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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 26 • June 25–July 2, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: New amphitheater aims to fill summer concert void Etc.: What the emergency declaration really means for Libby Books: Walter Kirn gives higher education a failing grade


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 26 • June 25–July 2, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: New amphitheater aims to fill summer concert void Etc.: What the emergency declaration really means for Libby Books: Walter Kirn gives higher education a failing grade


Missoula Independent

Page 2 June 25–July 2, 2009


nside Cover Story For a newcomer, a match of cowboy polo looks something like live-action foosball with strong elements of croquet. Players jokingly call it “poor-man’s polo,” a lowbrow version of the more familiar and aristocratic English polo played by princes on thoroughbreds. The sport Cover photo by Alex Sakariassen carries a rich tradition in Montana, but vets worry that the tradition may soon come to an end. As far as anyone can tell, the state’s four remaining teams—Billings, Bozeman, Great Falls and Missoula—are all that’s left of a sport that once boasted 75 teams across the country, hosted raucous national championships and even made a splash in Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Stop in after Downtown ToNight Thursday 9:30 pm

News

Letters Huey Lewis and Freemen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Pride parade and Tidwell promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Rey resurfaces, booze tax bombs and more zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. What’s the emergency designation mean for Libby? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Missoula developer sets sights on new amphitheater . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Up Front Will Deschamps takes the reins of state GOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski Obama administration continues the White House secrecy . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range The West serves as a modern-day La Mancha . . . . . . . . 11 Agenda Give us the drugs, dude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Brown is golden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 8 Days a Week Riding into the sunset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Mountain High Calendar Playa makes his mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Scope Author explores Luther Burbank’s garden of invention . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Noise Tyson Ballew, Seneca, The Present and Keep Your Soul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Books Kirn gives higher education a failing grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Film Soderbergh brings art house touch to Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Free Will Astrolog y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 This Modern World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill EDITORIAL INTERN Megan Gyermek ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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Page 3 June 25–July 2, 2009


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Tuesday afternoon in Rockin Rudy’s in Missoula.

Q:

This week the Indy looks into a new outdoor amphitheater near town called Ryan Creek Meadows. If you could see any band play outdoors in Montana, who would it be? Follow-up: What’s your most memorable outdoor show in Montana?

Cheryl Philips: The M Group! Absolutely! They play the Top Hat, mostly blues and originals, and throw in a little Carlos, too. They’re the greatest musicians in town and you young people need to go see ’em on Wasted Wednesdays. No sympathy: Well, hello?! The Rolling Stones, don’t you remember? We were right there, and man, my kid had never seen me scream like that. Katie Jividen: Reverend Slanky, because they’re the best funk band in Montana and they really like to get funky. Festivarian fever: That would have to be the Love Your Mother Festival, just recently, because I was totally loving my mother! There were 50 bands, and you just had to bounce around to see them all. Plus, just that feeling of being at a festival, loving your mother and hanging outside. You gotta love it! Joe McMahon: The Grateful Dead, because I’d love to see them one more time—in Montana would be great. Long ago, I saw them a number of times, and it was always a great scene. It’s like you were going to a carnival. Wolves in the park: Easy, Santana and Los Lobos in Caras Park. Los Lobos just blew me away. I mean, “Cinnamon Girl” by Los Lobos? Amazing. I remember thinking, “Wow. We’re in Missoula, in Caras Park.” Dennis Mangold: Oh boy, that’s a crazy question because there are just so many excellent bands. I guess I’d have to say a revival of Led Zeppelin. I’d be ecstatic, and it would just bring in so many people. Classic choice: Outdoor? Well, it wasn’t in Montana, but it was an amazing lineup at the Gorge—Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison and Bob Dylan, back in about ’95. The musicians really just put their heart and soul into it, and that venue really brings out the best in musicians. It was really a magical night.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 June 25–July 2, 2009

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Family ties As a member of the family that originally owned most of Huey Lewis’ land, I was very interested in your article about him (see “Deep cut,” June 18, 2009). The Flanagins bought the land and built the original farmhouse in the late 1800s. When my grandfather took over running the farm, his parents built a smaller place nearby. Grandpa sold the big house, barn and his half of the land in the early 1950s. Since then, that part of the property has been broken up with different folks in the house and others in newer houses built near the barn. My great aunt raised her family in that smaller house and lived there well into her 80s. Huey befriended her and bought her land and buildings when she needed to move into a nursing home. Aunt Phyllis died about a year afterward. Huey’s caretaker was at her funeral and invited us to come for a visit to see the work they had done on the land. (I never took him up on that offer!) I don’t know anything about the controversial slough, but do know that we flood irrigated the land using ditches. I also know that Huey treated my aunt kindly and with dignity. My aunt’s daughter shared that hunters and folks fishing often stopped to ask permission to cross her land as they headed to the river. Personally, I would rather Huey own the land than see it more chopped up and with houses. Susan Flanagin Missoula

sheriffs and offered bounties on employees of the criminal justice system. These criminal activities led to their 81-day standoff with federal authorities. Despite all of this, allies tried to portray the “poor Freemen” as innocent victims of the federal government, instead of criminals who, by the standoff, already faced over 50 federal and state criminal charges. We understand that occasionally good people get caught up in these groups due to what is happening in their lives. For instance, the Clark family gravitated to the Montana Freemen when their family farm faced foreclosure. However, the

Personally,

I would rather Huey own the land than see it more chopped up and with houses.

Still dangerous A recent article in the Independent discussed how former members of the Montana Freemen were unhappy about revelations that Scott Roeder, who murdered Dr. George Teller, had studied under Freemen leaders in 1996 (see “Finding Freemen,” June 11, 2009). The people interviewed repeated the “poor Freemen” rhetoric that was common during the 1990s from the anti-government group’s allies. Make no mistake about it: The Montana Freemen were a domestic terrorist group and invented what is now called “paper terrorism.” They filed fraudulent liens against the property of local elected officials. They formed “common-law courts,” which they often convened by taking over county courthouses, and issued bogus subpoenas for statewide elected officials. They defrauded banks and credit card companies of over a million dollars. They also threatened to hang local

majority of people who join radical groups do so because they find the ideology appealing. The motivation for joining the Freemen does not absolve individuals from the criminal activities in which they engaged. Instead of following the law, the Montana Freemen hitched their horses to LeRoy Schweitzer, who at the time was already a well-known fugitive and tax protestor. People involved with the Freemen shouldn’t be surprised that anti-government activists like Roeder continue to be tied to them. The Freemen conducted “classes” whereby they taught over 800 people to not pay their taxes and how to use bogus checks to defraud banks and the government. These “students” came from all over the country, learned the Freemen tactics, and took those practices home to their communities.

Some of those interviewed in the article made it sound like the practices of the Montana Freemen are a distant part of the past. That couldn’t be further from the truth. While incarcerated, LeRoy Schweitzer has taught his fellow inmates how to engage in “paper terrorism,” according to a 2001 Associated Press article. The other “common law” practices the Montana Freemen helped create continue to circulate and be modified in anti-government circles to this day. The Montana Freemen continue to show up in the media for a reason— their checkered legacy remains relevant today. Travis McAdam Montana Human Rights Network Helena

Larger agenda I would like to thank all the medical personnel and staff at the Blue Mountain Clinic for continuing to provide quality reproductive services, including abortion. They are courageous folks who face the risk of violence every day simply by going to work. In the wake of the cold-blooded murder of Dr. George Tiller, those of us who support legal abortion must redouble our efforts to make clinics safe for both the providers and their clients. This was not an isolated killing of a single abortion doctor. It’s part of an ongoing, organized effort to incite violence against abortion providers. We must demand that action be taken against the very real terrorist threat perpetrated by American right-wing extremists like Randall Terry and his followers. We must demand that those who incite violence against abortion providers, like Bill O’Reilly on Fox News, be held accountable and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. We must demand that the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act, passed in 1994 to make violence against abortion providers a federal crime, be rigorously enforced. We must stand up and proclaim our majority support for the right of access to safe, legalized abortion or lose that right to murderous fanatics who won’t stop at closing down the few remaining abortion clinics. Their agenda is much larger than that. Robin Spaziani Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

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Missoula Independent

Page 5 June 25–July 2, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, June 17

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces Regional Forester Tom Tidwell as the new chief of the U.S. Forest Service, making him the third consecutive agency head to come from the Missoula regional headquarters.

• Thursday, June 18 Montana Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester vote in support of the “cash for clunkers” program, ensuring its inclusion in a $106 billion war-spending bill that would pass later in the day. The government program provides $3,500–$4,500 vouchers to motorists who trade in their old gas-guzzlers for more fuel efficient vehicles.

• Friday, June 19 Inmate Heather Wasson, 31, dies while in custody at the Missoula County Detention Center. Undersheriff Jerry Crego rules out suicide as the cause of death, but notes that toxicology reports are still outstanding. Wasson was arrested on a probation violation and had been in the facility for approximately 36 hours.

• Saturday, June 20 More than 500 people take to Kalispell’s streets as part of the 2009 Montana Pride Celebration. The event goes off without a hitch, despite a May petition submitted to City Council in opposition of the gathering. More than 30 protestors still voice their disapproval during the parade, but are mostly drowned out by the revelers.

• Sunday, June 21 The Trail Head hosts its annual Blackfoot River Challenge to benefit the Missoula Food Bank. Over 50 participants enter in three events through the weekend, including a downriver race, whitewater sprint and whitewater slalom. Ben Schmidt scores the fastest overall time in the downriver long course, while Will Day wins the short course.

• Monday, June 22 A hit-and-run accident leaves a female bicyclist injured at the intersection of Reserve Street and Old Highway 93. Missoula police issue a public alert calling for witnesses, and identify the driver later in the evening when he turns himself in. Sgt. Travis Welsch says an investigation is ongoing.

• Tuesday, June 23 Montana Sen. Max Baucus names Barrett Kaiser his new chief of staff. Kaiser has worked with Baucus since 1999 and replaces Melodee Hanes, who was recently promoted to the U.S. Department of Justice. Baucus’ office shake-up also includes naming Missoula native John Lewis the new deputy state director.

A grizzly bear charges through Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley on June 21, drawing hundreds of gawkers visiting the park on a free weekend. All national parks—including Glacier—will again waive fees on July 18-19 and August 15-16 to encourage more visitors. “During these tough economic times, our national parks provide opportunities for affordable vacations for families,” Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said last week. “I encourage everyone to visit one of our nation’s crown jewels this summer and especially to take advantage of the three free-admission weekends.”

Health care

Booing the booze tax Montana barley growers and beer brewers are in a state of ferment as a proposed alcohol tax, designed to help fund health care reform, floats around Congress. A letter signed by a consortium of Montana ag groups, including the Montana Grain Growers Association, Montana Farm Bureau Federation, Montana Farmers Union, Montana Agri-Business Association and the Montana Grain Elevator Association, warns that higher beer taxes will harm the state’s sizable barley industry. “As with most ‘sin taxes,’ they’re a tax of diminishing return,” says John Youngberg of the Montana Farm Bureau Federation. “As you increase the price of it, people quit buying as much. If they quit buying as much then it affects our folks who sell the malt barley…It doesn’t take much of a change in the market to affect how much malt barley we sell here in Montana.” According to the National Agriculture Statistics Service’s 2008 figures, Montana

ranked third in the country in barley production, producing more than 31 million bushels, or about 15 percent of the country’s total. “We grow a lot of barely,” Youngberg says. And Montana also boasts a lot of breweries. “We don’t think it’s going to pass,” says Neal Leathers, Big Sky Brewing Co.’s president and co-founder. “But if it did, it would be a huge issue for brewers in general and craft brewers in particular, since it’s set up to be tied to the strength of the beer, and the stronger the beer the higher the tax level.” Leathers says customers would see the tax’s impact at the checkout line. “By the time it would actually hit the store shelves,” he says, “I think the average six-pack would probably have a 50-cent increase, and for some of the higher alcohol beers it might well be pushing an extra buck a six pack.” For Big Sky, the tax would come at the worst possible time. Like a lot of breweries, the business is already struggling to hold its prices in the current economy.

“That’s tough enough to do,” he says, “and if you have taxes making you raise your prices, that’s not a good thing.” Montana Sen. Max Baucus admitted last week that the beer tax proposal was “on life support.” Rep. Denny Rehberg, co-chairman of the Craft Brewers Caucus, has already spoken out against the tax. Matthew Frank

City Council

Zoned Out With zoning and subdivisions issues, the Missoula Building Industry Association (MBIA) usually sides with the five minority members of the Missoula City Council. But as the council attempts to overhaul its zoning ordinance, Ryan Morton, government affairs director with the MBIA, sided with the majority on an issue which could hinder the ordinance’s passage. The issue is whether the new zoning ordinance is a change in zoning, or a rewrite of the existing ordinance. If it’s the former,

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Page 6 June 25–July 2, 2009

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

the two-year process leading up to the draft of the ordinance was conducted illegally. If the ordinance is a rewrite, the city is in compliance with state law. City Attorney Jim Nugent says the ordinance is a rewrite, but council members Dick Haines, Renee Mitchell, Lyn Hellegaard, John Hendrickson and Jon Wilkins aren’t convinced. They’ve asked for an outside attorney to review Nugent’s decision. Morton, who supports the rewrite, sent Nugent’s decision to attorneys at the national level of his organization. The attorneys agreed with Nugent, but Morton believes clarity is not the root of the councilors’ concern. “With second opinions, this is nothing new,” Morton says. “People want opinions that equate with their outcomes. We tried to give them unbiased views, but I think with local politics, when people want a second opinion, they’re looking for an outcome, not greater clarity.” On May 4, Hendrickson sent a referral to the Committee of the Whole to hire outside legal representation. So far, Council President Ed Childers hasn’t placed the item on the agenda. If Hendrickson chooses, he and another colleague may choose to petition the committee to have the item placed on the agenda after six weeks has passed. Monday will mark the end of six weeks. Wilkins says the MBIA’s review doesn’t sway his wish for outside legal consultation. “They’re biased,” he says of the MBIA. “They support [the rewrite]. I don’t want to influence the attorney in any sort of way. I want the person to look at the document and tell me it’s a rezoning or not a rezoning.” Jesse Froehling

Environment

Mark Rey resurfaces Former Agriculture Undersecretary Mark Rey has a new job in Washington, D.C., but it’s not with the U.S. Forest Service. WildLaw, a Montgomery, Ala.-based nonprofit environmental law firm, hired Rey as a “part-time advocate” on Capitol Hill. “The U.S. Forest Service is on the verge of major positive changes in its management of our public forests,” said Ray Vaughan, WildLaw’s executive director, in a statement. “However, current laws and the arcane budg-

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

et process for the agency significantly hamper the development and growth of the scientifically sound, landscape-scale restoration work the agency could and should be doing. We needed an advocate in D.C. who will champion the need for congressional support for restoration and protection of national forests through new legislative and funding vehicles.” Specifically, WildLaw hired Rey to try to increase funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund and Forest Legacy. The

firm’s goal is to raise money to increase land acquisition in the south, the statement said. Rey made local and national headlines last year when he tried to secure a closeddoor deal between the Forest Service and Plum Creek Timber Co. that would have allowed Plum Creek to use shared roads to access residential development. Sen. Jon Tester asked for a probe into the entire negotiation process and county officials filed Freedom of Information Act requests for easement documents. Plum Creek eventually backed out of the deal, and Rey’s tenure as undersecretary ended when the Obama administration took office. Vaughan didn’t return a call seeking comment, but Rey says that under lobbying ethics rules he’s barred from representing any entity in front of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the Forest Service for the next year. He’s also barred for life from lobbying on any specific issue that fell under his personal responsibility. “I’ll probably be helping them with the congressional relations work for the most part,” Rey told the Indy. Jesse Froehling

Agenda

News Quirks

Courts

Christians file appeal Sparks continue to fly in a lawsuit leveled against the University of Montana by the Christian Legal Society (CLS), an organization of Christian law students. U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull ruled in favor of UM in late May, but CLS appealed that ruling June 18 in the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. CLS filed the original suit in December 2007 following a major tiff with the Student Bar Association (SBA) over the group’s requirement that all voting members and officers refrain from extramarital sexual activity. The SBA and the UM School of Law derecognized CLS as a student group claiming it violated a sexual orientation discrimination clause by seeking to exclude homosexuals. The move cut CLS’s access to funding through mandatory student fees. According to CLS attorney Casey Mattox, Cebull ignored key arguments in the group’s case by focusing on the sexual discrimination clause. During the suit CLS argued that revoking its recognition skewed allocation of student money toward student organizations with non-Christian beliefs. “The idea is basically you’re being forced to pay to support groups you disagree with,” Mattox says, “so you have to fairly distribute the money.” UM continues to recognize CLS as a student organization, and Mattox considers that a vote of approval. He says CLS’s stance on homosexuality has no bearing on the case. “The issue is simply a belief about sex outside marriage,” Mattox says. “And that applies whether it’s a heterosexual relationship outside marriage or a homosexual relationship outside marriage.” However, the point of contention for those opposed to CLS is the group’s traditional definition of marriage as between a man and a woman. Mattox explains that definition is part of the group’s religious beliefs. More than anything, CLS’s appeal seems to hinge on the fact that some student groups are exclusionary by their very nature. “There’s nothing wrong with the College Democrats having Democrats as their officers and not having Republicans,” Mattox says. “Everyone seems to understand that point, and it’s simply no different here.” Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS People who commented on Missoula’s proposed zoning rewrite during the June 22 City Council meeting. The meeting didn’t adjourn until 12:32 a.m.

51

etc. Last week’s emergency declaration in Libby received “Breaking News” treatment from CNN, as if a wildfire was about to engulf the town. Of course, Libby’s been engulfed in asbestos for decades, and declaring a public health emergency now is a little like flying in air tankers after the town’s burned down. As that CNN story reported, the EPA declaration—the first issued by the agency since the Superfund law was passed in 1980—means Libby will receive $131 million in cleanup and medical assistance. But what wasn’t reported was that the EPA isn’t actually providing any new money to the town. Of that $131 million, $125 million was tagged for Libby anyway. An EPA official, who requested anonymity, told the Independent that the money comes from W.R. Grace’s $250 million settlement with the EPA last year. No matter the source of the money, it may do little to address the underlying problem hindering proper cleanup of Libby: the lack of toxicity studies needed to establish safe and acceptable levels of Libby-amphibole asbestos. That was the problem Office of Inspector General Special Agent Cory Rumple detailed in his 2006 report (which the EPA buried until the Obama administration forced its release in April), and it remains the problem today. “[The declaration] is good news for the community for clinical health,” says Dr. Gerry Henningsen, former EPA senior toxicologist and technical advisor to the agency’s Technical Advisory Group, “but the underlying problem is still there and won’t go away until the EPA cleans the site to adequate health-protective levels, which they can’t determine because they don’t have the data.” The emergency declaration is definitely welcomed, even if it’s about seven years late. The people of Libby deserve urgent attention. The $6 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—the balance of the $131 million—will pay the medical bills of residents suffering from asbestos-related disease. Plus, even if the EPA isn’t receiving any additional funding now, the emergency declaration does give the agency more wiggle room to ask for it down the road. Parts of the deal are encouraging, but we can’t help but wonder if this breaking news will follow the same old story line in Libby: big promises, bigger disappointment. We’re not sure air tankers can drop a big enough pile of money to make it right.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 June 25–July 2, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Opening act Missoula developer sets sights on new amphitheater by Alex Sakariassen

Odds are the recent announcement of an Aug. 19 Mudvayne concert in the Missoula area generated a fair amount of confusion. Not so much the question “Why Mudvayne?” as the real puzzler: “What is Ryan Creek Meadows?” For the time being, Ryan Creek Meadows is an open field within eyeshot of Interstate 90, just east of Beavertail Hill. But for Toby Hansen, a Missoula developer and insurance agent, the answer is anything from a modest stage in a field to a sprawling outdoor

only a temporary concert location. Hansen says a larger facility will likely be housed on a 10-acre bench farther back on the property. He pictures a permanent stage with a shell, lots of camping and parking space, maybe a few buildings. With the proper infrastructure, he says the space could host crowds up to 10,000. “Our grand vision in five or six years would be a fairly well developed amphitheater up there with the potential for a retractable roof,” Hansen says.

Photo by Chad Harder

Ryan Creek Meadows, situated about 28 miles east of Missoula, will host an outdoor Mudvayne concert Aug. 19. Local insurance agent Toby Hansen hopes to turn the outlying acreage into a destination amphitheater over the next few years.

HICKORY STREET IS BLOCKED ON EVENT DAYS AND HAS NO ACCESS TO THE FACILITY.

By Car

You can only access Ogren Park Allegiance Field by Cregg Lane off of Orange Street. The Osprey encourage those driving to park in the Osprey’s provided parking lot at the stadium.

Ogren Park Allegiance Field is a bike-friendly facility. We are located as a hub to many trails in and out of the area. The Osprey and Missoula in Motion offer the following great incentives to bike to the games: •Get $1 off your game ticket by riding your bike to any Osprey game. •Bike to the Ballpark Tuesdays: Get 2-for-1 tickets for riding your bike to any Tuesday home game, courtesy of Missoula in Motion.

By Foot

By Bike

Ogren Park Allegiance Field is located as a hub to many trails in and out of the area. Walking is a great way to get to and from the stadium.

No matter what your mode of transportation to and from Osprey games, we ask that you respect the surrounding neighborhood and help us be good neighbors! We hope you enjoy another great season of Osprey baseball - see you at the ballpark!

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Page 8 June 25–July 2, 2009

amphitheater. He envisions thousands of music fans pouring in from all corners of the region for rock shows, country concerts and metal tours like Mudvayne. He says Ryan Creek Meadows is whatever his imagination—and regional concert promoters—will allow. Outdoor venues have an uneven history with Missoula. The most recent attempt by Big Sky Brewing Co. enjoyed success in 2005 with acts like Willie Nelson, Widespread Panic and 50 Cent before construction eliminated adjacent parking spaces. When Big Sky stopped hosting shows, it left a gap in the summer concert lineup that Hansen intends to fill. In 2005, Hansen purchased a 250acre ranch plot along the MissoulaGranite county line. In the process of investigating his new claim, he struck on the idea of an outdoor amphitheater just 30 minutes outside of Missoula. “One of the great things about this place right now is there’re no neighbors,” Hansen says. “Geographically, this place is isolated. It sits in its own little valley. Everybody should be able to go out there and have a good time, crank up the music. There’s no reason it should bother anybody.” The site of the Mudvayne stage is

“We’ve already looked into that. It would extend the concert season substantially. That would be the ideal situation…12 concerts a year.” Although Hansen came up with the vision, he didn’t have a clue about how to make it happen. Tom Webster, Hansen’s longtime friend and director of Missoula’s University Theatre, offered to scope the place out and act as an informal consultant for the project. “Missoula really needs an outdoor venue for summer shows,” Webster says. “That’s the one thing we don’t have going for us. We went out there to look at it and I thought it had great potential.” Last summer, Webster connected Hansen with Paul Donaldson, whose crew at Rocky Mountain Rigging (RMR) has extensive experience in production staging, including the Rolling Stones show at Washington-Grizzly Stadium and the 2009 Sasquatch! Music Festival at Washington’s Gorge Amphitheatre. Donaldson recognized the same potential as Webster and Hansen, but the trio’s progress hasn’t been easy. Hansen says coaxing a promoter into booking the venue has been the single greatest hurdle so far. Few were willing to consider an amphitheater with little or

no name recognition, he says, and the group’s initial attempts to land an act failed. “It’s hard to convince the folks that are actually buying acts and promoting the show to do a non-established venue,” says Donaldson. “People really like to read the history of a venue and find out how many people show up on average. How does a rock concert do? How does a hippie band do? There’s a track record.” Mudvayne may not be the first band that springs to mind when Missoulians think summer concert, but Webster believes the show will be a big draw for Ryan Creek Meadows. Hansen is just relieved that promoter Mark Dinerstein of the Knitting Factory was willing to gamble a Pedal to the Metal tour date on his new venue. “It’s kind of like when you’re sitting with your buddies there at the swimming pool,” Hansen says. “You want to jump off the high dive, everybody talks about doing it, but nobody wants to get up there and do it first. It’s the same issue, getting someone to say, ‘Yeah, we’ll put on the first concert ’cause we think people will come here.’” The first show will feature the usual concert infrastructure—fencing, port-apotties, etc.—and Hansen hopes to install showers so concert patrons can fend off Montana’s notorious August heat. The Wilma Theatre also signed on to cater the event with food and alcohol. Joining forces with the Wilma crew was an important move for Hansen, and manager Marcus Duckwitz sees the opportunity as nothing but beneficial for the theater. “For us, it’s a win-win situation,” Duckwitz says. “It’s a void that’s needed to be filled, especially since Big Sky stopped doing their little things. We all knew that void was going to be filled sooner or later by somebody, and we put it on ourselves to get something established.” Hansen says one more concert is in the works for Ryan Creek Meadows’ 2009 season, but he declined to give names or dates until negotiations are complete. Hansen also says he’s unsure how much the inaugural concert season will cost, but he doesn’t seem concerned. If the venue fails to attract more than a few small concerts a year, he can live. If Ryan Creek Meadows becomes known for year-round concerts, music festivals and multi-stage events, well, he can live with that too. “Really,” he says, “with this project you’re only limited by what your imagination is.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Man in the middle Missoulian takes the state GOP’s top post by Jesse Froehling

In the days leading up to Montana’s vative values—smaller government, lower In the wake of that gain, he hopes to June 12 GOP convention, news outlets taxes, increased personal responsibility— stay the course. described state chairman candidate Will a hard sell. In fact, Deschamps guesses “We want to try to continue the proDeschamps as more moderate than his that 60 percent of the people who grams that began two years ago to gain opponent, Rick Breckenridge of Proctor. answer the door in Missoula work for the some traction here in the state,” he says. The label may have been the result of government, the University of Montana Dennis McDonald, Deschamps’ Breckenridge’s refusal to cater to moder- or a nonprofit. counterpart at the Montana Democratic ate members of his Party, jumps at the party, or perhaps a opportunity to criticize result of Deschamps’ that strategy. address—the current “The Republicans property manager and are a party without former three-time candia message,” says date for the state House McDonald, who is also resides in Missoula, conchallenging Rep. Denny sidered enemy territory Rehberg in 2010 for the to most Republicans. state’s lone congression“We are looked at al seat. “Here in askance from the other Montana, right now side of the state,” admits they’re in disarray.” Deschamps, who ended Deschamps has up winning the chairheard that criticism manship by an undisbefore and doesn’t buy closed margin. “But I it. He says both parties tell them not to color have been written off in me by where I live, but the past as being disorby what I believe.” ganized, largely to no What Deschamps effect. believes echoes the stan“The Republican dard GOP party lines. He Party, nationally, is believes marriage should thought to be in that be between a man and a position now,” he says, woman. He says neither “and I think it will come he nor his party have back as a stronger party. ever wavered on aborWe have some strong tion. He defends the war leadership at the top in Iraq. Overall, he shies with Chairman [Michael] away from the label of Steele. He is a thoughtPhoto by Chad Harder a moderate, instead ful, well-spoken individchoosing to talk about Republican delegates voted Missoulian Will Deschamps the party’s ual with lots of fresh his vision of an inclusive state chairmen in June. “Republicans are going to stick by their core ideas and people are getvalues,” says Deschamps, “which are lower taxes, more personal Republican Party. More responsibility, family values. Those things have always been part of ting on board. I’ll be the than anything, he stress- our base. I don’t think those issues will change at all.” last one to think the es that there will be no party is done.” major changes to the party’s platform. “When a candidate says, ‘I want to Deschamps remains optimistic “Republicans are going to stick by cut government,’ why would they listen because he believes he can draw young their core values,” he says, “which are to you?” he asks. Republicans back to the party and retain lower taxes, more personal responsibiliDespite the uphill climb, Deschamps moderates and hard-liners alike. One ty, family values. Those things have thinks his party can craft a winning mes- person interested to hear from the new always been part of our base. I don’t sage. He talks about how government chairman is Lt. Gov. John Bohlinger. The think those issues will change at all.” can be smaller and still maintain social state GOP essentially excommunicated For Deschamps, who previously services, and how supporting small busi- Bohlinger when he accepted served as chairman of the Missoula ness allows a community to build on its Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s County Republicans, the new position own. Plus, he notes that Montana invitation to be his running mate in represents an unusual challenge. He rec- Republicans aren’t facing the same crisis 2004, but Bohlinger remains a regisognizes that the party will have trouble as other states. He believes the rift in the tered Republican. He didn’t attend the making any headway in his hometown, national party between moderates and state GOP convention because he was despite, he says, the fact that Missoula hard-line conservatives has largely out of town—he’s not sure he’d have County voted predominantly Republican skipped Montana. been allowed in anyway—but says he’s 50 years ago. “The last election cycle,” he says, “we interested to talk with Deschamps. What’s changed, according to were able to stave off [the Democrats] in “I would hope,” Bohlinger says, “that Deschamps, is the proliferation of non- the House and gain some seats in the he’s more moderate than what the leadprofits and organizations that rely on Senate. I think we were one of three ership has been.” state and federal funding. Those organi- states in the United States that did that jfroehling@missoulanews.com zations’ lifelines make traditional conser- after the Obama revolution.”

Missoula Independent

Page 9 June 25–July 2, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Troubling evidence President Obama continues White House secrecy Last November the United States went through what Iran is going through right now—only we didn’t have to die in the streets for it. We, the voters, tossed the Republican Party off the bus, elected a new “hope and change” president, gave the Democrats the majority control of Congress they said they needed to implement change, and looked forward to seeing it all happen. That was then. This is now. And with each passing day, the change we hoped for is being sidelined, denied and derailed. When Barack Obama was on the campaign trail, he made a lot of promises that, so far, he’s having a tough time keeping. One of those promises was made by pointing out the policies of President Bush and Vice President Cheney on keeping secret the list of those who participated in the administration’s notorious “Energy Task Force.” Despite court battles to gain access to that information, Bush and Cheney claimed “executive privilege” so it never was released to the public and, now that Bush and Cheney are gone, may never be made public. What that means is that the major energy companies got to craft a policy for the citizens of this country without ever having their fingerprints on the end product. What we did know was that Dick Cheney had been raking in millions as the CEO of Halliburton prior to stepping into the White House and, therefore, it was no real surprise that he would use his position of power to benefit his cohorts in the energy business. But now, instead of bringing the transparency to public policy formulation that he so fervently promised, President Obama—and some key members of Congress—continues to follow the secrecy patterns of the miscreant administration he replaced. Among the more troubling evidence in this regard is Obama’s recent decision to keep the tapes of the BushCheney tortures of “enemy combatants” from being disclosed. The reason? Well, if you believe the CIA’s logic, it’s because if people in the rest of the world saw what the United States actually did to those prisoners, they would be outraged and endanger our troops around the globe. So that part of the truth, which the world already knows and which is leftover trash from the Bush years, will remain under wraps. Likewise, the Obama administration, via the Secret Service and Homeland Security, has recently denied a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request from Citizens for

Missoula Independent

Page 10 June 25–July 2, 2009

Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW ) and MSNBC for access to the visitor logs of who is spending time behind those closed doors, cutting deals for the energy industries and, more directly, for coal companies. To figure that out, CREW requested all the likely sources of that information, such as e-mails and phone logs, as well as the visitor log. To quote from CREW’s FOIA request: “Specifically, the requested records are likely to contribute to the public’s understanding of the influence that executives of the 10 largest

It’s “ somewhat puzzling to find the Obama administration using the exact same dodge as Bush and Cheney to deny public

access

coal production companies within the United States have had, or attempted to have, on the president and his administration in formulating the nation’s energy policy, especially with respect to domestic coal production, coal-based electricity, carbon capture, clean coal technology funding, and climate change.” It is somewhat puzzling to find the Obama administration using the exact same dodge as Bush and Cheney to deny public access to find out who is influencing energy policy decisions behind closed doors. The results, however, seem clear. King Coal is back in the game, big time, including billions of dollars for the evasive, perhaps fictional, illusion that coal can somehow be made clean. The influence of those discussions is also evident in efforts to weaken the already watered-down Waxman-Markey climate bill that, like so many others, shoves the goals for reducing global

climate gases ever out into the future as the impacts grow more visible by the day. Here in Montana, that’s not good news. Well, it may be good news to some, like Gov. Brian Schweitzer, who continues to push energy development of any and all sources, including coal. But anyone who has driven around the state recently can see the sad reality for themselves in the growing mass of dead and dying trees that once flourished on our mountains. Arguments about forest health are, or should be, over. What we’re dealing with, thanks to global warming and the continued use of coal, is how to deal with forest death—because that’s what’s left, dead forests. For Montanans, any discussion of future energy policies is directly linked to our personal living space, not some abstract theories, and we deserve to know what’s going on at the highest levels of our government. Unfortunately, unknown influence by the energy sector is just part of the continuing plague of secrecy that haunts Washington. Just this week both Obama and Montana’s Sen. Max Baucus announced that they had held secret discussions with drug manufacturers in which the pharmaceutical industry apparently pledged to slow future increases in runaway drug costs by tens of billions in the coming years. But this wasn’t some altruistic decision by the companies that prey on the illness of Americans, it was a quid pro quo “deal” that any health care reform measure coming out of Congress and signed by Obama would heed the objections from Big Pharma. Unfortunately, given the level of secrecy now being employed in the development of some of the most important public policy decisions in decades, it’s impossible to know for sure who made what promises and what they received in return. And that’s a shame. We elected Obama on the promise of change. He repudiated the Bush policies while campaigning and rode the national disgust with them all the way to the White House. It’s well past time for Obama to live up to those campaign promises and end, once and for all, the despicable secrecy policies of the Bush-Cheney era. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Wind worries The West serves as a modern-day La Mancha by Jonathan Thompson

“Just then they came in sight of 30 or 40 windmills that rise from that plain. And no sooner did Don Quixote see them that he said to his squire, ‘…Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, 30 or 40 hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them.’” Miguel de Cervantes wrote these words in the early 1600s, but the passage sounds a lot like some of the rhetoric echoing through the sagebrush-clad West these days. To reach the ultimate goal of wind producing 20 percent of the electricity used in this country by 2030, tens of thousands of 200-foot-high turbines must be installed nationwide, with many of them slated for gusty public lands in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Wyoming. That’s sparked a fight that looks a lot like the one waged over natural gas in the past couple of decades. Only this time the battle lines are drawn in unexpected places. Some of those who fought against the onslaught of drilling now find themselves tilting at wind turbines. Meanwhile, some of fossil fuel’s biggest boosters say they’re cautious about or even opposed to wind power because of its environmental impacts. It’s beginning to sound like a surreal 17th century novel. The argument is loudest in Wyoming. That state embraced its role as the nation’s energy colony with its vast stores of coal, gas and uranium, and now it’s a target for sprawling wind farms. The Anschutz Corp. wants to put up 1,000 wind turbines on a patchwork of private and public land near Rawlins to generate 2,000 to 3,000 megawatts of juice. That could replace a coal-fired plant and keep some 15 million tons of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and other junk out of the air each year. But it would also mean lots of roads—300 miles of them, according to some estimates—and giant turbines slicing the skyline.

That’s got Wyoming Gov. Dave Freudenthal, a Democrat who has generally welcomed the energy industry and its jobs to Wyoming, in a quixotic state. In a May letter to the state Senate, he bemoaned the “gold rush” pace of wind speculation and its potential effects on the diminishing sage grouse. “Seemingly every acre…is up for grabs in the interest of ‘green, carbon-neutral technologies,’ no matter how ‘brown’ the effects are on the land,” Freudenthal said. “It’s like taking a short cut to work through a playground full of school children and claim-

“Some of those who fought against the onslaught of drilling now find themselves tilting at wind

turbines.

ing ‘green’ as a defense because you were driving a Toyota Prius.” He went on to say that traditional industries have voluntarily avoided prime sage grouse habitat, and that they have offset their impacts by bringing gobs of cash to the state. “I cannot speak with the same certainty with regard to wind development,” he said. No one really knows how turbines will affect the grouse. A National

Academy of Sciences report in 2007 found that wind farms generally kill far fewer birds than previously believed. Housecats, in fact, are a much bigger threat than windmills. Nevertheless, the construction of 1,000 turbines in core sage grouse habitat will certainly disturb the birds. And some scientists believe sage grouse instinctively avoid tall structures because they offer possible perches for predators such as raptors. It is also true that older wind turbines in California have been slicing up raptors at a rate of up to one bird per megawatt per year. Freudenthal and other wind-worriers see this as a multi-tiered threat. If wind farms hurt grouse, then the bird may end up on the endangered species list. That would mean additional regulations on oil and gas and other industries across the West. But the governor’s bluster may be as futile as that of Sancho Panza’s master. On federal land, the state’s opinion on wind power is likely to be trumped by the feds. And a new decision on listing the sage grouse is expected to come down from the Interior Department this summer, long before the wind rush has any impact. “In last year’s nests there are no birds this year,” says Don Quixote near the end of his life, and of the story. He speaks not of sage grouse, but of his madness: He has finally realized that the monsters he went to war with were nothing but harmless windmills. For those of us in wind country, though, we’re still in the middle of the story. And whether it’s the windmills we must battle, or whether we must use the windmills to slay the bigger giant—climate change—remains to be seen. Jonathan Thompson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org), which he edits in Paonia, Colorado

Missoula Independent

Page 11 June 25–July 2, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

You might not realize it, but those pills you’ve been stocking in your medicine cabinet for years could be deadly. The chemical makeup of those drugs changes over time, and could be harmful. And even if the makeup didn’t change, those pills still pose a threat. According to information provided by the Missoula City-County Health Department, 19 people in Missoula County died last year from drug overdoses, primarily from prescription painkillers. Additionally, the health department indicates more than 300 people across Montana died last year as a result of a drug overdose. That news may prompt you to immediately fish out those pill jars and start flushing the old goods down the toilet. Not so fast, my friend.

Thu. 25 June Bring a potluck item and kick it sustainably at another fun-filled MUD Mingle, which begins at 6 PM at the MUD headquarters, 629 Phillips St. Free.

Sat. 27 June Join volunteers from Missoula’s chapter of Organizing for America when they scour Missoula’s farmers’ markets and other downtown events today to collect supplies, and stories, for Partnership Health Center. Each shift is two hours and is preceded by a training session that lasts half an hour. Call 543-0286. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

Mon. 29 June Learn more about Two Creeks Community School, a private nonprofit that’s starting up in Hamilton and aims to provide alternative, holistic and place-based education, during an informational meeting at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, at 7 PM. Call Steve Archibald at 821-0885. If economic strain’s got you worrying about your home—or lack thereof—contact the Human Resource Council, 1801 S. Higgins Ave., which offers home repair and homebuyer assistance programs. Call Brendan at 728-3710.

Half the Price, Twice the Fun!

Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080.

Tue. 30 June Give the gift of red blood cells during a blood drive at Community Medical Center’s Day Room, 2827 Fort Missoula Rd., from 9 AM to 2 PM. Call 327-4077 to schedule an appointment. While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25-ish years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves

That’s a bad move. Flushed drugs pollute the water system and hurt fish and wildlife. All of that leaves one last option: Drug D i s p o s a l D ay . O n Saturday morning, citizens can bring expired medications or drugs of any kind and turn them in to the health department—no questions asked. Officials will then dispose of the drugs in line with environmental procedures. It’s a process that won’t harm the water system, wildlife—or you. —Ira Sather-Olson The Missoula City-County Health Department’s first-ever Drug Disposal Day runs from 9 AM to 2 PM, June 27, at 301 W. Alder St. Call 258-4298 or 258-3881.

a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like— and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.-Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM-1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in Room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

Wed. 1 July Take a load off in the company of friends every Wed. from 9-11:30 AM as Aspen Hospice, 107 Bell Crossing West, hosts the Caregiver Coffee Break. Free. Call 642-3010. You’ve got a lot of blood, and somebody out there probably needs it, so give the gift of your blood cells during a blood drive near the U.S. Forest Service headquarters and Adventure Cycling, 150 E. Pine St., from 10 AM to 2 PM. Call 329-3659 or 721-1776 ext. 211 to schedule appointments. You’ll have another opportunity to donate your blood today during a blood drive in the University of Montana’s University Center in rooms 332 and 333 from 11 AM to 4 PM. Call 543-6695, or visit www.givelife.org and enter the sponsor code “gogriz” to schedule an appointment. Not done giving blood? You’ve got one more chance to score a free sugar cookie—and help save a life, perhaps—at the American Red Cross in Kalispell, 126 N. Meridian Rd., from 11 AM to 2 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 June 25–July 2, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A man who snatched a wallet from a woman shopping with three friends at a market in Santa Rosa, Calif., tried to make his getaway on a bicycle, but the victim heaved a 12-pack of Miller Lite beer bottles at him when he was maybe 12 feet away. She hit him, knocking him to the ground, where all four women “were on him like kids on a burst piñata,” according to the Press Democrat. After the victim got back her wallet, the women let the man go but kept his bicycle. Philadelphia police chased two drug suspects, who ran inside a building and up the stairs into a second-floor room and then slammed the door. Police who entered the room right behind the suspects found it empty. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the puzzled officers were leaving when they heard noises below the floor, looked behind a couch and discovered a trapdoor, which led them to suspects Diego Rivera, 20, and Mario Torres, 23. BUMPY ROAD TO RECOVERY - More than 20 of Michigan’s 83 counties are turning deteriorating roads back to gravel to avoid the expense of repaving them. At least 50 miles of roads in the state have been reverted, according to the Associated Press. It reported that officials in Montcalm County, which converted nearly 10 miles of primary road to gravel this spring, estimate that grinding up a mile of pavement and putting down gravel costs about $10,000, whereas to repave it costs 10 times that amount. COALITION OF THE UNWILLING - Australian military leaders dispatched a special team of military cooks to Afghanistan because Australian soldiers griped about having to eat Dutch cooking. “It’s not Aussie food, it’s European food,” Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston told lawmakers at a special defense budget hearing in Canberra after many of the 800 Australian soldiers assigned to Tirin Kot military base in Uruzgan province complained that the food at the Dutch-run mess hall lacks freshness and flavor. “The least they could expect when they are deployed for six months,” Sen. David Johnston told Houston, “is that they can eat proper food.” STIMULUS PACKAGE - A woman hired to sell ads on commission for a weekly newspaper in Lincoln, Neb., placed $12,000 worth of bogus ads to boost her salary, police said after arresting her. Officer Katie Flood told KOLN-TV the paper’s owner discovered the fraud when he began trying to collect money for the ads from businesses, which denied buying them. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Franziska Stegbauer, 77, suffered a fatal stab wound while trying to break up a sword fight between her grandson and brother-in-law. Both men were hospitalized, and the brother-in-law, Adolf Stegbauer, 69, later died from his wounds. The Indianapolis Star reported that the Marion County prosecutor, who charged the grandson, Christopher Rondeau, 37, with murder and reckless homicide, said the men had been drinking when Adolf Stegbauer “went from a happy drunk to a mean drunk.” Stegbauer grabbed a samurai-type sword, knocked Franziska Stegbauer down and stabbed Rondeau, who told investigators he got a Japanese saber-style infantry sword from another room, “parried a few times and hit Adolf at least two times.” CRIMINAL HABERDASHERY - Police arrested the groom at his own wedding reception for disturbing the peace because his nephew was wearing saggy pants. The Times-Picayune reported the incident began when a police officer working security at the reception at the Crystal Plantation in Kenner, La., told Samuel Lucas, 19, to pull up his pants to comply with the reception hall’s dress code. According to the police report, the boy’s father, Walter Lucas, 52, told the officer to mind his own business and began arguing. While the officer was trying to escort the father outside, the groom, John Lucas, 53, got involved. The officer called for backup, and all three were arrested. “All the kid had to do,” Crystal Plantation owner Leonard Dazet told the newspaper, “was pull up his pants.” STORE-POLICY FOLLIES - After a Wal-Mart store in Manatee County, Fla., refused to allow Phillip R. Wright, 41, to return several items, authorities said he retaliated by setting fire to three racks of clothes. The Bradenton Herald reported that store officials quickly evacuated the store and extinguished the blaze. Wright was arrested two hours later at another Wal-Mart trying to exchange a few boxes of water filters, several flavored water filter packets and a greeting card. GUILTY BUT ARROGANT - Mark Ciavarella, a former judge in Luzerne County, Pa., admitted he was crooked but insisted he’s entitled to immunity for decisions he made from the bench, even if those decisions were corrupt. Ciavarella, who was sentenced to prison with fellow judge Michael Conahan for accepting more than $2.6 million in kickbacks in exchange for rulings that benefited private detention centers, is defending himself against a lawsuit filed on behalf of hundreds of children who said he violated their civil rights by taking the money and sending them to the facilities. VIRTUAL BUCCANEERS - Sweden’s Pirate Party captured a seat in the 785-seat European Parliament by winning 7.1 percent of Swedish votes in the Europe-wide ballot. “This is fantastic,” leading candidate Christian Engstrom told Reuters. The party, formed in 2006, advocates deregulating copyrights, abolishing the patent system and reducing surveillance on the Internet. BACKWARD WAYS - A marriage counselor in the United Arab Emirates has written a book about a variety of sexual topics, from the female orgasm to homosexuality. Wedad Lootah, 45, filled the book, “Top Secret: Sexual Guidance for Married Couples,” with anecdotes from her eight years as a marriage counselor in Dubai’s main courthouse. Although conservative Arabs accused Lootah of blasphemy, the New York Times noted she is a religious Muslim, who studied Islamic jurisprudence in college, and that the book is studded with religious references. It warns against anal sex and homosexuality, for example, not because of AIDS but because the Koran bans them. Noting that separating the genders in Muslim countries results in many men having their first sexual experience with other men, Lootah adds that when they marry, they “want the same thing with their wives because they don’t know anything else.” SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE - Employees who recently lost their jobs from religious institutions in Virginia discovered they don’t qualify for unemployment benefits. The reason, according to the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, is that the state tax exemptions for religious exemptions also exempt them from paying unemployment taxes.

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 June 25–July 2, 2009


ust and the scent of horse sweat mix in the air around the Willowbend Farm polo arena in Turah. A modest crowd—less than 50 people—sits on a pair of wooden bleachers, cheering for both teams without discretion. A construction worker from South Africa passing through on business wanders over from the nearby KOA campground, his camera trained on the Western oddity known as cowboy polo. Play-by-play commentary comes from the announcer’s box as Jeff Patterson, decked in a white polo shirt and jeans, reins his horse around for a clear shot at a red rubber ball. Patterson, who plays for Missoula, swings from the saddle with a long mallet, driving the ball up the arena toward the Cascade County team’s goal. Patterson’s pass finds its mark, but his teammate misses the ensuing

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shot wide right. Missoula ends up losing the game, a rare defeat before rallying to win the four-team tournament. Later on during the hot mid-June afternoon, Patterson, 52, sits at a picnic table with his son, Josh, and his daughter-in-law, Shannon. The group talks shop, giving Shannon pointers and watching Patterson’s 13-year-old grandson, Austin, try his own luck in another game against Cascade County. Behind the family, kids from the local 4-H chapter sell burgers hot off the grill. Spurs and worn tack leather squeak in the parking lot as the Gallatin County Polo Club readies its steeds for the next game. The players and fans exude an upbeat attitude during one of the state’s few scheduled cowboy polo tournaments, but it belies a growing concern within the sport. Today, a generous estimate would place the num-

ber of cowboy polo players in Montana around 50. As far as anyone can tell, the state’s four remaining teams—Billings, Bozeman, Great Falls and Missoula—are all that’s left of a sport that once boasted 75 teams across the country, hosted raucous national championships and even made a splash in Australia. Cowboy polo is going the way of the covered wagon or the homestead, another relic of the Old West that may soon kick the bucket. Nevertheless, the Montana teams persist, through weeknight practices and informal tournaments, holding out hope for a resurgence. Patterson and others say they’ll continue playing the game until the day they die. “Missoula has hung on really well, kept a pretty strong interest,” says Patterson, who notes the local team has actually increased its players the

story and photos by Alex Sakariassen

Missoula Independent

Page 14 June 25–July 2, 2009

last few years. “What I’ve really worried about mostly is the other teams petering out and having no one to play. We’ve seen a lot of teams go away in the last 20 years, from Livingston to Lewistown to Fort Benton to Butte. You get this fear that the whole game is dying because there’s no one to play against.”

owboy polo looks familiar at first, but like any sport, it’s full of its own intricacies and traditions. There are terms like “chukker,” the four 15minute periods that make up a match, and “jump shot,” where both players rush the ball for possession after a foul. Jeff Patterson finds himself clearing up confusion fairly often. He starts by noting that the similarities between cowboy polo and the more recognizable English version end pretty much at

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the horse and mallet. In English polo, speed is key and riders (four per team) rely on a long string of thoroughbreds to carry them across a 300-yard grass field in pursuit of a wooden ball. Expenses are high, making it a historically white-collar sport. Comparatively, cowboy polo requires little more than a quarter horse, tack, a rubber mallet and one of those bouncy playground kickballs. Two five-member teams advance the ball through a dirt rodeo arena divided into five sections with a goal at either end. One player from each team is confined to a section, where they match skills in a game-within-a-game. For a newcomer, the match looks something like live-action foosball with strong elements of croquet. Patterson jokingly calls it “poor-man’s polo.” “It’s so different from anything else you see right now,” says Dana Kopp, a member of the Missoula team. “Most city people haven’t seen something like this. They’ve heard of English polo, but this is a lot different from the Prince Charles polo. So it’s probably not what your basic person is going to think of as a true cowboy event. But you have to be able to ride and handle your horse to play. It’s been around so long, it’s a part of history. You hate to see something die off that’s been around for over 50 years.” Kopp has done her part to keep the game active. She joined the sport shortly after marrying her husband Doug, a national cowboy polo MVP, and doubles as the Missoula team’s historian. Her collection of historic photos and newspaper clippings, as well as aging anecdotes, shed much-needed light on her sport’s murky origins. Kopp talks intently about cowboy polo’s past, almost as intently as she drives a horse during a game. Variations of English polo began cropping up in Montana in the early 1950s as the sport’s influence spread beyond posh country clubs back east. Some iterations were as simple as a volleyball and a few brooms in the hands of rustlers, others called for more specialized equipment. Palmetto polo, developed in 1952 by the Smyrna Beach Saddle Club in Florida, proved a particular hit with cowpunchers in the state. The American Association of Sheriff Posses and Riding Clubs officially adopted palmetto polo in 1954 and hosted highly competitive world championship finals in Texas. Gradual tweaks in the rules by groups west of the Mississippi River spawned a unique new version: cowboy polo. “We know that they were playing some earlier versions of cowboy polo in the early ’50s, maybe even the late ’40s,” Kopp says. “But the organizations actually got going in the late ’50s, in ’58 and ’59. That’s when the organizations really gelled and wrote the rules that, for the most part, we still follow.” The true pioneers of cowboy polo in Montana were members of the

Cascade County Sheriff ’s Posse, a group of mounted law enforcement reserves pivotal to search and rescue in the days before ATVs and helicopters. They drafted an official set of rules and by-laws in 1958 and banded together with other Montana sheriff posses for lively matches. Polo fell into the mix of parades, drills and horse sport competitions that dominated the posses’ community presence. Missoula caught polo fever fast, taking home the first state trophy in

was going to do with it. And there was nothing I could do about it.” Those names and the rich history they embody stand as prime examples of what could be lost should Patterson, Kopp and their teammates fail to create a new generation of legends.

n 2005, the U.S. Cowboy Polo Association dissolved, and with it all semblance of the interstate order that fueled highly competitive national

I

little public exposure it once enjoyed, and a modest tradition born from rodeo arenas, Western saddles and the need to keep working horses fit all but disappeared. “Everybody just made up their minds they were going to quit,” says Jowers from his Texas home. “It died out across all the states. We had teams from Washington state and Oregon all the way down to Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Alabama. They all finally just died out, one at a time.”

“Part of it is our fault, ’cause we just go out there and have fun and dink around. You don’t have to be a lifelong cowboy to play cowboy polo.” —Jeff Patterson

September 1958. A few years later, with the sport gaining major traction, state posses formed the Montana State Cowboy Polo Association and started playing national tournaments in other states. Championship games were typically hosted in Texas or New Mexico against teams that, all agree, practiced a rougher strain of the sport. “When you went to a championship tournament, you had all the marbles out there,” says Larry Jowers, a Texas resident who’s played since 1968 and served as Cowboy Polo Association president through the early 1990s. “When you went out there to play, you played as hard as you could play. You went out there to win, and you didn’t go to let everybody play like you do in kids’ baseball.” In other words, cowboy polo could be a full-contact sport. Montana players recall games against southwestern teams that would buffet and check without remorse, even run horses into fences for a point. Patterson’s seen a horse shatter a leg bone during a warm-up. Once an errant bridle split a horse’s nose and the animal bled considerably while exiting the arena. “After it was over with, everybody was friends,” Jowers says. “You’d walk around, have a beer together. But when you were on the field, it was blood and guts.” According to Patterson, Montana’s teams prefer a brand of cowboy polo that relies more on strategy and finesse than brute force and speed. And that emphasis on strategy has spawned a fair share of star players, men Patterson and others mention in reverential tones. Names like Stan Kopp, Bob Cochran and Bert Walters carry the same weight as baseball’s Babe Ruth or Ted Williams. Today’s veteran players seem to measure their own skills in telling how they scored points against or blocked shots by such stars. “I used to play guard against Bert [Walters],” Patterson recalls. “He’d pick the ball out of the air with his mallet, set it down and tell me exactly what he

tournaments for half a century. Teams across the west dried up. Crowd numbers dwindled. Cowboy polo lost what

Montana’s cowboy polo players have defiantly rejected the trend, but still note a significant decline within

A Gallatin County first forward lines up a backhand shot in an attempt to score against Missoula County. The two teams are the strongest in the state, but membership on each still numbers lower than 20.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 June 25–July 2, 2009


the state. The reasons for the drop-off vary, but each reflects the natural evolution of the West. The sport has always relied heavily on sheriff posses, groups of countylevel volunteer peace officers you’ve likely seen carrying flags on horseback in local parades. The posse’s members come from all walks of life: Jeff Patterson works as a private investigator and operates the Willowbend Farm; he ran for a commissioner seat in Missoula County last year. Kopp serves as a librarian at St. Patrick Hospital’s Center for Health Information. The posses used polo to keep their horses in top form, but it also gave the organizations a much-needed social outlet. As the need for horses in search and rescue situations decreased in the late 20th century, sheriff posses became shadows of their former selves. In Gallatin County, the sheriff ’s posse disbanded as a mounted operation several years ago. Keeping polo alive required the interest and dedication of those still playing to form an official club. The loss of sheriff posses only provides part of the explanation for the sport’s decline. Players past and present contest that the real factor is money. Other competitive horse sports, such as team roping or cutting, drew potential polo players away with the possibility of a payoff in competition. Polo is more of a glorified hobby that requires a $10 entry fee. Players pay in, but they don’t cash out. “Times have changed,” says Doug Kopp. “We’ve found that a lot of peo-

A swing by Cascade County goes wide in the center section. Wild swings like this one help desensitize horses to sudden movement, making the animals better suited for trail rides and hunting.

ple, if there’s not money or fame and fortune involved, they don’t get too interested. You played for pride and that was it, there was no big payoff. You just got a trophy or a belt buckle. Nowadays people aren’t as interested in playing for pride. They want to win money or be in the spotlight.” Patterson has met with his share of discouragement working to fill out the ranks of the new generation. He says he hosted a polo clinic in Kalispell a few years back. Several young men from

Browning approached him about creating a Browning cowboy polo team. Their excitement almost matched Patterson’s own. The men liked what they saw, but they had one question. “I sat there in the grandstands and visited with them, and they were really excited about having a Browning team,” Patterson says. “Then one of them asked me, ‘Well, what are the purses? How much is a purse?’ I told them we don’t play for money and he said, ‘Oh, we aren’t interested.’”

A new generation scoffed at polo in favor of the prestige and financial profit occasionally won in rodeo. Patterson, a convert from his younger rodeo days, warmed up to polo in 1984 when he joined the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Posse. His exposure to polo through the posse led to his son’s induction in the sport, and later to his grandson’s. “It’s a fun, family game,” Patterson says, “and we’ve always been afraid that if we got money involved it would destroy the atmosphere of playing for fun.”

Photo courtesy of Ted Prater, Great Falls Tribune, printed Feb. 15, 1959.

Cowboy polo emerged in Montana when members of the Cascade County Sheriff’s Posse tweaked the rules of a Florida version of the game called palmetto polo. Men like Roy Wolverton and A.F. Crawford, pictured above, were early pioneers of a sport now nearly dead.

Missoula Independent

Page 16 June 25–July 2, 2009


Jeff Patterson takes a break from polo to relax with his nephew Jess, left, and son Josh, back. Jeff, raised in Seeley Lake, started playing the game in 1984. Most of his family, including his daughter-in-law Shannon, right, joined the Missoula team as well.

The sheriff posses themselves are also to blame for cowboy polo’s current situation, Patterson says. They haven’t done a great job of advertising the sport outside family and close friends, and outsiders often don’t realize how little riding experience is required to play. While most players already own horses for ranch work or hunting, Patterson encourages people with even minor experience in the saddle to stop by a practice. Someone always has a spare horse and tack. “Part of it is our fault, ’cause we just go out there and have fun and dink around,” Patterson says. “You don’t have to be a lifelong cowboy to play cowboy polo.”

amily is a universal motivating factor in Montana cowboy polo and likely the one element keeping the sport from extinction. Take Adam Pulasky, 29, the star Bozeman forward who doesn’t enter the arena without thinking of his grandfather, Merle Pulasky, who served as the first Montana State Cowboy Polo Association president.

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Most credit Merle with nurturing the sport in its infant years and relish stories of his talent. “That’s why I play polo, because of my grandpa,” Pulasky says. “The only way I’d quit polo is if polo quit.” Pulasky recently returned to the arena after a 10-year hiatus. He played polo through his teen years but focused his efforts on hockey during college. That led to a semi-professional career with a team in Billings. Pulasky only left hockey when he broke both his knees. The saddle seemed an excellent place to regain some competitive prowess. In fact, Pulasky’s saddle is a powerful heirloom in the legacy of cowboy polo. A hunk of worn, weathered leather, it doesn’t look like much. But it has seen decades of action. Merle played in that saddle. He passed it down to Adam’s dad, John, who likewise passed it to Adam with the simple command “take care of it.” “With that particular saddle, sometimes I just have memories of my grandpa and my dad,” Pulasky says. “I just try to think about what they were trying to think about before they played polo.”

Pulasky didn’t use the saddle during the Missoula tournament, but he still brought it with him. It needs some oil, Pulasky says, but otherwise it’s in

great condition. He’s determined to keep it that way. Doug Kopp feels he’s carrying on a similar family tradition in cowboy polo. Kopp is one of the stronger polo players competing today, an experienced rider and high-scoring forward. A number of Montana players ride horses with the Kopp brand. The going theory in the arena is Kopp’s as good at raising polo horses as he is at playing on them. Kopp traveled to nationals four times on Montana teams, and in 1996 won MVP in Albuquerque, N.M., on the back of his father’s horse. Stan Kopp, Doug’s father, held similar esteem during cowboy polo’s prime in the 1970s and ’80s. Now Stan rides with a whistle around his neck, a grayhaired referee watching as his son sends the ball far up the field with one stroke. For Jeff Patterson’s son, Josh, family is the one thread keeping him tied to cowboy polo. He says it’s tough with a wife and kids to find that single sport everyone enjoys. “I keep playing because my kids play,” says Josh, 32. “My wife has interest

Maureen Nilsen, right, weighs into a scuffle against Gallatin County. Action in cowboy polo often resembles a hockey game, with lots of pushing and slamming as riders use horses to block or open up shots. Players typically wear padded chaps over their legs to reduce bruising.

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in playing, my dad plays. The family part of it keeps you involved. It’s really easy to do when the whole family does it, you don’t have to fight about what the family recreational activity’s going to be.” But even Josh, who was once offered a position on a rough-and-tumble Texas team following a game in Billings, has considered throwing in the towel after nearly 20 years in the sport. He runs an independent Missoula contracting firm and can’t help feeling torn between the game, his job and his family. “It’s a hard call ’cause [cowboy polo] is a lot of work and it takes up a lot of time,” Josh says. “There have been lots of moments I’ve thought about quitting because polo really consumes a lot of my available time for recreation. I find myself unable to do other things I like to do because I play polo.”

issoula’s tournament feels much like a large family reunion. Small children run around the grass or press their hands against the wire fence separating them from the game. Rocks fly from under hooves like polo shrapnel as a scuffle for the ball escalates. There’s a pause as the ball rolls under a player’s horse, but the player soon spots it, whacks at it, and the action is off at a dead-run for the far side of the arena.

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the

Jeff Patterson smiles and rubs his salt-and-pepper beard as his nephew Jess sips a mug of coffee. It’s a rare break for Jeff. He seems constantly drawn to the field, like a fly to a polo horse, either swinging a mallet or touching-up the chalk lines in the arena between matches. Meanwhile, Josh Patterson talks about pulling his son Austin from the next game. The kid’s got deadly aim, but he’s played the last three games straight. There’s concern in the 80degree heat that he might be working himself too hard. Whistles blow and the announcer shouts, “That’s the end of your chukker. That’s the end of your game.” Players exit the arena, dismounting in the dirt or riding straight for the parking lot to water their horses. Some look beat, most are smiling, none remember the final score. “Like I said, we play for the fun and for the family and for the camaraderie,” Jeff Patterson says. “Most of these people are people we’ve known forever. We’ve seen them grow up, we’ve played with their parents, their dads. Now we’re playing with the kids and maybe the grandkids. One of the kids in Billings now, I started playing when he was running around in diapers.” As Jeff talks, his son commends his wife on a one-pointer—or point scored from the closest section to the goal— she made during the last match against

Cascade County. Nearby, Adam Pulasky and his wife, Kaycee, entertain one of the dozen or so children roaming in the shade. Kaycee joined the Bozeman polo team three years ago. She’s the team’s newest recruit, and plays a mean center position over the course of the weekend. Family is a proven saving grace for cowboy polo, for now. Montana made an unspoken but unanimous decision in the late ’80s to soften the rough edges of the sport. Wives entered the arena for practice games and tournaments, as did kids under 16. That decision gave teams a needed boost in membership, likely staving off the sport’s further decline. The ball may not fly as far as it once did, Jeff says, but there are enough players now to field a tournament’s worth of teams. But the family angle alone can only save the game for so long. What cowboy polo really needs is new teams, new families, new future legacies in the making. “As players get old and start retiring, it’s hard to replace them,” Jeff says. “Unless you’re in my position. When I finally give up the ghost of polo, I’ve got a son and a grandson that will continue to play. They’ll carry on the tradition for me. But for those who don’t have kids or family to take their place, we have to find new blood.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Adam Pulasky shows off his heirloom saddle between matches in Turah. The saddle has carried three generations of the Pulasky family in cowboy polo, including Pulasky’s grandfather Merle, who served as the first Montana State Cowboy Polo Association president in 1958.

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Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. Beer & wine available. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stonedeck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, “Pizza by the Slice.” Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 We're open 7 days a week at 7 AM. Serving breakfast, unbelievable espresso, and sumptuous lunch. Our menu

Page 18 June 25–July 2, 2009

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Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway • 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$


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Check out the personals on page 35. the Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day.

Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features home-

made soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

dish Whitefish

Café Kandahar 406-862-6247 A George’s Distributing fine wine tasting, a Café Kandahar 7 course wine dinner, Kandahar Lodge luxurious accommodations and an Andy Blanton champagne brunch come together May 14-15 for a “Not To Be Missed” event. Meet & greet with the winemakers. Full package $299 for two. Call 406862-6247 for limited tickets.

eMpanadas 728-2030 www.empanadalady.com eMpanadas are back! Indulge in your favorites at the Clark Fork River Market this Saturday, 8am to 1pm and at Downtown Tonight, Caras Park, Thursdays, June-August 5:30-8:30pm. Baked to perfection with fresh, local ingredients, 10 exquisite varieties of Argentine-style empanadas await you: Carne de búfalo, lamb, pollo, humita, and more. $ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

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Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. Lunch Board: Tuesday through Friday 11:30 to 2pm. Dinner A La Carte: Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 9pm. Reservations Accepted. For special events (business meetings, birthdays, baby showers, etc.) please call Chef Jason Tenesch.

Missoula Independent

Page 19 June 25–July 2, 2009


by Ari LeVaux

Brown is golden

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The Maillard reaction is what happens when you brown meat. This chemical combination of amino acids and sugars at high temperatures produces hundreds of aromatic compounds, a bouquet of flavors and smells that deserves much of the credit for making meat taste good. You don’t need to be a chemist to properly create the Maillard reaction, but if you want to be a cook you have to master it. Once I was watching my friend cook dinner. He had some burger meat he wanted to stir-fry with veggies, and I suggested he first brown the meat. “Good idea,” he said, reaching for an onion. “What’s up with the onion?” I asked as he began chopping. “I like to brown meat with onion,” he said. I winced, because you can’t brown meat with onion—you’ll end up with either gray meat or burnt onions, because browning meat correctly takes more heat than onions can handle. “Gimme that meat,” I said. “And that pan.” It’s scary how few people know how to brown meat, especially when you consider how many recipes call for it. There are many reasons to do it, including improved flavor, texture and appearance, and in some cases to seal in moisture. The nature of the dish you’re cooking, and the kind of meat you’re using, will determine which method you use. The broiler and the pan are the most common tools for browning meat. In most cases I prefer the broiler, where the Maillard reaction is elegantly simplified to its bare bones: heat and meat. My preference for the broiler puts me in good company. In James Beard’s Theory and Practice of Cooking, he writes of the broiler technique: “Not only does it draw out fat, rather than adding it, but it gives a crusty exterior and flavor.” As far as I’m concerned, the only reason to use a pan is if you’re browning smallish pieces

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Missoula Independent

Dear Ari, The radishes I got from my CSA recently were far too spicy for my taste buds. They glared back at me from the crisper bin of my fridge, and I wondered what to do—it seemed a sin to waste beautiful produce. Your radish cookery article was revolutionary for me. Now that I’ve tasted them cooked,

Page 20 June 25–July 2, 2009

the magic behind a good burger or Philly steak sub, and wouldn’t be a bad place to stop cooking and start eating, if you’re so inclined. Otherwise, proceed with your stir-fry or wherever your final culinary destination may be. The reason I usually prefer to brown under the broiler is that the broiler produces pictureperfect browning with less mess, and it’s easier. Whether I’m cooking a tough piece of meat long and slow—either by braising, stewing or in a crock pot—or cooking a rare steak or roast, the process begins in the broiler. Steaks and roasts should be browned whole. If making stew or some other kind of chunky dish, it’s best to cut the meat into its final size to increase the surface area on which the Maillard reaction can take place. (It only happens on the surface because water inhibits the reaction). Place the meat on a pan or broiler rack about 4 inches beneath a preheated broiler, and watch it carefully, turning as it starts to gain color, until it’s nicely browned, but not black. And that’s it—a single sentence to perfectly browned meat. Photo by Ari LeVaux Be warned that the product of this the Malliard reaction kicks in. Keep stirring lest cooking is so delicious that you might want to start the meat stick to the pan and burn. If it does stick, with more meat than you need, since you can take a few steps backward by adding liquid to the expect to lose some to snacking. As a safeguard, you pan. Try sherry, wine, stock or even water. This might want to hide the red wine, too. Especially if process, called deglazing, can add flavor to your I’m around—there’s no end to the amount of meat dish by incorporating the browned and I can put away if the wine is flowing. caramelized materials—what the French call Indeed, while browning is a crucial step fond—that are stuck to the bottom of the pan. If toward many a good dish, a browned piece of you think it was lack of oil that caused the stick- meat can also be the end point of the cooking ing, add a little more oil when you deglaze. process. If so, you’ll want to use a tender cut of Once you’ve pan-browned your meat to per- meat, and season it with salt and pepper before fection, you can now add those chopped onions. broiling it. Uncork that wine, and when the oven When you do, you will be rewarded with one of opens, it’s business time. Brown on the outside, life’s finer smells, the interaction of browned red on the inside, and you’re golden in more meat and raw onion on a hot pan. This is part of ways than one.

Radish revolution

My recent story on cooking radishes has given a bunch of readers a new lease on the fiery tuber. One reader was digging on the pickled radish Pad Thai recipe I gave, and another was all about sautéed radish in fried rice. The response below is typical:

Q

that are part of a dish that will be further cooked in the same pan. Such was the case with my clueless friend, who wanted to stir-fry his burger meat with some vegetables. While the browning of large cuts of meat seals in the juices, with burger you want the opposite—to get rid of the moisture in order for the meat to brown. Start by preheating the pan. If the meat is fatty enough, no oil is required. Otherwise, put some heattolerant oil, like safflower or grape seed, in the pan. First the meat turns gray as water seeps out and steams it, but soon the water evaporates and

the possibilities of life seem endless! Now I hungrily await my next radish delivery. I just wanted you to know that I modified your recipe for cooking them with bacon, and sautéed my radishes with Genoa salami and onion scapes. Totally delish! The leftovers went well as a savory breakfast accompaniment to eggs and toast the next morning, too. —Radish Cooker It seems the radish revolution is in full swing. It might soon peter out as the spring radish season ends, but it will pick up again in the fall. In the meantime, I have two more things to add to the growing body of radish-ology.

A

One, I’ve been making serious use of the radish greens, usually sautéed in olive oil with garlic and soy sauce. And since I’ve had more radish greens than I could eat, I’ve also put some away by blanching and freezing them. And on a final, full circle note, one reader wrote to say that he actually likes raw radishes. While he clearly seems to be in the minority, he did back up his claim with an interesting trick that’s the first I’ve seen beyond salad and garnish: “Interesting thoughts on cooking radishes. Might try it, but I’m pretty happy just dipping them in salt and eating them with a beer.” Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net.


8

days a week

Staring off into space and wearing snappy attire isn’t a prerequisite to seeing Broken Valley Roadshow, but maybe it should be. The old-timey, Americana band plays the Top Hat Fri., June 26, at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY June

25

Try a high energy, low impact workout on for size every Thu. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, where African Boogie gets you sweating with the basic body forms found in African dance. Call 541-7240 for pricing. It’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. Kids aged 5-13 can teach the man a thing or two during Movin’ with the Mayor, a health promotion event at 3:30 PM at McCormick Park. Free. Call 721-PARK.

Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4-8 PM as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 57:30. Even those without a bun in the oven will benefit when the Happy Mama Prenatal Center, 736 S. First St. W., presents a low-impact Community Yoga Class every Thu. at 4:15 PM. $5 suggested donation.

All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, death metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Bring a potluck item and kick it sustainably at another fun-filled MUD Mingle, which begins at 6 PM at the MUD headquarters, 629 Phillips St. Free.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5-7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s time for dinner and a show with several hundred friends as Caras Park hosts this week’s Downtown ToNight at 5:30 PM, a celebration with food vendors, kids’ activities including the Jump 4 Joy Bounce House and music by the Clumsy Lovers. Free. Call 543-4238. Threlkeld plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Beginning Pottery at The Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., is your shot to make something big and beautiful every Thu. at 6 PM through July 23. $168/eight-week class. Call 543-0509. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula

Arts & Entertainment listings June 25–July 2, 2009

Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9-10/hour. Call 541-7171. The YMusic Guitar Clinic, with triumvirate of hosts Gibson Hartwell, David Horgan and Caroline Keys, gets your frets a-buzzin’ at 6:30 PM at the YMCA. $35/$28 with family membership. Call 721-YMCA or visit ymcamissoula.org. Every Thu., Dianne Keast offers tips on taking care of yourself with the class Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure at 6:30 PM. Free. Call 2258504. Also on Fri. Learn a bit about native plants and their battle against the invading hordes with conservation land manager Morgan Valliant when the Montana Natural History Center presents a Mount Jumbo Wildflower Walk at 7 PM at the Lincoln Hills Trailhead. Free. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Grab your guitar or favorite instrument and head down to a local artist show at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. Free. Make sure to also call beforehand in order to secure yourself a spot to play. Call 541-8463. Bring your axe—or banjo for you backwoods types—and reminisce about music’s good ole’ days at the weekly Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., every Thu. at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 726-3765 or 880-6834. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thur. this summer at 7:30 PM during Hip Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 26, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

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Page 21 June 25–July 2, 2009


When in Rome Productions, Inc., presents the dance show Zn3p2 at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $8/$14 couples. The Alpine Theatre Project presents an Irish tale of a small town with Hollywood stars in its eyes with their production of Stones in His Pockets at 8 PM. $12-37. Call 862-7469 or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096. Modern, outrageous ‘n’ in-yer-face humor from the mind of twisted genius Mel Brooks graces the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road, with the 8 PM production of The Producers. $8-14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Bowling and karaoke go together like Iran and freedom of the press during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Start down the path that ends in a Las Vegas dressing room every Thu. at 8:30 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Show Girl 101. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Get your metallic fix when Missoula’s Metal Militia hosts a show featuring In Memory Of and Blessiddoom at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Irish indie alternative rockers Seneca play Sean Kelly’s at 9 PM. Cover TBA. (See Noise in this issue.) Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Sing along to remixed versions of famous pop songs like “I don’t wanna lose your love tonight,” shake yer booty and drink mad drink specials every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, electronic, indie, crunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Landslide hosts open mic night at the Bandit Saloon in Columbia Falls every Thu. and Tue. night, starting at 9 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Skank it up when Tucson, Ariz.’s Warsaw Poland Brothers bring their ska sounds to the Top Hat at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Clear that pile of cougars from your lap and hit the dance floor every Thu. at 10 PM, when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJs Kris Moon and Fleege spinning an all-over-tha-map mix of lounge, breakbeat, dub, tech house and progressive electro dance music. Free.

FRIDAY June

26

The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3 to 6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, The Common Good by Noam Chomsky. Just kidding (did I need to tell you that?). Free. Call 721-BOOK. Every weekday, kids aged 6-13 flock to the ZACC, 235 N. First St., where the Young Artists Afterschool Program provides experiences with ceramics, painting, construction, wire, robots and more. $12 per day. Call 5497555 or visit zootownarts.com

Missoula Independent

Page 22 June 25–July 2, 2009

nightlife Classic cars will dominate the scenery at Caras Park starting at 5 PM at the 9th annual Garden City River Rod Run. This festival of classic cars runs until 9 PM followed by a parade of the cars down Higgins Ave. which lasts until 10 PM. Free. Call 543-4238. Head down to the Missoula Art Museum at 5 PM for the first ever 2009 Montana Triennial, an exhibition featuring 88 pieces from 60 Montana-based artists that cross the spectrum of artistic mediums and styles. Free. Call 7280447 or visit www.missoulartmuseum.org. Stevensville’s Western Heritage Days kicks off with a Bitterroot Bale Buckin’ Team Auction, as well as a youth dance from 7-10 PM. Call 7773773, or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com. Larry Hirshberg rocks out acoustically at the Hangin’ Art Gallery & Coffee House, off Highway 93 in Arlee, at 7 PM. Free. Call 726-5005. Barbara Smith, a columnist for the Norwalk Citizen in Norwalk, Conn., presents a production of her play Butterscotch at Phillipsburg’s Opera House Theatre Company, 140 S. Sansome St., at 7 PM. $17 adults/$9 children. Call 859-0013. Cottonwood Draw plays some tunes at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5. BBQ food is also available for purchase. Call 541-8463. Give praise to the southern lord when shards of sound hit your ears as local metal bands Walking Corpse Syndrome, Mageddon and Doomfock rock an all-ages show at The Union Hall, 218 E. Main St., at 7:30 PM. $5, or a dollar off the cover if you show up before 7:30 PM. When in Rome Productions, Inc., presents the dance show Zn3p2 at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $8/$14 couples. Live music of an unspecified nature shakes things up at 8 PM at The Raven in Bigfork, 39 Orchard Lane, which should add some spice to the Walleye Fish Fry as well. Visit sleepeatdrink.com. The Alpine Theatre Project presents an Irish tale of a small town with Hollywood stars in its eyes with their production of Stones in His Pockets at 8 PM. $12-37. Call 862-7469 or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Modern, outrageous ‘n’ in-yer-face humor from the mind of twisted genius Mel Brooks graces the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road, with the 8 PM production of The Producers. $8-14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Shodown gets down at the Lumberjack Saloon in Lolo tonight at a time to be announced. Free. 21+. Bob Wire & the Magnificent Bastards show you a thing or two about country and Americana when they play Sean Kelly’s at 9 PM. Cover TBA. T-Nutty brings his rap heat all the way from the home of the governator, aka Sacramento, Calif., along with special guest X-Kid the Don Juan of Saddam to the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. $12 advance from Rockin’ Rudy’s, Ear Candy or www.ticketswest.com, or $15 at the door. Regional and local artists Slopstar, Koshir, Nineside Click, Aries, Mr. Dalo (O.T.H.), Dougie (NBC) and Inferno Mobb open. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free.


Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you saddle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Paint your eardrums with a palette of hip hop, funk, house, techno and more when Friday Night Delights delights the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Free. Get your freak on, Missy Elliot style, at AmVets Club, where DJ DC rocks dance music at 9 PM. Free. Release your inner Kool Keith when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to shake it like a Polaroid picture when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Soak yourself in booze and blues when Zeppo plays the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Bluegrass reigns supreme at the Top Hat when Broken Valley Road Show takes the stage at 10 PM. Cover TBA. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Bask in the sounds of spinning discs as Mobile Beat’s DJs scratch it up tonight and tomorrow starting at 10 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Cover TBA. Call 755-9463. Get to know the upstairs neighbors as the Blue Mountain Observatory hosts another Public Observing Night at their secret mountaintop fortress, featuring this week’s estimated observing start time, 10:30 PM. Call 243-5179

for weather and cancellation updates before you go. Visit physics.umt.edu/bluemountain for directions.

SATURDAY June

27

Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM-noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM-1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. The Bitterroot Quilters Guild shows off their handmade wares—over 300 quilts— at a quilt show called “Gems of the Bitterroot” at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds’ First Interstate Center, 100 Old Corvallis Rd. in Hamilton, from 9 AM-4 PM. $4. Visit www.bitterrootquiltersguild.com. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 5417240. And keep yer eyes peeled for a special July 4 session as well...

Learn about gardening, landscaping and even food preservation at the Hamilton Farmers’ Market, on Bedford and Third Streets, when Hamilton’s Montana State University extension office offers it’s expertise and resources at 9 AM until the market ends at 12:30 PM. Call 961-0004.

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Page 23 June 25–July 2, 2009


Join students from UM’s Social Work 360 class at Caras Park at 10 AM to noon when they hold a fundraiser for Missoula’s critters called “Doggy Day for Missoula’s Hungry Critters.” All contributions, such as cash or pet food, will be sent to the Humane Society and Food Bank. The fundraiser starts at Caras Park and ends at Missoula’s dog park. Call Heidi at 243-5438. Beth Jaffe leads a workshop for those who suffer from long-term illness or loss called “Creative Pages” at the lower level of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. Free but donations are appreciated. This workshop is part of Living Art Montana’s series of “Creativity for Life” workshops. Call 549-5329 or visit www.livingartmontana.org. Classic cars will once again dominate the landscape starting at 11 AM in Caras Park during the second day of

the 9th annual Garden City River Rod Run. Free. Call 543-4238. The Big Arm Fire Company celebrates its 30th anniversary with food, live music, games and more starting at 11 AM at the fire company’s headquarters in Big Arm, just north of Polson off of Highway 93. Call 849-6071. The second installment of Stevensville’s Western Heritage Days kicks off with an array of activities starting with a parade at 11 AM, followed by wagon rides, living history demonstrations, a dutch oven cookoff and more. Call 777-3773, or visit www.mainstreetstevensville.com. Alison Laundrie gets you in shape and provides a few moments away from your spawn every Sat. at 11 AM during a Pilates class at Sunflower Montessori School, 1703 S. Fifth St. W. $10 includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247.

Practice your rapid eye movement when you check out all that’s new during a Twenty Minute Tour every Sat. at noon at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Call 728-0447. MUD presents a Basics of Composting Workshop at 1 PM at their headquarters at 629 Phillips St. $20/$10 members. Call 721-7513. Author John McCulloch signs copies of his book Refined in the Furnace of Affliction at Hastings, 2501 Brooks St., at 1–3 PM. Free. Call 542-1077. Beth Sellars, a juror for the Missoula Art Museum’s Montana Triennial Exhibhition, leads a members only gallery talk regarding the work chosen for the exhibition from 1–2:30 PM. Each member can bring one guest. Call 728-0447. Survey a plethora of fermented grape juices during a wine tasting at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W.

SPOTLIGHT crème de l’art A few years ago, in Nicaragua, I spent a whole evening at an eco-lodge on the San Juan River doing a blind taste test of variously aged rums. The disadvantage of not being able to read the label focused my senses on the one thing that matters: smooth, rich flavor. Unlike most professional tastings, my amateur endeavor did not entail a spittoon, so you can bet my senses eventually became, well, blurry. The point is,

WHAT: Montana Triennial Reception WHEN: Fri., June 26, 5–7 PM WHERE: Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. HOW MUCH: Free blind tests make for fine taste, which is why the Missoula Art Museum’s first Triennial Art show should be of particular interest to those with high standards. The show consists of 88 works created by 60 different artists and was juried by Seattle curator Beth Sellars. Sellars blind juried the first several rounds of art, focusing her senses only on what struck her as the most intriguing and highest in quality without knowing anything about the artists. Finally, after narrowing the works down, she took off her blinders—figuratively speaking—and perused the biographies and geog-

Missoula Independent

Claire Emory’s “C is for Cottonwood” woodblock print and water color is one of 88 pieces at MAM’s Triennial.

raphies of her selections to narrow the group down diversity-wise. The resulting final group of emerging and established Montana artists includes people like Claire Emory, Scott Sutton, Stephanie Frostad, Chris, Lela and Lisa Autio and many others, ranging from places like Missoula, Bridger, Lewiston, Billings, Helena and Great Falls, to name a few. Like a fine selection of rums, the show—which includes a juror’s talk—will most likely be an intoxicating experience of fine-tuned creativity.

Page 24 June 25–July 2, 2009

—Erika Fredrickson

Harrier, starting at 2 PM. Free. Call 541-8463. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834. Heritage Timber, a sustainable deconstruction company, hosts an open house to celebrate its 15 years of existence in Potomac, 27 miles east of Missoula, from 3–7 PM. Free. Call 830-3966 or visit www.heritagetimbermt.com.

nightlife Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323. Voodoo Horseshoes belts out bluegrass and alternative country at the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. When in Rome Productions, Inc., presents the dance show Zn3p2 at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $8/$14 couples. Arrive early for the 8 PM sign-up— and to down a few jitter-killing drinks—as Frenchtown’s Alcan Bar and Cafe hosts the weekly Saturday Night Open Jam with Jimmy Falcon and Sam Massa at 9. Free. The Symes Hotel Event Hall, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs, hosts a silent auction and benefit for Melissa Blue at 8 PM. Blue is a musician who was recently diagnosed with cancer and had to have emergency surgery. Those wanting to play music or donate a silent auction piece can contact Naomi at 871-6173. The Alpine Theatre Project presents an Irish tale of a small town with Hollywood stars in its eyes with their production of Stones in His Pockets at 8 PM. $12-37. Call 8627469 or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. Modern, outrageous ‘n’ in-yer-face humor from the mind of twisted genius Mel Brooks graces the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road, with the 8 PM production of The Producers. $8-14. Call 3759050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Missoula’s Senior Citizen center takes a trip to Hawaii when it holds a “Hawaiian Luau” dance with a performance by Lockwood’s Versatilles

at 8 PM. $5. All ages are welcome to attend and bringing treats to the dance is encouraged. Call 543-7154. The Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., hosts a “tropical summer nights” party at 8 PM featuring Ms. Juicy, as well as emceeing by Holy Matron Ophelia. $5. A portion of the proceeds go to fund the Elk’s Youth Scholarship. Call 549-0542. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Local DJ’s Monty Carlo and Kris Moon bring sweaty beats and booming bass to The Badlander during Absolutely, a DJ party featuring a plethora of dance music styles, as well as two-for-one Absolut drinks until 11 PM. The party kicks off at 9 PM. Free. Get a dose of Alaskan rock experimentation when Super Awesome Villains Forever plays the Palace Lounge with locals Hangover Saints, Come Up Swinging and Arrested Adolescence at 9 PM. $5/$7 for 18+. T h e F r e n c h t o w n C l u b , 15 15 5 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to perform during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW, but do your best not to bellow, as people are trying to eat pizza next door. Free. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. You’re a diva on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJ DC and his dance music at 9 PM. Free. Full Grown Men play tunes by grown men at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Get that funk outta your trunk and down to the Top Hat when Reverend Slanky hits the stage at 10 PM. Cover TBA. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.


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Page 25 June 25–July 2, 2009


SUNDAY June

28

Today marks the second run of “Gems of the Bitterroot,” a quilt show hosted by the Bitterroot Quilters Guild that features over 300 quilts at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds’ First Interstate Center, 100 Old Corvallis Rd. in Hamilton, from 9 AM–3 PM. $4. Visit www.bitterrootquiltersguild.com. If economic strain’s got you worrying about your home—or lack thereof—contact the Human Resource Council, 1801 S. Higgins Ave., which offers home repair and homebuyer assistance programs. Call Brendan at 728-3710, but do it tomorrow, when they’re open. Modern, outrageous ‘n’ in-yer-face humor from the mind of twisted genius Mel Brooks graces the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road, with the 2 PM production of The Producers. $8-14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. This month’s featured dance step is “Poke the Frenchman” during the JTM Dance Party at MCAT studios at 2:30 PM, which is your chance to broadcast your hottest moves all over the valley. Free. Call 543-6309.

nightlife Joan Zen and Tsering Wangmo, a vocalist and Tibetan nun, play an outdoor concert to benefit the Garden of 1,000 Buddhas in Arlee at the Daly Mansion, 251 Eastside Highway in Hamilton, at 5 PM. $15/free for children. Cost of admission includes a drink and hors d’ ouerves. There will also be a silent auction during the event. Call 726-0217. If jazz dancing is a little too city for you, then hit the Kalispell Country Clogger classes at the downtown Kalispell Eagles Hall at 5:30 PM. Call 250-6965 or 885-2262. The Alpine Theatre Project presents an Irish tale of a small town with Hollywood stars in its eyes with their production of Stones in His Pockets at 6 PM. $12-37. Call 862-7469 or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. The weekend isn’t over until you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, where Landslide hosts at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with live jazz by the Sam White Quartet and spun sounds by DJ Gary Stein from 8:30 PM–midnight. Free, and the martinis are super affordable. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat—and no smoke: Head underground when The Palace Lounge, 147 W. Broadway, features a rotating cast of Random Rock DJs at 9 PM every Sun. Free.

MONDAY June

29

Learn the art of wood carving techniques with John Thompson, designer of some of the ponies and dragon ring machine for the Carousel For Missoula, when he teaches a class on basic wood carving relief techniques

Missoula Independent

Page 26 June 25–July 2, 2009

at the Missoula Art Museum, from 9:30 AM to noon. $80/$72 members. This class continues through July 3. Call 728-0447. Learn the basics of Pacifika Printmaking—a Polynesian art—when Matt Smith conducts a class at 1 PM at the Missoula Art Museum that teaches students to examine, design and create styles of Pacifika art which can then be transferred to printed surfaces. This class is for those ages 9 through 13. $50/$45 members. This class runs through July 2. Call 728-0447. Carrie Maynes presents students aged 16 and over five weeks of Figure Drawing for Young Adults every Mon. at 4 PM at the Missoula Art Museum through July 13. $75/$67.50 members. Call 728-0447. World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class for kids aged 5-7 takes place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon. at 4:30 PM. $30 per month/drum rental: $15 per month. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

nightlife If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot. Mr. Pibb, hit the road! Mountain Dew, here’s your pink slip! Refine your Soda Firing technique every Mon. at 6 PM through July 2 at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St. $200/eightweek session. Call 543-0509. Increase your digital proficiency to at least second grade level every Mon. at 6 PM when the Missoula Public Library presents an ongoing series of Computer Classes in the classroom near Web Alley. Free. Call 721-2665. Learn more about Two Creeks Community School, a private non-profit that’s starting up in Hamilton which aims to provide alternative, holistic and place-based education in small classrooms during an informational meeting at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, at 7 PM. Call Steve Archibald at 821-0885. Singer songwriter Larry Hirshberg plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-2906. If you’ve got a horn, go ahead and blow it in the Sentinel High School Band Room at 7 PM when the Missoula City Band rehearses every Mon. through Aug. 3, in preparation for some grand performance of the future. Free. Call 728-2403, ext. 7041. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. There’s a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Experience momentum, balance, and timing tuned with a strong drummer-dancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, who presents Tribal Fusion Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. and Wed. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Local funksters the Fulcrum Theory kick off a tour with a show at The Badlander at 9 PM with opening DJ support from the Milkcrate Mechanic. $5.


Lots going on this week, so the Calendar Playa, filling in this week for Comrade Calendar, will get right to it. If you’ve always wanted to learn about identifying native plants, as well as the invasive species that threaten them, Morgan Valliant, also known as Missoula’s conservation land manager, is your man. He’ll lead a trip up the Mount Jumbo saddle to identify the area’s naturally occurring flora, as well as those pesky pests, on Thursday, June 25, at 7 PM. Valliant also plans to discuss local restoration efforts to ward off invasive plants in this open space area. To join in, meet at the parking lot at the Lincoln Hills trailhead, just below the Mount Jumbo Saddle. Call 327-0405 or email mvalliant@ci.missoula.mt.us. Those with a keen interest in cataloging the biodiversity of our surroundings—and really, who doesn’t fit into that group?—might be interested in the first ever Bitterroot Bioblitz, a 24-hour activity starting at 3 PM on Friday, June 26, at the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge near Stevensville. Scientists and volunteers plan to descend into the refuge to record as many plant and animal species as possible. There’s limited space, and volunteers can be of any experience level, so head over to www.bitterrootbioblitz.com on the quick to register. If you miss the cataloguing, a series of free activities are also planned for Saturday, June 27, starting at 6 AM, including field and birding walks, a workshop on sketching plants and animals, and demonstrations on tying flies. Closer to town, Larry Weeks and our local Five Valleys Audubon chapter, hosts a free, five-mile bird watching hike up Mount Sentinel, down the Hellgate Canyon Trail and through the Kim Williams Trail on Saturday, June 27, at 8 AM. Meet at 8 AM at the parking lot at the base of Mount Sentinel and be ready to spot a variety of winged creatures, including warblers, vireos, swallows, flycatchers, Calliope hummingbirds, spotted towhees and lazuli buntings. If conservation is your thing, join the Wilderness Institute on one of its nine mapping and monitoring trips in the Sapphire and Blue Joint Wilderness study areas. This week, from June 26 to June 29, you’ll head up to the Weasel Creek area in the Sapphire

Mountains. The Wilderness Institute notes that dinners are provided and transportation is available from Missoula and many locations in the Bitterroot Valley. Run to grab more info and sign up at www.cfc.umt.edu/wi or call 243-5361. Speaking of running, the Lolo Pass Half Marathon and 5k Fun Run kicks off on Saturday, June 27, at the Lolo Pass Visitor Center at 8:30 AM. Registration ended, but you can still cheer on runners as they race past Packer Meadows, a historical area that lies along the Lewis and Clark and Nez Pearce trail ways. Call Colleen Mathisen at 240-0287 or visit www.runlolopass.org. Also on Saturday, the Montana Chapter of the Sierra Club hosts a weed pull and demo project tour in the Sawmill Gulch Elk Habitat area. See a forest thinning demonstration project where attendees will, in part, learn about the North Hills Elk Herd. Meet at the main Rattlesnake trailhead at 8 AM and dress appropriately. Call Bert Lindler at 542-7645, or e-mail blindler@montana.com. Free. The same group heads out the next day on a Spring Wildflower Hike to the Packer Meadow/ Lolo Pass area. This 8-mile hike takes walkers across the Lee Ridge, or perhaps the Lewis and Clark/Nez Perce Trail, depending on weather conditions. Meet at the Lee Creek campground with horticulturalist Adrienne Hopkins, and bring your own lunch and water. Call Adrienne Hopkins at 543-3755 or e-mail John Wolverton at yodelingdog@hotmail.com. Free. Some of us take to the outdoors on two wheels instead of two feet. For you, Missoulians on Bicycles leads a Geezer Ride to

Montana Club on Sunday, June 28, at 10 AM. Riders leave from the Greenough park parking lot, at the corner of Monroe and Locust streets and pedal approximately 14 miles. For more info, call Gayle and Ernie at 240-9279, or head over to www.missoulabike.org/ridepage for further updates. In the Flathead, the Flathead Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society hosts a handful of different events. On Saturday, June 27, fire ecologist Steve Wirt, a retired U.S. Forest Service fire specialist, explores previously burnt areas of the North Fork Road. Meet at the Nite Owl in Columbia Falls at 9 AM and bring your own lunch. Call 862-5452. Alternately, botanist Anne Morley leads a wildflower identification walk along the Old Swan River Road on Tuesday, June 30. Meet in front of Showthyme Restaurant in Bigfork at 10 AM, or call 886-2242 for more info. A l s o o n Tu e s d a y, J u n e 30 , Glacier National Park Nursery invites you to help seed, weed, transplant or work on a project inside the park. Call Joyce Lapp at 888-7817. And that’s not all. I’m pressed for space, but rest assured that Missoula Parks and Rec is in full summer mode. Check out the McCormick Climbing Wall every Friday, or the “Take Me Fishing” tackle loaner program. Try the Adventure Challenge Ropes Course or one of the MOBASH Sk8 clinics. For info on Photo by Chad Harder any of the above, call Jason Pignanelli at 552-6271 for more information. That feels like a full week’s worth of outdoor fun. Have fun out there, be safe, and rest assured that Comrade Calendar will be back in the saddle next week to scratch all your adventure itches. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 27 June 25–July 2, 2009


Local DJ Amanda Stuff ‘n Such and her cohorts take over the decks during Monday night’s DJ Jam at The Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bring your music appreciation glands to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and you’ll soon find yourself surrounded by the finest musical acts on the planet. Free.

TUESDAY June

Something For Everyone At the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula’s

Annual

th

at

4 of July Celebration & Pancake Breakfast

The Pancake Breakfast, prepared by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. NEW in 2009!!! FREE Antiques & Collectibles Appraisals, Personal History Research Help, Community Rhythm Band at 3 p.m. BE A WINNER!!! Attendance Raffle, Silent Auction, Kids Costume Contest and Games. “That’s A Pizza Art Contest” Questionnaire Raffle. ACTIVITES AND EVENTS Bicycle parade, model trains, ham radios, fire trucks, children’s games, pony rides, food, crafts, and special displays. Tour the lookout tower, schoolhouse and locomotive. See demonstrations of the historic sawmill, antique engines, telegraph, historical surveying. Enjoy the Society for Creative Anachronism, Books by the Inch used book sale, with a special appearance by Jeannette Rankin at 1:00. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for seniors, $2 for students, $15 per family. Children under 6 and Friends of the Museum are free. The Pancake Breakfast is a separate price. We'll see you Saturday, July 4th! RAIN OR SHINE For more information, call 728-3476 fortmissoulamuseum.org THANKS TO OUR GRACIOUS EVENT SPONSORS: Pepsi-Cola Bottling, Southgate Mall, and Zip Beverage.

Summer 2009!

30

Bend, stretch and play every Tue. and Thu. at Happy Mama, 736A S. First St. W., where Yoga for Everybody eases the suffering at 9:30 AM. $12 drop-in/$10 advance. Call 880-6883. Today is the final day to register your kids for two outdoor adventure camps, both in August, run by the Boone and Crockett Club. These camps take place up in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch, west of Dupuyer, Mont., and center on outdoor skills and wildlife conservation. C a l l 4 0 6 - 472 - 3 311 , o r e - m a i l cobb@boone-crockett.org. Alternately, visit www.boone-crockett.org. For the latest Latin cardio dance craze, try a dose of Zumba every Tue. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. The dictionary defines “BOGO” as an acronym for “Buy One, Get One,” which means BOGO Pottery Tuesdays ease your entry into ceramics ownership from noon–6 PM every Tue. at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. Families First presents a talk by Sara Polanchek on how to help your kids manage their emotions at the Missoula Public Library, at 2 PM. Call Families First at 721-7690 to register. The Missoula Public Library continues its summer family reading program for children with an activity from Science Woman at 2 PM in the library’s large meeting room, when science experiments are rumored to occur. Free.

nightlife Holly Jeremiassen teaches young people aged 10 and up the finer points of glass fusing every Tue. at 5:30 PM during Youth Glass Class at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $15 per session. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com.

June 27-28 at 3 and 5 p.m. MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS TICKETS 728-PLAY [7529] • www.mctinc.org SPONSORED IN PART BY:

Missoula Independent

Page 28 June 25–July 2, 2009

It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in Room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. Get gooey during Open Instructed Studio at the Clay Studio, 1106-A

Chico, Calif.’s Social Concern should have plenty of social and political topics to riff about when they bring their hardcore punk antics to the Palace Lounge Wed., July 1, with openers Bird’s Mile Home and TSMF. $5.

Hawthorne St., every Tue. at 6 PM through June 30. $168/eight-week session. Call 543-0509. Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5. Andre Floyd & The Mood Iguana bring the blues when they play Kalispell’s Picnic in the Park concert series at Depot Park, located at Center St. and Main St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 758-7717. You’re invited by Turning the Wheel to take part in some BodyCentered Creative Expression to live music every Tue. at 7 PM. $5-10 donation. Call 543-4414 for location and more details. In the wake of what it calls a “constitutional crisis,” the organization We the People Foundation for Constitutional Education Inc. holds a public meeting tonight at the Kalispell Public Library, 247 1st Ave. E., at 7:30 PM in order to inform citizens of their efforts to combat this crisis. Free. Call 406-570-5080. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented w i t h . R e a d y ? Wh a t p r e s t i g i o u s American university recently announced it would be laying off more than 200 employees as a result of budget constraints? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real every Tue. at 8 PM, when Hip Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30-11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

Bask in a night of local rock when The Chalfonts play the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Forego the weekly shower and join Unwashed Promotions for live music and moist DJs Harvey and Heyska when Punk Rock Tuesday fumigates the Palace Lounge every Tue. at 9 PM. Free. L.I.V. Karaoke night gives your larynx a weekly workout with a 9:30 PM sesh at the Elbow Room. Free. Call 531-7800. Expect some aural variety when Jack Gladstone, R. Carlos Nakai, Will Clipman and Lee Zimmerman descend into the New Salish and Kootenai Tirbal Theater in Pablo for a night of music. 7 PM. $25/$20 advance. Call 250-7038, or visit www.jackgladstone.com. Take a load off in the company of friends every Wed. from 9–11:30 AM as Aspen Hospice, 107 Bell Crossing West, hosts the Caregiver Coffee Break. Free. Call 642-3010.

WEDNESDAY July

01

Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. The Children’s Museum of Missoula presents Ready Set Read, an early literacy program at 11 AM for those ages 3 to 7. $4.25/free for members. Call 541-PLAY to register. Your weekly lunch date with, well, everyone comes at 11 AM as Caras Park transforms with Out to Lunch, which features food vendors, kids’ activities by the SpectrUM Science Tent and music by Blue Rock Shop. Free. Call 543-4238. One Less Karen plays during the lunch portion of Kalispell’s Picnic in the Park concert series at Depot Park, located at Center St. and Main St., at 11:30 AM. Free. Call 758-7717


Increase your digital proficiency to at least second grade level every Wed. at 12:30 PM when the Missoula Public Library presents an ongoing series of Computer Classes in the classroom near Web Alley. Free. Call 721-2665. Join former 1972 presidential candidate and sometimes Bitterroot Valley resident George McGovern when he signs copies of his book Abraham Lincoln at Fact & Fiction from 3-4:30 PM. Free. Call 721-2881. The Missoula Public Library continues its summer programs for teens grades 7 through 12 at 4 PM today with an activity centered on creating paper beads and baskets. Free. Call 721-2665.

nightlife Maybe you won’t be the next Salvador Dali or Francis Bacon, but local artist Edgar Smith could help steer you in that direction when he leads a class at the Missoula Art Museum at 6 PM on how to hone your skills in the realm of abstract drawings and art using a mixed array of media and processes. $60/$54 members. This class runs through July 22. Call 728-0447. Combine a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with live models in their birthday suits—18 and over only, please—and you’ve got the Missoula Art Museum’s Hump Day Figure Drawing group every Wed. from 6-8 PM. $7/$5 members. Call 728-0447. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her AfroBrazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Blue Argon plays “eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn” every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Learn to mystify and entrance by wiggling those hips every Wed. during a Hula/Tahitian Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where you can learn beautiful and energetic rhythms at 7 PM. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. The Missoula City Band toots its horn, and then some, when it plays with special guests Sweet Adeline’s Award Winning Barbershop at Bonner Park starting at 8 PM. Free. Call 728-2400 ext. 7041.

Enjoy jazzy sounds from locals Sky Moose as well as explorations into rock and funk with Modern Savage when both bands play The Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Chico, Calif.-based punk rockers Social Concern hit the Palace Lounge with anarchic fury during their set at The Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $5. Bird’s Mile Home and TSMF open. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this trivia question: Citing projected drops in the value of its endowment, the Ivy League’s Harvard University announced last week that it would be laying off 275 of its employees. Spit the gorf out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327. Eugene, Ore.’s Reeble Jar bring the funk, blues and acid jazz vibes to the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

THURSDAY July

02

Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662. Join Kassandra Hardy, coordinator for the centennial at Glacier National Park, when she discusses plans for the park’s upcoming birthday at a seminar from noon–1 PM in the West Glacier Community Building at the park’s headquarters. Call 888-5838 or 888-7895. Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4–8 PM as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5-7:30. Even those without a bun in the oven will benefit when the Happy Mama Prenatal Center, 736 S. First St. W., presents a low-impact Community Yoga Class every Thu. at 4:15 PM. $5 suggested donation.

nightlife Beginning Pottery at The Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., is your shot to make something big and beautiful every Thu. at 6 PM through July 23. $168/eight-week class. Call 543-0509. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. If your normal swing spot’s become jam-packed with losers, head to the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W.,

where swing lessons begin every Thu. at 7 PM and the dance party gets going in earnest at 8. $5. Find out the specifics of our supposed “constitutional crisis” when the organization We the People Foundation for Constitutional Education Inc. holds a public meeting tonight at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 7 PM in order to inform citizens of their efforts to combat this menace. Free. Call 406-570-5080. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thur. at 7:30 PM this summer during Hip Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8-11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096. Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, electronic, indie, crunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace Lounge at 9 PM every Thu. Free. Clear that pile of cougars from your lap and hit the dance floor every Thu. at 10 PM, when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJs Fleege and Kris Moon spinning an all-over-thamap mix of lounge, breakbeat, dub, tech house and progressive electro dance music. Free.

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This is Calendar Playa, filling in for Comrade Calendar, signing off for the week. It’s been fun folks, and a bit stressful, but thankfully you’ve kept us informed of all the happenings going on in our fair city. As always, please send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 26, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. And for Peet’s sake, don’t submit events through our website. Just don’t do it.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 June 25–July 2, 2009


scope

Fertile ground Author explores Luther Burbank’s garden of invention by Erika Fredrickson

Celebrity status usually involves Prada prancing, cushy jail time, reality TV, jet-setting photo ops in Africa, or all of the above. But once upon a time, a person could gain popularity by simply inventing something useful. Luther Burbank invented, among other things, the Burbank potato, rainbow corn, the miracle plum and the Shasta daisy—each bred to be bigger, hardier, tastier or more aesthetically pleasing versions of their originals. He was one such celebrity of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when local food wasn’t a movement, but the norm. The reality of local food systems at that time made it necessary to work within a confined geographical radius, but with Burbank’s breeding experiments, biological boundaries began to expand.

Burbank died and Congress is passing the Patent Act of 1930, which designated the patenting of plants. Though the act was couched in the intention to encourage more invention, Smith observes that using Burbank as the raison d’être for patenting plants was absurd—and most likely an exploitation of his celebrity. “During the entire [Patent Act] debate one of the strong arguments the proponents were making was, ‘We’ll never have another Luther Burbank if we don’t allow people to patent plants.’ Now, in fact, they had a Luther Burbank without patents, so I don’t think that conclusion is quite as inevitable as the proponents presented it. It gives you a sense of how the government was, in the beginning, the source of experimentation and free access to new develop-

Smith says she wrote The Garden of Invention to tell a story about a fascinating man who helped change agricultural economies and literally planted the seeds for new varieties of fruits, nuts, vegetables and flowers we often take for granted as merely a gift of nature. What she didn’t expect, she says, was to find herself delving so far into the issues of ownership. After all, Burbank’s legacy was more about transparency and experimenting than it was about control and power. Yet Smith’s book, as she notes, begins and ends in the U.S. Patent Office. “The question of who owns information and who owns control over the developing natural world is something that I hadn’t really been expecting to be quite so strongly a part of the story,” Smith says. “But it very quickly became obvious to me that questions of ownership were hugely important here. Not only of plants and seeds but also ownership of ideas and ownership of authority and, when you get somebody as famous as Burbank became, questions of ownership of his reputation.” In the first pages of the book Smith introduces the formation of the Patent Office, which was seen as a means “to promote the Progress of Science and the Useful Arts.” But by the end of the book we are back at the Patent Office again, this time five years after

ments and then, a century later, the chief agent of the privatization of nature.” Celebrity has its downfalls, even—and perhaps, especially—in the world of science. One of Smith’s main hopes is that The Garden of Invention will go beyond being an intriguing biography of Burbank and horticulture to showing a need for inventive spirit. She was inspired by the diversity of his plants, which included tomatoes bred specifically for canning, or lilies that “grew as easily potatoes.” These days a tomato is often bred—to the exclusion of other varieties—solely for one trait: to survive transportation. Burbank, however, experimented with the multiple paths one type of food or flower could take in order to serve multiple purposes. “That spirit of possibility and of invention is a wonderful thing that I do think we’re getting back to,” says Smith. “I hope so. I hope that people will be inspired to go into science. That kind of ‘gee whiz, boy-wonder’ that inspired Burbank is something that we could really use.” Jane S. Smith reads from The Garden of Invention at Shakespeare & Co. Thursday, July 2, at 7 PM. Free.

Jane Smith’s new book, The Garden of Invention, traces the life and legacy of inventor Luther Burbank’s plant breeding endeavors. “I think we are experiencing an enormous move back to the desire for g r e a te r v a r i e t y, ” S m i t h says, “which was very much a force in Burbank’s career.”

The Garden of Invention: Luther Burbank and the Business of Breeding Plants, by cultural historian Jane S. Smith, explores the famous gardener’s backyard bioengineering endeavors, and illustrates how his spirited craftiness ignited imaginations. Speaking of illustration, the book’s art consists of old seed catalog drawings, horticultural cartoons and farm photographs. One of the best indications of Burbank’s celebrity is the illustration from New York’s Evening Journal, titled “Luther Burbank Tells Parents the Way to Grow Babies as Plants.” It alludes to his peripheral (and perhaps dubious) status as a child-rearing expert. It wasn’t just Burbank’s celebrity that made him intriguing, but also the diversity of his fanbase. He was a friend of both creative artists and mechanical inventors like Thomas Edison. According to Smith, he was as much a hero to the chamber of commerce as to the Sierra Club. “I think it’s fascinating that Burbank and everything he represented made him very much admired by Henry Ford and Frida Kahlo,” says Smith, “as well as the urban reformer Jacob Reece and John Muir and all kinds of other people who you don’t usually get to mention in the same sentence.” Part of Burbank’s broad appeal, according to

Missoula Independent

Smith, stems from the fact that food wasn’t yet a controversy. The debates about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and fuel crops and exploitations by agri-business giants like Monsanto had not yet happened. Land grant colleges were on the rise, but the schools themselves were just barely up and running. One position in the USDA—an official title up until recent decades—was called the “plant explorer,” proving that agriculture was every bit about inventive spirit as it was about business. “There’s this impression that nothing happened between [the eras of] Mother Nature and Monsanto,” Smith says. “But there were huge amounts of guided nature going on between these two end points. It’s not as though heirloom crops were growing in the Garden of Eden.”

Page 30 June 25–July 2, 2009

efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Tyson Ballew

The Summer of Dodos Tummy Rock Records

There’s something a little bit Billy Joe Armstrong about Tyson Ballew’s vocals—the way he sings about crushes made me recently unearth Green Day’s 1,039/ Smoothed Out Slappy Hours just to hear “The One I Want.” That said, the local troubadour injects his own dramatic notions of love into his newest album, and darkens them with an end-of-the-world earnestness. In “The Hatchet,” he sings, “There’s unforeseen dangers in everything and we’d be lucky if we fell in love with anybody.” He counterbalances that in “Honest Friends” when he unabashedly belts out,

Seneca

Sweeter than Bourbon West Pole MGM

In the song “Marks,” Seneca offers up the line, “Grow slowly as time goes on.” I hope that this Ireland-based indie-pop foursome heeds their own advice. Given their enthusiastic fan base, it’s clear they’ve got what it takes to be popular: anthemic tunes, raw musical talent, no shortage of angsty lyrics and a knockout lead vocalist who sounds like Chris Martin meets James Russell Mercer meets Eddie Vedder. But it’s also clear that Seneca has yet to discover what it is that makes them different from a dozen other bands—particularly Snow Patrol, with whom they are often compared. Considering their acclaim in the United Kingdom, the alluring title of this debut and their

The Present The Way We Are Loaf Recordings

On The Way We Are, this New York City trio explores the outer regions of music through sound manipulations, aurally intoxicating ambient soundscapes and dramatic shifts in timbre and dynamics. It’s an exciting trip into the depths of a hellish, psychedelic pit where found sounds, droning instruments and electronic noise morph in and out of the mix. Improvisation seems to rule the day.

Various Artists

Keep Your Soul: A Tribute to Doug Sahm Vanguard Records

There are few things I love about Texas; it’s a state I would gladly see secede from the union. Then again, only Texas could produce Doug Sahm, the legendary frontman of the Sir Douglas Quintet. He’s the one who wrote “Mendocino,” “Texas Me” and “She’s About a Mover,” who slyly introduced white America to the joys of Norteño, who smuggled organic Tex-Mex sounds onto the airwaves in the guises of rock and outlaw country, and who is now sorely underappreciated. It’s about time someone produced a tribute to the late Sir Doug and brought his spirit back.

“This heart gets broken, this heart gets smashed, but I guarantee you, this heart is gonna last!” These kinds of songs evoke the excitement of first crushes and loitering on the sidewalk outside of all-ages rock shows, or hanging out with friends in parks at midnight. The fact that the album is on tape makes it all the more nostalgic, and the little details—clapping effects sharp as shotguns, poppy vocal layering—gives it brightness despite bleak undertones. In fact, Ballew might be the perfect acoustic guitarist to hang out with during the apocalypse, mostly because his angst is cradled in starry-eyed acceptance for whatever excitement—good or bad—happens next. (Erika Fredrickson) Tyson Ballew plays a release party at the Zootown Arts Community Center Monday, June 29, at 8 PM with Lela Bayless and The Cocker Spaniels. $3–$5. vaguely post-apocalyptic album art, I was expecting 13 stellar tunes. And on a technical level, they are: The album is flawlessly executed, well produced and entirely radioready. The song “Clarity” is a bluesy gem, straight-ahead rock overlaid with sultry violin. The title track is an acoustic ballad, perfect for a movie score. But still, something’s lacking. Personality, perhaps? Given the musical toolkit at their disposal and their extant success, Seneca is primed for fame—as soon as they figure out who, exactly, they are. (Melissa Mylchreest) Seneca plays Sean Kelly’s Thursday, June 25, at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Opening track “Medman” starts things off with lots of jarring acoustic and synthetic sounds swathed in effects, and at times seems eerily reminiscent of output by bands like Black Dice and Wolf Eyes. Things progress further on “Space Meadow” and “Shapeshifter,” as the band starts to expose its influence from electroacoustic composers Iannis Xenakis and Karlheinz Stockhausen, and smashes them together with brooding, dark ambience—the same you normally hear from artists like Lustmord or Svarte Greiner. The bulk of this release isn’t for those looking for an easy listening experience. It’s challenging work, but for those who have an appreciation for experimentation, as well as loose, droning compositions, The Way We Are offers much in the way of exciting surprises. (Ira Sather-Olson) Keep Your Soul is a fine effort. Though the covers rarely improve on Sahm’s original versions, they breathe new life into songs that should never have been forgotten. Little Willie G.’s cover of “She’s About a Mover” is surprisingly successful thanks to Ry Cooder’s greasy guitar, which stands in for the inimitable vox organ sound Augie Meyers created for the original. The album’s biggest disappointment is The Gourds’ version of “Nuevo Laredo.” One of my favorite Sahm classics becomes little more than a cookie-cutter country ditty. Ten years ago, covering Snoop Dogg’s “Gin and Juice” as a bluegrass tune was funny. Butchering “Nuevo Laredo” is just lazy. (Ali Gadbow)

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Page 31 June 25–July 2, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 32 June 25–July 2, 2009

Midway through his first year at Princeton, Walter Throughout, Kirn is relentlessly self-castigating. Kirn decided to become an English major, mostly Nonetheless, he describes an attitude fairly common because “it sounded like something I might already among overachievers: “I knew only one direction: know.” Pretty quickly, he learned what many an forward. I lived for prizes, plaques, citations, stars, English major before and since has also learned: that and I gave no thought to any goal beyond my next a snappy sprinkling of theoretical terms (bullshitting, appearance on the honor roll. Learning was secondin other words) “could turn a modest midterm essay ary, promotion was primary. No one ever told me into an A-plus tour de force.” Using phrases like “ges- what the point was, except to keep on accumulating tural,” “heuristic” and “semiotically unstable,” gave points, and this struck me as sufficient. What else Kirn and his classmates the linwas there?” guistic tools to skip “straight from After writing pretentious ignorance to revisionism, deconplays (his first was called structing a body of literary knowlLate Modern, an Apocalyptic edge that we’d never constructed Comedy) and bedding (or almost in the first place.” bedding) girls who live beneath That a college education often Tr u m a n C a p o t e ( “ I ’ l l c a l l resembles little more than clever u p s t a i r s … Tr u m a n ’ s t h e finesse is only one part of a larger best…”), Kirn eventually sucindictment in Kirn’s latest, cumbs to the general malaise of Lost in the Meritocracy: The many a college student who eat Undereducation of an too little, do too many drugs, and Overacheiver. In this shrewd, who ultimately come to agree engaging memoir, Kirn, who now with the establishment, which lives in Livingston, illustrates a dis“no longer seemed to want me turbingly accurate portrayal of the once it decided, by some fluke, to American meritocracy, specifically have me.” the kind extant in higher educa- Lost in the Meritocracy Eventually, however, Kirn tion. The book offers both a strik- Walter Kirn rallies. By the end of his senior ingly relevant discussion of hardcover, Doubleday year, he’s a finalist for a prestithe absurdities of meritocratic 224 pages, $24.95 gious fellowship funded by the advancement (perhaps not as talestate of a generous spinster, ent-based as we like to think) as well as an extremely whose will provides “a generous wine allowance” as amusing satire of Ivy League undergraduates—think part of the fellowship. Kirn aces the interview: “It drug-addled Marxists who regard flushing the toilet as appeared I’d come through, and by doing what I did a form of “unpaid labor” and trustafarians who party best: treating the room as a text and reading it, first on their families’ sailboats like there’s no tomorrow to myself and then aloud, to everyone.” (“but tomorrow was coming, laden with obligations.”) One can’t really escape the feeling that Kirn has Though the chapters that detail Kirn’s years at done the same with us: treated his audience as a text Princeton exist as the memoir’s narrative crux, it’s and then delivered something we might like to hear. the opening chapters, wherein Kirn describes his His accounts of Princetonian elites are wickedly childhood and adolescent years (when he learned schadenfreude-esque. He is appropriately disparagthat “percentile is destiny in America”), that give a ing of Princeton, and yet he recognizes its currency certain depth to the memoir. Kirn’s father, a self- in the real world (“I at last knew my power and my loathing patent attorney for the 3M Corporation status as what I’d forgotten I was: a Princeton man”). joined “in his campaign against convention and Like any good memoir, Kirn’s narrative is both funny conformity,” the Mormon Church. Then, when and cuttingly self-reflective. that conversion didn’t really take, the elder Kirn Lost in the Meritocracy is, unerringly, a good moved the family to rural Minnesota in order to read. However, unlike many memoirs, it’s not simfarm a small plot of land Amish-style (while com- ply a self-indulgent read. Though Kirn attended colmuting to 3M in St. Paul). When the younger Kirn lege in the early 1980s, his commentary about the arrives at Princeton, he’s, more or less, a so-called meritocracy feels alarmingly prescient. In Minnesota farm boy with high SAT scores and a the past month alone, the Chronicle of Higher lumberjacky flannel shirt that “filled me with Education has published two essays that describe shame about my regional origins.” the lack of education in higher education, titling It’s easy to believe Kirn felt displaced among one essay “America’s Most Overrated Product: the social and academic elites. In one circumstance, Bachelor’s Degree.” Countless other journals have both tragic and comedic, he’s banished from the called for, essentially, the demise of the university common room his wealthy roommates have deco- system as we know it. Kirn’s memoir illustrates an rated with a Persian rug and a chintz sofa—for which educational system that seems more about a syshe wouldn’t pony up almost $700-—rendering the tematic approach than an educational one, and suite “a concentrated version of what the whole cam- beneath his memories of angst and bad literary thepus would come to represent for me: a private asso- ory there lies a message, and it’s one we ought to ciation of the powerful.” listen to. However, the major indictment in Kirn’s discusarts@missoulanews.com sion is the absurdity of advancement itself.


#1 Reason to be good to the planet:

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Shades of Grey Soderbergh delivers an art house touch by Andy Smetanka

I’m never bored with Steven Soderbergh—not morning. She sells the “girlfriend experience,” in from movie to movie, anyway. Unkinder critics have other words, as opposed to the prostitute experience. Her actual boyfriend of 18 months is a freelance called him a dilettante and bristle at his habit of innocently mentioning himself in the same breath as personal trainer, every bit a prostitute in his own those of Tarkovsky and Howard Hawks. But can you fashion, and a much more assertive solicitor think of another household-name director with his besides—one of these shifty, smooth-talking weasels knack for slipping so effortlessly, and so stylishly, in whose conversational strategies you positively between the art house and the cineplex from one loathe to hear any trace of your own. Yet he’s the project to the next? Say what you will, the guy cranks worse for every gamble. There’s a lot of nervous kidout decent, diverse pictures at the genuinely ding about recession-proof businesses in The Girlfriend Experience, and it must be said that Hawksian rate of roughly one per year. Soderbergh claims in interviews that diversity between personal trainers and prostitutes, the latter was a career goal from the outset—not getting locked seem to be faring rather better. There are only a handful of dramatic developinto any style or genre. Granted, that’s exactly what you’d expect to hear from an established filmmaker ments in the movie. None of them force the slightest reflecting on a mixed bag of early efforts like Kafka and King of the Hill, not to mention a live concert film of 90125-era Yes. But his ongoing career patchwork of big-budget and no-budget, star-studded and starless, easily digestible and borderline unwatchable does make him fairly unique among directors of his stature. Sasha Grey wears her sunglasses at night in The Girlfriend If only more of them were con- Experience. tractually required to make $2 million features between their $200 million features. changing of Grey’s acting gears, and for much of the True, there’s a gimmicky side to Soderbergh at movie even those famously lifeless eyes are hidden his most experimental. Much has been made of his behind sunglasses. The Girlfriend Experience is less decision to cast actress Sasha Grey in the lead role of a plotted story than a series of encounters—transachis most recent feature, The Girlfriend Experience, tions is the better word—mostly between Grey’s about a pricey Manhattan call girl. Though barely of character and men who want things from her. Some drinking age, Grey is a prolific porn star who can guys want to get down, others just want to complain claim 165 triple-X videos in her three-year career— about their stock portfolios (The Girlfriend and now the lead role in a Steven Soderbergh movie. Experience is radioactively 2008 in its tanking-econIn Grey’s filmography, The Girlfriend Experience omy, pre-election jitters) or discuss Man on Wire. They all pay the same rate, and Grey’s call girl rests uneasily atop a writhing flesh-pile of, erm, entries like Hairy Movie and Apprentass 10, to name maintains her cool distance from johns, journos and lecherous bloggers throughout. She’s like a Godard just two of the more cleverly titled. Most of Grey’s titles—like the movies them- girl. The Girlfriend Experience, in fact, has many selves, presumably—leave nothing to the imagina- trappings of a Godard movie—the shrugging nontion; the scope of activity described in them makes it chalance, the bleeding-fresh politics, the non-actjust possible, without having seen any of them, to ing—and bears a strong resemblance to Vivre sa Vie, countenance one critic’s observation that Grey’s the old lefty’s 1962 film en douze tableaux about a career has heretofore been “distinguished both by Parisian woman’s descent into prostitution. (Is it the extremity of what she is willing to do and an always a descent? Would we describe Grey’s foray unusual degree of intellectual seriousness about into pornography a descent when after just three doing it.” I learned about Grey’s porn history only years she has established herself as a rich and savvy accidentally, in conversation, before seeing the businesswoman who now runs her own production movie; viewers more familiar with her oeuvre have company?) If Grey returned to strictly adult fare, or better pointed out in various online forums that some certain thespian trademarks have survived the leap to yet retired altogether, her performance in The the big screen intact, notably an unchanging look in Girlfriend Experience would be legendarily enigher eyes, described by even her keenest fans as matic. As it stands, it’s just intriguing—is she just that good at playing flat and affectless, or is she real“dead” and “lifeless.” One struggles to picture this placidity in Anal ly that flat and affectless? Even as Soderbergh pubCavity Search 6, but in The Girlfriend Experience it’s licly discusses his retirement (running out of ideas, just the ticket. Grey’s acting is flat and utterly without he says), Grey will be clearly sticking around—in the affect throughout the movie, which incidentally has cineplex or the art house or the grindhouse, it no sex at all. As mentioned, the actress plays a high- remains to be seen. end prostitute who, for $2,000 an hour, provides The Girlfriend Experience opens at the optional sex with the kind of trimmings prostitutes Wilma Theatre Friday, June 26. don’t ordinarily go in for: kissing, discussions of the arts@missoulanews.com current cinema, long leisurely breakfasts the next

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 June 25–July 2, 2009


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

OPENING THIS WEEK The Girlfriend Experience Adult film actress Sasha Grey makes her mainstream movie debut as an upscale prostitute who goes the extra mile with her clients to provide them with companionship rather than just physical pleasure. The movie, shot in cinéma vérité style, is a snapshot of her life and the ups and downs therein. Rated R. Showing at the Wilma at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. My Sister’s Keeper Cameron Diaz and Jason Patric play parents who have to make a life or death decision about one of their two children. This decision ultimately ends up in court, as one of their daughters fights to become medically emancipated from her parents. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 starting June 26 at 7:10 and 9:45 with matinees at 1:45 and 4:20. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 PM and no 9:10 showing on Sun. Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs This 3D-animated children’s comedy, the second installment in the Ice Age series, follows Manny and his friends as they navigate life through such adult-oriented topics as falling in love and starting a family. Voiceovers include cameos by Queen Latifah and Denis Leary. Rated PG. Showing at the Showboat Cinema in Polson starting July 1 at 4, 7 and 9. Also showing at the Mountain Cinema in Whitefish starting July 1 at 4, 7, and 9.

the super-slow Sleestaks and everybody’s favorite chimp-boy buddy, Chaka. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:20, 7:45 and 10:10, with matinees at 12:30 and 2:55. Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian The first film shot inside Washington, D.C.’s Smithsonian Institution, this flick reunites hapless security guard Ben Stiller with reanimated figures from history, as well as a few new faces. Rated PG13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7:15 and 9:40, with matinees at 1:45 and 4:30, and at the Village 6 at 7:15 and 9:40, with matinees at 1:45 and 4:30. Star Trek Young dynamic duo James Kirk and Mr. Spock take the U.S.S. Enterprise and her crew out for their maiden voyage, as director J.J. Abrams (“Lost”) boldly goes where no one’s gone before in remaking the 1979 film based on the ‘60s TV series. Rated PG-13.

forces of the Decepticons in this sequel to 2007’s fast-moving blurfest that thankfully also features Megan Fox. Oh, and Shia LaBeouf’s in it as well. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7, 8, 10:15 and 11:15 with matinees at 12:30, 1:30, 3:45 and 4:45. Also playing at the Village 6 at 7 and 10:15, with matinees at 12:30 and 3:45. Also playing at the Pharoahplex in Hamilton at 6:35 and 9:15 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 PM and no 9 show on Sun. Up 3D Aging balloon salesman Carl Fredricksen takes his house on a helium-powered expedition to South America, only to discover he’s got a stowaway Cub Scout equivalent on board. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:05, 7:30 and 9:55 with matinees at 12:15 and 2:40. Also playing, but in 2D, at

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:20 and 9:45. The Proposal Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25 and 9:55. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Star Trek Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:20, 3:50, 6:45 and 9:30. The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:15, 3:55, 6:50 and 9:15. Terminator Salvation Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:20 and 7:05.

NOW PLAYING Angels & Demons Tom Hanks is back as crack symbologist Robert Langdon—the one who broke The Da Vinci Code—and now he’s caught between the Catholic Church, the Illuminati, a sexy co-star (Ayelet Zurer) and Ewan McGregor, who can’t use the Force this time. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 through June 30 at 7 with a matinee at 1. Drag Me to Hell Alison Lohman is a bank loan officer who denies a mysterious old woman a home loan extension, which leads to foreclosure. Which leads to the mysterious old woman placing a curse on poor Alison. Which leads to her seeking the help of a psychic to break the curse. One arts editor reports this is actually a good movie, in the vein of Evil Dead 2. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 9:30 with a matinee at 4. Easy Virtue This adaptation of the Noel Coward play—set in 1929, so period piece lovers rejoice—features Colin Firth and Jessica Biel telling the tale of a difficult home visit for the son of an uptight British family and his new, racecar-driving American wife. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. The Hangover Four gentlemen on a Las Vegas bachelor party expedition scramble to answer the morning-after question, “What happened?” and get the groom back to L.A. in time for some nuptials. Sick lyrical cameo by Mike Tyson. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:30, 7:50 and 10:15, with matinees at 12:40 and 3:05. Also showing at the Village 6 at 5:30, 7:50 and 10:15, with matinees at 12:40 and 3:05. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Imagine That Eddie Murphy’s a busy financial executive who discovers there’s more to life than your damn Blackberry when his troubled career receives a boost from his 7-year-old daughter’s wild imagination. Rated PG. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 with matinees at 1. Land of the Lost Will Ferrell stars as a scientist on the fringe in this remake of the classic TV show, in which three modern humans are sucked into a wormhole and deposited in a prehistory populated by dinosaurs,

Missoula Independent

“You mean to tell me that I’ll have to pay for college, with pell grants?” My Sister’s Keeper opens Friday at the Village 6.

Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:50, with matinees at 1:20 and 4:10 and at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:50, with matinees at 1:20 and 4:10. The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 It’s definitely remake season: John Travolta hijacks a New York City subway train, and lowly dispatcher Denzel Washington is sucked into the action in this summertime fare that’s oh-so-easy on the brain. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7:15 and 9:40, with matinees at 1:45 and 4:30. The Proposal Sandra Bullock is Ryan Reynolds’ ball-busting boss, whose response to possible deportation—she’s Canadian, okay?—is to order the hapless chap to marry her. Then they have to play it off in front of his folks. Anybody see the train coming at us through the tunnel? Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:40, with matinees at 1 and 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Terminator Salvation It’s 2018, Skynet has unleashed its Terminator robots upon humanity and John Connor (Christian Bale) must decide whether to trust a really sketchy guy in this fourth installment of the franchise, which is easily the third best so far... Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 10 with a matinee at 4. Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Autobots wage their battle to destroy the evil

Page 34 June 25–July 2, 2009

the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Year One Jack Black and Michael Cera are lazy hunter-gatherers whose exile from the village leads to humanity’s primordial road trip in this Harold Ramis joint. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 7:15 and 9:30 with matinees at 1:15 and 4:15. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Wed., Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun.

FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES The Hangover Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:35, 4:35, 7:30 and 9:50. Also playing at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 7:15 and 9:15. Also showing at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 7:15 and 9:15. Land of the Lost Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 4:05 and 9:40. My Sister’s Keeper Showing Fri.-Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:25, 4:30, 7:10 and 9:50. Also playing at the Entertainer Cinema in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:15. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with matinees Wed., Sat., and Sun. at 3. Also playing at the Mountain Cinema in Whitefish at 4, 7:05 and 9:15 with Fri.—Sun. matinees at 1:30 until July 1-2, when the movie plays at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30.

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6:30, 7, 8:15, 9:45 and 10:15. Also showing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 1, 3:45, 6:45 and 9:45 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Up 3D Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at noon, 12:30, 2:20, 2:50, 4:40, 5:10, 7, 7:30, 9:20 and 9:50. Also playing, yet in regular old 2D and ending Tue., at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Year One Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:15 and 9:30. Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., June 26. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; Wilma— 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton—961FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton—363-5141. S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l — 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Amy Alkon

PERSONALS Ready to meet great new people?

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Free Ads: Free ads placed in this section are not guaranteed- to run every week. Be sure to renew your ad frequently to keep it fresh. Guidelines: Personals are for adults 18 or over seeking monogamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carefully screen all responses and have first meetings occur in a public place. This publication reserves the right to edit, revise, or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content of or replies to any ad. Not all ads have corresponding voice messages. To review our complete guidelines, call (617) 425-2636



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0623

Can you help a nice guy become a bad boy? Being nice is a curse, and not just with women. I do volunteer work, and always hear stuff like “You’re the only one we can trust, so stay and guard the door while we’re at a party with people we don’t trust. Clean up for us, too, because we won’t want to when we return tired and drunk.” I know a cooperative spirit can be mistaken for weakness, but I feel like Cinderfella. Still, I don’t want to stop being the guy my ex called “the brick” (because I’m always propping somebody or something up). I just want people to think I’m bad so they won’t try to get away with so much. When I’ve tried acting like a bad boy, I’m told I come off angry or antisocial. Maybe I should start smoking or get a motorcycle…maybe a tattoo? —55 Years Of Too Nice Sure, all you need to change everybody’s opinion of you is a smoking habit and big scary tattoo—and since you’re always mopping up after people, perhaps a skull crossed with a couple of Swiffers? You call yourself a nice guy, but you’re really a “nice guy,” an approvalseeking, conflict-avoiding suckup. In “No More Mr. Nice Guy,” Dr. Robert Glover clarifies the difference. The “nice guy” might seem generous, but he actually isn’t; he gives to get. He thinks he just has to hide how flawed he is and become what others want him to be, and he’ll be loved, get his needs met, and have a problem-free life. This is unlikely to happen, as he’s passive-aggressive, chronically dishonest, and brimming with “toxic shame.” Thanks to a lifetime repressing his feelings and denying his needs, he’s filled with rage, especially at women. Women, on the other hand, do love this guy—to wash and wax their cars while they’re on dates with guys they are sleeping with. And whaddya know, all it takes is calling him “the brick” instead of “a tool.” Yes, the bad boy does have allure. He’s masculinity on steroids: arrogantly confident, aggressive in bed and out, unpredictable and untamed. He’s fast cars, alcohol, tobacco, and firearms. And he’s sometimes in jail for using the latter to hold up the 7Eleven. Many women are drawn to him, but those who have it the least bit together hold out for a guy they can get conjugal with without first being cavity-searched by the guards. You’re right to want to change, but the answer isn’t trading in your wallet for one you chain to your pants and

slouching in a doorway with a cigarette hanging out of your mouth. People will warm to the real you or they won’t, but they’re unlikely to be fooled by the fake you, “nice” or “bad.” After 55 years of people-pleasing, don’t be surprised if you need to mount an archeological dig to figure out who you really are—what you like, want, need, and actually care about (even stuff that seems not so nice to care about). After you do, work on accepting yourself, faults included. Glover’s book should help. Finally, be who you are, and have the guts and the selfrespect to expect a thing or two from people—beyond what time they’ll return from the party so you can stop staring at the door.

Chasing Tale I’m supposedly jealous and insecure because I don’t want to hear about my girlfriend’s former lovers. I’ll discuss issues that carry over, but detailing past sexual experiences “to know each other better,” as she puts it, seems unnecessary and ill-advised. When, against my better judgment, we shared our number of sex partners, I had far more, which disturbed her. She initially lied about her number, upping it after hearing mine. —Insecure Or Discreet? The truth is everything to her, and oh, she’s sorry…about that number she gave you…multiply that by three, carry the two (the Vegas guys she forgot about), and do you have a graphing calculator she can borrow? She’s actually revealed more about herself by redoing her math after hearing your count than she would’ve by giving you the specifics on Sex Partner No. 12. And yes, insecurity probably is at root here—hers, not yours. It isn’t a character flaw to want to experience a person firsthand, uninterrupted by a loop of mental images of their sex with their exes. It’s perfectly okay to say, “I’m not gonna talk about it and I’m not gonna talk about not talking about it.” She needs to respect that, and get to know who you are instead of who you did last summer. That’s her business only if there’s some ongoing issue—the kind you send off on a swab so lab technicians can see if there’s anything doing the backstroke on a slide. Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r A v e , # 2 8 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Page 35 June 25–July 2, 2009


Scope Nose Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

PERSONALS

Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have a subconscious urge to escape the constraints of your customary behavior? Have you ever wished you could be someone else for a while? If so, this is your lucky week, Taurus. The cosmos is granting you a temporary exemption from acting and feeling like your same old self. From now until July 2, you have permission to walk like, talk like, think like, and even make love like a Pisces or Virgo or Gemini— or any sign, for that matter, except Scorpio or Aquarius. You might enjoy checking out my horoscopes for the other signs, and following the advice that sounds most fun. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s Fete Your Feet Week, Gemini. Your soles definitely need more attention, pampering, and contact with nature. (So does your soul, and hopefully that will happen as you carry out the more literal assignment.) So abstain from wearing your shoes and socks at every opportunity. Get as much contact as possible between your naked feet and the naked earth. Even walking unshod on floors and pavements could prove helpful. Foot massages are advisable, as well as pedicures, henna tattoos, and foot baths. Try praying with your feet instead of your hands, and see if you can get someone to kiss and adore you down there.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): “His heart was growing full of broken wings and artificial flowers,” wrote poet Federico Garcia Lorca. “In his mouth, just one small word was left.” There were times during the first half of June when I was tempted to borrow those words to describe you, Cancerian. Now, thankfully, you’re moving into a much brighter phase. The buds that are about to bloom in your heart are very much alive, not artificial, and your wings, while not fully restored to strength, are healing. Meanwhile, your mouth is even now being replenished with a fresh supply of many vivid words.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What scares you or perturbs you in the coming week could, by August, become what fuels you. What makes you feel unsettled and out of sorts could turn out to be good medicine. But of course you’re under no obligation to submit yourself to this experimental sequence, Leo. The fact is, you could probably run away from the discomfort and get immediate relief. Unfortunately, taking that approach would deprive you of the benefits that will almost certainly come from enduring the discomfort for a while. My preference is that you be brave and far-seeing.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s a better than even chance that you’re about to embark on a Summer of Love. To improve your odds even more, meditate on the following questions. 1. What qualities do you look for in a lover that you would benefit from developing more fully in yourself? 2. What do you think are your two biggest delusions about the way love works? 3. Is there anything you can do to make yourself more lovable? 4. Is there anything you can do to be more loving? 5. Are you willing to deal with the fact that any intimate relationship worth pursuing will inevitably evoke the most negative aspects of both partners—and require both partners to heal their oldest wounds?



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You are entering a phase when you’ll have more power than usual to influence people. Your charisma will be waxing and the light in your eyes will be growing more intense, making it more likely that your point of view will be heard and appreciated. Your powers of persuasion will be increasing, as well, and you’ll have extra understanding about how to motivate people and get them to work together effectively. So let me ask you the most important question: What exactly do you want to accomplish with your enhanced clout?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Congratulations, Scorpio. You’ve reached the end of the Big Squeeze. You’ve served your time in the bottleneck. And so I invite you to relax your pinched expression, loosen up your puckered expectations, and let the Season of Experiments begin. According to my projections, you will soon be receiving a host of invitations to wander into the frontier with your raw sense of wonder turned up all the way. Please research each invitation thoroughly before choosing. When you’ve decided which adventures are most likely to enhance your understanding of the art of liberation, dive in.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A guy I barely know critiqued me at a party recently. “You haven’t suffered enough to feel intense passion,” he said. “Your life has been too happy, too easy.” I didn’t want to get into a debate about whether my life has been too happy and easy, so in my reply I didn’t mention my divorce or the time I was shot or the grueling poverty I endured for 18 years. “So you’re saying,” I told him, “that suffering is the only way you can acquire passion? I don’t agree. Have you ever raised a child? Have you ever been in love with someone who incited you to make radical changes in your life? Have you ever worked on a creation for many years and then submitted it to be judged by thousands of people? I have.” I’m letting you know about this, Sagittarius, because I predict you’ll soon be offered an experience like those I named— adventures that have the potential to build intense passion without requiring you to suffer.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows,” said journalist Sydney J. Harris. That would be an excellent motto for you to live by in the coming weeks, Capricorn. Whether or not you’re enrolled in school, you’re in a phase when your capacity for attracting learning experiences is at a peak. To take maximum advantage of the cosmic tendencies, all you have to do is cultivate a hungry curiosity for fresh teachings and life lessons—especially those that shift you away from gazing at your own reflection and toward peering out at the mysteries of the world.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s a preview of the accomplishments I expect you to complete in the next four weeks. Number of karmic debts paid off and canceled: 1. Number of bad habits replaced with good habits: 2. Number of holes blasted in your theory about why you can’t do more of what you love to do: 300. Number of “necessities” lost that turn out not to be necessities: 1. Number of psychic wounds successfully medicated: 1. Number of confusing messes that evolve into interesting opportunities: 2. Number of romantic obstructions eliminated: 1 and a half.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A delicious forbidden fruit will be more available than usual in the coming weeks. You can choose to ignore it, of course. You can pretend it’s not even there and instead concentrate on the less forbidden fruits that are tasty enough. Or, on the other hand, you can sidle up closer to the forbidden fruit and engage in some discreet explorations, testing subtly to see whether it’s any healthier for your sanity than it used to be. I’m not sure what the best decision is, Pisces, but I do suggest this: Don’t just rip off all your defenses, forget all your commitments, and start heedlessly taking big bites out of the forbidden fruit. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 36 June 25–July 2, 2009

Ready to meet great new people?

IMPORTANT NUMBERS: Answer an ad:



UNUSUAL SWM, 43, straight, privately submissive, desires female top for friendship, fun, possible long-term relationship. 313521

Call 1-900-226-1232 It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,



or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a majorcredit or debit card

LET’S HAVE SOME FUN Fit SWM, early 40s, looking for discreet encounters with ladies, 40-55. Please be slim. Married ladies are welcome. Will answer all replies. 291122



OPEN-MINDED FUN SWM, 52, 5’9’’, 190lbs, brown/blue, clean-cut, fit, D/D-free, easygoing, laidback, not into games, seeks SM, 18-55, for adult fun. 296853

Place your own ad:



Call 1-800-710-8737 Answer some simple questions to create your ad MEN SEEKING SENSE OF HUMOR SWM, 44, 6’2’’, looking for outgoing SWF, 30-50, light drinker ok, who enjoys sports, outdoors, animals, kids, camping, fishing. 291953

WAITING FOR YOUR CALL GWM, 25, 6’1’’, 235lbs, seeks outgoing, gregarious, stable GWM for dating and romance. I enjoy movies, dining, bowling. 305105





FRIENDS

DO YOU CANOE? SWM, 50, athletic, N/S, N/D, seeks SWF, 30-50, for canoeing, fly-fishing, camping. Let’s meet! 292008

SEEKING FRIENDS Female, 44, looking for friends, age open, who enjoys the outdoors, wildlife, the country scenery, hiking, fishing, camping. Friendship, companionship, and getting to know each other! 307262

LET’S GIVE IT A TRY! SM, 62, N/S, slim build, likes fishing, lounging around at home. Looking for SM, age open. 292992





LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, 47, 5’9’’, 175lbs, hard-working, non-smoker, non-drinker, loves the outdoors. Looking for SF, 35-50, for friendship, dating and more. 294605



SPRING IS ALMOST HERE SWM, 26, 155lbs, 5’8’’, hazel eyes, looking for someone who likes the outdoors, hiking, camping, fishing, and has a nerdy side. Seeking a stable, dramafree LTR with the right person. Can’t wait to hear from you. 309362



LOOKING FOR YOU SM, 30’s, clean-cut, easygoing guy seeks companion, friend, hopefully long-term. Family-oriented and likes outdoor activities. How about you? 269315



FUN & OUTGOING SM loves to go on walks, enjoys spending time outdoors, likes fishing, camping. Looking for SWF, same interests, for friendship and possibly more. 277330



LOOKING FOR LOVE I just turned 35. I’m fairly athletic. Not much dating background. I’m sort of a loner. I just think that it is time to share my life with someone. 292623



LET’S GIVE IT A SHOT SWM, 52, 5’8’’, N/S, athletic build, loves spicy food, boating, waterskiing, hunting, fishing, camping. Seeking SWF, 3552, for friendship or more. 281682

SHOW ME THE ROPES Clean, discreet, fun-loving, laid-back curious male, 30, 5’8’’, enjoys dining, relaxing at home, partying. Seeking open-minded, fun Bi/GM to show me the ropes! 310170



LET’S TALK WM, 5’6”, 125lbs, reddish-brown/blue, nice tattoos, enjoys hiking, walks, bike rides, theater, dining out, time with friends and family, more. Seeking someone for friendship. 299138

LET’S GET TOGETHER SM, very oral and loves to receive, would love to meet singles and couples, males and females. ALso into toys and whatever else you would like. 307658



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OTHER WANT SOMETHING NEW WM want to try anything new and is game for something different. If interested, give me a call. 282388

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JOIN US Bi couple, middle-aged, into pretty much anything, looking for the same, or select singles, who would like to share life’s pleasures with us. 291876

with purchase over $50





JUST FOR FUN Male looking for a female to get together and have some fun with. Not interested in a relationship. 281153



HI LADIES! Attractive male in search of no-strings, discreet afternoon fun. Are you up for it? 281777

1733 South Ave. W.

728-5754

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10am-Midnight Mon-Sat Closed on Sundays





SEEKING DIVERSITY SWM, 43, intelligent, attractive, welltraveled, fit, clean-cut, blond/blue, successful, seeking slender, attractive A/B/ BF, 30-45, for dining, travel, cooking, intelligent conversation. 281407



HARDWORKING Native American male, 48, 5’9”, 160lbs, brown/brown, medium build, works out, likes the park, biking, fishing, horseback riding, more. Seeking female, 25-48, for dating. 282438



CONSTRUCTION WORKER SWM, 44, 5’10’’, 200lbs, seeks funloving woman who enjoys interesting conversation, needs a little excitement in her life! 282735



NEWS FLASH! Attractive, single Native American guy, early 40s, seeks adventurous Native American beauty, 25-40, for love, harmony, honesty, balance and much more, if fate leads us that way. 282900



*charges may apply

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Reality TV personality Spencer Pratt used to be skeptical about the power of prayer. But his wife Heidi, herself a devout believer, urged him to keep his mind open. Then, as an experiment, Spencer asked God to help him and Heidi get a double date with teen pop star Miley Cyrus and her boyfriend, despite the fact that neither of them even knew Cyrus. Apparently God heard and responded, because not too long after that, the hoped-for double date did indeed come to pass. I’m telling you this, Aries, because I think you’re entering a phase when you, like Pratt, will have extra luck in making idiosyncratic wishes come true. If I were you, though, I’d focus on more profound idiosyncratic wishes than the kind Pratt pined for.

OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST SWM, 42, 5’10’’, 165lbs, fit, active professional, N/S, N/D, seeking SWF, 25-39, who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking, fly fishing and traveling, for friendship or more. 285175



LET’S TALK WM, N/S, N/D, looking for female, 3542, for companionship that may possibly lead to a relationship. Someone who likes bowling, playing pool and more. 284641



SEEKING NICE PERSON SWM, 20, 6’3”, 200lbs, blond/green, in shape, looking for a WF, 18-30, to hang out and have fun with, maybe leading to more. 288398



LET’S TALK American-Indian SM, 45, 5’3’’, 190lbs, likes long walks, wishing on stars. Looking for SF, 35-40, for friendship or more. 289174



LOOKING FOR LOVE SWM, 18, 6’, short black hair, wears glasses, looking for SM, 18-21, to hang out with and get to know. 294712



LET’S TALK SWM, 48, 6’, clean-shaven, independent contractor, seeks SM, 25-60, to spend some time together. Let’s talk! 292718



WANT TO TRY WM, 6’1”, 145lbs, brown/brown, wants to get together with a smooth man for some no-strings fun. A plus if you go both ways. 283737



866.399.5979

18+

0623


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

Lost & Found

Announcements

Volunteers

Employment

Employment

The Multi Item Store LLC

Bright Beginnings Daycare ——Now Enrolling ages 6 weeks-12 years—- Licensed facility Call 493-6397

Dry bag full of wet stuff Found along river near Missoula. Call to identify. 549-2248

PROFESSIONAL

Announcements

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484

“Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more inform“Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm-8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more information: dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com 406-225-8504

Fireworks Hotline Volunteers Needed! The 9-1-1 Call Center needs volunteers to take calls on the Fireworks Hotline over the July 4th weekend. Training provided. Good telephone skills, some computer skills and ability to work with the public needed. Shifts are 4 or 8 hours long from 12 a.m. July 3 through midnight, July 5. Call Helen at 728-7682 for more information.

#2975704 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800-475-0876

Seniors for Seniors Adoption Program. The Humane Society of Northwest Montana “Seniors for Seniors” Adoption Program. Beginning June 30th, the adoption fee for all senior pets, age 7 or older, who are adopted by senior adopters, age 55 or older, will be reduced to $25 each. The Charlotte Edkins Animal Adoption Center is located at 3499 Hwy 93 N in Kalispell and is open Tuesday – Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Call (406) 752-7297 (PAWS) for more information.

STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

Help Wanted New women’s specific apparel and outdoor gear store opening Mid Summer. We are accepting resumes for Manager, assistant Managers, full time sales and part time sales positions. If you love the outdoors and have experience in gear and apparel sales for women and want to join our team.

1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Saturday September 12th at Caras Park. Need vendors & volunteers. Go to

missoulahempfest.com to sign up or contact us to volunteer.

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-5832 1 0 1 . www.continentalacademy.com THE GREEN ECO SHOW. www.greenecoshow.com August 22-23, 9-5. Missoula Fairgrounds. Fashion Show, Music, Speakers, Organic Food. Sponsor: Herman’s Eco Inc. Anna 846-1252

Get a clue! 543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

The Historical Museum at Fort Missoula is seeking memories, photos, artifacts, etc. from the 1910 “Big Burn” for an exhibit opening in March 2010. Call 728-3476.

Honeymoon Plans? "FREE" Website Honeymoon Gift Registry honeymoontoparadise.com

Lindy Plakke 406-239-1410

Bright Beginnings Daycare ***Open House from 35pm June 24*** 2223 S. Third St. West (yellow house) Cat Adoption Special. In honor of our four-legged felines and Cat Adoption Month, the Humane Society of Northwest Montana is reducing adoption fees and hosting a “Cat Adoption Special” beginning Tuesday, June 23 – Saturday, June 27, 2009. The adoption center will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day and the public is invited to stop in and find your purr-fect friend. The Humane Society is located at 3499 Hwy 93 N in Kalispell. During the Cat Adoption Special, adult cat adoption fees will be reduced to $35 and include vaccinations, de-wormer, spay or neuter surgery, microchip identification and a free vet exam. All proceeds from this event will help care for the homeless animals at the Charlotte Edkins Animal Adoption Center. Call (406) 7527297 (PAWS) for more informationation: dianne.getbetternow @gmail.com 406-225-8504

Pet of the Week

The major theme of the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is The Environmental Protection Agencies’ (EPA) consumer awareness/rightto-know Consumer Confidence Report (CCR). This rule requires all community water systems (CWS) to provide drinking water quality reports to their customers. The following CWSs are required to give public notice as to the methods of obtaining a copy of the CCR. Crisp Water Testing & Treatment, Inc. of Missoula has made available copies of these systems’ CCRs. To obtain a copy of your CCR report, write to: Crisp Water Testing & Treatment, Inc. PO Box 2525, Missoula, MT 59806-2525. Amity HOA #3710. Big Pines Trailer Ct. #0450. Bitterroot Gateway #0443. Blue Mountain Tr. Ct. #0381 Branco Court #4568. Buena Vista #0378. Carol’s Court #0451. Catrina Water Company #2540. Valley Homes Addition #4592. Country Side Court #0376. ECO #0870. Forest Lounge & Apts. #0840. Frenchtown Valley View #0404. Futura Park #0374. Hollywood Trailer Ct. #0454. Meadowbrook Park #4530. Missoula Village West #3012. Mobile City Trailer Ct. #0646. Montana Trailer Court #3215. Trestle Creek I & II #4423. North Davis Duplexes #2121. Outpost Camp Ground #0836. East Frenchtown Water Dist. #4516. River Road Trailer Court #0369. Ryan’s Court #4368. Shelby Subdivision #2800. Sorrel Springs HOA #0518. Spring Meadows #3630. Sunset Pines #2538

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Accidents & Personal Injury Over 17 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Eli has come along way since he was found wandering the streets with a note taped to his collar. Thanks to a brief jaunt with a fabulous foster family, we know that for a dog, Eli is as perfect as they come. He sticks right to your side, on or off leash, and he likes all dogs even pesky puppies. He has already mastered all your usual commands and is eager to learn more. He even likes kids! How could you say no? Come to the Humane Society, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. to visit Eli, or call us @ 549-HSWM.

Employment ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 GROUP SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR, F/T, Greenough, MT. A luxury resort located approximately 35 miles from Missoula is looking for a GROUP SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR. Experience in catering or hotels is preferred. #2975695 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HOUSE DIRECTOR-DELTA GAMMA SORORITY, MISSOULA. House Director works school year w/University breaks. Oversees basic facility maintenance, cook and several employees. Acts as official hostess. Room/board (small, private 1st floor apartment)/salary provided. Accepting applications now. Contact Lisa for application materials @ (406)546-6002. Experience working with students a plus, but not required

We are seeking an experienced Senior Web Developer who can work comfortably in a fast paced environment. This position will be involved in full life-cycle development of web applications written in VB.NET/ASP.NET or classic ASP using SQL Server, Transact-SQL, and stored procedures. Strong .Net Framework experience and database design skills a must. Strong HTML/CSS skills desired. Successful candidate must be a fast learner who is self-motivated and willing to tackle any task assigned. The position is available immediately in our Missoula, Montana office.

LAUNDRY WORKER, P/T, Msla. Missoula hotel is seeking a dependable part-time worker for LAUNDRY. #2975719 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

include the following. Other duties may be assigned.

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186

* Technical lead for web development projects including information architecture, code creation and testing. * Full life-cycle development of web-based applications and websites.

SECURITY OFFICER, F/T, Msla. Seeking a full-time SECURITY. FULL JOB DESCRIPTION AVAILABLE.

SUMMER JOBS with

Programming Jobs at InterTech USA

MontPIRG • $8-$13/Hour

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

Qualifications: * HS Diploma or equivalent required; B.S. Computer Science or equivalent experience preferred. * Solid experience using Adobe ColdFusion and Adobe Flex. * Familiarity with web production issues including browser and platform compatibility, size and speed issues.

• Fix America's Health Care • Work With Great People • Make a Difference Work with MontPIRG to pass President Obama's health care reform Career opportunities & benefits available Call 214-3052 and ask for Pat

For a full job description and qualifications log on to: http://www.intertech-usa.com/about_us/jobs.asp 6070 Industrial Road Missoula, MT 59808

Pl a c e yo u r c l a s s i f i e d a d . Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 37 June 25–July 2, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Instruction

Please send resume to PO BOX 7788 Missoula MT 59807.

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Occupational Safety & Health Specialist (4 openings). 66204616 & 66204621 - covers central MT Helena/Great Falls. 66204644 covers NW MT hi-line area Kalispell. 66204639 - covers WS MT area - Missoula. $37,490$49,329/yr. MT Dept of Labor & Industry, Employment Relations Division, Safety Bureau. Requires education or experience equivalent to 5 years in occupational health & safety, chemistry, physics, biological science, industrial health, or other related field of study or work. For complete details & application materials, contact MT Job Service, visit http://dli.mt.gov/jobopenings/, email dliapps@mt.gov or phone 444-3710. Deadline for applications is 7/6/09. EEO SEEKING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Experienced in administering grants and managing personnel. Excellent communication, writing and planning skills. For application materials, visit www.hrdc6.org Please no phone calls. EEO

SKILLED LABOR TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/INST RUCTION FIREFIGHTER Paid training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Learn all areas of IT. Great pay and benefits, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. No exp needed. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 U.S. NAVY Launch a career today. Advanced paid training, medical/dental, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 WAREHOUSING TRAINEE Good pay, regular raises, great benefits, $ for school, vacation. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289

OPPORTUNTIES

TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

Summer Enlightenment

Piano Lessons

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220

Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center! Warehouse Mall: 725 W. Alder, Suite 27. Regular Rates: $55/hr, $75/1.5hr, Students: $35/hr, $55/1.5hr. Erica: 396-6868, Souta: 207-6269, Mary: 5965842. Come see our local store and Art Gallery! Open M-F 10-7, weekends by appointment, and First Fridays 5-10pm.

PARADIGM REIKI Theta & Laser Reiki sessions $40. Offering Fall Laser Reiki instruction. For info: 549-0289

Amy Holmlund, Certified Massage Therapist Now taking appointments at the Hickory Street Chiropractic Clinic. Discount sessions through August 1st. 406.459.7475 Barefoot deep tissue. Deep compression massage great for relieving neck, shoulder and back pain. 4 0 6 - 3 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com

Ages 8-Adult Beginner-Intermediate

Laura- 250-0228

BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Text your appointment while driving

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

TODAY!

Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629

T'ai Chi

Michelle @ 406-270-3230

COSMETIC TATTOOING

728-0918 missoulataichi.com

549-0777

Eye Brows, Eye Liner, Lip Color, Medical Repigmentation 17 yrs exp

Beauty with benefits! Unique opportunity for motivated individual. Be your own boss sharing superior cosmetics, skin care and health care products with others. Generous compensation. No experience necessary. Exceptional support and training. Cosmetologists, estheticians, and salons welcome. www.Montana.MyArbonne.com or 406.207.7366. MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED. Earn $150 to $300 Per Day. All Looks, Types and Ages. Feature Films, Television, Commercials, and Print. No Experience Necessary. 1-800340-8404 x2001

Shear

The Goods

Art Salon 1804 North Ave

$10 off

A Touch of Class

exp 7/1/09

Call 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

NEW TO YOU Antiques & Treasures 11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

370-3705 www.permanentmakeup.org

Congregations

2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

Reiki Certificates Available 360-9153 Body/Mind/ Spirit

Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Antiques

IV Micronutrient Therapy

Antiques

Dr. Christine White, ND

542-2147 www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT

I spy... Missoula!

$600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5. ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068

MSW, CHT, GIS

COLLECTIBLE ESTATE AUCTION (2) Days. Friday, July 10, 2009, 5:30-9:00pm. Saturday, July 11, 2009, 9:00am. Sidney, MT Richland Youth Hockey Bldg, 601 Seventh Ave. SW. For more information: Annette 406-449-6306. A more complete list @ r-kauction.com

D r. K u r t S o l a r i

REIKI INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE, LLC

Body/Mind/ Spirit

728-5693 • Mar y Place

Music

Member NCTA, AAM, PCIA, & SPCP

Professional Services Only

Reiki promotes your body's natural ability to heal itself. Reiki is a series of hand positions which gently applies energy from head to feet. It is effective for the physical, emotional, mental & spiritual

CALL FOR MORE INFO

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Waxing • Facials

Massage $60/hr

Hypnosis & Imager y

Auction

Adoption

De'Ette Balfourd (Before it’s too late)

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Where am I? Affordable • Quality • Personal

We make it personal

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications Call for appointment 541- 8092 742 Kensington (intersection of Kensington & Bow)

• Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

541-8090 We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com Missoula Independent Page 38 June 25–July 2, 2009

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a $15 gift certificate to:

Carlo's One Night Stand

109 S. 3rd W. Missoula Hip Strip 543-6350 Do you wear clothes?

Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy


CLASSIFIEDS Sporting Goods 08 Kona Zing Road Bike Like new, extremely LOW mileage. Excellent road and competition bike. Carbon fork, 53 cm. $1050 O.B.O. Call Gwen @ 258-6091

HIKING, BIKING, CAMPING AND BOATING Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments

Furniture Like new, white crib, bassinet, changing table. Jenny Lind brand. $225. 372-5665 SAY HELLO TO

MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. 2935 Stockyard Rd. Unit K2 406.542.1202

111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

Clothing Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington

Assorted Dry Suits & Tops

(next to Baskin Robbins)

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

20% off Electronics DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214 Brand New Laptops & Desktops. Bad Credit, No Credit – No Problem Small Weekly Payments - Order Today and get FREE Nintendo WII game system! Call Now – 800-840-5439 GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800803-8819 GET A NEW COMPUTER! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. CALL NOW 1-800-8162232 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 5438287.

Music Outlaw Music Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

Computers

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 7285014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com FOR HIRE: Your very own 5-piece blues band. From your backyard get together to corporate blowouts. Horn section extra. Frank N. Furter 406-381-3629

Garage Sale HUGE MOVING SALE! All sorts of items. 2900 Highwood Drive off Gharrett. 6/26-6/27. 8:00 a.m. onward

Pets & Animals

LDR Kennel

Furniture

African Carvings & Island Art The Multi Item Store 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

Public Notices MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

INVITATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED BY MISSOULA COUNTYAT THE OFFICE OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY AUDITOR, ATTN: BARBARA BERENS, LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 UNTIL 1:30pm LOCAL TIME ON THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009. BIDS WILL BE OPENED IN ROOM 201 OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX AND PUBLICLY READ ALOUD FOR THE FURNISHING OF ALL LABOR, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE FOLLOWING: PARK STRUCTURES, MISSOULA COUNTY PARKS 3, 4 & 6, MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK, MISSOULA, MT. PARKS 3 AND 6, CENTRAL PARK SOUTH, PARK STRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION WORK TO INCLUDE: CONSTRUCT A SMALL PICNIC PAVILION WITH TABLES AND BENCHES; A SMALL SHELTER WITH BENCH AND TWO FREESTANDING BENCHES. MATERIALS INCLUDE FABRICATED STEEL, CONCRETE AND TIMBER. PARK 4, CENTRAL PARK NORTH, PARK STRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION WORK TO INCLUDE: CONSTRUCT ONE SMALL SHELTER WITH TABLE AND BENCHES AND ONE SMALL SHELTER WITH BENCH. MATERIALS INCLUDE FABRICATED STEEL, CONCRETE AND TIMBER. SEALED BIDS SHALL BE ADDRESSED TO THE BID OFFICER, MISSOULA COUNTY AND ENCLOSED IN SEALED ENVELOPES PLAINLY MARKED ON THE OUTSIDE “PROPOSAL FOR PARKS 3, 4 AND 6, MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK.” THE ENVELOPES SHALL ALSO BE MARKED WITH THE BIDDER’S NAME AND MONTANA CONTRACTOR’S IDENTIFICATION NUMBER. NO BID MAY BE WITHDRAWN AFTER THE SCHEDULED TIME FOR THE PUBLIC OPENING OF BIDS, WHICH IS 1:30 PM., LOCAL TIME JULY 2, 2009. A COMPLETE SET OF THE CONTRACT DOCUMENTS CONSISTING OF DRAWINGS, SPECIFICATIONS, BIDDING DOCUMENTS AND PROJECT MANUAL MAY BE EXAMINED OR OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE OF ROCKING M DESIGN, PC, 101 EAST BROADWAY, STE. 612, MISSOULA, MT 59802. THE REQUIRED DEPOSIT IS $30.00 PER SET, WHICH IS NON-REFUNDABLE. IN ADDITION, THE DRAWINGS AND PROJECT MANUAL MAY ALSO BE EXAMINED AT THE MISSOULA PLANS EXCHANGE, 201 N. RUSSELL, MISSOULA, MT (406) 549-5002. THERE WILL BE A PRE-BID CONFERENCE IN ROOM 201 OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX, LOCATED AT 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT AT 1:30PM ON TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 2009. INTERESTED CONTRACTOR’S ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND. CONTRACTOR AND ANY OF THE CONTRACTOR’S SUBCONTRACTORS DOING WORK ON THIS PROJECT WILL BE REQUIRED TO OBTAIN REGISTRATION WITH THE MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY (DLI). FORMS AND INFORMATION ON REGISTRATION CAN BE OBTAINED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY, P.O. BOX 8011, 1805 PROSPECT, HELENA MONTANA 59604-8011 OR BY CALLING 1406-444-7734. CONTRACTOR IS NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE REGISTERED WITH THE DLI PRIOR TO BIDDING ON THIS PROJECT, BUT MUST HAVE REGISTERED PRIOR TO EXECUTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT. ALL LABORERS AND MECHANICS EMPLOYED BY CONTRACTOR OR SUBCONTRACTORS IN PERFORMANCE OF THE CONSTRUCTION WORK SHALL BE PAID WAGES AT RATES AS MAY BE REQUIRED BY LAW. THE CONTRACTOR MUST ENSURE THAT EMPLOYEES AND APPLICANTS FOR EMPLOYMENT ARE NOT DISCRIMINATED AGAINST BECAUSE OF THEIR RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX OR NATIONAL ORIGIN. EACH BID OR PROPOSAL MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A CASHIER’S CHECK, CERTIFIED CHECK, OR BID BOND PAYABLE TO MISSOULA COUNTY IN THE AMOUNT OF NOT LESS THAN TEN PERCENT (10%) OF THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF THE BID. SUCCESSFUL BIDDERS SHALL FURNISH AN APPROVED PERFORMANCE BOND AND A LABOR AND MATERIALS PAYMENT BOND, EACH IN THE AMOUNT OF ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF THE CONTRACT AMOUNT. INSURANCE AS REQUIRED SHALL BE PROVIDED BY THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER(S) AND A CERTIFICATE(S) OF THAT INSURANCE SHALL BE PROVIDED. MISSOULA COUNTY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO WAIVE INFORMALITIES, TO ACCEPT THE LOWEST RESPONSIVE AND RESPONSIBLE WHICH IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE OWNER, TO REJECT ANY AND ALL PROPOSALS RECEIVED, AND, IF ALL BIDS ARE REJECTED, TO BE ADVERTISED UNDER THE SAME OR NEW SPECIFICATIONS, OR TO MAKE SUCH AN AWARD AS IN THE JUDGMENT OF ITS OFFICIALS BEST MEETS THE COUNTY/ES REQUIREMENTS. THE CONTRACTOR IS REQUIRED TO BE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No: 4 Cause No: DV-09-404 SUMMONS MONTANA HIGHWAY PATROL, Petitioner, vs. Christopher Maurice, Respondent(s) THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT(S). YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Petition for Forfeiture in this

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

action, which is filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer with the Office of the Clerk of Court, located at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, and to serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff Attorney within twenty days after the service on this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Petition for Forfeiture, namely a 2001 GMC Jimmy (VIN 1GKCS13W912210524). Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 16th day of June, 2009 Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust Deputy Clerk

Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Franklin C. Tremper, Timothy R. Tremper, Debra T. Williams, Thomas P. Tremper, Tamara G. Tremper and Teresa K. Tremper, the CoPersonal Representatives, return receipt requested at GEORGE LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 210 North Higgins Avenue, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED June 9, 2009. /s/ Franklin C. Tremper /s/ Timothy R. Tremper /s/ Debra T. Williams /s/ Thomas P. Tremper /s/ Tamara G. Tremper /s/ Teresa K. Tremper Co-Personal Representatives Attorney: GEORGE LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 210 North Higgins Avenue, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802

is now due for the 08/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 24, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $399,508.29. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $376,200.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 1, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19194) 1002.106232-FEI

County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 13, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $114,703.68. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $112,711.71, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 21, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03206) 1002.122668-FEI

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE 2008 DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAX SALE All 2008 delinquent taxes, including penalties, interest and costs, are now a lien upon the real property upon which those taxes were assessed. Unless the delinquent taxes, penalties, interest and costs are paid prior to the time of the Treasurer’s tax sale, the county’s lien will be offered for sale. The Treasurer’s tax sale is scheduled for 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, July 08, 2009 in the County Treasurer’s office, first floor, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W Broadway Missoula, MT 59802. A list of all properties on which 2008 taxes are delinquent will be on file at the time of the sale and open for public inspection during business hours 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Penalties, interest and costs will be added to the delinquent taxes upon payment by the owner or purchaser. Before a tax lien can be purchased for assignment, “Proof of Notice” according to MCA 15-17-323 (5) must be presented at the time of purchase. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer, Missoula County, Montana

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: 1. Boyer Conservation Easement A hearing on a proposal to use $245,000 in Open Space bond funding towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 752 acres of land in the Frenchtown area. The applicant is Joseph W. Boyer Jr., represented by Five Valleys Land Trust. The proposed match is approximately $8.80 for every dollar of open space funding expended. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 8, 2009, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Office of Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-3432; or you may contact Pat O’Herren in Rural Initiatives at 2584981. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION MISSOULA COUNTY LEWIS & CLARK WATER SYSTEM REHABILITATION PROJECT June 9, 2009 The Montana Department of Environmental Quality has reviewed the above named project. The project consists of the replacement of the existing water main and service connections with 1,160 lineal feet of new 4” PVC pipe and new service connections including water meters. The pipe being replaced will be abandoned in place. The new pipe will be installed within the Lewis & Clark Subdivision’s single existing street right of way. Pursuant to ARM 17.40.318, the Department has concluded that the proposed project meets the Categorical Exclusion criteria of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). The documentation for the Categorical Exclusion is available for public review at the following locations: 1.) Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund Loan Program 1520 East Sixth Avenue Helena, MT 59601 2.) Missoula County 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 Sincerely, /s/ Todd Teegarden, Bureau Chief, Technical & Financial Assistance Bureau, Planning Prevention & Assistance Division, Montana Department of Environmental Quality MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DP-09-97 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF DAVID L. FOX, JR. DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Larry Fox, at St. Peter Law Offices, 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, Montana 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 19th day of May, 2009. /s/ Larry Fox, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause Probate No. DP09-94 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DOLORES M. TREMPER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-09-109 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARTIN K. DUKLETH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jack Dukleth and Glenda Dukleth have been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four moths after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jack Dukleth and Glenda Dukleth, the Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, at 1624 South 4th Street, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 18th day of June, 2009. Birdsong Law Office, P.C. /s/ Greg Birdsong, Attorney for Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-09-91 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE: The Estate of Dorene Burlingame-Tompkins, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned is counsel for Tamara O’Brien, the appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Tamara O’Brien, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 11th day of June, 2009. /s/ Craig Mungas, Attorney for Tamara O’Brien, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-56 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BILLIE F. CORNELIUS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Robert Ray Cornelius, Sr., and Dana Lee Cornelius, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 30th day of March, 2009. /s/ Robert Ray Cornelius, Sr. Co-Personal Representative /s/ Dana Lee Cornelius, CoPersonal Representative. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-09-92 Douglas G. Harkin. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF GARY L. NOBLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jeannette A. Noble, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 156 Cascade Street, Lolo, MT 59847 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated the 5th day of June, 2009. /s/ Jeannette A. Noble, 156 Cascade Street, Lolo, MT 59847 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/28/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200726515, Book 806, Page 1668, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Daren M. Donnelly & Annette M. Donnelly, as joint tenants with right of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 61 of Invermere, Phase 1A, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/04/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200526489, Bk 761, Pg 1259, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Justin Kelly, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 28 of Wallace Creek Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 27, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $214,018.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $207,327.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 9, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03315) 1002.120972-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/17/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200340403, Bk 720, Pg 867, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Frank Humphreys and Sheryl Humphreys, as joint tenants with right of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. D/B/A Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 of Mallard Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/27/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200607077, Bk 771, Pg 326, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Patrick T. Beers was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The South one-half of Lots 16,17,18 and 19 in Block 20 of Car Line Addition a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC 2006-6. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $147,065.91. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $142,298.30, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 15, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.10169) 1002.121720-FEI

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 39 June 25–July 2, 2009


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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/30/02, recorded as Instrument No. 200300114, Bk 696, Pg 564, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Carla Hilferty, a married person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract D-2 of Certificate of Survey No. 4326, located in the SE1/4 SW1/4 of Section 35, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Together with a 60 foot Private Access and Public utility easement as disclosed by Certificate of Survey No. 4226 and Certificate of Survey No. 4326 and by document recorded in Book 464 of Micro

Records at Page 149. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200805875, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $317,879.35. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $312,855.72, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has

instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 15, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these

sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.03636) 1002.121793-FEI

DEED EXHIBIT NO. 3887 RECORDING REFERENCE IN BOOK 274 AT PAGE 1923 MICRO RECORDS James R. Day, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to David r. Chisholm, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 22, 2005 and Recorded August 29, 2005 at 4:44 o’clock p.m. in Book 759, Page 144 under Document No. 200522537. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank, NA. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $667.48, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 20, 2009 is $95,790.43 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5% now totaling

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE ‚ÄòS SALE on August 17, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER LOCATED IN SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. AS SHOWN IN

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$2044.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $99.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $14.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this safe include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10* day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 7, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On April 7, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3143323 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009

may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated: March 31, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On March 31, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3135104 06/11/2009, 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 10, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 OF LAKEWOOD ESTATES PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Michelle M. Bissonnette and Carl C. Johnsen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson of Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby and Kloster, PC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 2, 2005 and Recorded June 10, 2005 at 4:34 o’clock, p.m. in Book 754, Page 458 under Document Number 200514153. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,971.94, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 30, 2009 is $221,665.29 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $6598.36, late charges in the amount of $416.52, escrow advances of $613.30, and other fees and expenses advanced of $252.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.44 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 10, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 14 of KING RANCH PHASE II AND III, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, as recorded in Book 20 of Plats at Page 51 John W. Borgialli, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by August 30, 2005 and recorded September 1, 2005 at 4:19 o’clock P.M. in Book 759, Page 582, as Document no. 200522975. The beneficial interest is currently held by First Horizon Home Loans, a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,387.33, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 30, 2009 is $203,883.04 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $5,328.89, late charges in the amount of $225.12, escrow advances of $261.73, other fees and expenses advanced of $75.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.01 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: 04/01/2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 04/01/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3136961 06/11/2009, 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 14, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 AND 7 IN BLOCK 47 OF SUNRISE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Dana R Nichols and Tabitha Nichols, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2006 and recorded on June 28, 2006 at 4:27 o’clock P.M., in Book 777,


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Page 1193, under Document No. 200615820. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-7, by Washington Mutual Bank as successor in interest to Long Beach Mortgage Company. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1829.43, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 20, 2009 is $171,307.85 principal, interest at the rate of 9.35% now totaling $6,172.86, late charges in the amount of $86.68, escrow advances of $394.46, and other fees and expenses advanced of $173.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. $43.88 per The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: April 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On April 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3142095 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009

Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 19, 2007 and Recorded February 20, 2007 at 2:20 o’clock p.m. in Book 792, Page 299 under Document Number 200704024. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association as successor to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for the CBASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-CBS. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,305.31, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 29, 2009 is $152,183.20 principal, interest at the rate of 8.475% now totaling $6,222.03, late charges in the amount of $223.746, escrow advances of ($451.46), and other fees and expenses advanced of $146.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: April 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On April 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3142398 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009

Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 08, 2006 and Recorded November 14, 2006 at 01:19 o’clock P.M. in Book 787, Page 262, under Document No. 200629487. The beneficial interest is currently held by Litton Loan Servicing LP. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,465.94, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 29, 2009 is $313,096.29 principal, interest at the rate of 6.6250% now totaling $10,006.66, late charges in the amount of $599.70, escrow advances of $889.73, and other fees and expenses advanced of $156.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.83 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On April 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. NICOLE SCHAFER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission Expires 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3141374 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009

as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Guaranty Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 19, 2007 and recorded December 27, 2007 at 3:30 o’clock-P.M. in Book 810, Page 1403, as Document No. 200733075. The beneficial interest is currently held by Indymac Federal Bank FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1463.59, beginning June 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 15, 2009 is $186,366.15 principal, interest at the rate of 6.875% now totaling $12,236.36, late charges in the amount of $491.36, escrow advances of $1,328.82, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1396.01, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.10 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 8, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 4/8/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. NICOLE SCHAFER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 3/28/11 ASAP# 3145152 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009

OF MONTANA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 749, PAGE 156, ID# 759606, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 2 IN BLOCK 3 OF WAPIKIYA NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICE RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Erwin L Hilliard and Elaine Hilliard, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Gerald Schuster, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated December 15, 2006 and Recorded February 09, 2007 in Book 791 of Micro Records Page 1340.. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon (fka The bank of New York) on behalf of CIT Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-I. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $355.60, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 10, 2009 is $46,943.85 principal, interest at the rate of 8.190% now totaling $2,338.85, late charges in the amount of $124.46, suspense balance of $1247.24 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1922.35, plus accruing interest at the rate of $10.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 15, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On April 15, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schaffer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 3/28/011 ASAP# 3150056 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009, 07/09/2009

William P. Driscoll, FRANZ & DRISCOLL, PLLP, PO Box 1155, Helena, MT 59624-1715 Telephone: 406-442-005 Fax: 406-442-0008 Attorneys for Petitioner, Catholic Social Services of Montana. MONTANA FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY Cause No. CDA-2009-27. NOTICE OF PROCEEDINGS AND HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS IN THE MATTER OF THE PARENTAL RIGHTS TO BABY GIRL M. TO: “Dave”, whose last name is unknown, who has been named the father of Baby Girl M., who was born on March 3, 2009, in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana. The birth mother of Baby Girl M. has reported that she became pregnant by a man named “Dave” whose last name is unknown, in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, in June of 2008. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition for the termination of your parental rights to Baby Girl M. has been filed with the Montana First District Court, Lewis and Clark County, 228 Broadway, Helena, Montana 59601. The Court has scheduled a hearing for the determination of your parental rights, starting at 2:30 p.m. Mountain Time on June 30, 2009. Pursuant to Montana Code Annotated Section 42-2605 (2), your failure to appear at the hearing will constitute a waiver of your interest in

custody of the child, and will result in the Court’s termination of your parental right. Pursuant to Montana Code Annotated Section 42-2-616 (1), if you appear at the scheduled hearing and object to the termination of your parental rights and request custody of the child, the Court will then set deadlines allowing the parties to complete discovery, and will set a hearing on the determination of your rights to the child. DATED this 3rd day of June, 2009. FRANZ & DRISCOLL, PLLP. /s/ William P. Driscoll, Attorney for Petitioner

C r o s s w o r d s

Jonesin’

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 14, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West roadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBES AS TRACT 21-B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2469. Robert C. Matherne, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Surety Title, LLC Mr. John Barker, 2001 11th Ave. Helena, MT 59601, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 14, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 3 OF MOUNTAINVIEW ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Stephen Ray McAfee and Patricia Sue McAfee, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 17, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 9 in Block 4 of Seeley Lake Homesites No. 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Matt W. Livingston and Tara Livingston,

“We’ve Got a Monopoly”– versions you probably haven’t seen.

by Matt Jones

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 24, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE

Notice of Public Sale Notice is hereby given that the following described property will be sold to the highest bidder for cash or certified funds: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

221211111611111111-

Minimum Bid 1978 Chevy 2 1/2T Dump Trucks................$2,200.00 each 1981 Cat 140G Motor Graders..................$42,000.00 each 1977 Case W14H Front End Loader..................$17,000.00 1986 Cat 140G Motor Graders..................$47,000.00 each Pickup Canopy ........................................................$100.00 1986 Wacker WDH86 Walk Behind Roller ...........$2,500.00 1969 John Deere 350 Gas Crawler Dozer...........$6,500.00 1983 Ecolotec VacAll Sweeper ..........................$24,000.00 1976 Chevy Flatbed IT Truck ...............................$1,000.00 Diesel Fuel Tanks--Various Sizes ...................$120.00 each 2000 Honda Walk Behind Pavement Saw ...........$1,500.00 1994 GMC S-15 Jimmy 4x4 SUV.......................$2,7500.00 1986 GMC 3T Diesel Dump Truck w/Plow...........$3,500.00 1995 Ford F-350 Crew Cab Pickup......................$4,500.00 1989 Chevy 350 IT Crew Cab Pickup...................$1500.00 1994 GMC 1/2T Pickup ........................................$2,000.00 1973 Cat D-8H Crawler Tractor Dozer ...............$28,000.00 1990 Chevy IT Dump Truck..................................$5,500.00

Sealed bids will be accepted until 3:00 p.m., Thursday June 29, 2009 at: Missoula County Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 Terms of Sale: No representations are made about the above described equipment and the property will be sold "as is, where is". Removal of the equipment should be done within five working days of date of bill of sale. Property viewing to be done Thursday, June 18, 2009. Each bid should be in a sealed envelope and the envelope marked for which item it pertains. If bidding on more than one item use separate envelopes. Please indicate in each bid the following: Item # Description Method of Payment--Cash or Certified Funds Bid Amount Name/Address/Phone Number of Bidder

20 Comic book line artist 21 Space that ought to be in ZZ Topoly? 23 Viewed, to Tweety 24 Composer Stravinsky 26 Sweet suffix 27 "As God ___ witness..." 29 Hosp. area 30 Like one 33 Space in Underwater-opoly? 37 Greeting before "I didn't see you there!"

38 "Death ___ Funeral" (Frank Oz movie) 39 Designer ___ Saint Laurent 40 Space in Affair-opoly? 45 Turn from gray to brown, e.g. 46 Internet snicker 47 Item used in a golf variant 48 Sandwich with few ingredients 49 "2 ___ 2 Furious" (2003 movie) 51 Mickey Rooney ex Gardner 54 The space who's also the mascot of

DOWN

22 Almond ___ 25 OB/___ (baby doctor) 28 Eminem alter ego Shady 29 Words before "old chap" 30 Away, perhaps 31 It takes two 32 ___ Plaines, Illinois 33 Greeting on the seas 34 Item in a blindfolded party game 35 "Addams Family" cousin 36 Potato features 37 Condition of TV's Monk 41 Actress Liv of "A Bridge Too Far" 42 It may stick around after the office closes 43 Music lover's collection 44 Command to the band 48 Mistake

49 Property division, sometimes 50 Nerve-cell transmitters 52 Title Uncle on stage 53 "Please take ___" 54 Societal problems 55 Organized 56 It's broken after some thought 57 Turn-of-the-century Russian ruler 59 Gymnast Korbut 62 Out of the mil.

1 "I've ___ up to here!" 2 George Hamilton ex Stewart 3 "C'mon, I need your help here, so stop resisting" 4 "Akeelah and the Bee" star Palmer 5 Georgia airport code 6 2000s South African president Mbeki 7 "Speed ___" 8 1/2b x h, for a triangle 9 Bronco, Explorer, or Excursion, e.g. 10 Dumbstruck 11 Capital of the third largest country in South America 12 Earth Day subj. 13 News anchor's locale 18 "Jump, Jive an' Wail" bandleader Louis

Continued on Page 43

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

ACROSS

1 Skateboarder Tony 5 Gillette model 9 Did some clerical work 14 Lotion ingredient 15 "___ she blows!" 16 In safekeeping 17 Space found in Who-Turned-Out-theLights-opoly? 19 Univision News anchor Jorge

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 24, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SEK OF SECTION 29 AND THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 32B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5856 Mark L Heppler, as Grantor(s), conveyed

Cowboy-opoly? 58 Tiny amounts 60 "I Will Be" singer Lewis 61 Space in Snuff-opoly? 63 Heavily stocked, as a ship 64 Unwanted spots 65 "Los desastres de la guerra" painter 66 Howard on the airwaves 67 Take a load off 68 Med. student's study

Last week’s solution

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0420.

Missoula Independent Page 41 June 25–July 2, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS

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For More Information Contact: John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group • Custom Portfolios 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A • Shareholder Advocacy Missoula, MT 59803 • Community Investing (406) 543-0708 • Screening johnfaust@pwfinancial.net

Affordable Asbestos Surveys for contractors and homeowners Quick Turnaround Time

Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

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Missoula Independent Page 42 June 25–July 2, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

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said real property to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 30, 2007 and Recorded on December 05, 2007 at 04:47 o’clock P.M., under Document No. 200731453. The beneficial interest is currently held by IndyMac Federal Bank FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,069.10, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 2, 2009 is $324,000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $10,587.70, late charges in the amount of $526.50, escrow advances of $44.04, and other fees and expenses advanced of $59.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $57.70 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the

successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 14, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On April 14, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J, Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Joan Meier Notary Public ASAP# 3150067 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009, 07/09/2009

County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,435.56, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 26, 2009 is $155,312.87 principal, interest at the rate 9.05% now totaling $5,686.51, late charges in the amount of $303.90, escrow advances of $209.37, and other fees and expenses advanced of $303.94, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.51 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclama-

tion at least every 30 days. This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated: March 30, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 3/30/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3134365 06/11/2009, 06/18/2009, 06/25/2009

pates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 10, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On April 10, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3147627 06/25/2009, 07/02/2009, 07/09/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 7, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the East door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 6 in block 9 of Hillview Heights No. 3 & 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official corrected plat thereof. Gene A. Neuenswander and Deborah J. Boyle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated January 27, 2006 and Recorded February 01, 2006 at 4:29 o’clock P.M. in Book 768, Page 466, under Document No. 200602467. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-CB2. Charles J. Peterson , is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 18, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 45 of Meadwolark Acres, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Thomas W Theisen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated July 20, 2006 and Recorded July 21, 2006 at 04:24 o’clock P.M., in Book 779, Page 515, under Document No. 200618024. The beneficial interest is currently held by Residential Credit Solutions. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $856.11, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 8, 2009 is $161,150.59 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $4477.57, late charges in the amount of $128.40, escrow advances of $- , suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $23.52, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.15 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary antici-

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Automotive

Car of the Week! $4,995 '89 GMC Short Box Step Side, 4x4, sharp!

Nothing over $7,995! WE FINANCE

Jim's Cars

1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded!.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

CLASSICS

DOMESTIC ‘04 Dodge Stratus, 4dr, V6, auto, air.....$5,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com

94 Olds Cutlas Supreme power windows, power door locks, pioneer CD player. only 65K miles. nice car $3000 firm 721-6658

Your Key to Automotive Savings

IMPORTS Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com

Your Key to Automotive Savings

NOTHING OVER

Here Are Just Some Of The Cars On Our Lot!

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Automotive

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Public Notices

Clark Fork River Market • Saturdays 8-1 Downtown Tonight • Thursdays 5:30-8:30 www.empanadalady.com • 728-2030

coupon: get your 2nd eMpanada at half-price

Buying, selling, building and remodeling is what we love to do. Let us do it for you! Jeannette Williams & Walt Redfield Photo by Jessica Franks

Williams Real Estate 406.239.2049

R e d f i e l d C o n s t r uction 406.239.2206

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

redfield@montana.com

'07 Kia Rio LX, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '06 Chev Aveo, 4 Cyl, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '06 Ford Taurus SE, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '05 Ford Taurus, low miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Dodge Intrepid, 63,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Dodge Stratus, 4dr, V6, auto, air . . . . . . . .$5,995 '04 Nissan Sentra, 4 cyl, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Olds Alero, 2 door, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Buick Century, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Ford Ranger XLT, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Audi Quatro, V6, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Mercury Sable GS, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded! . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Mitsubishi Diamante, 4dr, loaded . . . . . . . .$4,995 '02 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited, 5spd, air . . . . . . .SOLD '02 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, auto, air . . . .$5,995 '02 Saturn, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Pontiac Grand Am, 2dr, 4cyl, 5spd . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Subaru Legacy Wagon 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Pontiac Grand AM, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge 1/2T, short, 2wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Ford Cargo Van E-250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4dr, 4x4, blue . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Ford Focus, 5spd, 4cyl, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 Jeep Cherokee Sport, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . .SOLD '00 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '00 Plymouth Grand Voyager, 4dr . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 Chevy 3/4 T X-Cab, 5spd, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '99 Ford Ranger Super Cab 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Isuzu Rodeo LS, V-6, auto, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '99 Toyota Camry, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Ford F250, V10, utility box . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '99 Honda CVR, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, loaded . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '98 Buick Century, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '97 Chevy Tahoe, 4dr, 1 owner, 2wd . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '97 Toyota Tacoma Pickup 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '95 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Chevy 1/2T 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Ford F-250 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '94 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, Concourse, loaded . .$3,995 '94 Mercury Grand Marquis, 4dr, auto, air . . . .$2,995 '94 Ford F-150 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '93 Ford Explorer, 2dr, 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . .$2,495 '91 Lincoln Towncar, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '89 GMC Short Box Step Side, 4x4, sharp! . . . . .$4,995

CLOSED SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS

Jim's Cars

WE FINANCE

1801 W. Broadway • 543-8269 Missoula Independent Page 43 June 25–July 2, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Automotive I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300 TRUCKS Ultimate Sportsman’s Truck 2007 TOYOTA TACOMA Double-cab (red w/gray cloth) only 16k miles and in like-new condition. Custom locking storage boxes and loading ramp, upgraded tires, electrical, sirius satellite radio. Perfect for fisherman, hunters and dog owners. Asking $27,500. Call 406-250-7146.

4X4 ‘01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘01 Subaru Legacy Wagon 4x4.....$5,995Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘97 Toyota Tacoma Pickup 4x4.....$5,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

SPORT UTILITY High Quality, Low Mileage, Pre-Owned Vehicles Log on to SaveOnTheLot.com

MOTOR HOMES/RVS 95 Sierra 27’ 5th Wheel Slider, microwave, a/c, storage, elec. jacks, awning. $7,000.00 o.b.o. Call 370-3158 for more info.

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Pr oudly SER VICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

RentalsApartments 2212 North: 2-bedroom, near the mall, yard, hook-ups, dog considered, $650, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990 509 S. 5th St. E #1 $625 everything included 1bd/1 ba 3 blocks from UM Campus. Grizzly Property Management 542-20260 Free Rent, Free Cable! 2 or 3 beds: 1510 Cooley St. $725-$850 Open Daily: 239.6483 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com Upscale Living on the Clarkfork! Granite, Tile, Fireplaces, Underground Parking. $1050 - $1200 Open Daily: 239.6483 We pay Heat! Free Rent! 1 or 2 beds on the Clarkfork $635 - $735 Open Daily: 239.6483

RentalsApartments

RentalsApartments

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana!

1&2

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org 3 GREAT PROPERTIES SOME RIVER VIEWS, WASHER & DRYER, FREE CABLE, FREE HEAT, STORAGE, UNDERGROUND PARKING. PETS OKAY. $550-$1200 OPEN DAILY:

239.6483

PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.

Professional Property Management Per Uniform Fire Code 10.11.07, hibachi, gas fired grills, charcoal grills or other similar devices can not be used on any balcony or under any overhang portion or within 10 ft. of any structure.

professionalproperty.com 406-721-8990

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

GardenCity

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Property Management

RentalsApartments

422 Madison • 549-6106 251- 4707 2 BD Apt 4265 Bridie Ct. $660/mo.

For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $620/mo.

New Lease Special – Up to Two Months FREE Rent!

3 BD House 123 Hearth Ct. $1095/mo.

Leasing Office Located Onsite at 4200 Expressway Missoula, MT

5 BD House 2402 Kent St. $1295/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

1333 Toole #C-13 $128,000 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Missoula Independent Page 44 June 25–July 2, 2009

5 bdrm, 2 baths, centrally located with hardwood floors, large yard, garage & 2 fireplaces. $265,000

3 bdrm 1/12 bath on large fenced lot in Lolo. Newer flooring, family room and deck with hot tub. Single garage. $179,900 MLS# 904649 Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics 3 Bed / 2 Bath in Potomac area. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. $264,900. MLS# 902389. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12592 for pics

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com • Wishard View lots (20+acres) • Meadows & Trees near Potomac • One has a pole barn • Plenty of room for horses or cows • $159,900-$189,900 Financing w/ 10% down OAC • MLS# 900454

• NEW LISTING! • 3 Bd Cedar log home on 20 acres • 3 decks / 2 covered patio's • Large garage w/ shop area • $850,000 • MLS# 903288 Text:44133 Message: 12885 for pics

OPEN HOUSE 1-4 SUNDAY 6/28 8875 Marigold Ct. Missoula • 2 Bd/ 2 Bath on large lot • 2 car garage, deck & patio • $219,900 • MLS# 808738 Text:44133 Message: 12593 for pics

• 40x82 insulated free span building • 1 acre with security fence • Three 14' overhead doors • 9292 Futurity Drive • $339,900 MLS#901478 Text:44133 Message: 12595 for pics

6403 Marias St. Missoula MLS# 901329

$305,000

Lorin & Amy

• Vaulted ceilings

a father daughter team

• Gas fireplace

Peterson

921 S 4th St W. $239,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

RICE TEAM

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $329,900 MLS#901764 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics

• Full bath with double sinks and jetted tub

• Central vacuum • Central air conditioning

"Let us tend your den"

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

MLS 809246 Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12596 for pics

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

RentalsApartments

4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $424,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting. $210,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185 www.AccessRealty.net

My home completely furnished. Utilities paid. Milltown area. No pets. References and deposit required. $400. 721-8933

RentalsFurnished

1216 S. 5th W. $218,500 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Gene Thompson, president

DOG WELCOME! Lolo, borders wilderness 4-bedrooms, deck&patio, hardwood floors, , 2baths, $1095 GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com

Land for Sale

1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House MF 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

RentalsHouses

Roommates

Homes for Sale

MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms

Wilma building Studio! $1200 everything included renovated, east facing views. Grizzly Property Management, 542-2060

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

Homes for Sale

• Fenced on three sides, underground sprinklers, landscaping and deck

• Walk-in closet with built-in organizers

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223 www.LorinAndAmy.com

Anna Nooney Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com www.BuyInMissoula.com

6402 L ower Mil ler Creek www.millercreek.com 3BD/2BA on one level in Maloney Ranch area. Big lot, private patio. RENT TO OWN possibilities.

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

Priscilla Brockmeyer

370.7689

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

FREE Foreclosure Listings. Over 200,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-446-1328

239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES.3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $268,800. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

Upper West Rattlesnake 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Fully remodeled bath & kitchen. Large fenced yard. $324,000. 531-5582 Lara@lambros.com

Charming 1925 U home. 4 beds, 2 baths + country kitchen. 737 Evans, Missoula. $399,870. MLS#902594. Joy Earls @ 406531-9811 www.joyearls.mywindermere.com FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus rooms, great deck and mountain and valley views, large sauna, just 20 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

A Career in Real Estate with Access Realty, we offer training, great commission splite and support. 406544-3098 www.AccessRealty.net GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @

Joy Earls Are you thinking of selling? I have qualified buyers looking for... • University area, near U area, or Rattlesnake. $250,000 range. • Commercial property (IES) - Multifamily 4-plex and up. Downtown area. • 5 Bedroom - Under $200,000

Visit my website for listings…

Immaculate & Convenient 4 Bedroom 2815 O'Shaughnesy, Missoula $254,500 MLS # 900070

Riverwalk Estates - 6549 Kiki Court, Missoula. New home built with accessibility & low maintenance. MLS#808566. $349,500. Joy Earls @ 406-531-9811 www.joyearls.mywindermere.com

Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Riverwalk Estates - 6605 West Kiki Court, Missoula. New Home/Land Package. MLS#903596. Starting at $299,970. Joy Earls @ 406-5319811 www.joyearls.mywindermere.com

Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds

University Area Home on 3 Lots

340 North Ave W. At Your Service…Interested in Buying or Selling a Home? You will receive top notch service as I work for you…call me TODAY!!

370-4063 windermere.com

This 5 bedroom home on corner lot with a fenced yard and a full finished basement features a separate one bedroom apartment that rents for $600/month. That equals LOW House Payments!

207.1185 • 544.3098 www.AccessRealty.net

$529,900 • 406-370-8859

Two 5 acre parcels

www.HomesByOwner.com/32197

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

1519 Defoe

SO

Let me help you sell your home.

5 Bedroom Home • 1 Bedroom Apartment MLS# 904336 • $295,000 • www.2626oshaughnesy.com

Detached guest quarters, separate office/artist studio.

LD

R DE ACT N U TR N CO

UPDATED WINDSOR PARK HOME. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, full, unfinished basement, gorgeous hardwood floors, $215,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

New Energy Efficient Homes • $265,000 These new construction, energy efficient homes blend low maintenance features with quality living. The unsurpassed craftsmanship accompanies amenities such as hardwood and tile flooring, hardiplank siding, tankless water system, custom alder cabinetry, 2 cycle furnace and much more! Convenient location close to downtown and river. Call Pat for a tour today.

Westside Story

3 floor plans to choose from

4617 Bordeaux Blvd Sweet 3 Bedroom

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com Commercial

mls# 904072 Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

Commercial

Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7

Credit History Required Get CASH now. For complete details go to www.BestTopCash.com

1379 Quiet Pines Missoula, MT MLS# 902424 $115,000

Need CASH Fast? $500, $1000, or $1500 direct to your account. No

ing with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Awesome 1 acre lot located minutes from Missoula, the Blackfoot River, Canyon River golf course and hiking trails! Beautiful mature Ponderosa Pines scattered throughout this wonderful property. Beautiful homes neighbor this lot, in this quiet little cul-de-sac. Utilities are in, and includes well and septic approval, gas, electric and phone. Bring your builders.

Downtown Restaurant For Sale Fabulous downtown locale 247 W. Front • Missoula includes 11 parking spaces! Seats 36+, outside seating, basement with lots of storage. Long time established Missoula restaurant with cabaret license included. $150,000 MLS# 901625

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185. www.AccessRealty.net

Kevin & Monica Ray

Laura Branson laurabranson@windermere.com

Please call me!! JUST LISTED! Target Range Gem 4289 Capy Court, Missoula $389,900 MLS# 902579

REDUCED PRICE! 3bdrm, 1 bath, single garage. Fenced yard and covered front porch. Newly remodeled. MLS# 808575 $84,900 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:18883 for pics

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

Homes for Sale

REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lend-

For all your home mortgage needs call

Marjorie Dula marjorie@landlmortgage.com

880-1373 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

#228,949

2 Bath home in the Canyon Creek Village. Built in 2003 this home has a wonderful floor plan with Master Bedroom on the main floor and an additional 2 bedrooms on the upper level. Charming covered front porch for enjoying the summer evenings. Home has been very well maintained and is priced to sell quickly. Home qualifies for many programs - human resource silent 2nd,RD, FHA. For a private showing or more information please call Mary Marry 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Missoula Properties

Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Missoula Independent Page 45 June 25–July 2, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Out of Town

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com

EQUESTRIAN PROPERTY. 13 acres + 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home. Garage/Shop, many out buildings, corrals, outdoor riding arena. Live stream and well. Views of Square & Shaw Buttes & Rocky Mtn Front. Fort Shaw $375,000. Fort Benton Realty, www.fbrealty.com (800)406-0946

Sapphires. Appraised $127,500 each. $864,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $485,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @

AWESOME MONTANA RANCHES: +/-9920 acres (+/-4400 deeded) on Missouri River, +/-2800 Deeded near Glendive, NO HOUSES, motivated sellers. Contact Russell Pederson 406-939-2501. www.montanalandauctions.com Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.RiverRidgeMT.com

TEXAS LAND -0- Down! 20-acre Ranches, Near El Paso. Beautiful Mountain Views. Road Access. Surveyed. $15,900. $159/mo. Money Back Guarantee. Owner Financing. 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

20 Lot Bitterroot Subdivision, 42 acres, views of Bitterroots &

Marlies Borchers Realtor

LET US HELP YOU PURSUE YOUR MONTANA DREAM. 11307 Melody Lane Big Flat area 4 bedroom, 3 and one half bath home on more than an acre, end of road very private. Open floor plan. ONLY $575,000

Nine Mile Creek Frontage 2300 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 10 acres with barn. Possible split. A BARGIN AT $299,000

2424 Burlington Totally Remodeled Home New Kitchen, roof, furnace, air conditioning, and rock. End of road privacy w/ shop, newly landscaped, a must see! ONLY $209,900

O'Brien Creek 2350 Clydesdale One Owner Like New 3bdrm, 2bth home, 24x42 RV Garage plus triple car garage on 2.5 acres. ONLY $425,000

Mike Wamsley :: Broker/Owner 501 Brooks Missoula 406-721-0620 :: 360-6362 www.wamsleyrealty.com

Turn key cabin in the Garnet Mountains, 24.49 acres, off the grid, gated access, spring water, new appliances, 9 miles south of Helmville. $140,000. Montana International Realty 406-883-6700

ABR, GRI

Office: 406.327.8787 • Mobile: 406.370.5758

shesellsmontana.com 445 Alder St • Missoula • email: marlies@porticorealestate.com

Creekfront Home in Six Mile Valley

$350,000 • MLS# 903548 18575 Six Mile Road • Huson, MT

3BD/2BA historic home with large garage/workshop on 3.44 lush creekfront acres. Spruce, aspen, lilacs & roses add privacy and serenity to this beautiful property. Only 20 minutes from Missoula!

Julie Gardner 406-532-9233 | jgardner@lambros.com

Spacious Rattlesnake Home $319,500 • MLS# 903027 • 10 Columbine 4BD/2BA on quiet dead end street. 2 car garage, full basement, over 2000 sq.ft. Close to trail system, organic farm, etc.

Single Level Home With Acreage $219,000 • MLS# 903899 • 73653 Coombs Lane 3BD/2.5BA home on 10+ acres with great mountain views in Arlee. 2 car garage, chicken coop, outbuildings including greenhouse, water rights. Ideal horse property, tribal land on 2 sides.

Mike Schmitt • 544.7912 Missoula Independent Page 46 June 25–July 2, 2009


Prairie Hills Natural Prime Rib Roast Or Bone-In Ribeye Steak

$6.99 lb.

Prairie Hills Natural Sirloin Steaks Or Roast

$3.49 lb.

Organic Seedless Red & Green Grapes

$2.39 lb.

Organic Peaches Or Nectarines

$2.49 lb.

Heartland Granola Cereals

$2.99 14-16 oz.

Wolfgang Puck Chicken & Egg Noodle Soup

$1.29 14.5 oz.

Sam Adams Or Twisted Tea

$5.99 6 pack

Meridian California Wines

$5.99 .75 liter

All Natural Family Pack Boneless Pork Sirloin Steak

Organic Bunch Broccoli

$1.59 lb.

Hutterite Large Eggs

99¢ dozen

Deli Sub Sandwich

$4.49 each

$1.69 lb.

IQF Vacuum Pack Tilapia Fillet

$4.09 lb.

Locally Grown Romaine And Red Or Green Leaf Lettuce

$1.69 each

Kozy Shack Puddings

$2.29 22 oz.

Assorted Craven's Organic Coffees

$7.89 12 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 47 June 25–July 2, 2009


Float your boat. With us. And other friends of the Clark Fork. Its about fun. Its about sun. Its about enjoying a RIVER ON THE REBOUND. And celebrating a community thats making it happen. Friday, July 3: 1 - 4 PM Clark Fork Float Sha-ron to Downtown Missoula 5 - 10 PM Community Party, Caras Park Pavilion Food * Beer * Music by Cold Hard Cash • Questions? Call 542-0539

Montana's First Native American Flute Festival! Featuring R. Carlos Nakai Sunday, June 28, 7:30pm • Caras Park Pavilion, Missoula Tickets at the door: $15 Also, come to a FREE concert! The Renaissance of the Native American Flute 2:00pm - same day, same place

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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