues better than any lawyer I've ever met; I challenge you to try to turn him down!

2420 W Broadway 2810 Brooks 3075 N Reserve

Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time

6149 Mullan Rd Clark Fork River Market

GINGER

Ginger has the coloring of a flame point Siamese, but her long, luxurious coat came from somewhere else. This blue-eyed beauty would certainly like to be somewhere else right now; she's really tired of living in a cage!

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DOMINIC

Practically every visitor to our cat room notices big (very big!), good-looking Dominic, but no one has decided to take him home. He's a gentle, mellow guy who gets along with everyone, so we know he'd be something close to a perfect pet!

MAGGIE

I'm sure by now, you all have heard how much Maggie loves hanging out with the doggies. So much so, that she has gone to a foster home, Showcase Grooming! Now you and the rest of your canine family can meet her there. I think she will try to wiggle her way right into the dog carrier and into your home.

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 517 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street

IZZY

Izzy was just recently upgraded to longest resident status. Lucky for her 'adopt a shelter cat' month has been extended here at the Humane Society. For just $35 you can give someone like Izzy that second chance that she has so patiently earned. Loubelle Wissler 240-0753 KC Hart 240-9332 fidelitykc@montana.com

721-1840

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

www.missoulahomes.com “A Team of Professionals Making It Easy for You!” Please Support our Humane Society

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals

721-4710 SPOT

He fought for life as long as he could. Spot kept vigil by his side and gave all the comfort she could to her very sick guardian. He was put in a hospital, never to return, and the kitty worried about where her friend had gone. Unable to find homes for this faithful companion, the family turned to AniMeals for help.

MADONNA

The old man died peacefully in his sleep. His family was not able to keep his faithful companion, who was just as old as he was. It was the only home she ever knew and her loss has been traumatic. Fearful that she will be passed over while hundreds of little kittens get adopted, she is hoping for a guardian angel that will cherish her just like the old man did for so many years.

FOXY

The house was filled with garbage stacked to the ceiling. Narrow pathways between dirty dishes and rotten food led from room to room. Her owner was a hoarder and couldn't throw anything away. The cat had just been another thing the old lady collected. Foxy came to us reeking of the trash-filled home she'd been living in, the smell clinging to her fur.

FA N C Y

She was dumped high up on a mountain in the dead of winter. Fancy made her way back to civilization through waist deep snow, how she did it will forever remain a mystery. When the manager of a ski resort found her she was skin and bones. Her benefactor wanted her to be the official office cat, but soon realized he could not overcome his allergies. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609 Missoula Independent

Page 5 July 16–July 23, 2009


Inside

WEEK IN REVIEW

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, July 8

News Quirks by Chad Harder

The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission unanimously agrees to a 75-wolf quota for the state’s first wolf hunting season, which will begin this fall. Carolyn Sime, the state’s wolf coordinator, says recent population growth suggests the quota could be set much higher.

• Thursday, July 9 Leslie Stehr, a former First National Bank employee, pleads guilty to federal embezzlement charges and tax evasion after she stole more than $800,000 from the Missoula bank between 1999 and 2008. Stehr, 45, faces up to 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

• Friday, July 10 Missoulians wake up to new bike lanes on Higgins Avenue downtown. Workers repave and repaint the road over the course of just two nights to complete the project. The bike lanes are one of three road upgrades already completed this summer, says Doug Moeller, district administrator for the Montana Department of Transportation.

• Saturday, July 11 The Montana State Highway Patrol parks its lone Mobile Impaired Driver Assessment Center (MIDAC)—an imposing black trailer equipped to process and detain drunk drivers—at the weigh station on Highway 200 east of Bonner, targeting partiers along the Blackfoot River. Troopers nab “two or three” river revelers, says Sgt. Shane Grimes.

• Sunday, July 12 Cooler weather sets the stage for record-breaking times at the third annual Missoula Marathon and Half Marathon. Kiefer Hahn and Annie Thiessen win the men and women’s marathons, respectively. About 2,400 participants register for the two races, with 659 competing in the full marathon.

• Monday, July 13 The Missoula City Council approves the Rattlesnake Valley Sewer Project, extending the city’s sewer line up the valley. Rattlesnake property owners will pay $2 million of the $4 million for the special improvement district. The council approves the resolution 11-0 with Renee Mitchell abstaining.

• Tuesday, July 14 Tim Blixseth, co-founder of the Yellowstone Club, accuses his ex-wife and her attorney of destroying or concealing evidence related to her bankruptcy case. According to the Associated Press, Edra Blixseth’s attorney, Gary Deschenes, motions to drop the case before eventually pledging to continue representing his client. Deschenes denies any wrongdoing.

A mature billy with a broken horn splashes through the soggy bottoms beneath Bearhat Mountain in Glacier National Park. Technically not a true goat, mountain goats are more closely related to cattle and antelope. They live in rugged alpine areas in an effort to avoid predators.

Weeds

Sheep on the march Missoula sheep rancher John Stahl stops on the southern flank of Mt. Jumbo and points down at the ground. “This is what I want you to notice,” he says, singling out leafy spurge stalks, eaten bare by sheep before the weeds could go to seed and propagate. “The weeds aren’t dead, but they won’t spread.” And now, insects are able to kill them, he explains. On this soggy and gray July morning, Stahl, 52, is on his way to the top of Mt. Jumbo to help herd his flock of 500-plus sheep down the mountain, across the Rattlesnake Valley, and up into Missoula’s North Hills. There, the sheep will continue their summer-long feast on leafy spurge, knap weed, toadflax and sulfur cinquefoil, the unruly noxious weeds that have taken root in large swaths of public lands surrounding Missoula. “They’ve done a great job this year,” Stahl says. “The expected trouble didn’t happen. Something happened to them. They disappeared.”

Stahl’s referring to coyotes. Last summer, the predators killed 36 lambs, which cost Stahl more than $3,000. So far this year, only a few have died, but none are the victims of coyotes. Stahl thinks wolves might have followed elk onto Mt. Jumbo and taken out the competition. Mike Thompson of Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks says he doesn’t know what to make of so many fewer sheep kills. “Certainly there are wolves in this country,” he says, “but it could be any number of possible explanations.” Near the top of Mt. Jumbo, Morgan Valliant, the city’s conservation lands manager, has a more immediate issue. He’s instructing a group of Parks and Rec staffers and University of Montana researchers on how, and where, to shepherd the flock. If any sheep start to wander, he suggests the volunteers holler, clap or throw a rock. “They’ve done a super good job this year,” Valliant says as he navigates the slippery rocks and grass to the left of the flock. “This is the best I’ve seen.” For Stahl, perhaps they’ve done too good of a job. The sheep rancher says the flock’s effective to the point that he needs to bring

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Cheri

(R) Nightly at 7 & 9 Sunday at 1 & 3

Moon

Nightly at 9 Sunday at 3

www.thewilma.com Missoula Independent

Page 6 July 16–July 23, 2009

Why didn’t two sue? Since the Missoula City Council took up the rewrite of the city’s zoning ordinance, five minority members have persistently argued that the public process surrounding the document doesn’t comply with state law. Yet when the minority took their objections to the courts on July 10, only three members— Lyn Hellegaard, Dick Haines and Renee Mitchell—signed the lawsuit. What happened to the other two members of the minority, Jon Wilkins and John Hendrickson? Wilkins, who lives on a fixed income, says his finances kept him from participating in the lawsuit. Plus, he wanted to wait and see how the deliberations played out in the Plat, Annexation and Zoning Committee.

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Zoning

Japanese Maples & Ginkgos

Times Run 7/17- 7/23

Nightly at 7 Sunday at 1

fewer to these hills each summer, with shortened stints. That means he gets paid less. “It’s a good thing,” he says, “but it’s a hard thing for me…when the economics start going to hell on you.” Matthew Frank

Herbs & veggies on sale too

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It makes no difference if I burn my bridges behind me - I never retreat. ~ Fiorello LaGuardia

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

“If we didn’t get the hot subjects that needed to be fixed, then I would have been for the lawsuit,” he says. Hendrickson declined to provide an explanation to the Independent, but used the comment portion of council’s July 13 meeting to remind everyone that he had formally asked the Committee of the Whole to hire an outside attorney to review City Attorney Jim Nugent’s legal opinion of the document. Nugent says the document is a rewrite, not a rezone, and not subject to the stricter state zoning regulations. Council President Ed Childers didn’t put Hendrickson’s item on the committee’s agenda. “This all could have been alleviated if [the item] was allowed [on the agenda],” Hendrickson said at the meeting. “I guess my colleagues felt that you left them no option.” The three minority members who filed the lawsuit want a writ of mandate, which would prohibit the city from approving the zoning rewrite until the legal questions are settled in court. The writ would also order the city to “provide due process and public notice and participation prior to modifying zoning regulations.” Lastly, the writ requests attorneys’ fees for the petitioners. Wilkins says that he supports his colleagues in spirit, but wishes they could have waited. “I wanted to see if the hot points could be ironed out,” he says. “But now you have it where the sides won’t talk to each other anymore.” Jesse Froehling

Guns

Shooting blanks The Ravalli County Sheriff ’s Department put a deputy on leave last week in connection to the theft of an undisclosed but substantial cache of ammunition from a secure county facility. State investigators continue to comb local shops hoping to reclaim the stolen material. The theft raises interesting questions about a chaotic ammunition market. Retailers are suffering from a nationwide shortage, local manufacturers are backordered six to eight months, and September’s hunting season is not far off. Arlyn Greydanus, lead investigator with the Montana Division of Criminal Investigation, says the .223- and .40-calibers

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

stolen in Ravalli County are particularly hot right now. “Everyone’s a little bit scared out there—scared they won’t be able to shoot, scared they won’t be able to protect their home and family,” says Nick Schiele, production manager at the Hunting Shack in Stevensville. Despite that fear, Schiele says the market for pre-owned ammunition remains “very, very small.” Several stores in the Bitterroot Valley say they do purchase unused cartridges from private individuals, but only on

occasion. It’s risky, Schiele says, as there’s no foolproof way to detect tampering. “A lot of people don’t want to buy something that other people have had already,” Schiele says. “They don’t want to take the risk of possibly selling ammunition that’s been messed with.” Investigators seized portions of the ammo in June from the Bitterroot Trading Post and Buhlgarts Guns and Camo, both of which say they don’t normally buy preowned ammo from private individuals. Faver Buhler of Buhlgarts and Bitterroot Trading Post owner Bill Neustrom both said they knew the seller in question. What small niche exists for flipping ammo in Ravalli County is lucrative. Schiele says remanufactured rifle and handgun ammunition–like that supplied to the Ravalli County Sheriff ’s Office by Bitterroot Valley Ammunition and Components in Florence–is valued between $180 and $240 per thousand rounds. Schiele says someone pawning large amounts of unused ammunition should have

Agenda

News Quirks

raised suspicions among retailers. Personally, he says the Hunting Shack would–and did–shy away from such dealings. Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

12

Greenpeace activists arrested on Mount Rushmore July 8 for draping a banner next to Abraham Lincoln’s face criticizing President Barack Obama’s approach to global warming. One activist, Helena native Brian Jenkins, graduated from the University of Montana in 2007.

etc.

Mitchell Slough

Picking portage routes In 2003, the Bitterroot River Protection Association (BRPA) asked the Bitterroot Conservation District to grant two portage routes to the Mitchell Slough. Now, six years and mountains of attorneys’ fees later, the BRPA may finally get them. When the BRPA made its initial request, the conservation district punted and left the decision to the Ravalli County Commission. However, later that fall, the district decided that the Mitchell Slough was a humanmade ditch, and not a natural, perennially flowing stream with guaranteed public access. That decision created a legal quagmire. In January 2004, the county commissioners called lawyers from the BRPA and lawyers representing area landowners, and got them to agree to an order to stay the decision until the slough’s prickly legal status could be resolved. Last November, the Montana Supreme Court finally decided that the Mitchell Slough was a natural, perennially flowing stream with guaranteed public access, once and for all. On July 13, Michael Howell, a member of the BRPA, filed a new request with the Ravalli County Commissioners to grant three portage routes to the Mitchell Slough. The routes include one through musician Huey Lewis’ land at Bell Crossing, one through businessman Ken Siebel’s land at Victor Crossing, and one through the slough’s headwaters at Tucker Headgate. Howell says that a portage route would be to the landowners’ benefit. “Right now, there is a right of portage without a route,” Howell says. “You can choose any way you want. With a portage route, once it’s established, that’s what you have to take.” Ravalli County Commissioner Jim Rokosch says that if the BRPA and the landowners can’t agree on portage routes, the issue will be sent to a three-person arbitration panel. If somebody disagrees with the arbitration panel, Rokosch says the issue could return to district court. “This could go on,” says Rokosch, “for a while.” Jesse Froehling

It’s not over until the fat lady sings. Play through to the final whistle. It ain’t over ’til it’s over. Pick any sports cliché you want, but know this—the University of Montana’s fight with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is far from over. To rehash, the NCAA announced in late spring it would ban Montana from hosting postseason football games unless the state reexamined gambling laws that allow betting in sports fantasy games. The complaint, which stemmed from Delaware’s much more egregious sports betting policy, threatens to nix especially lucrative tailgating weekends at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. The University of Montana has regularly hosted postseason games for almost a decade, each of which brings in millions to the local economy. The back-and-forth lasted a couple weeks before the NCAA, having defended its position, simply stopped talking. Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock sent a letter to NCAA General Counsel Elsa Kircher Cole in late June outlining why Montana law doesn’t violate association rules. According to Assistant Attorney General Judy Beck, Bullock’s office has yet to hear back. That’s making Griz Nation a little uneasy. But there is a snippet of news in all this anxious quietude. The university has followed the situation with rapt attention, as the loss of postseason football activity would rob the institution–and the community–of a major financial boost. David Aronofsky, chief legal counsel for UM, says the NCAA intends to hold a meeting in early August to finally address Bullock’s letter and hopefully resolve the issue. Why the delay? Aronofsky was told the NCAA’s general counsel is currently tied up on a business trip to Asia. That’s all anyone knows—or will know. The NCAA did not return repeated phone calls from the Independent about the August meeting—or, for that matter, about what the association is doing in Asia. Aronofsky adds that the NCAA has closed the meeting to outsiders, essentially shutting the door on UM, state officials or the media. Aronofsky says the university has been transparent about the entire ordeal, and only wishes the NCAA would operate the same way. Good luck. As with every step of this debate, the NCAA seems to work from an ivory tower, unwilling to discuss the merits of the state’s argument unless it’s on the NCAA’s terms. That leaves all of Griz Nation with nothing to do but sit on its hands and wait to see if the fat lady’s anywhere in sight.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 July 16–July 23, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Taking aim Montana’s Firearms Freedom Act goes “viral” by Jesse Froehling

Since Gov. Brian Schweitzer signed the Montana Firearms Freedom Act into law April 15, the bill’s author says it’s “gone viral” as other states attempt to ward off the authority of the federal government. But at least one anti-gun organization believes the alleged effort to strengthen states’ rights is nothing more than a ploy orchestrated by the gun lobby to disarm federal firearms regulations. The state act, which goes into effect Oct. 1, exempts firearms, gun accessories

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 July 16–July 23, 2009

“There’s a groundswell of support for this idea because all across the nation people are realizing that the federal government is like a river that is flowing over its banks and it needs to be shored up,” says Boniek. “This is a good rallying point for people to do that.” Marbut admits the Firearms Freedom Act sets a legal precedent that will not sit well with the U.S. Department of Justice, and he’s already planned to defend it in court. Once the

Photo courtesy of DuaneSpethman

With versions of the Montana Firearms Freedom Act gaining momentum across the country, Gary Marbut, head of the Montana Shooting Sports Association, expects a long legal battle over strengthening states’ rights.

and ammunition made and kept in Montana from federal law. On the heels of Schweitzer’s signature, legislators in other states have introduced bills nearly identical to the Montana Firearms Freedom Act. HB 186 in Alaska, HB 1863 in Texas, S. 794 in South Carolina and HF 2376 in Minnesota were all introduced in those states’ legislatures. On July 9, Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen signed a version of the Firearms Freedom Act into law. Gary Marbut, who drafted the Montana bill and serves as president of the Missoula-based Montana Shooting Sports Association, says this is only the start. Marbut claims lawmakers in 14 additional states have told him that they plan to introduce the bill when their respective legislatures reconvene in January. “It is really more about states’ rights, the 10th Amendment and the Interstate Commerce Clause of the Constitution,” says Marbut. “Guns are just the object. States’ rights are the subject.” It’s the states’ rights aspect that prompted Rep. Joel Boniek, RLivingston, to sponsor the bill in the Montana Legislature. He says that’s also the reason similar bills are sweeping across the country.

law goes into effect, Marbut will ask a local gun maker to write the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms requesting permission to operate under the new statute. Marbut anticipates a denial from the agency, which will then arm him with a reason to file a declaratory judgment in federal court. Ultimately, Marbut and other supporters hope to use the case to roll back the powers they believe the federal government has seized illegally ever since the Great Depression. “I believe in constitutional government and I think the system that the American founders set up is a good one,” Boniek says. “The president and the courts and Congress grab as much power as they can and nobody ever asks what’s the proper role for each branch of government.” Actually, the courts decided those roles years ago, according to Paul Helmke, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. He believes a federal judge will ultimately shoot down the Firearms Freedom Act movement. “This has been a settled area of law since the Depression-era cases in the Supreme Court and it’s a little bit why

they fought the Civil War,” Helmke says. “The New Deal cases dealt with folks who were growing crops in their own state and consuming them themselves. The courts then found that it had an effect on interstate commerce and there was proper federal regulation. It strikes me that they’re trying to re-litigate the New Deal and the Civil War.” Helmke also questions why Marbut and the Montana Shooting Sports Association would pick something as controversial as firearms to battle for states’ rights. Currently, only three real firearms regulations exist at the federal level. After prohibition, Congress banned machine guns with the National Firearms Act of 1934. After the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, Congress passed the Gun Control Act of 1968 to prohibit certain interstate firearms transfers. Lastly, after White House Press Secretary James Brady took a bullet for President Ronald Regan in 1981, Congress instituted background checks on most gun purchases. “So the question I ask,” Helmke says, “is which of those three laws does the state of Montana not like? Do they want to make machine guns available to felons? It strikes me as particularly strange that if the whole focus is states’ rights, that they would pick guns because there are very few federal laws regarding guns.” Boniek and Marbut say Helmke is missing the point. The Firearms Freedom Act isn’t just about guns, and Boniek specifically says it’s not a preemptive measure to protect gun rights under the Obama administration. Instead, Marbut says he chose guns because they rally local constituents more than any other issue. He contends that “90 to 95 percent” of state households pack heat, and that the average number of guns per home is 27. He attributes the numbers to his own unscientific research. “Gun owners are by far the majority,” Marbut says. “By and large, they are the political mainstream here in Montana.” With a strong majority behind him, Marbut says he’s prepared for a long legal battle. Even if the courts knock down the Firearms Freedom Act for the reasons Helmke explains, Marbut has one other trick up his sleeve: emerging consensus. “That’s basically judicial jargon for, ‘There are mobs of peasants at the palace gates with torches and pitchforks, so we better pay attention,’” he says. “The emerging consensus is the other states that are picking up on this idea.” jfroehling@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Making hay Open Space Bond protects 752 acres near Frenchtown by Matthew Frank

Joseph Boyer hoped to spend his Monday moving hay bales on the family ranch, but a summer storm doused those plans. The waterlogged bales were too wet to move and needed to air dry. Instead, Boyer just jumped to the next task on his list—moving equipment up from the nearby Clark Fork River. It was just another day on a ranch that’s been in Boyer’s family since 1896—the place where his father

The county has spent about $950,000 on seven projects, all conservation easements, protecting working lands from Frenchtown to the Swan Valley. The Boyer project eats up roughly $245,000 of the county’s expenditures, making it the most expensive purchase to date. But the deal turns out to be a steal for the county. Boyer, among the many western Montana farmers and ranchers

“We were interested in the property because it’s such a large property— 752 acres for the Missoula/Frenchtown valley is pretty substantial—and it also has significant and productive agricultural land,” says Pelah Hoyt, Five Valleys Land Trust’s conservation project manager. “Some of these just take longer than others. But throughout that whole time the landowner has never wavered in his commitment to conserving this land. That’s just been wonderful. He’s just been rock solid on that. It partly took a long time to put the funding package together.” The ranch’s development potential—which is what Boyer forfeited by agreeing to a conservation easement—is estimated at $2.4 million. He essentially donated about $1.8 million of that estimate to the county, which can be used as an income tax deduction. The difference—$600,000—amounts to what Boyer will gain from Photo by Chad Harder the easement. Missoula County Pelah Hoyt of Five Valleys Land Trust walks along Joseph Boyer’s 752-acre ranch contributed $245,000 in Open in the hills between Frenchtown and Huson. Hoyt helped broker the land’s conservation easement and Open Space Bond expenditure approved by Missoula Space Bond funding, which qualified the project for a County last week. $295,000 matching grant from was born and buried, and where 13 facing pressure to sell his land, says he the Federal Farm and Ranchland Boyers have been raised. decided to pursue a conservation ease- Protection Program. Five Valleys Land Now 62, Boyer’s 752 acres on the ment because, as he puts it, “It would Trust kicked in $60,000, plus another benches above Frenchtown comprise have been a crime for me to gain” from $29,100 to cover transaction costs. one of the rare, fully intact working his land’s development. “The bond has been absolutely ranches close to Missoula. Thanks to “There were a lot of speculators essential to getting these done,” says an open space agreement approved by who said, ‘We can sell this, do that, Hoyt, who has helped Five Valleys Land the Missoula County Commission on build houses everywhere,’” Boyer Trust broker six projects utilizing bond July 8, Boyer’s working ranch will says. “But this property is pretty valu- money. “Most of the funding sources remain exactly that. able, just to the wildlife…I didn’t that are out there, they won’t release The Boyer Open Space Bond think I had the right to destroy the their funds unless you have secured a Project marks the 13th easement or land.” non-federal match, and that was a key acquisition since 70 percent of Boyer boasts of the 80–100 elk that thing on the Boyer project.” Missoula County voters approved a winter on his ranch and the diversity of County Commission Chairman Bill $10 million bond in 2006. The money bird species. For instance, a Five Carey says the county is lucky to land from that bond—split evenly between Valleys Audubon Society survey once such a sweet deal, because the counthe city and county—is being spent to spotted the Swainson’s hawk, a bird ty’s funds are matched on an 8.8:1 preserve open space and working that breeds in Western grasslands after ratio. “It’s an incredible project,” he lands as subdivisions sprout on the migrating from Argentina. says. fringes of Missoula Valley and fragment According to the Five Valleys And it means this haying season is precious farm and ranchland inside Audubon Society, Boyer’s ranch—shar- not nearly the Boyer family’s last. Missoula County. ing a corner with the Lolo National “This valley is too small to take All told, about $2.7 million of Forest—is “large enough to provide much more [development],” Boyer Missoula’s Open Space Bond money secure reproduction and foraging says. “I just want to see the farming has been spent so far, according to esti- opportunities for both birds and mam- and ranching try to hold on. I know it’s mates from Missoula County Rural mals that require large undisturbed hard for the farmers and ranchers. The Initiatives. The city has tapped about areas.” money ain’t in it for ’em, but, you $1.75 million of its $5 million share on About 10 years ago, Boyer contact- know [in today’s economy], the money six projects, including a $1.17 million ed Five Valleys Land Trust to initiate ain’t really in subdivisions, either.” easement secured in 2007 to protect the process of creating a conservation mfrank@missoulanews.com 626 acres in Missoula’s South Hills. easement on the ranch.

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Missoula Independent

Page 9 July 16–July 23, 2009


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Page 10 July 16–July 23, 2009

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Losing patience Democrats continue to let chances slip away Anyone who has been following the news in recent weeks will undoubtedly have noticed a growing and very disturbing trend. Namely, the solid Democratic majorities in Congress, the largest in 30 years, just can’t seem to get their act together. From energy to health care to wilderness, the Democrats are putting on a sorry show of missed deadlines, blown opportunities and an inability to provide leadership for a nation adrift. Let’s start with Montana senior Sen. Max Baucus. After deciding it was up to him to lead the nation’s health care reform effort, Max has done little but flounder. Some critics, pointing to his massive, multi-million dollar campaign contributions from the health care and insurance industries, would say Max isn’t leading because he’s more intent on serving the interests that fund him than the people who voted for him. Unfortunately, it’s worse than that. Just last week Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D–Nev., dressed down Max in no uncertain terms for continuing to pander to Republicans on health care reform. Max, of course, likes to trumpet what he calls his “bipartisan” plan, using such arcane terms as “more sustainable” to justify his kowtowing. Basically, Reid told Max to give it up and get on with the show, especially since the Democrats now have enough votes in the Senate to pass anything they want without a single Republican vote in support. For Montanans, the whole concept of “bipartisan” is laughable. We’ve been treated to two legislative sessions in a row where solid bloc voting by both Democrats and Republicans has occurred on almost every piece of major legislation—not that they have produced much in the way of progress or major legislation, but that’s another story. Yet, here’s Max Baucus, still trying to appease Republicans who had their chance at leading the nation and failed miserably. In the meantime, the House has its own problems. The Waxman-Markey climate and energy bill is being hailed as some kind of a solution to global warming and the nation’s energy future. But in truth, it is no such thing. For instance, it contains a “cap and trade” provision for emitting global warming gases such as carbon dioxide that will do little except create a nightmare web of futures trading in pollution—the same sort of risky financial wheeling and dealing by the mega-bankers and investment houses that brought us the recession and the collapse of Wall Street’s giants.

And guess what? Unlike other methods, such as a straight carbon tax or a cap and dividend program that would auction off the pollution permits and send the dividends back out to the people, Waxman-Markey allows massive amounts of pollution to continue—leaving us with the same problems we have now, albeit perhaps shuffled around the country. Too bad, but thanks to Demo lameness, all those kids with skyrocketing rates of

“You probably recall all those Loggers for Tester campaign rallies, don’t you? And the massive timber mill vote that sent Tester to the Senate? What, you don’t remember those?

asthma who are choking their young lives away in our polluted cities have little or nothing to look forward to in the way of relief. The bold Democrat plan to actually reduce pollutant levels may happen by 2050—and, after all, that’s only another 40 years down the road. Then, of course, there’s Montana’s own Democratic travesty, Sen. Jon Tester’s wilderness—err, I mean logging—bill. We haven’t seen it because it was written in secret by a few select organizations and timber mills and, by golly, they’re keeping it under wraps until the bill is actually introduced. You probably recall all those Loggers for Tester campaign rallies, don’t you? And the massive timber mill vote that sent Tester to the Senate? What, you don’t remember those? Neither does anyone else, because they didn’t happen. Yet, for some bizarre reason, Tester, who maybe caught some kind of D.C.

virus from Max, thinks it’s his job to appeal to those who didn’t support him instead of those that did. Rather than serve what is commonly called “the base” in political jargon, Tester has scuttled not just to the middle, but well into the camp of those who did not vote for him in the past and probably will not vote for him in the future. Tester’s base, those Montanans that threw fundraisers, manned campaign offices, knocked on doors and put up yard signs to get him elected, is dissolving as his campaign promises fall by the wayside to whatever definition of political expediency blows by in the D.C. winds—which are not, sad to say, the winds of change. Plus, we have this week’s distressing news that, with Democrats totally in charge of Congress and the White House, we have set a new, $1 trillion record for the deficit—and we’re only three-quarters of the way through the fiscal year. You would be in good company to wonder how so much money can be getting borrowed and spent (again, another Demo promise falls by the wayside) while achieving so little for the populace. The Dems, however, much like their Republican pals, have been very good to the bankers and corporations. Meanwhile, President Obama, Mr. Hope and Change, is telling us we must “be patient.” Could it be that he, like many of us, is wondering why the Democrat-dominated Congress seems incapable of leading? Could he, like many of us, be wondering why the Demo majorities can’t pass bills, why they miss their own deadlines, and why what they finally produce seems riddled with stale, Republican-leaning policies? Of course this is not a plea to return to the really bad days of Republican domination of Washington or Montana. But sooner rather than later, the Democrats had best figure out that they got elected to change the course of our nation. And you don’t do that through lame excuses, even lamer legislation, or pandering to the same powerful special interests that brought our once-great nation to its knees. You do it by leading, and our patience is running out. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Catching up How a small Montana town resembles Facebook by John Clayton

“I’m looking for a crib,” I said, and my friends reacted predictably. “I’m so out of touch!” lamented one, while another asked if I had an announcement to make, then raced over to my wife’s spot to ask if she was pregnant. The unusual aspect of this smalltown rumormongering was its location. We weren’t in a traditional gossiping spot such as the post office, coffee shop or microbrewery. We were on Facebook, the social-networking website, which now claims to be the world’s fourthbusiest online destination. The fad was relatively slow to reach my rural Montana town, but now that it’s here, I’m struck by how its success comes from mimicking our ancient social patterns. Consider that Facebook tells you what everyone else is doing—which recalls the old joke about how in a small town you don’t have to use turn signals because everyone knows where you’re going. And just like in the small town, on Facebook it’s relationship news that travels the fastest. For example, when Facebook told us that M “is no longer listed as ‘in a relationship,’” or that L “is looking for ‘dating,’” tongues wagged. Indeed, when I’ve gotten together recently with friends in person, we’ve often talked about what’s happening on Facebook. Call it a case of life imitating artifice. I’m not necessarily claiming that Facebook promotes admirable behavior. Take one of my favorite pastimes, learning people’s ages. For 18 years now I’ve wondered if B is older or younger than I am. Our hair is graying at similar rates, and he’s made comments suggesting we’re contemporaries, but since B is my doctor, he’s been able to look up my age in his files. So I was delighted to see that B filled in the Facebook birth-year field, equalizing our information disparity, and even more delighted to see that I’m three years younger than the old coot.

B has 37 official “friends” on Facebook, a relatively low total that’s partly due to generational challenges— folks our age (and especially his age…) have plenty of real-world friends who don’t network online. On the other hand, my college classmate P has 896 friends. Does he really know all these people? Or is he like my friend

“There are plenty of people who might find such a lack of privacy stifling, which is why there are plenty of people who don’t live in small towns or, for that matter,

join Facebook.

D, who regularly befriends faraway Facebookies he’s never met in real life? D loves to work the network—just like some folks in a small town. You think you know everybody, and then you spend time with a friend who’s a Catholic Rotarian on the school board and knows all sorts of people you don’t. You’re stunned to realize that you don’t know all your friends’ friends. In the

city, you would take for granted such multiple circles—friends from work, the neighborhood, your favorite sports or pastimes—and the way each circle ripples outward. In a small town, they ripple back on themselves. Facebook, by publicly listing all of your friends for anyone to see, telescopes those circles. Again, it’s replicating one of my favorite features of the small town: the way you see the same people in different contexts. I see work friends at basketball, or neighborhood friends at a committee meeting, and they become more fully rounded to me. There are plenty of people who might find such a lack of privacy stifling, which is why there are plenty of people who don’t live in small towns or, for that matter, join Facebook. But that small-town-style intimacy turns out to be a quality that lots of people are flocking online to replicate. Call it the small-towning of 21st century life. On Facebook, as in a small town, you end up learning a lot more about people than you might have intentionally chosen to do. But when it works, when you love it, it’s because you like the things you learn, because the people in your community consistently turn out to be full of pleasant surprises. Take, for example, the crib. I made my announcement, but explained the details: It wasn’t actually about my household. My sister was coming for a weeklong visit and we needed a crib for my new nephew. C said he kept a crib in his garage for visiting grandchildren, and once again the small-town rumor mill had become a network of support. John Clayton is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He communes with neighbors in south-central Montana.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 July 16–July 23, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

It’s not like a local bicyclist really needs more incentive to jump on two wheels during the summer, but perhaps there are a few reluctant gas-guzzlers among us who could use a prod. For them, we have Bicycle Benefits, a national nonprofit that rewards riders with discounts at local businesses, and its inaugural bicycle scavenger hunt. Founder Dillon Klepetar brought the program to Missoula last year, but with little fanfare. For a $5 helmet sticker, participants would receive rewards “for their commitment to cleaner air, personal health, and the use of pedaling energy in order to create a more sustainable community.” Now with more than 30 local businesses involved, he’s ready to push Bicycle Benefits to a larger audience. “It’s okay to just bike because it’s fun,” says Klepetar. “But we have the tendency

Thu. 16 July Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010. While the 14th Annual Missoula Hempfest doesn’t get sparked up until Sept. 12, don’t be left holding the bag of shake: Attend their Volunteer Informational Meeting—one shift gets you a drink and a “meal”—at 6 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Call 493-0425, or visit missoulahempfest.com.

Sat. 18 July Quit wasting the planet’s precious lifeblood when you attend a Branched Drain Greywater Installation Workshop, presented by MUD and the Greywater Guerrillas, at 10 AM at a location to be announced once you register. $20–50 sliding scale. Call 8801038 or e-mail summerpnelson@gmail.com. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

Mon. 20 July The Brain Injury Survivors and Special Others gather at Franklin Park, Kemp and 10th St. , for their sixth annual picnic at 6:30 PM. Reservations were $2 and ended July 15. Call 728-9117.

Tue. 21 July Quit wasting blood when you get those weekly nosebleeds and donate it to a good cause,

to do things as a means to an end, and I tried to make the scavenger hunt itself something to look forward to.” The July 18 hunt includes most of Bicycle Benefit’s participating businesses, as well as other partners in the community. Competitors, formed in teams of two or more, will start at Free Cycles and make their way through step-by-step instructions to the finish line at La Parilla on West Broadway. The three teams that retrieve clues, solve riddles and pedal across town fastest, earn special prizes— and admiration for promoting a healthier community. —Megan Gyermek The Bicycle Benefits Scavenger Hunt begins Saturday, July 18, at 11 AM. Participants should meet at Free Cycles, 732 S. First Street.

like someone else, during a blood drive at a bloodmobile near Missoula’s Prudential Montana Real Estate & American Title, 1006 W. Sussex St., from 9 AM–12 PM. Call 7214141 to schedule an appointment. Quit taking your red blood cells for granted, or at least ponder the thought of donating some of it, during a blood drive at Kalispell’s Glacier Bank from 11 AM–3 PM. Call 755-7237. The American Red Cross vants to suck the blood out of you. No really, they actually do, during a blood drive at Hamilton’s Lambros Real Estate, 514 N. First St., from noon–4 PM. Call 363-6668 to schedule an appointment. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834.

Wed. 22 July Parents and families experiencing difficulties and/or chaos with their Guardian Ad Litems (GALs) are invited to a confidential bi-weekly meeting of the Missoula GAL Family Support Group at 4 PM in the Missoula Public Library’s small meeting room. Free. Email missoulagalfamilygroup@yahoo.com.

Thurs. 23 July There’s nothing quite like self-inflicted anemia. Give blood, have a beer afterwards. Or rather, just head down to a blood drive at Kalispell’s Glacier Subaru, 1212 E. Idaho St., from 11 AM–2 PM and maybe eat some protein after you’re done. Call 755-7237.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 July 16–July 23, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – FBI investigators identified Terrol Alan Casborn, 32, as the suspect who robbed two banks in Concord, Calif., because of his distinctive tattoo. The surveillance video at one of the banks showed the robber’s hand had a “blotch or spot close to the wrist, with what appears to be cursive writing below the blotch, closer to the knuckles,” Special Agent Todd Dorman reported. DNA from ski masks found near the scene of both robberies matched that of Casborn. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, when the FBI interviewed Jolene Allen, the mother of Casborn’s four children, she told them that Casborn had her name tattooed on the back of his left hand until another woman made him cover it with a dark tattoo like the one on the video. Three British burglars broke into a house in Leeds and made off with a $2,900 plasma television, but their getaway van got stuck, forcing them to flee empty-handed. London’s Daily Express reported police had no trouble identifying Christopher Lister, 21, as one of the culprits, however, since the crime occurred in broad daylight, and witnesses recognized Lister, who stands 7 feet 4 inches tall. SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – One homeless man smacked another homeless man in the face with a skateboard while the two men were discussing “quantum physics and the splitting of atoms,” according to prosecutors in Redwood City, Calif. Deputy District Attorney Sharon Cho said that at some point Jason Everett Keller, 40, got upset by the conversation and hit Stephen Fava with the skateboard, splitting his lip, but the jury acquitted him because they “just felt unable to really know what happened out there.” WHEN VIBRATE JUST WON’T DO – Tennis player-spokesmodel Maria Sharapova unveiled a dress designed to light up when the wearer’s cell phone rings. Reuters reported that British fashion student Georgie Davis, 20, created the dress as part of a school project with phone maker Sony Ericsson to incorporate new technology and fashion. The dress is designed to connect to the wearer’s phone so she can be alerted in the noisiest of places, Davis said, noting, “When you’re in a pub or a bar, you can never, ever hear your phone.” CALIFORNIA IN CRISIS – Los Angeles County taxpayers have been paying $1.5 million a year to keep 8,000 old telephone lines active, according to auditors, who said they expect that the number of lines and the amount will double by the time they complete their investigation. The phone lines may never have served any legitimate government purpose, such as one registered to a now-defunct Hollywood ticket brokerage that the county paid the bill for the past 14 years. “This is government at its worst,” County Supervisor Zev Zaroslavsky told the Los Angeles Times. The review began earlier this year when William T Fujioka, the county’s chief executive, learned that no one ever shut down 329 phone lines at Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital after it was downgraded to an outpatient clinic in August 2007. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Police arrested Robert Lee McKinney, 34, after they said he tried to rob a hotel in Rapid City, S.D., with a butter knife. The clerk refused to give the man any money and provided police with a detailed description, which led them to McKinney. When a passenger pulled a knife on a 51-year-old cab driver in Elgin, Ill., and demanded money, the cabbie disarmed the man with a can of aerosol deodorant. Deputy Police Chief Jeff Swoboda told the Daily Herald that after the driver sprayed deodorant in the robber’s eyes, the robber dropped the knife and fled. LESSON LEARNED – A Salt Lake City woman suffered head and leg wounds after she was run over by an 11-year-old boy she was teaching to drive. Police Detective Dennis McGowan told the Salt Lake Tribune the woman was standing next to her car with the driver’s-side door open, when the boy suddenly released the clutch, causing the car to lurch backward. The open door knocked the woman to the ground, and the car ran over her while spinning in a semi-circle. SO HARD EVEN A CAVEMAN CAN’T DO IT – British authorities evicted Hilaire Purbrick, 45, from a 7-foot-wide cave he’s been living in on his land in Brighton for the past 16 years. The Telegraph reported that the Brighton and Hove City Council recently investigated and decided the cave did not have enough fire exits. Judge Jonathan Simpkiss told Brighton City Court there were also concerns the cave could collapse. Despite the legal order, Purbrick insisted, “I am still living there and intend to continue to do so.” He added he would challenge the council’s move in the European Court of Human Rights. RUBE GOLDBERG MEETS DR. KEVORKIAN – A 27-year-old man tried to kill himself by positioning a 24-inch sword through the steering wheel of his car, tying it in place with a T-shirt and then driving into a house in Chandler, Ariz. Police Sgt. Joe Favazzo told the Arizona Republic the suicide attempt failed because when the man started to drive through the home’s concrete block wall, the car’s airbag deployed and bent the sword. The car continued until it crashed into a swimming pool. The man got out and was hospitalized with a cut in the neck from the sword that Favazzo said wasn’t life threatening. FIREPOWER HATH CHARMS – When 400 cobras and vipers overran a police station in Sierra Leone, authorities summoned snake charmers to lure the reptiles away. That tactic failed, however, so officials resorted to power hoses and assault rifles. “We have forced water into the building, and some of the snakes trying to escape were shot by our men carrying AK-47s,” Brima Kontu, head of the police station in Gerihun, told Reuters, indicating about 250 of the snakes living at the station were killed. LEADER OF THE FLOCK – Police found 53 baby birds in the bedroom of a 15-year-old boy in Longmont, Colo. Sgt. Dave Orr said the boy took the hatchlings, including barn swallows, sparrows and a bluebird, from nests near his home and kept them until his mother realized he had them and notified animal control. Forty of the birds died.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 July 16–July 23, 2009


W

esterners faced brutal challenges 15,000 years ago. They had to scratch out a living in the resource-scarce Ice Age, competing against the likes of saber-toothed tigers, cave bears, dire wolves, mastodons, woolly mammoths and giant beavers. In order to survive, they had to make a technological breakthrough. They painstakingly collected stones such as flint and chert, fractured them and flecked chips off the pieces to form thin, narrow triangles. These stone triangles had long-lasting sharp edges and tight grooves at the bottom where they could be securely lashed to the ends of sticks. In other words, our ancestors created kickass spears, which enabled them to effectively kill larger animals for food, clothing and other needs. Today, we call this technique “bifacial percussion flaking,” and the resulting spear points are known as Clovis

Missoula Independent

points, after the New Mexico town where they were discovered in 1929. Clovis points have since been found in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Washington, as well as in South America—proof of the technology’s widespread success. Clovis points were only the beginning. The West’s Folsom people developed even better spears about 12,000 years ago. And the Chaco Canyon people, in what we now call New Mexico, designed a spectacular city about 1,100 years ago—more than 50 million stones precisely stacked to make thousands of condo-style rooms, in 15 complexes rising up to four stories tall. Maybe it’s the West’s inspiring scenery, or the sense that some kind of predator is always nearby, or something magical in the region’s waters. At their best, Westerners have a genius for coming up with inventions and new ideas. And the innovations that originate out here are often, literally, earthshak-

Page 14 July 16–July 23, 2009

ing: the modern environmental movement (the first national parks and the original environmental group, the Sierra Club), modern tourism (from Disneyland and Las Vegas to outdoor playgrounds like Aspen and Moab), nuclear bombs, Hollywood movies, pretty much the entire computer sector (Apple, Microsoft, Google, YouTube, Craigslist, Facebook, everyone else in Silicon Valley), and the renewable energy gurus (Amory Lovins and his Rocky Mountain Institute, plus the National Renewable Energy Labs, both in Colorado). We’re even responsible for the frozen french fry as a basis for global fast food (Idaho’s J.R. Simplot). And we helped pioneer modern daredevilry as mega-entertainment (Montana native Evel Knievel, for example, attempting to jump the Snake River Canyon on a jetpowered motorcycle in 1974, and Larry Walters, the Californian who in 1982 became the first man to fly by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair).

Our region has tremendous cultural tolerance for experimenters. Our people are ready and willing to try new ideas that are sometimes a little crazy, and we are energetic about shooting off in new directions—not hampered by musty, cobwebbed, traditional thinking, the way New England and the Midwest and the South can sometimes seem. So let’s honor this Western trait—and make good use of it. The timing couldn’t be better. The world is gripped by huge economic, energy and environmental crises, including climate change, and threatened by widening class differences and gaps in access to technology and education. We need innovators now more than ever. Here’s a small sampling of Westerners who are shaking up things right now. —Ray Ring These essays first appeared in High Country News (hcn.org), which covers the West’s communities and naturalresource issues.


A sci-fi approach to solar energy The curved 10-foot mirror focuses sunlight onto a steel plate about five feet away, and the steel glows bright and white—shedding sparks as if targeted by a cutting torch. Within seconds, the amplified sunlight burns a hole clean through the quarter-inch steel, near the engraved name of the Arizona Democratic congresswoman whose million-dollar earmark helped make this demonstration possible. University of Arizona astronomer Roger Angel is relieved, but not surprised; he’d already tested his solar-mirror gun several times. He spent the hour before Rep. Gabrielle Giffords arrived Feb. 18 making sure that the mirror—its legs braced in an emptied swimming pool on the Tucson campus—was properly aligned to capture the sunlight. Angel, dressed in baggy faded jeans, a plaid shirt and a well-worn hat, admits that the demonstration was something of a trick. His research is aimed at focusing light, not heat. What he has proven, he says, is that a mirror with a very precise focus can be made from cheap material.

To make this one, Angel and other astronomers, optical scientists and engineers associated with the university’s Steward Observatory Mirror Lab took some “cheap win-

globe. (A single telescope mirror costs upwards of $10 million.) Angel turned his attention to the climate change crisis—and its link to fossil fuel emis-

dow glass,” heated it, shaped it, coated it and attached it to a salvaged communications dish. This is not the first time Angel has done something revolutionary. In the mid-1980s, he developed a process for making the telescope mirrors that are used in observatory domes across the

sions—about four years ago when his wife told him: “You should do something about it.” He hopes to make solar energy competitive with fossil fuels by perfecting mirrors that can focus the equivalent of 1,000 suns onto a specialized photovoltaic device, which other solar

experts are currently developing. The result would be “a solar engine,” he says. “The price has to be 10,000 times less than the telescope mirrors.” The parabolic concentration of sunlight is not a new concept: Archimedes supposedly used it to create a “death ray” that set fire to Roman ships in 212 B.C. These days, it’s used for various purposes, such as heating liquid to convey heat in industrial-scale generating stations. But if Angel and his cohorts succeed in their plans, they will create a major breakthrough of the sort found in science fiction stories. If all else fails, Angel has a last-ditch plan to ward off climate change. Using NASA funding, he would create a 600,000-mile-long permanent cloud, consisting of trillions of one-meter-diameter plastic spacecraft. These could deflect 1.8 percent of the total light the sun casts on the Earth’s surface—enough to get global temperatures down to glacier-saving levels. But Angel is hoping it doesn’t come to that. — Tom Beal

Inventing equality for blind people George Kerscher has a sweeping vision, even though he’s blind: He wants to make all printed information “accessible.” Websites, academic papers, books, magazines and other publications—everything in print should be readily available in audio, he says, so that the millions with impaired eyesight can “read” by using their ears. For 21 years, Kerscher has been a global leader in carrying out this vision. From his base in Missoula, he’s invented technologies and computer programs and encouraged advancements in policies that involve dozens of countries. Kerscher was born in Chicago with a timebomb ticking in his genes: retinitis pigmentosa, a condition that causes the retinas to deteriorate slowly. By the 1980s, when he was a high school teacher in Montana, his eyes were so bad he could only read two pages of print per hour.

He began experimenting with computers to enhance text and then went on to study computer science at the University of Montana. At that time, few books were available in audio, and the format of the books on tape was primitive. Kerscher persuaded publishers to send him computer files that contained the texts of some books, and he wrote his own software that converted those texts to audio. When his computer read the books aloud in 1988, he says, “I was amazed, totally shocked. These were [some of] the first electronic books.” He got a National Science Foundation grant to develop his e-book technology, then a job working on it for a top textbook company, Recordings for the Blind & Dyslexic. He’s worked with organizations such as the Association on Higher Education Access and Disability, the Web Accessibility Initiative and the United Nations. He’s also a longtime top staffer

for the DAISY Consortium, a global nonprofit that helps computer programmers make standardized e-books. The DAISY reader, which is about the size of a deck of cards, enunciates text, footnotes, headings and even math problems in DAISY-formatted books in an easily understandable way. It even responds to verbal commands—say, “Page 88,” for example, and it zips to that page. Kerscher travels around the world constantly, spreading the word and working to help devise international accessibility standards. His first guide dog, Nesbit, became the first dog to travel more than 1 million air miles. Kerscher, who turns 59 this month, is now seeking funding for the Missoula Demonstration Project. With the help of other local experts, it would make many local websites and reading materials in schools and nursing homes accessible. “We’re in the Information Age,” Kerscher says, “and access to information is a fundamental human right.” —Ray Ring

Redefining rancher politics Bill Bullard runs the feisty ranchers’ group, RCALF USA, from an office in a cattle-auction yard in Billings. It’s cluttered with technical documents, and from his desk he can hear the singsong of the auctioneer next door. But don’t underestimate this group. It’s become a national power in ag politics, lobbying Congress and the White House and pushing ambitious lawsuits. R-CALF notched its latest victory against huge corporations in February, when the country’s third-biggest meatpacker, JBS, gave up its attempt to buy the fourth-biggest meatpacker. R-CALF had battled against the deal for a year, charging that it would violate anti-trust laws because the four

biggest packers already controlled 88 percent of the cattle market (a dominance that often forces ranchers to sell for low prices). R-CALF presented reams of research to the U.S. Department of Justice, and its 10,000 members in 46 states pressured the states’ attorney generals. That helped persuade the federal agency and many states to file a lawsuit opposing the deal, which caused the corporations to back down. Independent-minded ranchers founded RCALF—which stands for Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund—in 1990 to oppose such corporate power and make a political thrust they felt they weren’t getting from the biggest ranchers’

group, the Denver-based National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. That association draws funding from corporate meatpackers and chemical giants such as Monsanto and often “supports policies that are detrimental to the interests of cattle producers,” says Bullard. R-CALF has pushed for Country Of Origin Labeling on meat sold in grocery stores to inform consumers whether or not their meat is from the United States (a regulation the packers oppose). Congress passed Country Of Origin Labeling in the 2002 Farm Bill, but the corporations have stalled and tried to find loopholes (such as labeling meat as “a product of the United States,

Canada and Mexico”). R-CALF has also worked to get the feds to be more wary of allowing imports of beef that could carry mad cow disease. The leader of a Montana environmental group says it’s “refreshing to work with R-CALF”—a welcome contrast to the National Cattlemen’s group. That independent spirit has resulted in ups and downs for the group, but in recent years “we’ve maintained a solid membership base,” says Bullard, a former rancher with a political science degree who’s headed R-CALF since 2001. “Now we’re free to aggressively fight for the interests of (cattle) producers on issues that other organizations are afraid to touch.” —Ray Ring

Missoula Independent

Page 15 July 16–July 23, 2009


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Breaking down walls with art In May 2007, subdued murmurs accompanied the crash of collapsing bricks and shattering glass as Adam Price, along with dozens of spectators and more than 100 artists, watched the demolition of his first experiment in public art. Inspired by a project in New York, Price and his wife, Dessi, had invited 143 artists— ranging from teenaged graffiti artists to classical painters in their 70s—to transform an abandoned, 42-room building in one of Salt Lake City’s oldest neighborhoods. The 337 Project, named for the building’s address, was open to the public for two weekends. Then the whole thing was dramatically destroyed to make way for greenbuilt apartments that will include space for public art. Before the demolition, more than 10,000 visitors came to see the sculptures, installations, paintings and murals that covered the building, inside and out. For many Salt Lake City residents, the quality of the artwork was a revelation. “Utah can’t think of itself as an individual country anymore,” said one awed viewer. “Its walls are falling down.” Price describes the 337 Project as a magical, breathtaking experience. It sounds strange coming from a Harvard-

trained commercial litigation and criminal defense lawyer. But then, there aren’t many lawyers like Price. Whether he’s wearing a suit or a T-shirt, he looks youthful and tousled, with a gentle smile. His wife, with sleek brown hair and a Bulgarian accent, has a similar, self-effacing charm.

“My only claim to any art competency or fluency is the fact that my mother dragged me to every new show in every gallery in town,” Price says of his childhood in Washington, D.C. “I think I was bored and resented it at the time, but I guess it sunk in, in ways I wasn’t fully aware of.” When he moved to Salt Lake City in 2000, he missed the art in D.C., Boston and New York. But rather than fret about the vacuum, Price decided to create something new. The 337 Project was so energizing and cathartic that the Prices decided to continue creating unexpected avenues for art in Salt Lake City. They are drawn to projects that take art out of museums and catch ordinary people off-guard. Their most recent venture is the Art Truck—a traveling installation by well-known artists that visits schools, libraries and even parks in front of people’s driveways, unannounced. “There is no plan,” says Price. He makes up the route as he goes along. Up next, Price envisions a mini-golf course, with each hole created by a different artist. “People might not even know that it is art at first,” he says. “They might just come to play.” —Emily Underwood

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Missoula Independent

Page 16 July 16–July 23, 2009

Nathan Myhrvold calls it an “invention session.” Roughly twice a month, he pays experts in a variety of fields to meet for several days at the headquarters of Intellectual Ventures, his $5 billion company in Bellevue, Wash. He seeks unusual people from around the world— bioengineers, nanotechnologists, chemists, software developers, surgeons, even a few artists. Some are regulars, such as the atmospheric scientist who’s also a published poet. Others have only been invited once or twice. Myhrvold, who has a Princeton Ph.D. in physics and studied cosmology under Cambridge’s Stephen Hawking, wants people “who have really deep knowledge and an open mind.” An average session features five to 10 people in a big conference room furnished with a massive secondhand table and comfortable purple and green chairs. The small group size and informal atmosphere encourage friendly interaction. Participants freewheel, talking

about difficult problems and trying to find new perspectives. “There are a lot of problems that haven’t been solved because the right kinds of knowledge were not brought together,” says Myhrvold. “If you can get a critical mass (of motivated experts) together with the right spirit, it’s fun and you can create something pretty amazing, often in ways that the people involved don’t anticipate. We’ve found it to be an incredibly productive way to generate solutions.” Newsweek described Myhrvold’s invention sessions as a “factory of the future,” and Washington CEO magazine said he’s “an overgrown leprechaun…mischievous, with a crock of gold.” Since he began the sessions in 2003, they’ve led to hundreds of inventions—including advancements in surgical equipment, computers, optics and robotics—that have earned his company about $80 million. He has staffers working on developing more ideas, including a 60-person team taking “a radical new approach” to nuclear power.

Not all the press coverage is positive, though. Because Intellectual Ventures earns most of its revenue by buying patents held by inventors outside the company and licensing them to other companies, it’s often denounced as a “patent troll” that jacks up the costs of innovations. There’s no doubt that Myhrvold has the personality to jumpstart innovations. Myrhrvold, 49, became wealthy during the 1990s leading Microsoft’s research efforts. He’s a high-energy, widely roaming eccentric whose interests include French cooking and dinosaurs. (He funds dinosaur digs and has a full-size Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton in his living room.) He says the West has the best habitat for innovators: “You need…some societal support for doing crazy new things. And historically the Western U.S. has supported that, much more than [other regions characterized by] stodgy careerism. We’re trying to explore the intellectual frontiers.” —Ray Ring


A home for the homeless—on the street Two years ago, during his daily bike ride from his home to the beach and back, Hollywood movie producer Peter Samuelson began noticing more homeless people than usual. He started counting them, keeping track of the numbers, and then took his interest further. “One thing that’s worked for me in my life, if I’m a little scared of something, I make myself do it,” says Samuelson. “I decided I was a little scared of these guys. So I interviewed [62] of them and asked…where they go at night.” He was surprised to learn that few were sleeping in shelters. So he tapped his philanthropic skills— Samuelson’s launched three successful charities—and raised money to create a contraption he calls the EDAR (Everyone Deserves A Roof ). Designed by Eric Lindeman and Jason Zasa, the EDAR is shaped like a shopping cart. It’s made of wire and piping, wrapped with military-grade canvas and adorned with detachable pouches. For day use, it can be filled with

baggage and pushed around. But a person can lock the wheels and collapse an EDAR in about a minute, transforming it into a raised tent to sleep in. The EDAR sprang out of a sad pragmatism. Adding a single bed to a typical shelter and providing the necessary support staff costs as much as $100,000, says Samuelson. And the sheer size of the problem—more than 70,000 people sleep on the streets of Los Angeles County alone on any given night—makes the cost prohibitive. An EDAR costs only $500 to build, and Samuelson wants to pay that expense through fundraising rather than charging the units’ recipients. The first batch of 60, released in Los Angeles last summer, proved so popular that EDAR Inc. is trying to raise money for another 1,000. And shelter managers across the United States and Canada, as well as in Romania, the Czech Republic, Brazil and Indonesia, are interested. They see it as a way to expand their capacity and to build relationships with

homeless people who would otherwise steer clear of their facilities. By opening their grounds to EDAR campers at night and offering to store EDARs during the day, shelters can

connect with people while still allowing them their independence. Christopher Raynor, a 40-year-old homeless man who camped near Pacific Palisades last December, told

the Los Angeles Times that he finds his EDAR “very comfortable…This is one of the greatest damn gifts you could ever give to anybody.” —Terray Sylvester

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Missoula Independent

Page 17 July 16–July 23, 2009


Low-carb(on) brews New Belgium Brewing makes at least 18 kinds of beer in Fort Collins, Colo., ranging from its famous Fat Tire Ale to whimsical seasonals such as Skinny Dip (only 114 calories per glass). By conventional standards, the company is the nation’s third-largest craft brewer. It’s also one of the most environmentally conscious companies on the planet, a path it pioneered beginning 18 years ago. New Belgium buys all of its electricity from renewable sources, chiefly windmills, except for what it makes by burning methane from its own wastewater. The brewmaster boils his wort in an uber-efficient kettle imported from Germany, the first of its kind in this country. To trim the environmental costs of transporting and making cardboard, the company recently reduced the packaging material in each 12-pack. That alone cut yearly cardboard demand by 150 tons and shaved 174 metric tons from the estimated annual greenhouse gas emissions caused by the brewery’s operations. New Belgium has lowered its rate of water use with a new, technologically advanced bottling plant. To foster low-impact transportation, it gives bicycles to employees after they’ve been with the company for a year, and keeps a collection of loaner bikes on the property for lunch-break excursions. It also pays a bike courier to gather brown bottles from downtown bars and restaurants, because the city doesn’t

the

offer commercial recycling. It then ships those bottles, along with its own stream of waste glass, to the nearby Rocky Mountain Glass plant, where Coors bottles are born. The company is working to brew more of its beer from organic ingredients, but has had trouble finding high-quality organic ingredients in the local market. So it donated $20,000 to Colorado State University to spur research into Colorado’s organic growing conditions. Before bringing their first batch of beer to market in 1991, co-founders Jeff Lebesch and Kim Jordan hiked in the mountains to brainstorm a few basic sustainability principles for their company. They committed to “kindling social, environmental, and cultural change as a role model of a sustainable business.” Ever since then, they and their staff have discarded the idea that profit-making conflicts with a commitment to the common good. New Belgium believes that its green image underpins its brand strength. “We don’t calculate the cost of doing something unsustainably and then more sustainably and figure out the difference,” says Jenn Orgolini, New Belgium’s sustainability director. “We’re always looking for the next thing.” —Terray Sylvester

Rural empowerment The plateau south of Wheatland, Wyo., where Gregor Goertz and his family raise beef and organic winter wheat, is blustery country. Winds averaging 27 mph comb the fields where 56-year-old Goertz once worked alongside his parents and roar past cliffsides where Indians drove bison to their deaths. A few years ago, those winds started attracting energy developers. “It got to the point where three a week were calling us,” Goertz says. Intrigued but unsure how to get the best deal from companies that want to develop their land, Goertz and some neighbors tapped their local U.S. Department of Agriculture Resource Conservation and Development coordinator, Grant Stumbough. With his help, they lobbied other landowners on the plateau, brought in experts and, in 2007, formed the Slater Wind Energy Association, which encompasses about 30,000 private acres and nearly 50 landowners. The idea is relatively simple: Owners pool their land and evaluate its wind resources, put together a marketing package and present a unified voice in bargaining with companies for a fair price. Because all the members experience construction and visual impacts, everyone gets a share in the proceeds, even those who don’t end up with turbines on their land. Companies know there is community support and avoid having to negotiate separately with many landowners— though they may end up paying more.

It’s a model that could avert some of the animosity around wind farms. And proponents think it can revitalize rural communities and keep farmers and ranchers on their land despite rising costs. Slater was the first of 11 associations (two more are in the works) to organize in southeastern Wyoming. One has signed with a developer, and three others, including Slater, are close to making deals. Since last spring, 16 have sprung up in northeastern New Mexico. In Colorado, older landowner cooperatives that had trouble developing wind on their own are now signing with companies that take on the risks of projects in return for ultimately owning them. The idea is also catching on in Utah, Montana, Nebraska and South Dakota. The main obstacles are lack of transmission lines and financing problems amid the economic crisis. Landowners also face a steep learning curve. Stumbough scrambles to keep up with the demand for seminars and webinars. The Colorado-based Rocky Mountain Farmers Union is working with Windustry, a Minnesota-based nonprofit, to provide technical and legal support to fledgling associations. It’s a key innovation for establishing fairness as Westerners tap their wind, says Windustry’s Lisa Daniels: “Otherwise it might end up being just another form of exploitation, like what’s happened with oil and gas leases.” —Sarah Gilman

dish

$$–$$$...$15 and over Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. • 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner 7 days a week 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 We're open 7 days a week at 7 AM. Serving breakfast, unbelievable espresso, and sumptuous lunch. Our menu

Page 18 July 16–July 23, 2009

uses local ingredients and varies seasonally. Try our renowned tomato-lime tortilla soup or freshly made pastries and desserts. $-$$

attentive service. Getting ready for outside seating? So are we. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway • 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$


July

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly House Blend $9.75 lb. Bold & Robust Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

COFFEE, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL

the Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day.

Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and

eMpanadas 728-2030 www.empanadalady.com eMpanadas are back! Indulge in your favorites at the Clark Fork River Market this Saturday, 8am to 1pm and at Downtown Tonight, Caras Park, Thursdays, June-August 5:30-8:30pm. Baked to perfection with fresh, local ingredients, 10 exquisite varieties of Argentine-style empanadas await you: Carne de búfalo, lamb, pollo, humita, and more. $

dish

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. Lunch Board: Tuesday through Friday 11:30 to 2pm. Dinner A La Carte: Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 9pm. Reservations Accepted. For special events (business meetings, birthdays, baby showers, etc.) please call Chef Jason Tenesch.

Whitefish Café Kandahar 406-862-6247 A George’s Distributing fine wine tasting, a Café Kandahar 7 course wine dinner, Kandahar Lodge luxurious accommodations and an Andy Blanton champagne brunch come together May 14-15 for a “Not To Be Missed” event. Meet & greet with the winemakers. Full package $299 for two. Call 406862-6247 for limited tickets.

Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors - Russian teacakes, pizzelles, baci di dama, as well as cupcakes, scones, specialty breads, with new specialties added daily. Get bread fresh from the oven between 3 & 5PM. Open M-F 7AM to 6:30PM, Sat 7AM-4PM. We're just around the corner from Bamboo Chopsticks. Stop in today. $ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European handcrafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $

Missoula Independent

Page 19 July 16–July 23, 2009


by Ari LeVaux

Sizing up squash blossoms

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

French American Cuisine 363-4567 • Upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton, MT 59840 Lunch Board • T - F 11:30 - 2pm Dinner a la carte • T - Sat 5 - 9pm

We're The Perfect Place To Sit, Sip, Meet and Eat! Sun thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com Across from the U of M campus.

Missoula Independent

Squash blossoms, breaded and deep-fried, are insanely delicious—which isn’t saying much. After all, you could deep-fry a breaded rat’s ass with tasty results. So it’s a shame that tempura-style is so often the focus when the conversation turns to squash blossoms. I think they’re better cooked in a way that highlights, rather than hides, their delicate, floral, squashy flavor. Beyond the flavor, squash blossoms are beautiful, with an appealing mystique. A squash blossom necklace of turquoise and silver is the cornerstone of many an American Indian jewelry collection. Nearly every life stage of the squash is eaten, including the seeds, the immature fruit (aka summer squash), the mature fruit (winter squash), the young shoots and the blossoms. The hard shells are used as vessels and decoration. Adding to the blossoms’ allure, at least in my book, is the fact that they’re as fleeting as summer, and one of the few foods that can’t be preserved. That all but ensures any squash blossom you eat will be local during their brief window of availability, which lasts from July through early September. If you expect to go blossom hunting at the farmers’ market, arrive early. They’re usually a popular item and quickly sell out. Plus, you want to get them home and cool before the day heats up. By the same token, if you’re deflowering your own plants, it’s best to do so early in the morning and keep the blossoms in the fridge until you’re ready to use them. Squash blossoms come in both male and female forms, and only female flowers produce squash, while male flowers produce pollen to fertilize the female flowers. Thus, by picking only male blossoms—the ones with the pollen-covered stamen inside—you won’t be robbing the cradle on your own squash crop, provided you leave a few males per patch to pollinate the females. When preparing male blossoms to eat, make sure to remove the stamen, which is edible but bitter.

Ask Ari:

Q

I’m a fan of simple recipes, because I firmly believe that if you use good quality ingredients, it doesn’t take much to make them taste good—it’s more about getting out of the way and letting the

Page 20 July 16–July 23, 2009

flower or grapeseed, which won’t smoke as easily as olive oil) until golden brown. Here’s a mellow celery sauce that makes a nice accompaniment to batter-fried blossoms: Boil 2 cups chopped celery for 20 minutes in salted water. Drain, puree in a food processor, and cook 10 minutes with 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 teaspoon of ground nutmeg, a pinch of ground black pepper and salt to taste. Meanwhile, if you leave several blossoms in the leftover batter overnight, it makes great pancakes. After a night in the batter, the blossom flavor permeates, and maple syrup on top adds the sweetness one would expect from a flower. Highly recommended. Stuffing squash flowers is another popular way to overwhelm their delicate flavor. Chevre, with or without herbs or apricot jam, is really good. So is avocado mashed with curry powder, roasted garlic and chopped tomatoes (this leftover stuffing makes an outstanding omelet). After stuffing the blossoms, twist the tips of the petals together, as if putting the finishing touches on a “hand-rolled cigarette,” as Photo by Ari LeVaux one chef I know puts it. You can wilt your stuffed flowers in attached) as you can. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring the oven for 2 minutes at 350 degrees. Or you can often to prevent burning. Add 6 cups chicken bread and fry them, which gives the stuffed blosstock, bring to a boil over high heat, and simmer soms a more solid form and helps hold the stufffor 10 minutes. Serve hot, garnished with chervil. ing in. Another breading option, perhaps more This simple recipe, which I got from a gor- culturally appropriate to the southwest is corngeous book called Foods of the Southwest Indian meal: Dredge blossoms, stuffed or unstuffed, in Nations by Lois Ellen Frank, is perhaps the most beaten egg, roll in cornmeal, and fry as above. elegant way I know of letting the delicate squash If you want the easiest preparation, simplest blossom flavor shine without being upstaged by presentation and most unobstructed squash-blosstrong flavors or smothered in batter. som flavor, fry some blossoms, unbreaded and But if you’re determined to batter-fry your unstuffed, slowly in butter or extra-virgin olive oil blossoms, make a batter from 1/2 cup water, 1 until they’re brown on all sides and crispy. beaten egg, 1 cup of flour, and 1/2 cup heavy Arrange artfully on a plate, and drizzle with balcream. Whisk together with a fork, slowly adding samic vinegar, preferably aged. Eat them on the water until it’s thin enough to dip a flower into. deck, patio or porch during a lazy evening, while Let it stand for an hour. Dredge the blossoms in sipping a cool drink and watching summer slip the batter, and fry them in hot oil (ideally saf- away into the sunset.

Easy eats

Dear Ari, Thanks to the economy, I’ve started cooking at a rather late age. I eat almost no carbs, and I cook only omelets and bacon, cheeseburgers and chicken, all of which I make in quantity, store, and heat up. Any suggestions of simple recipes for other foods? —Hungry for advice

A

And always take a peek inside, because there might be a bee doing its business. The stem near the flower is edible, so leave about an inch attached. Squash blossoms look and taste great in the following soup recipe: Melt 1 tablespoon unsalted butter in a pan on medium heat. Add 1 onion and 2 cloves garlic, both finely chopped, and sauté until the onions become translucent. Decrease heat to low, add 1 teaspoon salt and a half teaspoon pepper, and as many squash blossoms (male or female, with or without babies

ingredients shine. A good piece of steak doesn’t need much more than salt and pepper, especially if paired with a nice salad with a tangy vinaigrette to balance the richness of the meat. And red wine, of course. In addition to seeking out new meals, you also might want to consider preparing fancy condiments out of fresh, locally available ingredients. Pickled peppers, hot sauce, fruit chutneys, salsa, mustard, barbecue sauce, even ketchup, if made with love, can wait in your fridge, ready to improve the next simple dish you whip out. So here’s a homework assignment: Invest a little time and money experimenting with dif-

ferent pre-prepared or store-bought condiments. Figure out which ones work best with your favorite meals, then tell me what you come up with. I’ll tell you how to make those condiments yourself, only better, and with as many local ingredients as possible. As for a simple main dish, you ruled out carbs but mentioned meat and chicken. What about fish? Salmon is in season right now, but any fish will do for this plan: Squeeze a lime and pour some soy sauce on it, marinate for 20 minutes, then broil. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings July 16–July 23, 2009

THURSDAY July

16

The International Choral Festival Concert begins in earnest, with swine-flu-free performances at four locations—the Hellgate High School Auditorium, St. Anthony Parish, and UM’s Music Recital Hall and University Theatre—at both 10 AM and 7 PM, and continues through Sat., July 18. $15 all-access button. Call 721-7985, or visit choralfestival.org. (See Sound Check in this issue.)

The recent outburst of savage inter-ethnic violence in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, in northwestern China, caught the world by surprise. But the problems that erupted in bloodshed are long standing. Continuing Education and the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center at the University of Montana present a talk by Steven I. Levine, Mansfield Center Associate Director, on “Xinjiang: The Roots of Violence” on Thursday, July 16 at noon in Rm. 204 of the Todd Building (Continuing Education) on the UM campus. Levine, an expert on Chinese politics, visited Xinjiang in July 2008 and departs for Urumqi the day after his talk. Free. Learn how to conduct electricity in a safe and fun way when the SpectrUM Discovery Area, located in Room 166 of UM’s Skaggs Building, presents the program Electromagnetic Attraction from 3:30—7 PM. $3.50/free under 4. Call 243-4828 or visit spectrum.umt.edu. Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4–8 PM as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5–7:30.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Take in art from all corners of the state—yes, there are more than four—when Artini:Triennial begins at 5:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, features appearances by aesthetics luminaries Lee Proctor, Elizabeth Rose—also an extreme long-distance cyclist—Scott Sutton and Jessica Baldwin at 7. Free. Call 728-0447.

Expect an aural punch to the head when members of Minneapolis’ Doomtree collective, including MCs Dessa, SIMS, Cecil Otter, and Mike Mictlan, and DJs Lazerbeak and Paper Tiger, rock the Palace Lounge on Fri., July 17, at 9 PM, with local support from Acher and Slopstar. $6/$8 under 21. It’s time for dinner and a show with several hundred friends as Caras Park hosts this week’s Downtown ToNight at 5:30 PM, a celebration with food vendors, kids’ activities by the Children’s Museum of Missoula and music by Deja Voodoo. Free. Call 543-4238. All genres are encouraged—except, perhaps, black metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. You’re invited to dance as though nobody’s watching—but, come on, we all know they’re watching—as the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., hosts another sesh of Ecstatic Dance at 6 PM. Cover TBA. E-mail ecstaticdancers@gmail.com. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Feeling lonelier than normal? Singles of Missoula, a group for singles 45 years and older, meets at the bicycle trailhead behind Conlin’s Furniture, 1600 North Ave. W., at 6:30 PM for a bike ride that will probably include a stop for ice cream. Free. Call Cletius at 541-2333.

Come to The Cottage Inn in Kila for a 7 PM Irish jam session and stay for the weekly cribbage tournament at the world famous home of “Turbo Crib.” Free. Call 755-4572. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpine theatreproject.org. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., July 17, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calander Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Patrick J. McCormick

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

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Page 21 July 16–July 23, 2009


Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096. Bowling and karaoke go together like Sarah Silverman and Ann Coulter during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Lest ye think all bands that might be heard on The Blaze are dude-brah conventions, dig on Aroarah, four ladies of the night who beckon you to the Palace Lounge, where they play at 9 PM with Rooster Sauce and Celestial Chaos. $6. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone and booze-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The price of well drinks plummets, laptops hit the stage, and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, crunk, electronica, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Missoula’s most ballady balladeer, Russ Nasset, graciously picks up a gig at the Old Post Pub, playing every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Landslide hosts open mic night at the Bandit Saloon in Columbia Falls every Thu. and Tue. night, starting at 9 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world sideways in a good way every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Award-winning Minnesotan bluegrass glistens like an egg wash over the deep Irish loaf that is Sean Kelly’s when The High 48s get the party started at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. That down-home bluegrass flava just don’t come any more dependably than when it’s dished up by local pickers Pinegrass at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865.

FRIDAY July

17

See if you can catch an artist in the act of creation at various outdoor locales around Missoula starting today as the Dana Gallery kicks off its seventh annual Paint Out, which runs until July 23. During the event, 23 painters hailing from states like Idaho, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Illinois and Montana will take their work outdoors and problem solve their way to a final product as they deal with the chaos that is mother nature. As of now, locations are unknown, but keep your eyes out for these artists around Missoula, specifically on July 18 and 19. Free. Additionally, an exhibition of the finished pieces hits the Dana Gallery on July 23. Call 721-3154. Here’s a call to artists for the Traffic Signal Box Project, your chance to deface public property in the name of art, so you’ve got until Fri., July 24, to submit your proposal. Visit www.ci.missoula.mt.us/index.aspx?NID=854, or go hassle someone at City Hall.

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Page 22 July 16–July 23, 2009

The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3 to 6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train by Howard Zinn. Just kidding (did I need to tell you that?). Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply preliterate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Has your 6 year old been acting despondent lately, especially because you wouldn’t let

them go to that one punk show at the Palace Lounge a few weeks back? Well, here’s the solution: Kiddopalooza, a free children’s music festival that runs from 2–8 PM in Caras Park. Kid friendly acts like Anna Ballew and Ellie Nuno, Amy Martin, Vera and Wartime Blues play during the festivities. But that’s not all, there’ll also be a Blackbird Kid Shop Dance Party, Childbloom Guitar Ensembles, as well as pony rides, a live art creation exhibit followed by an auction, and a quiet time story tent. Barbeque food and beer will also be available for adults to purchase. Visit www.familiesfirstmt.org or call 721-7690. Free. The Opera House Theatre in Philipsburg offers three running productions this summer: The Vaudeville Variety Show, Butterscotch and Having a Wonderful Time, Wish You Were Her are staged every week from Thu.–Sun. at varying times throughout the season. $17/$9 under 13. Visit operahousetheatre.com, or call 859-0013. If high school English class isn’t exactly nurturing your inner poet, bring all that angsty verbiage to the Missoula Public Library every Fri. when the Teen Writing Group meets at 4:30 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Bead lovers rejoice when Ruby’s Inn hosts a bead show starting at 5 PM. The show will feature Czech pressed glass, seed beads, stone, pearls, ceramic, acrylic, bone, metal and a wide variety of other beads. Free. The show runs through July 19. The Can’t Hardly Playboys pick ‘em old and new—as long as it’s acoustic folk and rock—every Fri. from 6 to 8 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Follow the evolution of freeride trail bike riding on Teton Pass, from its illegal beginnings to its now legal status, during 6:30 and 8 PM screenings of Freedom Riders, a documentary about a group of Wyoming bike riders and how their once illegal trail systems soon got the thumbs up from the U.S. Forest Service. Roxy Theatre. $10/ advance with tickets at Missoula Bicycle Works, Bicycle Hanger, Bike Doctor, Big Sky Bikes & Fitness, Backcountry Racks, Edge of the World, Strong Water Kayaks, Hellgate Cyclery and Ear Candy Music. Visit www.freedomridersthemovie.com. Every Fri., Dianne Keast offers tips on taking care of yourself with the class Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure at 6:30 PM. Free. Call 2258504. Also on Thu. Russ Nasset picks ‘em hard, and helps you process all that food and booze, when he plays the Keep Restaurant at 7 PM. Free. Sick of taking your date to the bars? Try something different when The Missoula Public Library hosts its 7 PM Cheap Date Night film presentation, with tonight’s movie TBA. Free. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Call 721-2665. Landslide slides on over to Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, for a show at 7:30 PM. $5. Barbeque food will also be available for purchase. Call 541-8463. Imbibe your Friday night with a drink, or two, and the Lifers, who play the High Spirits Club and Casino in Florence, 5341 U.S. Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. Sidestep any traps that may be in your way and revel in the tunes of the Wild Coyotes, who play Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Live music of an unspecified nature shakes things up at 8 PM at The Raven in Bigfork, 39 Orchard Lane, which should add some spice to the Walleye Fish Fry as well. Visit sleepeatdrink.com. Local reggae-influenced rockers Pluto’s A Planet gets the crowd irie when they play an early show with local indie-rock darlings March of the Black Queen at the Badlander at 9 PM. $5.


Wallow in the complex rhymes and off-kilter beats of Minneapolis’ Doomtree collective when MCs Dessa, SIMS, Cecil Otter and Mike Mictlan take the stage of the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Acher and Slopstar open. $6/$8 under 21. Beat the summer heat indoors with some cold brews and music when Cabin Fever plays tunes at the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, at 9 PM. Free. If you like it proggy and acoustic, as well as a little indie, The Tim Torgerson Band should wet your aural whistle when they take charge at Kalispell’s Blue Canyon Kitchen and Tavern, 1840 Hwy. 93 S., at 9 PM. Free. Call 758-2583. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Café’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Get your freak on at AmVets Club, where DJ DC rocks dance music at 9 PM. Free. Release your inner Tom Waits when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to shake it like a Polaroid picture when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office

Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The party-friendly funk rock of Bellingham, Wash.’s The Growers might get you to gulp down an extra pint or two of Guinness when they play Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Danceable jazz and blues licks hit the stage when Full Grown Men play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Hit the dance floor every Thu. at 10 PM, when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJs Fleege and Kris Moon spinning an all-over-tha-map mix of lounge, breakbeat, dub, tech house and progressive electro dance music. Free. Give your respects to D-Town, aka Detroit Rock City, when proggy art rockers Bump represent the motor city when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Bask in the sounds of spinning discs as Mobile Beat’s DJs scratch it up tonight and tomorrow starting at 10 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Cover TBA. Call 755-9463. Get to know the upstairs neighbors as the Blue Mountain Observatory hosts another Public Observing Night at their secret mountaintop fortress, featuring this week’s estimated observing start time, 10:30 PM. Call 243-5179 for weather and cancellation updates before you go. Visit physics.umt.edu/bluemountain for directions. Enjoy the sounds of electro and bass heavy house jams when Seattle duo Phantom Power (comprised of DJ Cameo and Slutty Two Shoes) unleashes a live fury of booty bustin’ beats and gurgling basslines during a special midnight performance at the Badlander. DJ Coma opens. Cover TBA.

SPOTLIGHT block rockers It’s no secret that many Missoulians love supporting local businesses, especially those with the flair and diversity usually found on the Hip Strip.

WHAT: Hip Strip Block Party WHEN: Sat., July 18, 4–10 PM WHERE: Boone and Crockett Club Parking Lot HOW MUCH: Free, but to gain admission you must bring a non-perishable food item Whether you’re after gourmet food, scrumptious beer, stylish clothing or independent music and movies, the downtown appendage that sits just south of the Clark Fork on Higgins Avenue has just about anything to serve our unconventional consumption needs. In return for your loyal patronage, Hip Strip proprietors have once again teamed up for an all-day bash of all things local and hip.

“Our aim is to celebrate our neighborhood,” says Leah Morrow, organizer of the event and co-owner of Selvedge Studio. “It’s an interesting and distinct part of town, and business owners like to collaborate…We just basically felt like throwing a party,” The celebration, funded entirely by Hip Strip businesses, includes two stages of live music (like Wartime Blues, pictured above), a fashion show, food and beer, and kayak and skateboard demonstrations. Admission only runs one non-perishable food item, which will be donated to another Hip Strip staple, the Missoula Food Bank.

Missoula Independent

—Ira Sather-Olson

Page 23 July 16–July 23, 2009


SATURDAY July

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You can be certain there won’t be any derailments during Alberton’s 24th annual railroad day, which kicks off at 8 AM with a pancake breakfast and a fun run, followed by a host of activities including tours of the Alberton Railroad Museum, treasure hunts, a bluegrass jam session, beer garden, stories by a cowboy balladeer and more, concluded by music by Lefty Lucy. Free. Call 722-4990. Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. If you’re south of Missoula, your weekly dose of freshness awaits at the Hamilton Farmers’ Market, which opens at 9 AM every Sat. through Oct. 3 on Bedford Street near the Ravalli County Museum. Free. Call 961-0004. Julie Jensen, resident playwright at the Salt Lake Acting Company, leads the first of two panel discussions regarding the creation and marketing of new plays at 10 AM on the Montana Stage at the University of Montana’s PARTV building. $20/both sessions. The second session starts at 10 AM on July 19. Call 2436809 or visit www.montanarep.org. Art and technology converge when the SpectrUM Discovery Area, located in Room 166 of UM’s Skaggs Building, presents the program

LED art and MosSE Sharing session from 11 AM–4:30 PM. $3.50/free under 4. Call 2434828 or visit spectrum.umt.edu. Practice your power of observation and interpretation when you check out all that’s new during a Twenty Minute Tour every Sat. at noon at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Call 728-0447. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834. Marcus Olson’s The Roaring Girl is performed at 3 PM in the PARTV Center at the University of Montana during the first day of the Missoula Colony 14 staged readings series, which runs through July 26. $5. Later that day at the PARTV Center, actors perform Julie Jensen’s play She Was My Brother at 8 PM. $10. Call 243-6809 or visit www.montanarep.org. All things hip hit the Boone and Crockette Club’s parking lot at 4 PM during the Third Annual Hip Strip Block Party, where live music by bands like Zeppo, Wartime Blues and The Raquet play alongside kayak and skating demonstrations, food and beer vendors, as well as local artists hawking their wares. Free, but you must bring one non-perishable food item to donate in order to gain admission. Visit hipstripblockparty. blogspot.com for a full schedule of events. (See Spotlight in this issue)

nightlife Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323.

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Missoula Independent

Page 24 July 16–July 23, 2009

129 W FRONT ST (406) 721-1670


A photo walk is a social photography event where photographers get together to walk around, shoot photos, and generally have fun with other photographers. Missoulians will meet at Caras Park at 5:45 PM for a photo walk as part of the Scott Kelby Second Annual Worldwide Photo Walk. Free, but space is limited so pre-register or visit www.worldwidephotowalk.com/missoula-mtusa/. Gorge yourself with barbeque food and wine (for purchase, of course) when Farmer’s Cove plays a show at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5. If you didn’t get a chance to catch them last night, tonight you can once again sidestep any traps that may be in your way and revel in the tunes of the Wild Coyotes, who play Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Chuck Jonkel of the Great Bear Foundation shares his obsession with all things ursine when he displays hides and skulls and discusses bear biology and identification (and most importantly, how not to attract bears or get eaten by them), during a discussion at Salmon Lake State Park, five miles south of Seeley Lake off of Highway 83, at 8 PM. Free. Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Arrive early for the 8 PM sign-up—and to down a few jitter-killing drinks—as Frenchtown’s Alcan Bar and Cafe hosts the weekly Saturday Night Open Jam with Jimmy Falcon and Sam Massa at 9. Free. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Hip takes on a whole other meaning when Brooklyn indie rockers Wellness play a show at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Greenstar and Ryan Rebo open. $5. DJs Kris Moon and Monte Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip

hop, electronic and other bass heavy, booty busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to perform during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW, but do your best not to bellow, as people are trying to eat pizza next door. Free. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Café’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. You’re a diva on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJ DC and his dance music at 9 PM. Free. As the sun sets at 9:24 PM, be sure you’ve scored a spot on the playfield of Missoula’s Headstart School, 1001 Worden Ave., during the third installment of the Missoula Outdoor Cinema. Tonight’s selection: Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the absurdist classic that spoofs King Arthur’s quest to acquire the Holy Grail. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873. The Lifers just might urge you to get out of your house, get a life and perhaps grab a drink when they play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Cozy on up to the dance floor with your favorite guy or gal when Zeppo brings their rhythm and blues to Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 US Highway 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Charlie Parr proves that folk and Americana isn’t just for old folks when the Duluth, Minn. artist hits the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday

and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. You’re hereby invited to Hamilton’s Carriage

SUNDAY July

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House, 310 N. Fourth St., every Sun. at 9 AM, in order that you might bear witness to Rev. Kathianne Lewis’ message from the Center for Spiritual Living in Seattle. Free. Call 375-9996. Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Free. You’re invited to wrestle with the claims of Jesus in an open and accepting environment every Sun. at 10 AM, when All Souls Missoula meets on the third floor of the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Free. Visit allsoulsmissoula.org. Did Jesus like carnival food? Find out when the Clark Fork City Church holds a community carnival at Caras Park at noon featuring food, prizes, kids games, live music, a petting zoo and much more. Free. Call 721-7804. Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 2 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Craig Meyers, Haley Running Crane and Andrea Running Wolf, as well as Eddie Stonechild have professional actors act from plays they wrote at 3 PM in the PARTV Center at the University of Montana during the second day of the Missoula Colony 14 staged readings series, which runs through July 26. $5. Later that day at the PARTV Center, actors perform Rob Caisley’s The Lake at 8 PM. $10. Call 243-6809.

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nightlife Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with live jazz by the Sam White Quartet and spun sounds by DJ Gary Stein from 8:30 PM–midnight. Free, and the martinis are super affordable. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Mellow country vibes from the Missoula of Texas, aka Austin, hit your ears when James McMurtry visits the Top Hat for an early show at 8 PM. Cover TBA.

MONDAY July

20

Actors perform Barret O’Brien’s Midnight in the Marigny at 3 PM in the PARTV Center at the University of Montana during the third day of the Missoula Colony 14 staged readings series, which runs through July 26. $5. Later that day at the PARTV Center, actors perform James McLure’s play Charades at 8 PM. $10. Call 2436809 or visit www.montanarep.org.

nightlife What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Missoula’s newest naturopaths want health care to be accessible to everyone. That’s why doctors from the Golgi Clinic invite you to participate in a

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Missoula Independent

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Page 25 July 16–July 23, 2009


SPOTLIGHT play group Montana Rep Artistic Director Greg Johnson talks about his summer playwrights’ festival like a proud parent. That’s because over the last 13 years, he’s seen virtual unknowns come through the Colony to test, tweak and re-test rough scripts through public

WHAT: The Missoula Colony 14 WHEN: Sat., July 18–Sun., July 26 WHERE: University of Montana’s Montana Theatre HOW MUCH: $5 afternoon reading, $10 evening reading, $40 all readings readings and private workshops, all in an effort to get better. In many bestcase scenarios, those same scripts have launched hugely successful writing careers. And even those writers who haven’t reached the mainstream (yet), show marked improvement over time. The result is an event that’s taken on a life of its own. “Every year we say we’re low on money and we’ll do it small,” says Johnson. “Then, like this year, we still end up with 21 playwrights. After all these years I think we’ve developed a track record of developing these local writers, or writers who simply love the experience of the Colony, and they keep coming back with new work.”

casual, round-table discussion about health topics that interest you. Whether you’re concerned about fatigue, chronic allergies, digestive complaints, or just want to chat with some new docs, join them at Bernice’s Bakery, at 6 PM. Free. Train your fingers to feel the difference between a “Q” and an “E” when you attend the Missoula Scrabble League’s weekly Scrabble meet at 6 PM in the boardroom of the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-0387. The music is free, but the wine sadly isn’t, during a set by Discount Quartet featuring Steve Kalling and Eric Keeling at the Red Bird Wine Bar at 7 PM. Free. Author Rick Bass recounts life in the Yaak during a reading and signing of his book The Wild Marsh: Four Seasons at Home in Montana at Shakespeare & Company, 103 S. Third St. W., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-9010. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Inject a little Baroque classical music into your life when Missoula’s Baroque ensemble Brandhout presents “Bach and More,” a concert of 18th-century French and German classical music at Hamilton’s First Presbyterian Church, 1220 W. Main, at 7:30 PM. $12/$5 students and seniors. Call Jill Davies at 642-3601. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM

Missoula Independent

Page 26 July 16–July 23, 2009

Local audiences benefit the most from that commitment. This year’s lineup includes Colony veterans like Ron Fitzgerald (now a lead writer on Showtime’s hit series “Weeds”), Roger Hedden and James McClure (they collaborated on a screenplay) and Carol Hemingway (Ernest’s daughter-in-law, whose It Just Catches went from the Colony to New York stages). Barret O’Brien, pictured above, also returns to his old stomping grounds for a reading of Midnight in the Marigny, a hilarious play that he brought to the Colony two years ago and has now adapted into a screenplay. Playwrights consider their Colony material works in progress, but it rarely feels that way for the audience. With staged readings by professional actors, it’s a chance to discover the next gem before it reaches the big stage. For a full schedule of the Missoula Colony 14, see our calendar of events or visit www.montanarep.org. Skylar Browning

at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, who presents Tribal Fusion Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. An array of unnamed DJs that you may or may not know play music you might know at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The Milkcrate Mechanic keeps the groove fine tuned when he presents random music for random people, featuring rotating electronic DJs and acts, free pool and mad crunk every Mon. at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge. Free. Archaeologists spend a lot of time with dead people. They dig up graves and study the human remains which they find. A lecture by Dr. E. B. Eiselein at Flathead High School will look at what graves and human remains tell archaeologists about the past. Examples will be drawn from the Egyptian mummies, American Indian finds, the Italian “Ice Man” and European bog bodies. 9 PM. Free. Bring your beer and music appreciation glands to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and you’ll soon find yourself surrounded by the finest musical acts on the planet. Free.


This week’s unseasonably cool weather and heavy rains makes the Calendar Playa look toward fire season. It’s probably too early to know if Mother Nature plans to bring her wrath to the forests of our five valleys this summer. But if she does, it likely won’t be as bad as it was in the state of California last year. You see, I just recently came back to our fair town from a 14-month stint living in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Last year’s forest fires in California were downright nasty. So bad, in fact, that Fresno was engulfed in a disgusting orange-brown haze of smog and fire particulate for several weeks. Add to this the fact that Fresno recently received the honor of being ranked the fourth worst city in the nation in terms of air quality by ozone, according to the American Lung Association—and the fact that it’s, you know, Fresno—and you can imagine my nightmare summer. As you can probably tell, it feels good to be back. So take solace, dear readers, in the fact that western Montana isn’t coated in a perpetual layer of smog and enjoy plenty of fresh air during one of the Wilderness Institute’s volunteer monitoring trips in the Sapphire and Blue Joint Wilderness Study areas, which this week takes volunteers up to Reynolds Lake Trail. Hikers will head out on July 17, return July 20, and help monitor weeds, recreation impacts and wilderness character. Click on over to www.cfc.umt.edu/wi to sign up, or call 243-5361. After my experience in Fresno, sometimes I like to just sit inside and simply dream of shredding western Montana’s terrain.

If you’re similarly inclined, you’ll get a chance to watch the evolution of freeride trail bike riding on Teton Pass, from its illegal beginnings to its now legal status, during July 17 screenings at the Roxy Theater of Freedom Riders, a documentary about a group of Wyoming bike riders and how their once illegal trail systems soon got the thumbs up from the U.S. Forest Service. 6:30 and 8 PM. $10 advance. Tickets at Missoula Bicycle Works, Bicycle Hanger, Bike Doctor, Big Sky Bikes & Fitness, Backcountry Racks, Edge of the World, Strong Water Kayaks, Hellgate Cyclery and Ear Candy Music. Visit www.freedomridersthemovie.com.

Speaking of thumbs up, the joy of pleasant distraction fills this weekend’s discovery workshop at the National Bison Range near Moiese. You should be signed up for it by July 16 if you want to participate in the activity on July 18. As for the workshop itself, citizens should expect lots of mud bogging and trail walking while learning about the importance of wetlands, as well as the plants and animals that inhabit them. Hurry up and call Pat Jamieson at 644-2211 ext. 207 to register or e-mail pat_jamieson@fws.org. Cost and other details TBA. If you slack on signing up to explore the National Bison Range, you’ll have yet another chance to enjoy a particulate-free environment during “Fun and Games!” a kid-oriented weekend festival

that runs from 9 AM–7 PM on July 18 and 9 AM–5 PM on July 19 at Traveler’s Rest State Park near Lolo. Youngsters can participate in a range of classic European American games as well as American Indian games, such as an atlatl throwing competition. Free/$2 adults. Call 273-4253 or head over to www.travelersrest.org. Later on Saturday, for those who aren’t early birds, but enjoy studying birds, two Missoulians—Byron “The Bug Man” Weber and Charles “The Bird Man” Miller—present “Beneficial Insects and Beautiful Birds,” a tag-team presentation at 10 AM that begins with a meet up at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. This presentation, which is also kid friendly, covers all the birds and insects that reside on the PEAS Farm and aims to show you where and what to look for the next time you go out to explore those winged and sixlegged creatures. $15/$10 members. Call 327-0405 to register, since space is limited. On Sunday, July 19, get out of church—or if you’re like me, skip church altogether—and hit the pavement when Missoulians On Bicycles presents a Geezer Ride to Some Restaurant Somewhere at 10 AM. Riders should plan to meet up at the Greenough parking lot, at the corner of Monroe and Locust Streets, and be prepared to endure a 10–14 mile bike trip. Call Gayle and Ernie at 2409279 or visit www.missoulabike.org. Photo by Chad Harder Later that week, those of us who feel like skipping a day of work might consider heading out with the Nature Conservancy and American Wildlands at 10 AM, July 22, for a 2.5 round-trip hike in the Northern Swan Valley to Glacier Lake. Plan to meet at Highway 83 and Kraft Creek Road near mile markers 36–27. Call Kim Davitt at 728-2087 or e-mail kdavitt@wildlands.org. Well, I’m a little pressed for space at this point, but hopefully this should satiate your outdoor needs at least for the next week. As always, please send outdoors related events to me by 5 PM on Fri., July 17. Until then, work hard and play harder outside. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 27 July 16–July 23, 2009


Praise Jah and burn the town down when roots reggae artist Joseph Israel brings his heady, positive vibes to the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

TUESDAY July

21

Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Bluegrass and Americana fans take note: Nashville pickers The Cantrells play a free concert at Hamilton’s

Legion Park during “Tuesdays at 12,” which actually begins at noon. Free. Toes will tap and fingers will snap (in the painless way) when the Rocky Mountain Rhythm Kings ride into Snappy Sport Senter, 1400 Hwy. 2 E., every Tue. at noon. Free, donation suggested. Call 257-7525. The dictionary defines “BOGO” as an acronym for “Buy One, Get One,” which means BOGO Pottery Tuesdays ease your entry into ceramics ownership from noon–6 PM every Tue. at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. Turn off the tube, or YouTube for that matter, and get your parents to give you a ride down to the Missoula Public Library at 2 PM where there’ll be refreshments, games and books abound during a Summer Party as part of the library’s family reading program. Free.

nightlife Classical music and locally grown produce find themselves in a healthy marriage during the Whitefish Downtown Farmers’ Market at Depot Park, at the north end of Central Avenue, from 5–7:30 PM when the Glacier Symphony and Chorale Amadeus Showcase belt out soothing symphonic sounds. Free. Call 862-2043. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in Room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834.

Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. Stop playing games with yourself or with your computer—Game Night featuring “mostly Scrabble” takes place at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. 6:45 PM. Free. Vladimir Putin probably won’t be making a guest appearance, but if piano music floats your boat, renowned Russian pianist Gleb Ivanov tickles the ivory keys during a performance at Superior Baptist Church, 609 Fifth Ave. E. in Superior, at 7 PM. Free, but donations are appreciated. If you can’t read this and you’re not interested in Tiny Tales, allow me to suggest the 7 PM informal English conversation group Talk Time, which is led by TEFL instructor Adam Hart and meets the first and third Tue. of the month at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-2665. Classic rock and ice cream mix like a match made in a care-free, dad-knowsbest, 1950s heaven when Fresh Ink plays Kalispell’s Picnic in the Park concert series at Depot Park, located at Center St. and Main St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 758-7717. Hey wrong-side-of-the-street rider: You can learn to bike responsibly at Free Cycle’s Bike Well classes at 7 PM at 732 S. First St. W., where class also convenes on Wed. and Thu. Call 5417284 for times. You never know what you’ll find— except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and

Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Suite 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Hone your rhymes, stanzas and diction during a six-week poetry writing workshop with Chris Dombrowski, author of By Cold Water, at 7 PM at a TBA location. $150 for all six weeks. Call the 406 Writers Workshop at 493-0746. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? Who was the inventor of the Moog Synthesizer, an electronic instrument popularized in the 1970s from its use by prog rock groups like Emerson, Lake and Palmer, as well as ambient music pioneer Brian Eno? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Actors perform Roger Hedden and James McClure’s untitled screenplay at 8 PM in the University of Montana’s PARTV Center during the fourth day of the Missoula Colony 14 staged readings series, which runs through July 26. $10. Call 243-6809 or visit www.montanarep.org. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

The Bookstore at The University of Montana is gearing up for Fall Rush and looking for experienced customer service experts to work August 10th through the second week of September. We pay $8.00/hr. and successful applicants will receive a storewide discount on most items. We are looking for outgoing, friendly, compassionate people. Previous retail experience including the use of a cash register and money handling is required. Also, you must be willing to work weekends, holidays and overtime, thus these are non student positions. Applications will be accepted through August 2nd. Please pick apply online at montanabookstore.com. UNIVERSITY CENTER • 5 CAMPUS DRIVE • MISSOULA, MT 59801 406.243.1234 TOLL FREE 888.333.1995

montanabookstore.com Missoula Independent

Page 28 July 16–July 23, 2009


Sacramento, Calif., punkers Bastards of Young hit the Palace Lounge with support from In the Red and Anchor Down for a full fledged night of aural rebellion at 9 PM. Missoula rockers Come Up Swinging open. $5/$7 under 21. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Local bands looking to expand their audience, and perhaps garner a handful of drink tickets, play at the Badlander tonight at 9 PM. Free. Tonight’s band is TBA. The moon’s always full and the pack’s always howlin’ at the Wolf Den’s Open Mic Night in Polson. Free. 9 PM. Call 883-2054. L.I.V. Karaoke night gives your larynx a weekly workout with a 9:30 PM sesh at the Elbow Room. Free. Call 531-7800.

WEDNESDAY July

22

Take a load off in the company of friends every Wed. from 9–11:30 AM as Aspen Hospice, 107 Bell Crossing West, hosts the Caregiver Coffee Break. Free. Call 642-3010. Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. Your weekly lunch date with, well, everyone comes at 11 AM as Caras Park transforms with Out to Lunch, which features food vendors, kids’ activities by the SpectrUM Science Tent and music by Smoke. Free. Call 543-4238. White Hawk brings their alternative rawk to Kalispell’s Picnic in the Park Wednesday lunch series at Depot Park, located at Center St. and Main St., at 11:30 AM. Free. Call 758-7717. Professional actors perform plays by Jim Sontag and Carol Hemingway at 3 PM in the PARTV Center at the University of Montana during the fifth day of the Missoula Colony 14 staged readings series, which runs through July 26. $5. Later that day at the PARTV Center, actors perform Jessica Goldberg’s Just War at 8 PM. $10. Call 243-6809 or visit www.montanarep.org.

nightlife Blue Argon plays “eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn” every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. A revolving cast of local singers and musicians makes up the band Katy and Friends, who do the rocking every Wed. at 6:30 PM at the Cottage Inn in Kila. Free. Call 755-8711. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom

every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy both cravings by attending bimonthly meetings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running science fiction convention, the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333.

Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066.

The Missoula City Band toots its horn, but not without the help of guest vocalist Dawn Douglass, during its weekly concert at Bonner Park at 8 PM. Free.

Local illustrator, Indy contributor and coffee/gluten slinger Andy Smetanka presents the final Missoula screenings of My Winnipeg, a film by Guy Maddin—with silhouette animation by Smetanka— which documents the filmmakers hometown (a city that’s been called “The World’s Capital of Sorrow”) at 7 and 9 PM. $7.

Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org.

Whitefish’s Alpine Theatre Project presents the Tony Award-winning musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center. $12–37. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org.

Indie pop cavorts with psych rock tendencies when Tucson, Ariz.’s Holy Rolling Empire hits the Palace Lounge with Floating Action, Generationals and the Volumen at 9 PM. $5.

Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096.

Get a taste of the folk stylings of Gabriel Sullivan, who has a cigarette and whiskey-tinged voice that sounds eerily like Tom Waits, when he plays the Badlander at 9 PM. $5. The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, maintains a healthy balance every Wed., when Ladies’ Night features Guitar Hero contests and kicks off at 9 PM. Free, unless you buy something. Call 363-6969. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: The inventor of the popular Moog Synthesizer was none other than Bob Moog, an electronic instrument pioneer who passed away in 2005.

Start down the path that ends in a Las Vegas dressing room every Thu. at 8:30 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Show Girl 101. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Jibe to a mellow vibe when Sol Jibe brings their brand of acoustic rock to the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Clear that pile of cougars from your lap, or don’t, if you like the older ladies, and hit the floor every Thu. at 10 PM, when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJs Fleege and Kris Moon spinning an all-over-tha-map mix of lounge, breakbeat, dub, tech house and progressive electro dance music. Free.

July

23

Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4–8 PM as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5–7:30.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

Fall Bowling Leagues Forming Now Get Your Team Ready To Roll Play in our Vegas style casino

Karaoke by Solid Sound 8:30pm Wed, Thurs, & Sat Nights

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Attention Drivers GO ONLINE TO RENEW YOUR VEHICLE REGISTRATION Avoid lines! Save gas! Conveniently renew your vehicle registrations from your home or office, day or night.

https://app.mt.gov/vrr/ Mail renewals still available.

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop fueled hip hop, crunk, electonic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every Thur., where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booty’s bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $2. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace Lounge at 9 PM every Thu. Free.

THURSDAY

CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Spit the trid out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327.

Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

36 LANES

Greetings fellow arts and entertainment enthusiasts. This is the Calendar Playa, once again filling the void as calendar editor until a replacement is finally chosen for this position. As some of you may have noticed, we were a little short on space this week and couldn’t include everything. Our apologies in advance—especially to some of you offering summer classes. In the meantime, send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., July 17, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 July 16–July 23, 2009


scope Missoula Independent

It’s about the journey Cast of characters brings Best Bar in America to big screen by Skylar Browning

Here’s the pitch: Two first-time Missoula film- something we thought we could do on a limited “He brought some objectivity to the project makers, brothers, decide to write, direct, finance budget.” that Damon and I no longer had,” says Eric. “He and edit a non-linear feature-length film that’s The Best Bar in America follows Sanders was like the godfather in guiding us through things, essentially about self-discovery—and drinking. (Andrew Rizzo, and his impressive beard), a and he fit right into the overall vibe of the movie.” The cast consists of mostly unknown local talent, writer documenting every watering hole in the But the Ristaus realized that a finished film, with the lead actor sporting a beard that looks West for a guidebook. Along the way, he falls for even if it was good, wasn’t guaranteed to reach like something Saddam Hussein grew in a spider a mermaid (Lee McAfee) working at the Sip N Dip a screen outside of Missoula. On a whim, they hole. After filming, the brothers ask an estab- who’s trying to resurrect her family’s bar, and called Dowd and asked for him to consider lished local playwright and screenwriter to be the befriends Northway (David Ackroyd), a sage wan- signing on with the film. The Dude, who has project’s “godfather” and help them finish it derer based on a real homeless veteran the ties to Missoula—he calls Huey Lewis and because he knows what it’s like to write for Ristaus met in their own travels. Sanders also Monte Dolack friends, and worked with Annick Hollywood—and he knows drinking. Once the wrestles with a pending divorce, picks up a hitch- Smith to help launch the Sundance Film film’s mostly completed, the brothers convince hiker (Gregory Collet) who robs a casino and Festival—abided. “The Dude,” the real-life Hollywood personality comes across countless other characters—cameos “I thought Damon and Eric did a phenomenal who inspired the main character in The Big include author Jim Harrison and Crystal Video job of telling a non-linear story with some really Lebowski, to sign on and try to sell the finished owner Tim Huffman—who populate the diviest great characters,” says Dowd, who will attend product to festivals and distributors. And then bars of the West. Friday’s screening. “If it can get compelling word this crew—the first-time filmmakers, the unknown cast, the veteran screenwriter and The Dude—decides to host a rough cut screening at the Wilma Theatre, just to see how the whole thing flies. Now, is that something you might be interested in? If you said yes—and, come on, who isn’t intrigued to see the outcome of all that?—then consider the fact that this pitch only covers the making of Eric and Damon Ristau’s debut feature, The Best Bar in America. On Friday, July 17, the brothers will screen an 85-minute rough cut of the almost-finished product in hopes of generating some positive word of mouth and taking their first step toward getting it to big screens across the country. “A film has to be really great to succeed as an independent film,” says Jim Dowd, aka The Andrew Rizzo, right, and Gregory Collet star in The Best Bar in America, an independently financed feature Dude, who has a track record of film made almost entirely by western Montanans. producing successful smallbudget project. “There are over 10,000 independThe Ristaus covered the cast and crews’ basic of mouth, if people don’t just say it’s interesting— ently financed films sitting on a shelf right now that expenses—including copious amounts of Wild that’s another word for ‘I didn’t really like it, but are going to get close to no theatrical [release], Turkey—but no one was paid. Ninety days of I’ll cover my ass’—then it’s got a shot.” probably no DVD and very little cable. They may shooting in Idaho, Utah and Montana took over Despite his support of the film, Dowd’s the get some action on the Internet, but that’s it for five months. With various overlapping storylines first one to point out that indie films face a dauntmost of them. There are exceptions, though, and I and hours of footage, the Ristaus’ original cut of ing challenge when it comes to ever making think the Ristaus have a shot to be an exception.” the film spanned more than 150 minutes. money. The Ristaus know that, as well, but conEric and Damon Ristau, 32 and 30, respective“It’s been a learning experience,” says Eric. sider themselves a little more battle tested after ly, founded Firewater Film Co. two years ago, but “Fortunately, we overshot, and having too much simply finishing the current version. have been working together professionally for six material versus too little is a good problem to “It’s been pretty wild, to say the least,” says years. Both brothers bring film backgrounds to have.” Damon. “But the important thing is that I think the company—Damon is the former director of the To edit down the film, the Ristaus asked we’ve made—with a few changes still, but mostly Big Sky Documentary Film Festival; Eric worked in local playwright and screenwriter Roger made—a film that we’re ready to stand behind freelance film and radio—and started by shooting Hedden for assistance. Hedden, who wrote and be proud of.” high-def footage for commercial clients. But fea- films like Hi-Life and Sleep With Me, jumped ture films, and specifically The Best Bar in into the project, offering help with re-writes The Ristaus host a “work-in-progress America, were always a part of their plan. and tightening story arcs. The Ristaus and screening” of The Best Bar in America Friday, “It’s something we wanted to do from the Hedden worked late hours—usually over a bot- July 17, at 7:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $5. start,” says Damon in his garage-turned-editing tle of Jack Daniels—getting the film into its cursbrowning@missoulanews.com bay. “It’s a story we really wanted to tell, and rent form.

Page 30 July 16–July 23, 2009


ATTN: NON-PROFITS! Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Foreign tongues Crashing the coral, er, Choral Festival by Bob Wire

It’s been on everyone’s lips for weeks, and I’ve visas, or I would have been forced to make some been dying to get involved. A Coral Festival! Sweet! lame joke about the cancelled Czechs. I love snorkeling. Where’d I put my Speedos…? The Tianan Chamber Choir from Taiwan has But, of course, it’s not coral everyone’s talk- an interesting makeup—most of its 26 members ing about, it’s choral. As in, the International are elementary and junior high school teachers. Choral Festival. You know, singing. I’ve heard of Their choral focus, though, is to mix it up with the festival, but I’ve never even been to one. And the people and music of other cultures, which although the entire event takes place above water, makes for a highly entertaining concert full of surI’m still game to act as an unofficial hand-holder prises. Just don’t get caught chewing gum. for this year’s first-timers. If you manage to get to only one performFirst, a little background on this shindig: ance, though, make it the finale concert at University of Montana Professor Donald Carey put Washington-Grizzly Stadium Saturday, July 18, at together the debut Festival in 1987, after touring Europe with the Missoula Mendelssohn Club, and conducting the University’s Chamber Chorale in France a few years earlier. He was so knocked out with the oldworld hospitality and enthusiasm for his groups, he thought Missoula should return the favor and host an international festival here. Organizers were amazed by the overwhelming response from counPhoto courtesy of Mark Gorseth tries like Austria, France, Germany, The International Choral Festival draws choral groups and the burgeoning nation of South from around the globe every three years, including this Dakota. Crowds filled the venue—a South Korean choir in 2006. “It’s music we really don’t get high school gym—to overflowing, to hear very often,” says Executive Director Carol Stovall. so the concert was moved to the more spacious environs of UM, and Carey and his 7 p.m. The “Parade of Nations” features the entire crew knew they had a hit on their hands. collection of choirs, each singing a sample of their Seven festivals later, Missoula has played host country’s music. It’s kind of like the Olympic closto choral groups from 40 countries, not to men- ing ceremonies, but without the fireworks or tion 12 U.S states. cornball commentary from Bob Costas. But it’s not just about the music. Organizers The festival is a stunningly complex undertaking, found more than 100 host families to house, feed requiring lots of international legal wrangling, which and transport the 215 international singers who is why they need three years to prepare. Organizers came to Missoula this year. and lawyers have to wrestle with government agen“We keep hearing that we’re not really differ- cies over passport and visa issues, and the constantent from each other,” says Executive Director ly shifting sands of world politics makes it a challenge Carol Stovall. “We discover that we share a lot of for them to make this ambitious event a reality. the same hopes and dreams and problems and The polished performances, colorful finery everyday life.” Still, our isolated location can pres- and pure musical bliss of the concerts can belie ent some difficulties for a first-time visitor from the turmoil left behind by the singers from some the other side of the world. Like, “Where can I of these global hot spots. Estonia, for example, score some fried Baltic herring this time of night?” was kicking a leg out from under the barstool of or “Okay, who stole my rubber mbui-bui?” the Soviet Union by declaring their independence, But that’s the singers’ problem. Potential when their Tallinn Chamber Choir traveled to attendees are more concerned with what they’re Missoula for the International Choral Festival in getting themselves into. For one thing, according 1990. Within a year, the Soviet Union had colto Stovall, you’re not going to be rubbing elbows lapsed. Coincidence? Maybe, maybe not, comrade. with your typical stuffed-shirt symphony crowd. From Mexico to South Korea, these far-flung The emotional pull of music created by the nations have sent their musical emissaries to Big human voice cuts across all socio-economic Sky Country, leaping political boundaries to show boundaries, and it’s a real mixed bag of concert- thousands of participants and fans that music is the goers that pack the venues to dig the soaring universal language. I’ll be there. In my Speedos. vocals and the lush, complex harmonies. “It’s music we really don’t get to hear very The International Choral Festival continues often,” says Stovall. You’ll hear everything from through Saturday, July 18, at venues across the spooky Gregorian chants of the Tbilisi, Missoula. All-access buttons cost $15. For a full Georgia choir, to the vocal stylings of the heavily festival lineup, visit www.choralfestival.org. trophied Concert Choir from the Czech Republic. arts@missoulanews.com It’s a good thing the latter group cleared their

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Page 31 July 16–July 23, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 32 July 16–July 23, 2009

When Sadia Shepard left New York in the fall Foreign?” he asks. Shepard nods. The guard’s of 2001, just days after the attack on the World question supplies the memoir’s title and embodTrade Center, she journeyed to India on a ies a deeper reality. In truth, Shepard is not tradiFulbright Scholarship. Her project was to focus tionally American, nor is she entirely Indian, nor, on the Bene Israel, a tiny Jewish community for that matter, is she necessarily Pakistani. whose members believe they are one of the lost Therefore, yes, she is the girl “from Foreign.” tribes of Israel, having been shipwrecked in India At no time was that sense of foreign-ness more 2,000 years ago. Though certainly a cultural mis- alienating than in her first months in India. After an sion, even an anthropological one, Shepard’s trek upsetting encounter with a street vendor who, was also a personal one. much to Shepard’s horror, mimed the attack on Growing up in a suburb of Boston, Shepard the World Trade Center while pointing at Shepard and her younger brother were and saying “Amreeka! Amreeka!” raised by their white Protestant Shepard wondered why her father from Colorado, their mother had never taught her Muslim mother from Pakistan Hindi or “the hand gestures, the and their grandmother, Rahat head toss, the way to walk in Siddiqi, who lived with the famileather sandals, picking up the ly. One afternoon, when Shepard sole of the shoe a little bit each was 13, she discovered her time with a small squeeze of your grandmother’s secret: that Rahat first and second toes.” The Siddiqi had been born Rachel answer was that her mother Jacobs and was a descendent of never wanted Shepard to feel difthe Bene Israel—making Shepard ferent from the other children. herself part-Christian, part“But of course I am different,” Muslim and part-Jewish. Shepard writes. “I am different at At 16, Rahat fell in love with home and I am different here. At and secretly married Ali Siddiqi, home it is unusual, interesting to a Muslim 10 years her senior be different, a cultural curiosity. who already had two other The Girl from Foreign Here it is merely uncomfortable.” Sadia Shepard wives and several children. For paperback, Penguin Shepard’s story is part of an 10 years, until she became preg- 384 pages, $16.00 ever-growing multicultural liternant with Shepard’s mother, ature, one that seems to consisRahat kept the marriage secret. In 1947, after the tently explore the roots of “home,” whether that partition of India (when the British Indian terri- be the home of one’s ancestors, one’s parents or tories became India and Pakistan, respectively), wherever one might decide to make home. Our Rahat left her beloved home in Bombay (built for concept of personal history is so often shaped by her by Ali and called “Rahat Villa”) and followed our place of birth, our roots, our religion. her husband to Pakistan, to live in a home shared Shepard’s personal history supplied multiple among Ali, his three wives and all their children. options, but no definitive answers, and her jourNot long before Rahat’s death in 2000, Sadia ney is an attempt to explore the most mysterious Shepard promised her grandmother she would part of her cultural inheritance—her grandmothgo to India to learn about her ancestors. The er’s Judaism. result of Shepard’s nearly two-year stay in By the memoir’s close, Shepard has found a Mumbai is an intricate, poetically written memoir. way to comfortably navigate throughout India. In “I am here,” writes Shepard, “as an amateur fact, she’s grown so comfortable that part of her detective on that most American of journeys: a longs to stay. Having unraveled much of her search for the roots of my own particular grandmother’s past and chronicling the lives of tree…What I know are fragments. I am here to the few remaining members of the Bene Israel weave them together, to create a new story, a community (most have emigrated to Israel), story uniquely my own.” Shepard has, ostensibly, fulfilled her Fulbright Which is exactly what she does. requirements. Yet, there is a feeling of reluctance The Girl from Foreign tells the story of Shepard’s in the closing pages of Girl from Foreign, that the grandmother and, to a broader extent, the history of personal story Shepard set out to create at the the Bene Israel. (Shepard also made a documentary beginning of her journey is best left unfinished. called In Search of the Bene Israel that chronicles the For the sake of her audience, Shepard might history of Jews in Mumbai.) Primarily, though, it is want to keep writing that story. If it’s anything Shepard’s own story that prevails here, part-trave- like this memoir, we’ll want to read it. logue and part-meditation on what it means to have grown up in a multi-ethnic, interfaith home. Sadia Shepard reads from The Girl from In one instance, when trying to enter through Foreign at Fact & Fiction Tuesday, July 21, at a gate at The Film and TV Institute of India, a 7 PM. Free. guard stops Shepard and questions her since he arts@missoulanews.com has no record of her name. “You are from


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“You need a shave,” says Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) to Harry Potter (Daneil Radcliffe) during a late scene in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince—and damned if there isn’t a trace of stubble shadowing the lad’s chin. There’s a pitch-perfect tone to Gambon’s delivery—not chiding, but with an almost wistful disbelief that this could be the same pink-cheeked boy who was plucked six years earlier from a cupboard under the stairs to the middle of a magical civil war. Eight years and six films into the Harry Potter films series, it’s undeniable that a lot of the pleasure comes from an accumulation, the experience

territory, making their frustrated fumblings as endearing as they are uncomfortable to watch. And it continues to be a delight following the three lead actors grow into their roles, and play off one another so naturally. Only-children Harry and Hermione spar like a brother and sister neither one ever had, becoming confidantes when both are low. Meanwhile, Ron’s good-natured obliviousness provides the ideal comic-relief fulcrum. It’s a pleasure, too, visiting again with Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane), McGonagall (Maggie Smith) and Snape (Alan Rickman). Even as newcomer Broadbent continues the tradition of Hogwart’s guest faculty stealing the

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of watching children become young men and women before our eyes. J.K. Rowling’s books created a witty, magnificent mythology, but at their core they were always fundamentally about growing up from innocence to experience and responsibility. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince shows the films continuing to mature just as its protagonists are, with all the humor, awkwardness and heartbreak that such a journey entails. The Death Eaters are still on the march as a new school year begins at Hogwart’s, and everyone seems to have a secret agenda. Dumbledore cajoles retired instructor Horace Slughorn (Jim Broadbent) back to work at Hogwart’s for an unknown purpose. Draco Malfoy (Tom Felton) has been recruited into a secret mission by the other servants of Voldemort, including Bellatrix Lestrange (Helena Bonham Carter). Even Harry’s frayed copy of his potions textbook presents a mystery, with its copious marginalia attributed to “The Half-Blood Prince.” Everyone would seem to have quite a lot on his or her plate simply trying to stay alive. These are, however, 16 year olds we’re talking about, and as such they tend to have their minds on other things as well. Screenwriter Steve Kloves spends a lot of time on the characters’ burgeoning romances, as Hermione (Emma Watson) fends off the advances of self-absorbed Cormac McLaggen (Freddie Stroma) while fretting over seeing Ron (Rupert Grint) find a girlfriend. Harry, meanwhile, gets twitterpated over Ron’s younger sister Ginny (Bonnie Wright). Director David Yates—returning from Order of the Phoenix— effectively guides his young cast through tricky

show, the central trio hold their own. There’s so much goodwill built into their interactions that a smart filmmaker probably needs simply to get out of the way. There is, of course, always the problem of condensing when it comes to Rowling’s increasingly massive volumes. In the first two films, Kloves seemed too concerned with packing in plot details for the books’ fans, but like the series itself, he has relaxed and grown. Half-Blood Prince is far less dense with magical action than its predecessors, and perhaps that makes it feel mostly like a stage-setter for the finale that will be Deathly Hallows. Yet it’s so rich with characterization that it scarcely matters. Hardcore Potter-ites know, of course, that HalfBlood Prince concludes with a spoiler-iffic plot development, and in fairness to those few who remain unaware it’s best not to name it. But even the way the film builds to that moment shows how keenly Kloves and Yates are aware that it fits into Harry’s maturation into manhood. This is a dark and foreboding tale, filled with plenty of disturbing images—including the hexing of a young student that plays like a demonic possession, and an attack by a swarm of creatures a bit too reminiscent of Lord of the Rings’ Gollum—that make the switch back from Goblet of Fire and Order of the Phoenix’s PG-13 to PG seem as arbitrary as it is befuddling. Harry Potter’s story at this point isn’t one for children any more—just as it isn’t a story about children any more. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince opens Friday, July 17, at the Carmike 10 and Village 6. arts@missoulanews.com

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OPENING THIS WEEK Cheri Set in the Belle Époque era of 19th Century France, this romantic drama—directed by Stephen Frears–tells the story of young Cheri (Rupert Friend) and his relationship with 49-year-old Lea (Michelle Pfeiffer). See what happens when Cheri’s mom (Kathy Bates) tries to thwart their love. Rated R. Showing at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

NOW PLAYING Bruno Six words: Sacha Baron Cohen’s gay Austrian model. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:10 and 3:20. The Hangover Four gents on a Las Vegas bachelor party expedition scramble to answer the morning-after question, “What happened?” and get the groom back to L.A. in time for some nuptials. Sick lyrical cameo by Mike Tyson. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:30, 7:50 and 10:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:40 and 3:05. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Ding! Round six! All your faves are back, everything’s more dangerous and hormonal—especially Hermione—and somewhere someone’s getting all steamed up about witchcraft’s glorification in the mainstream media. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7, 8 and 10:15, with a 10:15 AM showing and 11:15 PM showing Wed.–Sat. Matinees at 12:30, 1:30, 3:45 and 4:45. Also showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 10:15, with matinees at 12:30 and 3:45. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:35 and 9:15, with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs This animated children’s comedy, the third installment in the series, follows Manny and his friends as they navigate life through adult-oriented topics like falling in love, starting a family and going extinct. Voiceovers include cameos by Queen Latifah and Denis Leary. Rated PG. Showing in 3-D at the Carmike 10 at 4, 7:10 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:40 and 2:50. Also playing, but in 2-D, at the Village 6 at 5, 7:10 and 9:30, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 12:40 and 2:50, and in 3-D at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. I Love You, Beth Cooper While masturbatory in nature, this summertime fare about a high school valedictorian whose graduation speech confession of love to the one, the only Beth Cooper—and his subsequent “night of his life” with her—probably con-

tains some something of a moral as well. Actually, maybe not. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:55, 7:25 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon and 2:25. Moon Whoa. See this. Sam Rockwell (The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford)—a solo lunar Helium-3 miner who’s two weeks from the end of his three-year contract—cracks up big time, and has to put all the pieces back together before the support crew shows up and/or he has any more hallucinations, in this ice cold blend of several sci-fi space fears. Rated R. Showing at the Wilma Theatre at 9, with Sun. matinees at 3.

The Hangover Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Showing at noon,1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6:30, 7, 8:15 and 9:45, with Fri.—Sat. shows at 10:15 and midnight. Also playing at the Entertainer Cinema in Ronan at 3:45, 6:45 and 9:35, as well as Mountain Cinema in Whitefish at 3:45, 6:45 and 9:45. Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at noon, 12:30, 1, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5, 6, 7:15, 8:30 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 7 and 9. I Love You, Beth Cooper Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 3:45, 6:55 and 9:25 with Fri.–Mon. shows at midnight. My Sister’s Keeper Showing Fri.—Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 6:50 and 9:20. The Proposal Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:25, 4:10, 7:05 and 9:40, with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30.

The Proposal Sandra Bullock is Ryan Reynolds’ ballbusting boss, whose response to possible Public Enemies deportation—she’s Canadian, okay?—is to Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in order the hapless chap to marry her. Then Kalispell at 12:05, 1:15, 4:45, 6:35 and 8, they have to play it off in front of his folks. with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Anybody see the train coming at us through the tunnel? Rated PG-13. Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:40, Showing Fri.—Thu. at the Stadium 14 in with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Also Kalispell at 12:10, 3:15, 4, 7:45 and 9:40 playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Also 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matishowing at the Mountain in Whitefish at Personal space ceases to exist in Cheri, opening Friday nees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. 3:45, 6:45 and 9:45 and at the Showboat at the Wilma Theatre. in Polson at 3:45, 6:45 and 9:30. Public Enemies Jump on the bank-hatin’ bandwagon with Up 3-D this tale of 1930s gangster John Dillinger (Johnny Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:05, 7:30 and Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Depp), hunted by the newly formed FBI’s top 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:15 and 2:40. Kalispell at 1:30, 4:15, 6:30 and 9 with agent (Christian Bale) and his cohorts in a wild Whatever Works Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. ride complete with betrayals, slick gunfights, car Grumpy old Larry David leaves his life of luxury chases and the aspirations for power of J. Edgar to reinvent himself as a bohemian in New York, Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Hoover (Billy Crudup). Rated R. Showing at the which leads to his shacking up with a young Ira Sather-Olson. Carmike 10 at 7 and 10 with Fri.–Sun. matinees southern belle in this Woody Allen film that also at 1 and 4, and at the Village 6 at 7 and 10, with features Evan Rachel Wood, Patricia Clarkson Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Also playing at the and Ed Begley Jr. Rated PG-13. Showing at the as of Fri., July 17. Show times and locations are Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Wed., Sat. and Wilma Theatre at 7, with Sun. matinees at 1, subject to change or errors, despite our best Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. and no shows on Fri., July 17, and Thu., July 23. efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parkTransformers: Revenge of the Fallen ing lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Autobots wage their battle to destroy the evil FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village forces of the Decepticons in this sequel to 6—541-7469; Wilma—728-2521; Pharaohplex 2007’s fast-moving blurfest that sexploitationally Bruno in Hamilton—961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton— showcases Megan Fox. Wanna know the truth? I Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in 363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell-—752-7804. walked out. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Kalispell at1:50, 4:25, 7:30 and 9:50, with Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Carmike 10 at 7 and10:15, with Fri.–Sun. mati- Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight. Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.

The Kingfisher’s Weekly Fishing Report: Week of July 16th Bitterroot

"Do ya feel lucky punk . . .well do ya??". Hmmmm, you probably shouldn't today at least. With the major heat-wave that's due to hit through Saturday, the fish will be hiding out big time during most of the day. Your best action will be early and late in the day when the PMDs and then evening caddis motivate the fatties that have been laying low all day. If you are out and about on the stream midday, expect to have your best fishing with hoppers and attractor patterns with DEEP droppers or even tandem nymph rigs under and indicator. The evening fishing from about 6:30 until dark will be the best of the day using a variety of caddis patterns in the size 12 to 14 range.

mini heat wave that's upon us will probably limit good fishing to the early and late hours on the Clark Fork and Bitterroot while having little impact on the other two. The intense hatches of PMDs, yellow sallies, caddis and hoppers will keep the fish looking up most of the day in the faster oxygenated flows. Avoiding the lower river from about Whittaker downstream on the hottest days will pay big dividends. If you happen to be on this stretch in the near future, a welding helmet should be standard equipment to prevent eye damage from the blinding sun reflecting off the polar bear colored inner tube jockeys and their photon redirecting cans of Bud Light.

Clark Fork

The next few days in the bright sun promise to be challenging fishing heat of the day. Your best option for this river will be to hit it early in the The Blackfoot and Rock Creek will likely be your morning until about 1 then go back at it from best alternatives over the next few days. The around 6:30 until dark. If you do find yourself

Blackfoot

Missoula Independent

Up 3-D Aging balloon salesman Carl Fredricksen takes his house on a helium-powered expedition to South America, only to discover he’s got a stowaway Cub-Scout equivalent on board. Rated PG.

My Sister’s Keeper Cameron Diaz and Jason Patric play parents who have to make a life or death decision about one of their two children. This decision ultimately ends up in court, as one of their daughters fights to become medically emancipated. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 7:10 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and 4:20. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 PM and no 9:10 showing on Sun.

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nees at 12:30 and 3:45. Also playing at the Village 6 at 7 and 10:15, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 12:30 and 3:45, and at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 PM and no 9 show on Sun.

trying to get it done midday, working riffles and shady banks will improve your odds dramatically. Bigger attractors with deep droppers will likely be your best bet. In the morning, slow moving olive colored streamers and PMD dries will work the best for you. The evening caddis will be going off again due to the heat and a size 12 or 14 elk hair, Goddard or stimi chew toy dragged or twitched along brushy banks should be silly good.

Rock Creek

Good shooting top to bottom on the creek these days. The fish have been willing to fall for a plethora of bug decoys recently including PMDs, golden stones, caddis and terrestrials of all sorts. This river has probably been the most consistent fishing throughout the day of any of the local rivers. Pretty much from mid morning until dark, Rock Creek has been giving it up non stop. The wading has gotten much easier in the past week as flows have fallen below 1,000 cfs.

It's fishing well all the way from its upper reaches clear down to the Clark Fork confluence.

Missouri

Sunny and warm to a fault over here the next few days. Like most of the rivers west of the divide, your best fishing on the surface will be the mornings and then the last few hours before dark. While the direct sunlight won't totally shut down your midday prospects, the blazing sun will definitely put most of the fish deeper in the water column. Go after them with tandem nymph rigs on the riffled inside turns and deeper mid river trenches. Working seams along the banks with a hopper/dropper rig will also be a good way to prospect. Once things cool down a bit around 6:30 pm, the caddis will make their appearance and the fish will get considerably more aggressive to the surface. Today's flow below Holter is 7110 cfs.

O f c o u r s e Th e O l d Po s t - w h a t ' r e y a , N E W ! ! ?

Page 34 July 16–July 23, 2009


Amy Alkon

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WHERE THE RUBBER MEETS THE TOAD My boyfriend of eight months is 38, with two kids. I’m 27 and divorced. He has unofficially moved into my apartment, but he isn’t pulling his weight. He pays $500 a month in child support and $400 for his apartment—that he doesn’t live in. (All of his utilities were shut off for nonpayment.) I understand that he doesn’t have money to throw around, and help him financially whenever he needs it. He’s always grateful, but I’m feeling resentful because he’s very irresponsible in his spending (he lacks self-control). I could’ve amassed an emergency fund or bought the motorcycle I promised myself after my divorce. Now, that’s been put off. He threw me a few bucks for expenses when I asked, but only twice. I told him he has until August 1 to ditch his apartment so he’ll have some money. He does say he loves me every day, tells me I’m beautiful, and says I make him happier than he’s ever been. I’m at a loss. How do I kindly tell him to pull it together? —Tapped Out You dreamed of the wind on your face and the sun at your back as you’re speeding down the open road on a new Harley. You settled for a Hog parked in your living room, mowing through your groceries and mining the couch crevices for spare change. Not surprisingly, the guy isn’t saying, “Gimme all your money, and make sure there’s no dye pack in there.” He tells you he loves you, how happy you make him, how beautiful you are. (He finds you especially beautiful as you’re writing the check to pay his electric bill.) It would be one thing if he’d fallen on hard times, but he’s impulsive and fiscally irresponsible. As unromantic as it is to care about money, what’s even more unromantic is fighting bitterly about it, which is what you’ll be doing, and in close quarters, if Mr. Moochypants gives up his place and moves in for good. And, no, the problem isn’t how to “kindly” tell him to get it together; this is a character issue. This is who he is—a 38-yearold man who can’t live within his means, but has no qualms about living within yours. You don’t have to find a rich guy with a bum ticker, just a nice, stable guy who brings more to the party than a variety of flattering remarks about your hair. After all, you pull your weight. Don’t you think you deserve a man who does the same?

Also, because women evolved to seek providers, men co-evolved to become somebody and acquire resources, probably as a way of getting chicks. A guy might tell you he has no problem being supported by you, but he’s sure to devalue you for it—his genes make him do it. (Sadly, they have yet to enroll in “Intro to Women’s Studies.”) You might care about your boyfriend, but your willingness to stay with an unrepentant sponge suggests you don’t expect much for yourself. Good news! You can change that. Work on becoming a person who has a strong sense of self-worth—strong enough to set standards for who she lets into her life. You’re sure to pick a different sort of guy once it’s you who’s looking for a boyfriend, not your unresolved issues. Should you have a moment of weakness, just remind yourself of all the things you have to offer a guy—beyond lights, running water, and a telephone with a dial tone.

LET’S MEEK PLANS A guy I did some juvenile “dating” with back in junior high is stopping by my workplace. The thing is, he doesn’t ask me out; he just keeps coming by and hanging around. I’d like this to come to some sort of conclusion so I can stop wondering what his intentions are. —Perplexed Loitering is a misdemeanor, not a form of seduction. The guy probably has the hots for you—accompanied by all the mojo of your stapler or the fake plant on your credenza, both of which have also lingered in your workplace but have failed to ask you out. Of course, you may be part of the problem. The flip side of Today’s Wimp is the woman sits there like a paperweight instead of flirting to let a guy know it’s safe for him to make a move. Sure, you could ask your fragile petunia out. But, it’s a really bad idea. The guy who overcomes his shyness for you isn’t likely to take you for granted in a relationship like the wimpy guy you reward by taking over and doing the asking. Assuming you have flirted, the conclusion you should come to is clear: If you want the guy to make himself useful, hand him a time card and a broom. Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r A v e , # 2 8 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Page 35 July 16–July 23, 2009


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Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I fear you’re on the verge of slipping into a state of mind that wants everything and is therefore in danger of getting nothing. I worry that you’ll be lusting for such total control over so much wild sweetness that you won’t actually formulate a foolproof plan to commune with even a pinch of that sweetness. Let’s see if we can motivate you to overthrow this state of mind. Let’s try to coax you into devising a precise strategy to assemble paradise piece by piece.

ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Cuckoo birds build no nests of their own. Instead, they rely on trickery to raise their young. The female cuckoo lays her eggs in the nest of a host whose eggs are similar in size and color. The host, often a sparrow, cares for the cuckoo’s eggs as her own, and usually rears the hatchlings until they reach maturity. Does this behavior ring a bell? I suspect that something analogous is unfolding in your world. I’m alerting you to the situation so that you will be fully informed as you decide how to proceed. (P.S. I’m not saying this is a bad thing; just want you to acknowledge the truth.)

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I hate to admit it, but love is not always enough to solve every problem. On some occasions you need love, clever insights, strategic maneuvers, and fierce determination. In my astrological opinion, this is one of those times. Take a moment right now to shush the grumbling dialogue you keep having with yourself about what’s fair and what you deserve. Save all that mental energy for the work of fighting like hell for the fair share you deserve. Oh, and while you’re fighting like hell, don’t forget to be as strategic as Gandhi, as loving as Einstein, and as fiercely determined as Jack Black, Ben Stiller, and Sarah Silverman combined.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): I invite you to write down brief descriptions of the five most pleasurable moments you’ve ever experienced in your life. Let your imagination dwell lovingly on these memories for, say, 20 minutes. And keep them close to the surface of your awareness in the week ahead. If you ever catch yourself slipping into a negative train of thought, interrupt it immediately and compel yourself to fantasize about those Big Five Ecstatic Moments. This exercise will be an excellent way to prime yourself for a New Age of Unhurried Bliss and Gentle Beauty, which I predict is just ahead for you. If you can keep the morose part of your mind quiet, there’s a good chance you will stir up a new ecstatic experience that will belong near the top of your all-time list.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Welcome to your aromatherapy workshop, Leo. We’ll be using imaginary scents because, frankly, sometimes fantasy yields better results than the real thing. (Especially for you right now; keep that in mind as you deal with other situations in your life.) For your first exercise, imagine the aromas of eucalyptus and vinegar. That’ll clear your head of static, creating a nice big empty space for your fresh assignment to come pouring in from the future. Next, imagine the fragrance of hot buttered popcorn. It will make you more receptive to the outside help that has been trying and trying and trying to attract your attention. Have you ever taken a new computer out of the box? Remember that smell? Simulate it now. In your subconscious mind, it will awaken the expectation that the next chapter of your life story is about to begin.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): O ye of little faith: Do ye not understand that the events of mid-July through mid-August of 2009 are but the fruition of seeds ye planted in September, October, and November of last year? Do not thank or blame the gods, but only thyself, for the destiny that is upon ye. Now please prepare to assume thy new goodies and perks, O favored one, as well as thy new temptations and headaches, with full knowledge that ye are receiving the exact rewards and responsibilities ye earned many months ago.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sometimes this job of mine grinds me down with a heavy sense of responsibility. Am I doing the right thing by divulging so many cosmic secrets? Do people use my advice in good ways? This week I’m especially tormented. Would it be ethical of me to reveal that you could dig a hot tip out of a wastebasket, or that you could prosper because of someone else’s foolishness? Or how about if I disclosed that you’ve temporarily acquired a dicey edge over a competitor who’s previously kicked your butt? And would it be mean of me to suggest that you shouldn’t share a vast idea with a half-vast person? I guess I’ll just have to trust that you’ll show maximum integrity in using all of this inside dope.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There goes your exaggerated respect for warped chunks of complications. Here comes an opportunity to make a break for bubbly freedom. To take advantage, Scorpio, you’ll need to travel much lighter. So please peel off your armor. Wipe that forty-pound sneer of doubt off your face. Bury your broken-down theories by the side of the path, and donate all your unnecessary props to the birds and the bees. Strip down, in other words, to the bare minimum. Where you’re going all you’ll need are your good looks and a big fresh attitude.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t leave me hanging, Sagittarius. What happens next? How could you even imagine you’ve wrapped the whole thing up? According to my analysis, you’ve got at least one more riddle to solve, one more gift to negotiate, one more scar to wish upon. (Yes, that says “scar,” not “star.”) To stop pushing for more adventure at this pregnant moment would be a crime against nature and a whole chapter short of a bestseller. Get out there and bring this story home.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It makes me famished just to think of you there stewing in your hunger. You almost remind me of a bear that’s just awoken from hibernation or a political prisoner who’s been on a hunger strike. And yet I know it’s not a craving for food that you’re suffering from. It’s not even an impossible yearning for sex or fame or power or money, either. You’re starving, you’re ravenous, you’re mad for something you don’t have a name for—something whose existence you don’t fully understand and can’t quite imagine. But I predict you’ll uncover a fuller truth about this thing very soon, and then you’ll be more than halfway toward gratifying your hunger.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If I were your daddy, I’d take you mountain-climbing or buy you a three-week intensive class in the foreign tongue of your choice. If I were your president, I’d give you a Purple Heart for your undercover heroism and make you ambassador to Italy. If I were your therapist, I’d send you on a pilgrimage to a sanctuary where everyone means exactly what they say. But I’m merely your five-minutes-a-week consultant, so all I can really do is say, “Escape the cramped quarters of your own mind. Slip away from the corners you’ve been backed into. Stop telling the convoluted stories you’ve concocted to rationalize why you should be afraid. Get out of the loop and escape into the big, fresh places that will rejuvenate your eyes and heart.”



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Long-standing myths are on the verge of mutating. Stories that have remained fixed for years are about to acquire unexpected wrinkles. The effects may be pretty spectacular. I suspect it’ll be the equivalent of Sleeping Beauty waking up from her long sleep without the help of the prince’s kiss, or like Little Red Riding Hood devouring the wolf instead of vice versa. There’s something you can do, Pisces, to ensure that the new versions of the old tales are more empowering than the originals: For the foreseeable future, take on the demeanor and spirit of a noble warrior with high integrity and a fluid sense of humor.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 36 July 16–July 23, 2009

ADULT

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

People's Choice "One-Stop Adult Shop"

DISCOUNTS THIS AD GOOD FOR 20% OFF NEXT PURCHASE

1733 South Ave. W.

728-5754

10am-Midnight Mon-Sat Closed on Sundays


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

To Give Away

The Multi Item Store LLC

Bright Beginnings Daycare-Now Enrolling ages 6 weeks-12 years-Licensed facility Call 493-6397

LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800-475-0876

Saturday September 12th at Caras Park. Need vendors & volunteers. Go to

missoulahempfest.com to sign up or contact us to volunteer.

Be part of the solution.

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-8885 8 3 - 2 1 0 1 . w w w. c o n t i n e n t a l academy.com THE GREEN ECO SHOW. www.greenecoshow.com August 22-23, 9-5. Missoula F a i r g r o u n d s . F a s h i o n S h o w, Music, Speakers, Organic Food. Sponsor: Herman’s Eco Inc. Anna 846-1252 The Historical Museum at Fort Missoula is seeking memories, photos, artifacts, etc. from the 1910 “Big Burn” for an exhibit opening in March 2010. Call 728-3476.

Lost & Found Found Mountain Bike near Higgins and Hazel on June 5. Call to ID 542-2833 LOST KAYAK Red sit-on-top kayak lost in Blackfoot River above Angevine access area. 406-251-2641

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Worker's Compensation Over 17 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Bulletin Board

Employment

Employment

B & K Eco

Announcements

Maintenance

“Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more information: dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com 406-225-8504

S e r v i c e s Comprehensive Plumbing & Heating

PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

Specializing in Green Technology

Volunteers AniMeals is looking for volunteers! AniMeals is a non-profit animal food bank and no-kill adoption center. We are looking for volunteers to help with fundraising, office work, deliveries and giving our animals some love and attention. Please contact Jaime at (406) 721-4710 or info@animeals.net. Help feed hungry animals! BIOMIMICRY NEEDS YOUR HELP! We are looking for a CD Promotions Intern for Ask the Planet, The Biomimicry Institute’s recently released, awardwinning children’s CD. Must be willing to commit to 8 to 12 hours/week. An outgoing individual with strong attention to detail is preferred. Send cover letter, resume and three references to: Angela[at]biomimicryinstitute.org. Application deadline: July 27. No phone calls please.

Bulletin Board

Brian French Master Plumber

CALENDAR EDITOR Concerts, readings, meetings, oh my! The Independent is looking for a part-time Calendar Editor to keep his or her finger on the pulse of all things hip and keen. Candidates should be incredibly well organized, adept at working under deadline pressure, and able to write engaging copy about compelling local events. Journalism experience is preferred, but we’re willing to train the right candidate. Send a résumé and cover letter detailing relevant work experience to:

20 years experience

Editor, Missoula Independent 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 Or via e-mail to sbrowning@missoulanews.com No phone calls, please.

406.251.1295

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

Free Estimates

Pet of the Week Bogie You know the rumor, “orange boys are the best!” Well Bogie is no exception. He is a big, friendly, easy going sort of fellow just here to hang out. He doesn’t mind the hustle and bustle of the shelter, whether it’s dogs passing by or kittens climbing all over. Also the Humane Society is offering $35 cat adoptions all summer long. Our new hours are Tues.-Fri. 1p.m.6p.m. and Saturday 11a.m-4p.m.

Pl a c e yo u r c l a s s i f i e d a d . Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 37 July 16–July 23, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

GENERAL

is open 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, including some holidays. Must be available to work ALL SHIFTS, evenings, nights and weekends included. Hours per week will vary and will be discussed during interview. Part time will work 20 or more hours per week, full time will be 40 hours per week. Will start in August. Pay is depending on experience. #2975838 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

years old, The Montana Army National Guard has many positions available starting at over $10.00/hr. $20,000 Enlistment Bonus, $80,000 for College Education, $20,000 for Prior Service. For more information call 1-800-GO-GUARD

RESIDENT CARE COORDINATOR DAY SHIFT, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a half-time permanent individual for the position of day shift RESIDENT CARE COORDINATOR at their group home. Duties are to provide direct service and support to young mothers and their babies, perform computer log entry, and some general office work such as filing, etc. Minimum qualifications are HS Diploma or GED and must be 21 years of age. The employer prefers applicants with a Bachelor’s degree in the Social Services Field. Weekly hours are 6:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Thursday and Friday, plus a 2 hour weekly staff meeting on Tuesdays from 9:00am-11:00 for a total of 26 hours per week. Wage is: $9.00/hr, plus paid annual leave sick leave and health insurance. Employer will do a criminal background check on the successful candidate. Prefer individual who has experience working with children and adolescents in a residential environment. #2975822 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

have a great deal of self-motivation and self-direction. Salary range is from $14.30-$15.56/hour and includes a comprehensive benefit plan. The position requires a bachelor’s degree in social work or other relevant behavioral science and five (5) years of relevant experience or a suitable combination of education and experience. Full job description at the Missoula Job Service front desk. The employer does not wish to have applicants contact them directly. Closing date is Monday, July 20, 2009. #2975854 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

state license required. Half-time position to increase to full-time. Salary is DOE, excellent benefits. EOE employer. Open until filled. #2975827 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

ability to learn software programs. Both full and part-time positions are available. Days and hours worked are up to the individual. Pay is reliant on commissions. Applicants will be required to obtain their local state Life Insurance License. Openings are in all counties in Montana as well as Missoula. #2975853 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

$ 6 0 0 W E E K LY P O T E N T I A L ! Helping the Government, PT. No experience. No selling. Call: 1888-213-5225, Ad Code: A32 ! BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no ence necessary, training ed. 1-800-965-6520 ext.

! experiprovid278

CHILDCARE WORKER, F & P/T, Msla. A Missoula day care that is expanding seeks experienced fulltime and part-time Childcare Workers. Employer is firm on experience. Must has at least a year verifiable experience caring for infants and children in a child care facility. NO EXCEPTIONS. Must enjoy working with infants and children to 5 years of age; possess patience and a high level of maturity. Must have all shots; TB test, have or be able to get CPR and 1st Aid Card and pass a background check. This daycare

PROFESSIONAL

HOUSE DIRECTOR-DELTA GAMMA SORORITY, MISSOULA. House Director works school year w/University breaks. Oversees basic facility maintenance, cook and several employees. Acts as official hostess. Room/board (small, private 1st floor apartment)/salary provided. Accepting applications now. Contact Elizabeth for application materials @ (406)239-2089. Experience working with students a plus, but not required JOBS, JOBS, JOBS. Part-time job! Full-time BENEFITS-to include medical and dental. If you are 17-42

Programming Jobs at InterTech USA We are seeking an experienced Senior Web Developer who can work comfortably in a fast paced environment. This position will be involved in full life-cycle development of web applications written in VB.NET/ASP.NET or classic ASP using SQL Server, Transact-SQL, and stored procedures. Strong .Net Framework experience and database design skills a must. Strong HTML/CSS skills desired. Successful candidate must be a fast learner who is self-motivated and willing to tackle any task assigned. The position is available immediately in our Missoula, Montana office. Essential Duties and Responsibilities include the following. Other duties may be assigned. * Technical lead for web development projects including information architecture, code creation and testing. * Full life-cycle development of web-based applications and websites.

Qualifications: * HS Diploma or equivalent required; B.S. Computer Science or equivalent experience preferred. * Solid experience using Adobe ColdFusion and Adobe Flex. * Familiarity with web production issues including browser and platform compatibility, size and speed issues.

For a full job description and qualifications log on to: http://www.intertech-usa.com/about_us/jobs.asp 6070 Industrial Road Missoula, MT 59808

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 O F F I C E A S S I S T A N T, F / T, Msla/Ronan. Missoula Chiropractic office is seeking an Office Assistant. Will be answering phones, scheduling appointments, billing, processing accounts receivable, and other office duties. Must be good with people. Excellent customer service skills are required. Need strong organizational skills, solid computer skills, ability to learn new software and have strong attention to detail. Must be responsible and dependable while maintaining a cheerful, empathic, and pleasant manner with patients, staff and doctor. Will be working Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, from 8 am to 6 pm for about 40 hours per week. Pay is depending on experience. #2975861 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OPERATIONS ASSISTANT – P/T, Msla. Seeking a part time OPERATIONS ASSISTANT for someone with a passion and enthusiasm for foreign travel and culture. DUTIES INCLUDE: Entering client information to database, assembling and mailing confirmation packets, and assisting operations staff in coordinating tours. Also assist with daily routine of making the office run(answer phones, filing, client mailing, etc). Prefer a University degree. Key characteristics of the Ops Assistant are excellent organization and writing skills, multitasking abilities, and self-motivation. Work is generally 5 hours per day on Tuesdays and Thursdays with some flexibility Monday - Friday. Wages begin at $9/hr with progressive raises possible for the right candidate. Applicant is required to submit a TYPING TEST (with a minimum of 45 WPM) along with resume, cover letter and references. #2975830 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OPERATOR, F/T, Msla. Immediate need for phone message taker. Duties include talking on phone, taking accurate messages, data entry, typing, and relaying messages. Must have experience with multiline phones, pleasant phone personality and enjoy working with people. Inbound calls only. Taking calls for professionals and businesses. Center is open 24 hours/day. Will be working varied shifts. Must work Saturdays. Pay starts at $8.50 with raises upon proven performance. Vacation after one year and paid holidays. Must have excellent telephone and dispatch and office skills. Must be proficient with typing and an excellent speller. Must take Job Service Basic Spelling Test and include certification with application materials. $11.00 per hour. Benefits available after 6 months probationary period. #2975858 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

Join AmeriCorps! WORD’s Literacy Support Corps is looking for people interested in working in Missoula with WORD’s Young Family Resource Center, WORD’s McKinney program serving homeless families, or MCPS District’s new Family Engagement Center. Are you that person? Positions begin August 25, 2009. Training provided. Benefits include living stipend, education award, and health insurance. Find out more at www.wordinc.org/FRC/member_info.php or call Brook or Jeanne at 543-3550.

Missoula Independent Page 38 July 16–July 23, 2009

STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/ statejobs.asp Unlimited earning potential New company looking for motivated distributors. Call to reserve your spot. 406-281-7005

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PROFESSIONAL ASSESSMENT AND STABILIZATION UNIT MANAGER, #51112. Montana Developmental Center, Boulder, MT. Salary $52,709 to $65,886 DOQ. Deadline: 7/17/09. For details visit Job Service or www.dphhs.mt.gov/jobs EEO BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST, F/T, Msla. Child and Family Service Network is seeking a Bachelor’s of Arts level Behavioral Specialist to provide behavioral and community support to Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED) youth and families as part of family-based services team. Treatment team experience preferred. Strong behavioral management skills required. Must have Bachelor’s Degree in human services field. Work is Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Competitive salary and excellent benefits offered. Open until filled. #2975826 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Debt Collection Agent Missoula based debt collection company seeks experienced debt collector. Full time, variable hours, hourly plus commission. Debtcollection @live.com ENERBASE COOPERATIVE of Minot ND is seeking a qualified CEO / General Manager. A full service retail energy and agronomy operation with sales of $140 Million and several branch locations. A strong background in finance, communication, and personnel management is desired. Send or fax (701-223-9078) resume to: Larry Fuller, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck, ND 58503, larry.fuller@chsinc.com LEAD CASE MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time Lead Case Manager. Duties include supervising and coordinating the Medicaid Waiver team in assessing the needs of clients, formulating care plans, and working with the team to support seniors. The Lead Case Manager will also plan, monitor, organize, and work with contractors, community groups, and others to deliver social services to specialized populations of older adults and their support systems. The position is a full-time permanent position. The successful applicant will need to be open-minded, flexible, able to operate under pressure,

PARENT/COMMUNITY PROG SUPPORT SPECIALIST, P/T, Msla. The Parent/Community/Support Specialist will provide consultation, training, technical assistance and programmatic support for the Montana Parent Information & Resource Center (MT PIRC). This position will serve as a liaison with schools, LEA’s, SEA, & OPI and other state agencies. This position requires excellent communication skills in interacting with both the public and professionals, especially school staff and parents; the ability to perform multiple tasks efficiently; attention to detail; experience in school-based settings; familiarity with group and community organizing principles; and excellent collaborative skills. Must be able to work as part of a team and have a strong interest in program development and services for low-income and American Indian families, as well as knowledge of the federal NCLB legislation. A valid driver’s license, reliable vehicle, and a Bachelors’ degree are required. ESTIMATED START DATE: September 1, 2009. This is a CONTRACT POSITION. This position will be approximately 30 hours per week, MondayFriday, of which 50% or more may be travel; plus travel expenses. #2975831 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR LOG CRAFTER/TIMBER FRAMER, FT, Colorado. Local Missoularaised man is looking to hire high-level experienced LOG CRAFTER/TIMBER FRAMERS for work in Colorado. Each worker MUST have a minimum of 5-7 years experience with Log Fabrication and Installation. This fast-paced business has no time for training. They are looking for folks that “know what to do”. DUTIES INCLUDE: Fabrication & Installation of log homes. Set up, notch, scribe, install & read blueprints. These workers must have strong mathematical skills. Work is SEASONAL through October. Current projects are in Colorado. Employer says it’s preferable to bring a camper or other portable living arrangement, but he’ll try to help with other living arrangement. Work is usually scheduled from Monday-Friday; however workers that want to work additional hours have ability to work weekends. Days off can be discussed and negotiated to allow time to come back to Missoula area for days off. #2975834 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified s t u d e n t s . S A G E Te c h n i c a l Ser vices, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

HEALTH CAREERS ADVANCED PRACTICE REGISTERED NURSE, P/T, Msla. Child and Family Service Network is recruiting an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (ARPN) to provide psychiatric medication services to Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED) youth. The APRN functions as an active member of a comprehensive mental health services team. MA in nursing and

CNA, F/T, Msla. Missoula long term care facility needs CNAs for all shifts. Candidates need at least 6 months experience. Experience with geriatric patients preferred. Duties include answering patient call signals, assist with bathing, feeding, clean as needed, observe patient conditions, explain medication, aid patient exercises, set up equipment, aid in transport, and some clerical documentation duties. Will work varying shifts, rotating days, for about 32 hours per week. Must be available for weekends. Pay is $9.30/hr. Business is on bus line. #2975839. Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS - On Call, P/T, Msla. PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS needed to provide personal care services for residents in assisted living facility. Training is available, and experience will earn you a higher hourly wage. DUTIES INCLUDE: Monitor medication and dispense times, monitor blood sugar levels, bathe, assist residents in and out of bed, daily living activities and other duties as needed. Work will be varied Days and Shifts with a shift differential for evening and night shifts work. There is also a great opportunity to get more hours. Wage starts at $8.60/hr. plus appropriate shift differentials, potential increase after 90 days. This position requires a pre-employment drug screening. #2975819 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

THE GLASGOW (MONTANA) COURIER is accepting applications for a sales and marketing manager. This publisher track position in the sales and marketing department will work with local, state, and regional businesses to cultivate, develop and implement successful marketing strategies in all media, with a focus on print media. The Glasgow Courier is part of a federation of 22 newspaper titles (many with strong internet presence) located in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota, Idaho, and Washington. Ample opportunities exist for advancement within the Courier, or federation-wide. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in sales and marketing, a working knowledge of computers, and a drive to excel. Salary plus bonus is commensurate with experience. Benefits include paid holiday leave, paid vacation/personal leave, health insurance stipend, and retirement package. Please send resume, cover letter, references, salary requirements and availability to publisher@vcn.com

OPPORTUNTIES $600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5.

SALES CONTRACT SALESPERSONS to sell aerial photography of farms on commission basis, $5,000$8,000/month. Proven product and earnings. Travel required; sales experience preferred. 1-877-882-3566 EXPERIENCED TELEMARKETERS. $8.00-$10.00/hour base DOE. Commissions paid right away. Nice Missoula office: AC, weight room, low turnover. Average employee makes $25K + benefits. Call for interview. 329-7685 Give Yourself A Raise P/T Hours-Long Term Skills. See if you too qualify at h t t p : / / w w w. d a i l y i n t e r n e t income.net INSURANCE SALES/RECRUITER – F & P/T, Msla. Local insurance agency is seeking a full and/or part-time insurance sales agents/recruiter to call on qualified leads. The primary duties are selling mortgage protection and other insurance to qualified leads. Can work from home. Must have state life insurance license. Ability to communicate with residential homeowners, read/write with good follow up skills, able to use laptop computer, use Windows OS, send & receive e mails, and

Instruction

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 LOOMIX(r) FEED SUPPLEMENTS is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800-870-0356/kboen @loomix.com to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area Mobile Espresso Business For Sale Chevy Astro van fitted with everything you need to make espresso drinks, smoothies, frappes etc. including espresso machine, refrigerators, sinks, blender, grinder and much more. The van currently services a very profitable route M-F approximately 7AM-3PM with consistent and growing customer base, and lots more income potential. Buyout $44500......... Bids welcome. See complete details at gojoeespresso.com or call 406-212-5692. NOW HIRING: companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 Dept. MT-4186

Instruction

REIKI WITH HORSES WEEKEND WORKSHOP at River Pines Farm - meet the herd

Aug 8th and 9th Discover Your Authentic Power Through the Way of the Horse Reiki and Equine Facilitated Experiential Learning together for the first time!

Equine Reiki helps horses heal physically, mentally, emotionally. Facilitated by: EPONA Approved Instructor, Shari Montana and Reiki Master, Linda St. Peter Fee is $225.00 includes Reiki 1 certificate, lunch & materials

For information and registration call Linda at 360-9153. Registration deadline is June 21, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Body/Mind/ Spirit

Employment

Instruction

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com

COSMETIC TATTOOING

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Eye Brows, Eye Liner, Lip Color, Medical Repigmentation 17 yrs exp

7-12 SCIENCE TEACHER, K-12 Strategist/LD Teacher, 7-12 Tech Ed (Industrial Arts) Teacher. Burke Central School. Base salary is $29,000, also pays a $4,400 benefit (health insurance, annuity, etc.) District will pay for all years of experience. Coaching available. This area is a sportsman paradise with fishing, upland game, waterfowl, and more. Please send letter of application, resume and transcripts. Burke Central School, Attn: Mike Klabo, Superintendent, P.O. Box 91, Lignite, ND 58752. 701-9332821, mikeklabo@sendit. nodak.edu

Instruction

De'Ette Balfourd Member NCTA, AAM, PCIA, & SPCP

370-3705 www.permanentmakeup.org

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

542-2147 www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

We make it personal

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

missoulataichi.com

Summer Enlightenment

Piano Lessons

Shear

Body/Mind/ Spirit Reiki Retreat Laser Reiki Cosmic Energetic Healing- 4 day seminar & retreat. October 1-4th, located in the beautiful Potomac Valley on 40 acres of pristine beauty. $375 includes workshop, lodging, and 1 meal/day. Limited space, reservation deadline 9/15. Call 549-0289 for more info or to schedule a Theta or Laser Reiki healing session. Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

Art Salon 1804 North Ave FREE Style Lesson exp 7/23/09

Call 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Hypnosis & Imager y * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

728-5693 • Mar y Place Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 Amy Holmlund, Certified Massage Therapist Now taking appointments at the Hickory Street Chiropractic Clinic. Discount sessions through August 1st. 406.459.7475

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

For free confidential help after an abortion Call Word of Hope at

406-549-6565 “The past is not the past if it still affects your present.”

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

Call for appointment 541- 8092 742 Kensington

Thinking about a wax?

Full Body Waxing Backs, Cracks & Sacks Michelle McClain Waxing Specialist 406-270-3230

Dr. Kurt Solari Summit Chiropractic 549 - 0777

The Multi Item Store • 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Bathing Beauties Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

A Touch of Class Adoption

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220

ADOPTION: Your baby will be surrounded with love, laughter and given all the opportunities life can offer. Expenses paid. Sophie & Michael 1-877206-5307 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Affordable • Quality • Personal • Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

NEW TO YOU

Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

Glassware New & Vintage The Multi Item Store • 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Clothing Thanks, Missoula!

Finalist Best Thrift Store

Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins)

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

Congregations Positive. Practical. Casual. Comfortable. And, it's a church. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Sporting Goods Custom

543-0176 HIP STRIP BLOCK PARTY JULY 18TH

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a $10 gift certificate to:

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

Fly Rods

541-8090

Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington

2935 Stockyard Rd. Unit K2 406.542.1202

Antiques & Treasures

rodsbyjay@gmail.com

We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid

MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE.

501 S. Higgins Ave.

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

Where am I? Body/Mind/ Spirit

Books! Books! Books!

HUGE selection of

I spy... Missoula!

Laura- 250-0228

Giclee Ar t - Highland Winds Inner Tulip; Giclee, photographic; signed, limited. 24x30. Mint. Artist Jason Kainz; Sale:$750. Highland Winds Shop, 1520 S. 7th St, Missoula. Open Saturdays. 541-7577

Crystal Limit

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org

The Goods

Ages 8-Adult Beginner-Intermediate

215 e main • missoula, mt • 541-6110 8:30am - 5:30pm weekdays 11am - 2pm Saturday

10-6 • 543-0018

Herbals — Highland Winds Shop is at 1520 S. 7th St, Missoula. Open Saturdays. 541-7577. Healing Linseed Salve, Massage Oil, more. Also sold at Good Foods Store on 3rd.

(intersection of Kensington & Bow)

Furniture New Arrivals!

Open Every Day

BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Cer tificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

The Goods

Missoula

Barefoot deep tissue. Deep compression massage great for relieving neck, shoulder and back pain. 406-360-8746 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com

Bennett’s Music Studio

728-0918

742 Kensington • 542-8090

MSW, CHT, GIS

Dr. Christine White, ND

T'ai Chi

TEN PERCENT SOLUTION Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

IV Micronutrient Therapy

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Buy/Sell/Trade

Carlo's One Night Stand Costume Rental

ries o s s e c Ac Wigs 109 S. 3rd W. • 543-6350 12-6 • M-Sat • On the Hip Strip

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

Antiques

130 W Broadway 721-2180 DELIVERY AVAILABLE Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 39 July 16–July 23, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Antiques

Electronics

YIKES!! Fly Fishermen and Outdoorsmen! Missouri River Fishing Lodge Estate-Just In. LeeWulff Bronze; LeeWulff tied flies; 72pcs, rare signed art; SVS/12 Lenox Trout China; Antique tin lamp collection; 100’s fish stuff!!! Tori’s Antiques & Exquisite Jewelry. Helena. 406442-5595. Open Daily!

DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

CLARK FORK STORAGE

Music

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

Auction

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 7285014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com FOR HIRE: Your very own 5-piece blues band. From your backyard get together to corporate blowouts. Horn section extra. Frank N. Furter 406-381-3629

Computers

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214 Brand New Laptops & Desktops. Bad Credit, No Credit – No Problem Small Weekly Payments - Order Today and get FREE Nintendo WII game system! 800816-2232 GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800803-8819 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1 3 3 7 We s t B r o a d w a y. 543-8287.

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

Pets & Animals

LDR Kennel

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 216 and 217. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting July 18th, 2009 by appt only by calling 5417919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to July 22nd, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the following units: 48, 101, 153, 190, 211, 254, 301, 336, 440, 508, and 523. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be viewed starting Tuesday, July 28, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, July 30, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Monday July 20 2009 at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing two (2) Heavy Duty Motor Graders. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 258-4753. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 181-203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Motor Grader Purchase” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works, ATTN: Jeff Seaton, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808

6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 2584753. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 181-203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Radial Stacker Purchase” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808

Commissioner’s Resolution 2008-097 on July 16, 2008. 4) The Board of County Commissioners found the above referenced abandonment to be in the public interest for the following reason: “1. There is no need for the right-of-way” (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1) The Public Road per Plat Book 1, was located in the South onehalf of the Southwest one quarter of Section 11, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana. There is no physical evidence that the Public Road ever existed in this location. 2) All other portions of said Public Road per Plat Book 1 were abandoned by Commissioner’s Resolution 2008-097 on July 16, 2008. 3) The Board of

County Commissioners found the above referenced abandonment to be in the public interest for the following reason: “1. There is no need for the right-of-way” 4) The portion of the road that this petition requests to be abandoned does not provide exclusive access to any public or private land. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on July 29, 2009 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk &

Recorder, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 2583241. Date: July 2, 2009

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Monday July 20, 2009, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing one (1) Loader/Backhoe. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 258-4816.Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposal for Backhoe Purchase” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works, ATTN: Jeff Seaton, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Monday July 27, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing one (1) 36 x 80 Portable Radial Stacking Conveyor. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works,

Missoula County Government

Requesting Quotes Requesting quotes for an independent contractor to develop an orientation module for local public health practitioners. Curriculum to include a broad range of topics necessary to practice in a large local public health department in Montana. Self-training method; electronic format. Quotes must include a summary of qualifications, a budget quote, and commitment to start by August 30, 2009 and complete within one year.

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com Purebred male Miniature Schnauzer puppies. $295 each. Call 273-6073

Written quotes only will be accepted until 5pm July 23rd at Missoula City-County Health Department, 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59801, attention Julie Mohr.

Missoula Independent Page 40 July 16–July 23, 2009

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGS The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold budget hearings on the proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2010. The PRELIMINARY budget hearing will be held on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 at approximately 2:30 p.m., following the regularly scheduled Public Meeting, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. The FINAL budget hearing will be held on Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at approximately 3:00 p.m., following the regularly scheduled Public Meeting, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. PLEASE NOTE: THE DATE OF THE FINAL BUDGET HEARING IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON THE RECEIPT OF CERTIFIED TAXABLE VALUES F R O M T H E M O N TA N A DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE. The Commissioners will meet to Fix the Final Budget and make appropriations on Tuesday, September 15, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. Any taxpayer or resident may appear at the hearings and be heard for or against the proposed budget. PLEASE NOTE: THE DATE OF ADOPTION OF THE BUDGET IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON THE RECEIPT OF CERTIFIED TAXABLE VALUES FROM THE MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE. The proposed budget is open for inspection in the Missoula County Commissioners’ Office. For further information, contact Andrew V. Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, at the Missoula County Courthouse, 258-4919, or by e-mail at Aczorny@co.missoula.mt.us BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman ATTEST: Vickie M. Zeier, Missoula County Clerk By, /s/ Kathleen Milam, Deputy, Clerk & Recorder MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: A Public Road per Plat Book 1, located in the South one-half of the Southwest onequarter of Section 11, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana in Tract b17 of Certificate of Survey No. 1218. From the Bitterroot to Bannack Road shown in Commissioner’s Journal A2 at Pages 100 and 101 to the common boundary of Tract b17 of Certificate of Survey No. 1812 and Tract L-1A of Certificate of Survey No 6107. This Petition is filed pursuant to MCA 714-2601. The portion of said Public Road per Plat Book 1 which the petitioners request to be abandoned is shown on the attached copy of Certificate of Survey No 6107 named “EXHIBIT A” and by this reference made a part hereof. In support of this petition, the petitioners state: 1) As shown on the attached “EXHIBIT A” (C. O. S. No. 6107) the portion of said Public Road per Plat Book 1 which the petitioners request to be abandoned is located on Tract b17 of Certificate of Survey No. 1218. 2) Southwest one-quarter of Section 11, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, Principal the Public Road per Plat Book 1, was located in the South onehalf of the Meridian, Missoula County, Montana. There is no physical evidence that the Public Road ever existed in this location. 3) All other portions of said Public Road per Plat Book 1 were abandoned by

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR Professional Engineering Services for Project Design and Construction Engineering for the Mullan Rd Bike/Ped Path - MSLACO from Flynn Lane to Cote Lane. Missoula County Public Works, ARRA 8123(1), UPN 6999 Missoula County has received notice from the Montana Department of Transportation to Begin the Consultant Selection Process to design a bike/ped path along Mullan Road in Missoula County, Montana. Notice to Engineering Consultants: Notice is hereby given that Missoula County Public Works will receive written Qualifications and Proposals

Missoula County Government INVITATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED BY MISSOULA COUNTY AT THE OFFICE OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY AUDITOR, ATTN: BARBARA BERENS, LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 UNTIL 1:30PM LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2009. BIDS WILL BE OPENED IN ROOM 201 OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX AND PUBLICLY READ ALOUD FOR THE FURNISHING OF ALL LABOR, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE FOLLOWING: MISSOULA COUNTY PARKS 2, 3, 4 & 6 LANDSCAPE PARK IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK MISSOULA, MT PARK 2, MT. JUMBO WEST LITTLE LEAGUE BALLFIELDS, LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION WORK TO INCLUDE: SITE PREPARATION, GRASS AND TREE PLANTINGS TO THE PLANTING STRIP BETWEEN THE BALLFIELDS AND STREET AT EXPRESSWAY AND KESTREL COURT TO PROPOSED PARKING LOT ENTRY AND EXTENDING THE EXISTING IRRIGATION SYSTEM TO THE NEWLY PLANTED AREAS. PARKS 3 AND 6, CENTRAL PARK SOUTH, LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION WORK TO INCLUDE: FULL DEVELOPMENT OF THE PARK 6 PORTION WITH TREES, SHRUBS, TURF, NATURAL GRASSES, TO INCLUDE AN IRRIGATION SYSTEM, EARTHWORK, FINISH GRADING AND PARTIAL DEVELOPMENT OF PARK 3. PARK 4, CENTRAL PARK NORTH, LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION WORK TO INCLUDE: FINISH GRADING AND RECLAMATION SEEDING IN THE AREAS OF THE TWO PARK SHELTERS. SEALED BIDS SHALL BE ADDRESSED TO THE BID OFFICER, MISSOULA COUNTY AND ENCLOSED IN SEALED ENVELOPES PLAINLY MARKED ON THE OUTSIDE “PROPOSAL FOR PARKS 2, 3, 4 AND 6, MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK.” THE ENVELOPES SHALL ALSO BE MARKED WITH THE BIDDER’S NAME AND MONTANA CONTRACTOR’S IDENTIFICATION NUMBER. NO BID MAY BE WITHDRAWN AFTER THE SCHEDULED TIME FOR THE PUBLIC OPENING OF BIDS, WHICH IS 1:30 PM., LOCAL TIME JULY 23, 2009. A COMPLETE SET OF THE CONTRACT DOCUMENTS CONSISTING OF DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, BIDDING DOCUMENTS AND PROJECT MANUAL MAY BE EXAMINED OR OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE OF PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS, INC, LOCATED AT 3115 RUSSELL STREET, MISSOULA, MT 59801. THE REQUIRED DEPOSIT IS $75.00 PER SET, WHICH IS NON-REFUNDABLE. CHECKS SHALL BE MADE PAYABLE TO MISSOULA COUNTY. IN ADDITION, THE DRAWINGS AND PROJECT MANUAL MAY ALSO BE EXAMINED AT THE MISSOULA PLANS EXCHANGE, 201 N. RUSSELL, MISSOULA, MT (406) 549-5002. THERE WILL BE A PRE-BID CONFERENCE IN ROOM 201 OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX, LOCATED AT 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT AT 1:30PM ON FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009. INTERESTED CONTRACTOR’S ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND. CONTRACTOR AND ANY OF THE CONTRACTOR’S SUBCONTRACTORS DOING WORK ON THIS PROJECT WILL BE REQUIRED TO OBTAIN REGISTRATION WITH THE MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY (DLI). FORMS AND INFORMATION ON REGISTRATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY, P.O. BOX 8011, 1805 PROSPECT, HELENA MONTANA 59604-8011 OR BY CALLING 1-406-444-7734. CONTRACTOR IS NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE REGISTERED WITH THE DLI PRIOR TO BIDDING ON THIS PROJECT, BUT MUST HAVE REGISTERED PRIOR TO EXECUTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT. ALL LABORERS AND MECHANICS EMPLOYED BY CONTRACTOR OR SUBCONTRACTORS IN PERFORMANCE OF THE CONSTRUCTION WORK SHALL BE PAID WAGES AT RATES AS MAY BE REQUIRED BY LAW. THE CONTRACTOR MUST ENSURE THAT EMPLOYEES AND APPLICANTS FOR EMPLOYMENT ARE NOT DISCRIMINATED AGAINST BECAUSE OF THEIR RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX OR NATIONAL ORIGIN. EACH BID OR PROPOSAL MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A CASHIER’S CHECK, CERTIFIED CHECK, OR BID BOND PAYABLE TO MISSOULA COUNTY IN THE AMOUNT OF NOT LESS THAN TEN PERCENT (10%) OF THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF THE BID. SUCCESSFUL BIDDERS SHALL FURNISH AN APPROVED PERFORMANCE BOND AND A LABOR AND MATERIALS PAYMENT BOND, EACH IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF THE CONTRACT AMOUNT. INSURANCE AS REQUIRED SHALL BE PROVIDED BY THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER(S) AND A CERTIFICATE(S) OF THAT INSURANCE SHALL BE PROVIDED. MISSOULA COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO WAIVE INFORMALITIES, TO POSTPONE THE AWARD OF THE CONTRACT FOR A PERIOD NOT TO EXCEED SIXTY (60) DAYS, TO ACCEPT THE LOWEST RESPONSIVE AND RESPONSIBLE BID WHICH IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE OWNER, TO REJECT ANY AND ALL PROPOSALS RECEIVED, AND, IF ALL BIDS ARE REJECTED, TO BE ADVERTISED UNDER THE SAME OR NEW SPECIFICATIONS, OR TO MAKE SUCH AN AWARD AS IN THE JUDGMENT OF ITS OFFICIALS BEST MEETS THE COUNTY’S REQUIREMENTS. ANY OBJECTIONS TO PUBLISHED SPECIFICATIONS SHALL BE FILED IN WRITTEN FORM WITH THE BID OFFICER PRIOR TO BID OPENING AT THE OFFICE OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY AUDITOR, ATTN: BARBARA BERENS, LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802. THE CONTRACTOR IS REQUIRED TO BE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

for Engineering consultant services for the Mullan Road Rd Bike/Ped Path from Flynn Lane to Cote Lane. Proposals are to be submitted to: Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 and must be postmarked by 5 pm on July 31, 2009. This project will include project design and engineering and construction engineering for the construction of an eight (8) foot wide paved pathway along the south side of Mullan Road between Flynn Land and Cote Lane in Missoula County, Montana. The trail is to be constructed wholly within the existing Mullan Road right of way and no utility relocation is being considered at this time as the right of way is wide enough to accommodate the existing utilities and the proposed trail. Background: The Mullan Road Trail is a project that is to be funded by ARRA funds and is subject to all restrictions therein. It is the consultant’s responsibility to familiarize themselves with these restrictions, deadlines and requirements prior to submitting Proposals for this project. This trail will provide recreation and a safe alternative means of transportation for the residents along Mullan Road between Flynn and Cote Lanes. Pre-Submittal Meeting: Interested and qualified firms are invited to an informational meeting at 10:00 am on Friday, July 24, 2009 at the Public Works conference room at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Tours of the project area may be arranged by contacting County E n g i n e e r, Ti m E l s e a a t 4 0 6 258-3773 or by e-mail at telsea@co.missoula.mt.us.

corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of Missoula County against liability. BIDS TO REMAIN OPEN: The Bidder shall guarantee the Total Bid Price for a period of 60 calendar days from the date of bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. (“Bid Only” registration is available for out-of-state contractors.) All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with Missoula County Business Licensing requirements. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Lewis & Clark Water System Rehabilitation Project”, “Opening” August 4, 2009 and marked “Sealed Bid” with the Contractor’s name, address, current state license number, and, Montana Contractors Registration Number and be addressed to: Missoula County Director of Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 No facsimile bids will be accepted. Any objection to published specifications must be filed in written form with the Board of County Commissioners Office prior to the scheduled time of bid opening. WAGE RATES: This project is partially funded with Federal Funds; therefore, the Contractor shall not pay less than the latest Federal Davis Bacon Wage Rates as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the specifications in Section 00825. Bidder is subject to 18-2-401, et. Seq., Montana Code Annotated and amendments thereto and regulations issued there under, relating to prevailing wages, benefits, and other requirements. No claim for additional compensation will be allowed based upon a lack of knowledge or a misunderstanding of any such requirements by Bidder or failure to include in bid adequate increases in such wages over the term of the Contract. NONDISCRIMINATION PROVISION: Bidders on this work will be required to comply with Title 40 CFR 35.3145(d) and Executive Order 12138. The goals and other requirements for bidders and contractors under this regulation which concerns utilization of Minority Business Enterprises (MBE), Women’s Business Enterprises (WBE) Small Businesses (SB) and Labor Surplus Area Businesses (LSAB) are explained in the Section FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS. Bidders on this work will be required to comply with the President’s Executive Orders No’s. 11246 as amended, 11458, 11518 and 11625. The requirements for bidders and contractors under these orders are explained in the specifications. Certain goals and timetables for minority and female utilization shall be included in all federal and federally assisted construction contracts and the subcontracts in excess of $10,000. The goals are applicable to the Contractor’s aggregate on-site construction work force, not merely that part of the work force that is performing work on a federal or federally assisted contract or subcontracts. The appropriate goal will be inserted in the blank in paragraph (d) of “Notice of Requirements” contained in Section 00900 – Funding Agency Special Provisions for Montana Public Facility Projects. FEDERAL AND STATE INTEREST EXCLUSION: Neither the United States or State of Montana, nor any of its departments, agencies, or employees are, or will be, a party to this Invitation to Bid, any resulting contract, or subcontract. PRE-BID CONFERENCE: Prospective bidders shall attend a mandatory pre-bid conference which will be conducted jointly with the Owner and Engineer, located at the Clinton School, 20397 East Mullan Road, Clinton MT 59825 at 2:00 p.m. on July 29, 2009. PROJECT ADMIN-

ISTRATION: All questions relative to this project prior to the opening of bids shall be directed to the Engineer. It shall be understood, however, that no specification interpretation will be made by telephone, nor will any “or equal” products be considered for approval prior to award of contract. The Engineer for this project is: John Manion, P.E. HDR Engineering, Inc. 1715 South Reserve Street, Suite C Missoula, MT 59801-4708 Te l e p h o n e : ( 4 0 6 ) 5 3 2 - 2 2 0 0 OWNER’S RIGHTS RESERVED: The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in a bid, or to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid and bidder, and to make awards in the interest of the Owner. The low bid shall be deter-mined on the basis of the lowest responsible Bid or lowest combination of Base Bid Items No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and No. 18 and accepted Alternative Bids if alternatives are included. Bids received that do not include pricing for all Bid Items will be considered non-responsive. The Owner reserves the right to authorize construction of any combination of, or all of, the base bid items and additional bid items defined at the bid amounts presented in the Contractor’s Bid Proposal Date July 7, 2009 Owner: Missoula County By: Amy Rose, Missoula County Public Works

undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the dte of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nancy K. LaBuff, the personal representative, return receipt requested, in care of its attorneys, Crowley Fleck, PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, PO Box 7099, Missoula, Montana 59807-7099 or filed with the Clerk of lthe Court. Dated this 22nd day of June, 2009. /s/ Nancy K. LaBuff, Personal Representative

Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. Cynthia L. Riggleman has defaulted in the performance of the said Deed of Trust and associated Loan Repayment and Security Agreement by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $910.97 for the month of November, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. As of April 15, 1009, the sum of $4,848.45 is past due. As of April 15, 2009, the principal balance due was the sum of $119,666.07 principal, plus $7,018.66 accrued interest, with interest continuing to accrue on the principal at the contract rate set out in the Loan Repayment and Security Agreement, which is currently 7.98% per annum, and other fees and expenses that may be advanced. The Beneficiary may disburse any amounts as may be required to protect Beneficiary’s interest. If Beneficiary elects to make such disbursements, sums paid shall become additional indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust. In accordance with the provisions of the Deed of Trust and Loan Repayment and Security Agreement, the Beneficiary has elected to accelerate the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Deed of Trust and Loan Repayment and Security Agreement and has elected to sell the interest of Cynthia L. Riggleman, the original Grantor, her successors and assigns, in and to the aforedescribed property, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances or covenants existing of record or evident on the property at the time of sale to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiary has directed Dan G. Cederberg, as Successor Trustee, to commence such sale proceedings. Those with an interest in the property and who appear from the public record to be entitled to notification of these proceedings are: Occupants 843 Emma Court Missoula MT 59802 Cynthia L. Riggleman 843 Emma Court Missoula MT 59802 Cynthia L. Riggleman 10895 Fred Lane Missoula MT 59808 Successor Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATED this 18th day of May, 2009. /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA: ss. County of Missoula) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 18th day of May, 2009, by Dan G. Cederberg, Successor Trustee. (Notarial Seal) /s/ Susan Marshall Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana My commission expires 17 March 2011

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SECTION 00020 INVITATION TO BID RECEIPT OF BIDS: Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula County Director of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808, until 2:00 P.M. local time, on August 4, 2009 for the construction of the Lewis & Clark Water System Rehabilitation Project. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work includes the installation of approximately 1,200 lineal feet of 4” water main, 42 water services, 1 blow off assembly, valves and fittings according to the plans and specifications and appurtenant work. PROJECT FINANCING: The “Lewis & Clark Water System Rehabilitation Project is funded by the federal government through the State Revolving Fund Program (SRF)—American Recovery And Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Renewable Resource Grant Loan Program (RRGL), Missoula County and the Special Improvement District No. 8496. Bidder must meet all requirements of the appropriate Federal/State agencies, as indicated in the specifications. The Bidder shall take special notice and shall meet the requirements of section 00900 as this project is partially funded by the State Revolving Fund (SRF)—American Recovery And Reinvestment Act of 2009. SITE OF WORK: The site of the work is located on Clarkson Drive in Clinton Montana. COMPLETION OF WORK: All work must be substantially completed within 60 calendar days after the commencement date stated in the Notice to Proceed. Contract time will be extended in accordance with the contract documents. DOCUMENT EXAMINATION AND PROCUREMENTS The Bidding and Contract Documents may be examined at the following locations “Lewis & Clark Water System Rehabilitation Project”: 1.) Missoula County—Public Works6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808, 2.) HDR Engineering, Inc.1715 South Reserve Street, Suite C Missoula, MT 59801, 3.) Missoula Plans Exchange 201 N. Russell Missoula, MT 59801, 4.) NW Montana Plans Exchange 2303 US Highway 2 East Kalispell, MT 59901, 5.) Montana Contractor’s Association 1717 11th Avenue Helena, MT 59601 6.) Builders Exchange 1105 Reeves Road W., Ste. 800 Bozeman, MT 59718. Copies of the Contract Documents may be purchased by mailing check or money order to: HDR Engineering, Inc. Attn: Devie Bessette 1715 S. Reserve St. Suite C Missoula, MT 59801 406-532-2200. Documents will be shipped via UPS Second Day Service. If shipping by other means is required, Bidder shall include their UPS/Federal Express/DHL account number with their request for documents. Copies of half-size set of Drawings and Contract Manual may be obtained upon paying a non-refundable fee of $100.00. Fullsize drawings are not available. Make checks payable to HDR Engineering, Inc. BID SECURITY: Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COIUNTY, Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-09-121 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILMA O’GARA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joseph V. Dulac, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 30th day of June, 2009. /s/ Joseph V. Dulac, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-09-779 Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of David James Martinez, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from David James Martinez to David James Jordan. The hearing will be on August 13, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED: June 24, 2009. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By Amy M. Day, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-111 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LINDA KURE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Gary Henricks, return receipt requested, at The Modine Law Office, 215 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 18th day of June, 2009. /s/ Gary Henricks, Personal Representative, 1845 36th Street, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-119 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY S. DAVIDSON, a.k.a. DOROTHY DAVIDSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to William L. Davidson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, 1853 Frey Lane, Missoula, Montana 59808, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. DATED this 29th day of June, 2009. /s/ William L. Davidson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-09-122 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PAUL D. O’CONNELL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Francis M. O’Connell, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 30th day of June, 2009. /s/ Francis M. O’Connell, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Probate No. DP-09-114 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LEN J. LABUFF, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Douglas Harkin Probate No. DP09-106 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARY J. WEISSMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHESTER W. OLIVER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 3231, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 10th day of June, 2009. /s/ Chester W. Oliver, PO Box 3231, Missoula, MT 59806 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO. 4 PROBATE NO. DP-09-125 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL J. LAUGHLIN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joan Alexis Harrington, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 9th day of July, 2009. /s/ Joan Alexis Harrington, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Robert L. Deschamps III Dept. No. 2 Case No. DV-09-780. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Robert Allen Wandler, Petitioner. This is a notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Robert Allen Wandler to Robert Allen Barnhouse. The hearing will be on August 11, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County, Montana. /s/ Christopher W. Froines, Geiszler & Froines, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K., Missoula, MT 59803 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Robert L. Deschamps III Presiding. Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-09-123 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RODNEY JACOB LOUDON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Elizabeth Mary Jo Loudon, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, P.L.L.P., PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 8th day of July, 2009. /s/ Elizabeth Mary Jo Loudon, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to §71-1-301, et seq. of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned hereby gives notice of a trustee’s sale to be held on the 29th day of September, 2009, at 1:00 o’clock p.m, on the steps of the Courthouse of Missoula County located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, of the following described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: The following described premises in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: Lot 17 of Emma Court, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Subject to: Provisions, conditions, easements and special assessments of the Missoula Valley Water Quality District; An Easement shown on plat; Provisions contained in a document entitled Declaration of Protective Restrictions, Covenants, Conditions and road Maintenance Agreement for Emma Court Subdivision in Book 419 at Page 681 Micro Records; Assessments, if any, of a Homeowner’s Association as provided for in Declaration of Protective Restrictions, Covenants, Conditions and Road Maintenance Agreement for Emma Court Subdivision in Book 419 at Page 681 Micro Records; Continuing rights of utility companies to any utility lines or systems now installed in the vacated street and/or alley and access to same for maintenance; Conditions or Restrictions set forth on plat; Conditions set forth in Certificate of Subdivision plat approval, filed as file no. 2698, records of Missoula County, Montana. Tax Map or Parcel ID No.: 3234305. Cynthia L. Riggleman, as Grantor, conveyed the abovedescribed real property, and the improvements situated thereon, if any, to I.R.E. Processing, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Beneficial Montana Inc., d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co., a Delaware corporation authorized to do business in Montana, who was designated as Beneficiary in a Deed of Trust dated July 22, 2004 and recorded on July 27, 2004 as Document No. 200421073 and put of record in Book 738 at Page 1651 of the official records of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). Dan G. Cederberg, a licensed Montana attorney, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated April 20, 2009, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/05/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200717849, Bk 801, Pg 698, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Sergio Romero & Emily S. Walter, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 27, 28, and 29 in Block “E” of Car Line Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 13, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $158,768.87. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $153,290.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 21, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03866) 1002.122733-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/31/02, recorded as Instrument No. 200203478, Bk 876, Pg 922, mortgage

Jonesin’ C r o s s w o r d s

"Yes We Can"--an international movement.. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

43 Riled, with "up" 44 Went out with the chivalrous type, to a Russian yes-man? 49 First name in Notre Dame football coaches 50 Hayao Miyazaki genre 51 Damascus's place: abbr. 52 Washing machine dye brand 53 Last letter, in Leeds 54 Tag info 58 Reasoning behind a crime 60 Send out 62 U.S. uncle's "Friday the 13th" character, to a German yes-man? 64 Went kaput 65 Concert load 66 Carb-loading dish 67 Craigslist postings 68 Pull-down list 69 Dream on?

DOWN

46 Spruced (up) 47 Song sung on Sunday 48 Their support is requested on some bumper stickers 55 Get in ___ 56 1974 Lucille Ball musical 57 Chris Berman network 59 Company that introduced non-stick cookware 61 Scores that may cause showboating afterward: abbr. 63 NW school that's home to the Beavers

1 Stockpile 6 Zwei times zwei times zwei 10 Ques. response 13 West Coast capital 14 Mrs., in Munich 15 "The Valley Isle" 17 Level draining device, to a Spanish yes-man? 19 Bar code on a book 20 Movie response to "Quick, let's hide!" 21 Dec. holiday 23 U.N. secretary-general Hammarskjold 24 ___-mo instant replay 25 Fuel additive brand 27 June birthstone 29 Greek letter T 30 Selassie's NYC restaurant, to a Japanese yes-man? 34 Nav. rank 35 Reaching like a puppy 36 President after HST 37 Hotel room list item 39 Contents of jewel cases 42 John Lennon's son

1 Gave some help 2 The rest of the U.S., to Hawaiians (with "the") 3 Place to pick up some brews 4 Spanish golfer Ballesteros 5 Russian org. and enemy in Bond novels 6 CIO's labor mate 7 Core 8 "Mad Men" star Jon 9 Heavy marching band instrument 10 "___ not making myself clear?" 11 Index with a composite 12 Legacy maker 16 Fireplace spot 18 Org. that requested the Pet Shop Boys change their name to the Rescue Shelter Boys 22 Like cacti 26 Feed music through, as with Muzak 28 Rowing machine unit 31 Hawaiian porch 32 "Dallas" family 33 Op. ___ (footnote abbr.) 37 "Funeral Blues" poet W.H. ___ 38 Civil rights leader, in street names 39 "Singin' in the Rain" actress Cyd 40 Word that comes from another word 41 Outline seen in local weather reports 42 1980s "truly outrageous" cartoon 44 In a fog 45 Condition meaning "lack of blood"

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0423.

Last week’s solution

Missoula Independent Page 41 July 16–July 23, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael A. Lee, a married man as his separate estate was Grantor, Montana Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: All Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company’s rights of way as constructed in the S1/2 SW1/4 of Section 6 and the NE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 7, Township 14 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M. in Missoula County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book 262 of Micro Records at Page 769. An easement 30 feet in width for ingress and egress as set forth in Quitclaim Deed recorded May, 232001 in Book 653 of Micro Records at Page 497. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200208076, Bk 879, Pg 206, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed

of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 15, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $113,330.93. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $110,225.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 22, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the

Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03438) 1002.122802-FEI

described as follows: Lot 4 in Block 1 of Alff Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, as recorded in Book 4 of Plats at Page 49. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Capital I Inc. Trust 2006-NC2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 29, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $146,548.52. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,088.28, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps

of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 7, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28990) 1002.124551-FEI

Notice of Trustee’s Sale T.S. No. 09 0087134 Title Order No. 090451181 THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/12/2009, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: On the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT.. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ANTHONY M CERASANI, AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 12/06/2006 and recorded 12/12/2006, in document No. 200631786 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 788 at Page Number 1055 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described

as follows; LOT 12 OF BEYER MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 12676 CONESTOGA. WAY, LOLO, MT 59847 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $387,000.00 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 02/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/17/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200530907, Book 764, Page 891, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michele D. Peasley, a married man, as sole and Separate property was Grantor, New Century Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly

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attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 07/08/2009 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-0703 Richardson, TX 75082 ASAP# 3164791 07/09/2009, 07/16/2009, 07/23/2009

Salomon Mortgage Loan Trust, C-Bass Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-CB3 without recourse. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,085.60, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 13, 2009 is $100,074.83 principal, interest at the rate of 10.875% now totaling $8549.99, late charges in the amount of $207.38, escrow advances of $5,590.59, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $308.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.82 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: 05/05/2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 05/05/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Miranda Marx Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 05/05/2015. ASAP# 3172968 07/16/2009, 07/23/2009, 07/30/2009

made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days, THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On May 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3177681 07/16/2009, 07/23/2009, 07/30/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on August 4, 2009, at 10:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, Montana 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land situated in the Southeast one-quarter of the Northwest one-quarter of Section 25, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana, particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a point that is on the North side and on the North right-of-way line of the Montana State Highway as the same is now constructed and maintained across and through Section 25, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, said point of beginning being South 1556.3 feet and South 71º51´ East, a distance of 2250 feet from the Section corner common to Sections 24, 23, 26, and 25, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, thence North 18º09´ East, a distance of 145.2 feet, thence South 71º51´ East and parallel to the North right-of-way line of said highway a distance of 300.0 feet, thence South 18º09´ West a distance of 145.2 feet, thence North 71º51´ West and along said right-of-way line a distance of 300.0 feet to the place of beginning. EXCEPTING from the abovedescribed land that portion conveyed by Deed recorded in Book 40 of Micro Records, Page 826, being Deed Exhibit No. 2929, records of Missoula County, Montana. Recording reference in Book 373 at Page 1529 Micro Records. Parrott Town Enterprises, Inc, a Montana corporation, as Grantor conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, Missoula, Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation to Herbst, LLP as Beneficiary by Montana Trust Indenture dated October 4, 2001, and recorded October 5, 2001, at Book 669, at Page 41, in the office of the Clerk and recorder, Missoula County, Missoula, Montana. Sayler Nelson, L.L.P., is the successor in interest to Parrott Town Enterprises, Inc. Roger and Renee Herbst are the successors in interest to Herbst, LLP. Dennis E. Lind is the Successor Trustee, dated March 18, 2009, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Missoula, Montana. Kevin Joseph Amaro is the assignee of Sayler Nelson, L.L.P.’s interest. The default for which this foreclosure is made is the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,535.61 for the months of December 2008, January, February, and March 2009 and each subsequent month until paid. Principal amount owing is One Hundred Sixty Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty and 60/100 Dollars ($160,760.60) together with interest accrued through March 31, 2009 in the amount Five Thousand Four Hundred Thirty-Three and 51/100 Dollars ($5,433.51) at the rate of 8.75% per annum, and per diem interest accruing in the amount of $38.50 per day. Real estate taxes for the first half of 2008 were due December 1, 2008, and as of March 31, 2009 the principal and penalty amount of Two thousand four hundred eighty-seven and 67/100 Dollars ($2,487.67) was due. The second half taxes in the amount of $2,348.19 will be due on May 31, 2009, and prior to the Trustee’s Sale on August 4, 2009. Interest on taxes due is accruing at 10% per annum. Other charges include all costs, expenses, and attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the tenth (10) day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED this 26 day of March, 2009 /s/ Dennis E. Lind Successor Trustee Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, PC 201 West Main Street, Suite 201 Missoula, Montana 59802 STATE OF MONTANA ) : ss. County of Missoula) On this 26th day of March, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Dennis E. Lind, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same in his capacity as Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my hand and affixed my Notarial Seal the day and year first above written. /s/ Janet Haney Notary Public for the State of Montana. (Printed Name) Janet Haney (SEAL) Residing at Missoula, Montana. My commission expires: 9-1-2010

of the District Manager, 1182 Lazy J. Lane, Corvallis, Montana, 59828, until 3:00 P.M. local time on July 31, 2009, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each bid shall be submitted in a sealed envelope. The envelope shall be clearly marked as follows: “BID PROPOSAL” “PURCHASE AND DELIVERY OF SIPHON 1 PIPING” “BITTER ROOT IRRIGATION DISTRICT” This project consists of, but is not necessarily limited to, the following major items: 1.) Purchase and delivery of approximately 600 LF of 72 ” steel pipe; 2.) Purchase and delivery of approximately 100 LF of 68” steel pipe; 3.) Purchase and delivery of approximately 100 LF of 62” steel pipe; 4.) Purchase and delivery of 62-72” steel pipe fittings; The Procurement Project Manual (Contract Documents) may be purchased from the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT, telephone 406 542 8880. The cost is $50 each, including delivery by US Postal Service mail or United Parcel Service (UPS) ground service. Payment of an additional $20 is required for express mail. After award of the contract, the successful Bidder will be furnished five Procurement Project Manuals free of charge. The Procurement Project Manual may be examined at the following locations: Bitter Root Irrigation District, 1182 Lazy J. Lane, Corvallis, Montana 59828, and the offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at: 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT; or at plan exchanges in Great Falls, Billings, Dodge-Scan-Boise, Kalispell, Missoula, and Montana Contractors Association, Helena. Each bid must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to the Bitter Root Irrigation District, Montana, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid amount. The successful BIDDER shall furnish approved Performance and Payment Bonds, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Workmen’s Compensation, Comprehensive General Liability, and Transportation insurance and insurance certificates shall be provided by the successful Bidder. Information, as required in Section 00200 Instructions to Bidders, Article 4, shall be submitted with the bid for review and evaluation by the Engineer and Owner. Bids shall include transport insurance for delivery. Installation is not part of the work and shall not be included in the bid. No bid may be withdrawn within a period of 60 days after the bid opening date. Before a contract will be awarded, the District will conduct investigations to determine the performance record and ability of the apparent low Bidder to perform the size and type of material specified. Upon request, the Bidder shall submit information as deemed necessary by the District to evaluate the Bidder’s qualifications. The District reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to determine which bid is, in the District’s judgment, the lowest responsible bid. The District also reserves the right to secure pipe and materials that is not the lowest bid, if in the District’s opinion, other evaluation factors favor pipe and material with a higher bid. The District also reserves the right to waive any informalities, irregularities, or minor deviations in any bid and to delete certain items listed in the bid. A detailed listing of pipe, material and contractual specifications are described in the Procurement Project Manual. Published this 16th day of July, 2009. John Crowley, Manager Bitter Root Irrigation District 1182 Lazy J. Lane Corvallis, MT 59828

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on 09/08/2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN SECTION 43, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5236 Amber & Erik Armitage, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of MT, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Montana First Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated 05/22/2007, and Recorded 05/29/2007 at 12:19 o’clock p.m., in Book 798, Page 184, under Document No. 200713098. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,562.44, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of 05/27/2009 is $203,410.55 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $8,139.89, late charges in the amount of $416.28, escrow advances of $499.03, and other fees and expenses advanced of $68.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $39.71 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: 04/28/2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 04/28/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013. ASAP# 3169748 07/09/2009, 07/16/2009, 07/23/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 14, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 1 OF BLUE MOUNTAIN VIEW NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF David P. Rodli and Penny S. Rodli, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to GOR-KIN Enterprises dab Alternative Mortgage Source, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 29, 1995 and recorded April 3, 1995 at 11:05 o’clock A.M. in Book 438, Page 78, as Document No. 9505939. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, f/k/a JP Morgan Chase Bank , as Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement, dated as of June 1, 2002, among Credit-Based Asset Servicing and Securitization LLC, Salomon Brothers Mortgage Securities VII, Inc., Litton Loan Servicing LP and JP Morgan Chase Bank

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 14, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO WIT: TRACT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1836, RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, THE SAME BEING A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 16, T14N, R19W, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 5816941; SOURCE OF TITLE IS COOK 357, PAGE 1289 (RECORDED 07/20/92) Craig Foust & Orawanda Foust, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to United General Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 15, 2006 and Recorded September 1, 2007 in Book 792, Page 1145 as Document No. 200704870. The beneficial interest is currently held by Arch Bay Holdings LLC -Series 2008. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2578.06, beginning February 1, 2007, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 15, 2009 is $311,839.94 principal, interest at the rate of 10.125% now totaling $69,499.77, late charges in the amount of $ 1307.18, escrow advances of $ 12,985.30, other fees and expenses advanced of $8119.24, plus accruing interest at the rate of $85.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Trustee will on OCTOBER 15, 2009, at the hour of 11:00 o’clock A.M., at the front doors of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, the following described property: Tract 1-B on Certificate of Survey No. 5813, located in Government Lot 6 within Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Said property is subject to a Montana Trust Indenture recorded October 11, 2006, Document No. 200626378, records of Missoula County, Montana, where GARY L. HAND is GRANTOR, STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY is TRUSTEE, and ED ENGEL, an undivided 16% interest, TIM L. GUENZLER, an undivided 13% interest, KARL L. ROESCH, an undivided 13% interest, MAX M. JOHNSON AND MARIANNE M. JOHNSON, an undivided 11% interest, GREGG FRASER A/K/A STEWART GREGORY FRASER, an undivided 3.2% interest, COREY E. RICHWINE AND KATHY A. RICHWINE, joint tenants with right of survivorship, an undivided 4.4% interest, CHERYL FRASER, an undivided 3.4% interest, JACK C. DOWNES AND GAIL L. DOWNES, joint tenants with right of survivorship, an undivided 11% interest, RANDALL S. OGLE, TRUSTEE OF THE OGLE AND WORM, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, PROFIT SHARING PLAN, an undivided 11% interest, and RONAN TELEPHONE COMPANY, EMPLOYEE PROFIT SHARING PLAN, an undivided 14% interest are BENEFICIARY. Christy L. Brandon is the Successor Trustee pursuant to an Appointment of Successor Trustee recorded May 12, 2008, Document No. 200810563, records of Missoula County, Montana. Grantor’s default consists of failure to make payments when due beginning with the monthly payments from and after November 9, 2007 in the amount of $3,937.50 each. The total sum owing on this obligation is $315,000.00 principal balance plus accruing interest at the rate of 15% per year ($129.45 per diem) totaling $75,082.20 as of May 12, 2009, $6,300.00 late fees, $562.00 escrow fees, and $6,753.84 other fees and costs. Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Montana Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary elects to declare all amounts under said Note and Trust Indenture to be immediately due and payable in consequence of the default of Grantor. Beneficiary directs that Trustee sell the real property above described for the satisfaction of the obligation. This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed and will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the tenth day following the sale. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff, reinstatement or any other circumstance that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damage. The grantor or the grantor’s successor in interest in the trust property or any part thereof or any other person having a subordinate lien or encumbrance of record thereon or any beneficiary under a subordinate trust indenture, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the beneficiary’s successor in interest the entire amount then due under the trust indenture and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED June 1, 2009. /s/ Christy L. Brandon, Successor Trustee, P.O. Box 1544, Bigfork, MT 59911, (406) 837-5445.

PUBLIC NOTICE: Foreclosure auction. 1966 Chevy PU. Place, Sherlock Storage, 2603 Industry Rd, Missoula, Mt. previous owner Richard Hyde. date 8/3/09, 10 am. details call 880-7287. SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for the purchase and delivery of Siphon 1 piping, as described in the Procurement Project Manual, will be received by the BITTER ROOT IRRIGATION DISTRICT, MONTANA at the office

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Automotive

Automotive

Log on to SaveOnThe L o t . c o m Yo u r K e y t o Automotive Savings

SPORT UTILITY

‘03 Mitsubishi Montero Sport LS, 2WD.....$6,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

High Quality, Low Mileage, Pre-Owned Vehicles Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com

‘02 Mitsubishi Diamante, 4dr, loaded.....$4,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 2003 Subaru Legacy Sedan. AWD, 4 cyl, automatic, 118K miles. Accepting Bids at Montana Educators’ Credit Union, 2000 South Russell, or fax 721-6125. Bids accepted until 7/22 ‘00 VW Jetta GLS.....$5,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

PICKUP TRUCKS Ultimate Spor tsman’s Truck 2007 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE-CAB (RED W/ GREY CLOTH) ONLY 16,000 MILES AND IN LIKE-NEW CONDITION. CUSTOM LOCKING STORAGE BOXES AND LOADING RAMP, UPGRADED TIRES, ELECTRICAL, SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO. PERFECT FOR FISHERMEN, HUNTERS, AND DOG OWNERS. ASKING $27,500. CALL 406-250-7146.

MOTOR HOMES/RVS 2007 Winnebago Tour 40TD Well-maintained diesel pusher in EXCELLENT CONDITION. Freightliner Evolution chassis, Cummins 400-hp engine. Two slides-outs, hydraulic auto leveling system. Full body paint. Kitchen: Solid-surface countertops, 30” microwave/ convection oven, 4door refrigerator/ freezer with icemaker, range with three gas burners. Living Room: Dinette, Leather Euro chair with ottoman, leather RestEasy dual control couch that reclines into full bed, in-motion satellite tv system, 30” tv and DVD player. Bedroom: Sleep Number queen bed, ceiling fan, stereo system, with AM/FM stereo, CD/DVD player, alarm clock, headphone jack and port for MP3 player, Splendide washer/ dryer, Large closet and cedar-lined storage chest. Smokefree, pet-free. $173,500 OBO 858-603-7897

NOTHING OVER

$7,995!

Here Are Just Some Of The Cars On Our Lot! '06 Chrysler PT Cruiser, 30,000 miles . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '06 Chev Aveo, 4 Cyl, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '06 Ford Taurus SE, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '05 Ford Taurus, low miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Ford Focus SVT, 6spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Dodge Intrepid, 63,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Dodge Stratus, 4dr, V6, auto, air . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '04 Nissan Sentra, 4 cyl, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Olds Alero, 2 door, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Buick Century, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Mitsubishi Montero Sport LS, 2WD . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Ford Ranger XLT, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Mercury Sable GS, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded! . . . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Mitsubishi Diamante, 4dr, loaded . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '02 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, auto, air . . . . .$5,995 '02 Saturn, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Dodge Grand Caravan, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Subaru Legacy Wagon 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Pontiac Grand Am, 2dr, 4cyl, 5spd . . . . . . . . . $5,995 '01 Pontiac Grand AM, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge 1/2T, short, 2wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4cyl, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '00 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '00 VW Jetta GLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Ford Windstar Mini Van, auto, air . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4dr, 4x4, blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '00 Plymouth Grand Voyager, 4dr . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 GMC Yukon, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Dodge 1500 Cargo Van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 Ford Ranger Super Cab 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Chevy 3/4 T X-Cab, 5spd, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '99 Toyota Camry, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Ford F250, V10, utility box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '99 Honda CVR, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, loaded . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '98 Volvo Wagon XC, AWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '98 Nissan Pathfinder, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '98 Ford Taurus 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,495 '98 Subaru Outback Wagon, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '97 Honda Accord LX, 4dr, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '97 Chevy Tahoe, 4dr, 1 owner, 2wd . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '96 Honda Civic EX, 4dr, auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '95 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Chevy 1/2T 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '94 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, Concourse, loaded . . .$3,995 '94 Mercury Grand Marquis, 4dr, auto, air . . . . .$2,995 '94 Ford F-150 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '93 Ford Explorer, 2dr, 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,495 '91 Lincoln Towncar, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '89 GMC Short Box Step Side, 4x4, sharp! . . . . . .$4,995

CLOSED SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS

Jim's Cars

WE FINANCE

1801 W. Broadway • 543-8269 Missoula Independent Page 43 July 16–July 23, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS RentalsApartments

RentalsHouses

RentalsFurnished

The Multi Item Store LLC

1yr old- 3bd/2ba house off Expressway. Hellgate School Dist., 2 car garage, DW, pet poss. $1150per mo. Devan @ Prudential Missoula 241-1408

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

RentalsCommercial PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

Stuido Space for Rent Teranga Arts School. 1300 sq.ft. maple floors, mirrors with curtains. $15/ hour. Please call 721-3854.

1&2

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Roommates ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

Professional Property Management

Find your new home with PPM Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

2 BD Apt 4265 Birdie Ct. $660/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $620/mo. 3 BD House 123 Hearth Ct. $1095/mo. 4 BD House Double Gargae 2036 13th St $1295/mo Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990 Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

1120 TOOLE AVENUE. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1 bonus room. Claw foot tub, wood floors, 7800 sq.ft. lot. Must see interior to appreciate. $189,900. 544-8356

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED WINDSOR PARK HOME. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, hardwood floors, fenced yard, unfinished basement, and more. $215,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

1216 S. 5th W. $218,500 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1333 Toole #C-13 $128,000 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House MF 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1848 sq ft. 3 bdrm, 2 bath on 5 acres, 2 rental units & 2 mobile lots. Double garage, storage sheds, landscaped. $299,900. MLS#903836. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12882 for pics 2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting. $210,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 2bd/1ba, 2car gar Immaculate 217 South Ave W. $232,000 Close to Univ. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3BD/2BA, DECK & SHED 4721 Sage St. in Westview Mobile Park. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $329,900 MLS#901764 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics 4 mos New Liberty, 28’x52’, 3bd 2ba. Move or lease lot. Realtors welcome. $81,000 546-5816 4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $424,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

1401 S. 6th W: Recently updated studio, garage, on-site laundry, heat & cable paid, $525, GCPM, 5496106 gcpm-mt.com

GardenCity

3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990

Property Management

4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990 730 Turner St #1 2bd/ 1ba hkups, wheelchair accessible $650 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 801 Prince: All redone 1-bedroom, garage, on-site laundry, heat&cable paid, $690, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpm-mt.com RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com

New Lease Special – Up to Two Months FREE Rent! Leasing Office Located Onsite at 4200 Expressway Missoula, MT

RentalsDuplexes 2206 Garfield 2 bed/1ba duplex w/carport, hookups Central location $650 Grizzly Property Management, 542-2060

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Missoula Independent Page 44 July 16–July 23, 2009

4600 + finished sf, 3 Bed/3 bath Cedar log home on beautiful private wooded 20 acres adjacent to national forest. 3 decks & private patio off the den. $850,000. MLS#903288. Janet 5327903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595 4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4BD/3BA, 3GAR + VIEWS 6960 Linda Vista 4 doors off Upper Miller Creek. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 4bd/3ba, Lovely Home w/Views 6960 Linda Vista $349,500 Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.Move Montana.com

Homes for Sale

New Listing! www.coburgln.com

www.mindypalmer.com

Classic U-area home 3 bd plus 2 bd in basement apt., hardwood floors, 1940’s character, garden, fireplace. $380,000. 308 North Ave. E. Call John at 546-9402. FREE Foreclosure Listings. Over 200,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-446-1328 GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $295,000.Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS LOLO AREA HOME. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, crown moldings, decks and patios, and much more. $234,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS LOLO AREA HOME. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, crown moldings, decks and patios, and much more. $234,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Homes for Sale

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Immaculate 5BD/ 2.5BA in Maloney Ranch Area. $308,000 Priscilla Brockmeyer

370.7689

Missoula Proper ties

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

4617 Bordeaux Blvd Sweet 3 Bedroom mls# 904072

www.mindypalmer.com

GREAT DOWTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $349,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689 UNIVERSITY DISTRICT 1/2 BLOCK FROM UM CAMPUS. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, off-street parking, hardwood floors, fenced yard, built-ins, fireplace, and more. $228,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at....

2 Bath home in the Canyon Creek Village. Built in 2003 this home has a wonderful floor plan with Master Bedroom on the main floor and an additional 2 bedrooms on the upper level. Charming covered front porch for enjoying the summer evenings. Home has been very well maintained and is priced to sell quickly. Home qualifies for many programs - human resource silent 2nd,RD, FHA. For a private showing or more information please call Mary Marry 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Beautifully updated, great floor plan, mountain and valley views. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $260,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

921 S 4th St W. $239,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Upper West Rattlesnake 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Fully remodeled bath & kitchen. Large fenced yard. $324,000. 531-5582 Lara@ lambros.com

A Career in Real Estate with Access Realty, we offer training, great commission splite and support. 406-544-3098 www.AccessRealty.net

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

Nice newer 3 bedroom 2 full bath home on the North side. Very Close to bike/walking path. FOR RENT 908 Defoe Approximately 1,100 Sq. Ft. built in 2005. Includes all appliances and washer/dryer. Small unfenced yard. $1,050 a month. Year lease.

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

5 Bedroom Home • 1 Bedroom Apartment

Used Furniture Sale

Austin McKee

MLS# 904336 • $295,000 • www.2626oshaughnesy.com

All Offers Considered

This 5 bedroom home on a corner lot with a fenced yard and a full finished basement features a separate one bedroom apartment that rents for $600/month. That equals LOW House Payments!

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 544.3098 www.AccessRealty.net

1358 1/2 W. Broadway

1519 Defoe New Energy Efficient Homes • $265,000 These new construction, energy efficient homes blend low maintenance features with quality living. The unsurpassed craftsmanship accompanies amenities such as hardwood and tile flooring, hardiplank siding, tankless water system, custom alder cabinetry, 2 cycle furnace and much more! Convenient location close to downtown and river. Call Pat for a tour today.

Westside Story

The Multi Item Store LLC (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Homes for Sale

The Top Hat! 134 W. Front • Price Reduced! $1,900,000 First time on the market in 25 years! This property features a large 2-story building with basement and adjoining 1-story building. Total: 9,000 sq.ft. est. Downtown Missoula, off-street parking. Price includes all beverage liquor license and gaming license.

Proud to be a part of Windermere's new commercial real estate division!

"Raised on Real Estate" Experience with a fresh perspective. CELL: 546-5705 • www.Live-Montana.com

RICE TEAM

3 floor plans to choose from

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

4322 Capy Lane in Target Range MLS 904419 4 bed 3-1/2 bath on 1 acre $435,000

131 S. Higgins MLS 900989 High end remodel Wilma bldg condo 1+ bed, 2 bath $478,000

928 Elm MLS 904910 Lower Rattlesnake, Great Investment Property $229,000 10250 Valley Grove Dr MLS 902264 2 bed 2 bath LOG home w/modern kitchen $299,000

CALL ABOUT MY COMMERCIAL LISTINGS

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

You may be able to: payment

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

• Lower from your monthly payment • Switch an ARM • aSwitch from an ARM to a to predictable fixed-rate predictableloan fixed-rate loan

• Get term to • Geta ashorter shorter term to pay payoffoff your your mortgage faster mortgage faster • Finance your closing costs

Buying or selling a home 5999 Cunningham Ct. So of Lolo, 3800 sq ft home 4 yrs new, Ranch w/ full finished basement $390,000

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

For all your home mortgage needs call

Zia Maumenee zia@landlmortgage.com Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are You may be able to: Still• Lower Historically Low! your monthly

is one of the most important decisions of your life

& I take pride in providing a positive, professional experience.

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com www.BuyInMissoula.com

Astrid Oliver

Joy Earls Cared for by one owner for over 30 Years! Open living room & kitchen. Gardens, Flowers, & Fruit Trees. Near the School & park.

1852 S. 8th West $179,900 MLS#904867

Joy Earls • 531-9811

#228,1087

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Don’t miss your chance,

Don't miss your contact mechance, today. contact me today.

Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Home Mortgage Consultant Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com 1800 S. Russellhttp://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ St. Ste. 200 Missoula, MT 59801 astrid-oliver Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Credit is subject to approval. astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Some restrictions apply. This http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver information is accurate as of

JUST LISTED!!! 514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

• Finance your closing as part of your new loan costs as part of your new loan.

Astrid Oliver

WHS, CNE, GRI

544-6829

Mortgage & Financial

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Anna Nooney

Mortgage & Financial

Homes for Sale

date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Mortgage Credit is subject toFargo approval.Home Some restrictions apply.is a Wells Fargoand Bank, This information isdivision accurate asof of date of printing is 2009 Wells subject to change N.A. without©notice. Wells FargoFargo Home Bank, N.A.Fargo All Bank, rights Mortgage is a division of Wells N.A. 2009 #63731 Wells Fargo Bank,reserved. N.A. All rights reserved.03/09-06/09 #63731 06/09-09/09

Missoula Independent Page 45 July 16–July 23, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

At Your Service…Interested in Buying or Selling a Home? You will receive top notch service as I work for you…call me TODAY!!

406-327-8787

445 W Alder - PORTICOREALESTATE.COM

$99,500/up, MONEY TO HELP Sweet slant street cottage. N. Side Lot. Ready to build.

So much character & great yard

Charming 2+bdrm/1 bath.

Native landscaping.Great house!

Downtown 2bdr/2bath condo.

$148,500. Wow! T-Falls

MLS#900646 • $299,000

MLS#900844 • $175,000

MLS#903154 • $179,000

MLS#903003 • $219,900

Laura Branson 370-4063 windermere.com laurabranson@windermere.com

Corner lot across from park 4400 Martindale, Missoula 3 Bed / 2 Bath / Double Garage. Front porch, fully landscaped yard with planted trees and shrubs.

13.82 Acres. Seasonal Stream 4.35 acres, river access Easy Communte, close to river 10.42 acres, 3bd/2.5ba 9.99 Acres 3bd/3ba

$679,900 waterfront beauty

3bd/2ba Large Lot

Classic Slant St Home

Amazing Arts & Crafts style

3bd/1.5 ba, Great access to U

Lots of Updates, Super Kitchen, Huge Garage/Shop

What will be the next page in your family scrapbook?

MLS#904831 $193,500

- $369,900 - MLS 900687 909 Longstaff - $305,000 - A Real Charmer!

Land for Sale 20 Lot Bitterroot Subdivision, 42 acres, views of Bitterroots & Sapphires. Appraised $127,500 each. $864,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $385,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.RiverRidgeMT.com

Missoula Independent Page 46 July 16–July 23, 2009

Commercial 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $339,900 MLS# 901478 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595 Tanning Salon $65,000Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 2400753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

Out of Town 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

REDUCED Beautiful 20 Acre parcel with meadow and views. Financing available OAC with 10 % down. M a k e o f f e r. $ 1 5 9 , 9 0 0 . MLS# 900454. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text: 44133 Message: 12888 for pics

Turn key cabin in the Garnet Mountains, 24.49 acres, off the grid, gated access, spring water, new propane appliances, 9 miles south of Helmville. $140,000. Montana International Realty 406-883-6700

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406721-1444; 800-999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803


USDA Organic Apricots

Prairie Hills Natural Bone-In Beef Short Ribs

$2.99

$1.39

USDA Organic Cantaloupe

6 pack

Banrock Station Australian Wine

lb.

69¢

$4.99

4 oz.

lb.

.75 liter

USDA Organic Stalk Celery lb.

IQF 16-20 ct. Raw Black Tiger Shrimp

$7.79

$4.99

15.5 oz.

Beaver Dusseldorf Mustard

89¢

Prairie Hills Natural Boneless Chuck Roast Or Steak

$2.89

$1.29

Oregon Honey Beer

lb.

Prairie Hills Natural Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

$4.99

lb.

Aunt Nellie's 3 Bean Salad

16 oz.

$1.29

Pita Wraps

Florida Natural Orange Juice bunch

California Whole Seedless Watermelon

29¢

$3.19

$4.29 64 oz.

Fruit Turnovers

Earthtones Organic Coffee lb.

each

$6.99

2

for

$1.99

12 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 47 July 16–July 23, 2009


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Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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