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Up Front: Kettlehouse taps into a global gluten-free trend Noise: Bob Wire sounds off on his favorite drinking songs Flash in the Pan: Preparing—and pairing—food with beer


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Up Front: Kettlehouse taps into a global gluten-free trend Noise: Bob Wire sounds off on his favorite drinking songs Flash in the Pan: Preparing—and pairing—food with beer


Food, Tunes & Fun Join us for the Good Food Store’s annual Spring Anniversary Celebration, Saturday, May 1, 11 am - 3:30 pm. COMPLIMENTARY BBQ & BIRTHDAY CAKE

Stop by and help us celebrate almost 40 years of organic and natural goodness in Missoula. We’ll treat you to organic hot dogs, veggie dogs, GFS deli salad, Alden’s ice cream, and Liquid Planet raspberry lemonade Plus inside we’ll have Bernice’s cakes, Craven’s Coffee and lots more.

LIVE MUSIC WITH JOHN FLORIDIS

One of Missoula’s favorite singer songwriters, John will be in the deli from noon to 3:00 pm sharing his gorgeous vocals and guitar compositions.

FACE PAINTING, SNACKS & SUNFLOWERS

Bring the kids because we’ll keep ‘em busy. They can plant a sunÁower, decorate the sidewalk, get a face paint facial from Cicelia & Grace. And they can munch on GoldÀsh, Snackimals and Twisted Fruit.

SIDEWALK PRODUCE SALE

Avocados, rhubarb, broccoli and more. Paul will have so many deals on your favorite organic fruits and vegetables that we’ll be Áingin’ open the garage door and expanding out onto the sidewalk.

AND LOTS OF TERRIFIC PRIZES • Globe Cruiser-Commuter Bike, courtesy of Nature’s Way and Big Sky Bikes • Old Town Vapor 10XT Kayak, courtesy of Nature’s Path and Bob Ward’s • Cuisinart Food Processor, courtesy of Frontier • Garmin eTrex GPS Receiver, courtesy of SunRidge • $100 Gift CertiÀcate to Silk Road, from Blue Marble Brands & Sunridge • Weber Charcoal Grill, from Summit Beverage • $50 Good Food Store Gift CertiÀcate, from Organic Valley • Jamis Trail X1 Mountain Bike, courtesy of Honest Tea • $100 Gift CertiÀcate to Sorella’s Salon & Day Spa, courtesy of Amy’s • Champion 2000+ Juicer, courtesy of Blue Marble Brands • MCT Coffee Gift Basket, courtesy of Montana Coffee Traders • $100 Gift CertiÀcate to Caras Nursery, courtesy of Organic Valley • $100 Gift CertiÀcate to Bernice’s Bakery, courtesy of Bernice’s Bakery • A Year of Free Coffee, courtesy of Liquid Planet • Sierra Designs Tent & Sleeping Bag, from Big Sky Brewing • $100 Gift CertiÀcate to Red Bird, courtesy of Traditional Medicinals • A Year of Free Coffee, courtesy of Craven’s Coffee • Men’s and Women’s Biking Jerseys, courtesy of Le Petit Outre • Rice Cooker & Rice, courtesy of Lundberg • Eureka Sleeping Bag, courtesy of Big Sky Brewing • MyChelle Gift Basket, courtesy of MyChelle Dermaceuticals • Sit-On-Top Kayak, courtesy of Summit Beverage • Recycled Bike Chain Home Accessories, courtesy of New Belgium Brewing • Big Box of Chocolate, courtesy of Theo Chocolates • Stella Artois Glassware & Beck’s Cooler, courtesy of Summit Beverage • Samuel Adams Camp Chair, courtesy of Summit Beverage • Corona Backyard Cooler & Hoegarden Glassware, courtesy of Summit Beverage • Nordic Naturals Gift Basket, courtesy of Nordic Naturals • Eden Gift Basket, courtesy of Eden Foods • Threshold Gift Basket, courtesy of Threshold • Henckel Knife Set, courtesy of Blue Marble Brands

www.goodfoodstore.com

Missoula Independent

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Page 2 April 29–May 6, 2010

1600 S. 3rd St. West

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541-3663

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7am to 10pm Every Day


nside Cover Story

Spring Asparagus Caesar

How exactly did Missoula become a beerdrinker’s paradise? Partly out of sheer curiosity and partly because we knew there was some rich history involved (getting paid in beer!?), we take a look back at more than 130 years of yeast, malted barley, hops and water in the Garden City...............................14 Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Locally grown grilled asparagus, organic spring mix, shredded Lifeline cheese, & croutons with house asiago garlic dressing. Served with soda bread.

Saturday 5/1 @ 8:30pm

News

Top of the Mic Finals:

Letters Defending the Tea Party, Tester and trappers ...............................................4 The Week in Review Griz get drafted, indecent exposure and pot .........................6 Briefs Capturing carbon, Brooks Street and Ooh La Latte ........................................6 Etc. You may have noticed this issue has something to do with beer.......................7 Up Front Kettlehouse taps into a global gluten-free trend .......................................8 Up Front Local beer geek teaches brewers worldwide .............................................9 Ochenski Montana’s long legislative battle for the breweries ................................10 Writers on the Range Floyd Dominy, the colossus of dams, dies at 100 ..............11 Agenda May Day festivities. ......................................................................................12

Matt Hassler, Greenstar, The Skurfs, & Joshua Farmer SUNDAY 8PM

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Preparing—and pairing—food with beer......................................19 Happiest Hour Desperado Sports Tavern ...............................................................20 Ask Ari Old onion magic..........................................................................................21 8 Days a Week Washing the week down with a cold one.......................................22 Mountain High Gear for the Garhwal wraps up.....................................................33 Scope Two artists who pour themselves into a brewery’s image ............................34 Noise Bob Wire sounds off on his favorite drinking tunes......................................35 Arts Flathead ceramicist creates custom growlers ...................................................36 DVD Classic beer moments from the big screen......................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................38

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

Emily Clark Mode of Sustainable Transportation: Bike. How many days did you commute by sustainable transportation to work in March? I biked to work 27 days. Why do you choose to use sustainable transportation to commute to work instead of driving alone? “Biking to work is a great way to start off my day. Even in winter, I look forward to the time spent outside. If the roads get too icy, I walk.” Profession: Program Specialist with Montana Campus Compact

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2010 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

GRAND TOTALS

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny ADMIN & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Marie Noland FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold EDITORIAL INTERN Kyle Lehman CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

WEDNESDAY 8PM

2,913 Days 1,659 Members 198,952 Member Reports 10,653,625 Miles 8,626,417 lbs CO2 Total Miles Biking: 2,297,147 miles Walking: 506,536 miles By Bus: 1,205,049 miles Carpooling: 6,268,983 miles Telecommuting: 247,622 miles Other: 128,287 miles

What is Emily’s prize for being March’s winner? 3-month membership to Gold’s Gym

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You could be a winner too! Register for the Missoula In Motion Way to Go! Club today. Contact Missoula In Motion at 258-4961 or visit our website!

www.missoulainmotion.com Missoula Independent

Page 3 April 29–May 6, 2010


STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning in downtown Missoula.

Q:

This week’s issue of the Indy is dedicated to beer. What’s your favorite local brew? Follow-up: The Garden City BrewFest kicks off the outdoor festival season on Saturday at Caras Park. What spring or summer activity are you most excited about?

Amy Cilimburg: Kettlehouse’s Cold Smoke. To the put-in: To get out on the mountains and in the rivers. We’re going to the Smith River next week, then using our feet hiking—low carbon activities!

Teddy Maloof: Big Sky Moose Drool. To the sun: Going to Flathead Lake for boating, swimming and sunning.

Anne Cohen: Big Sky Moose Drool. The standards: Out to Lunch at Caras Park every week and the Symphony in the Park concert in August.

Amanda Andrews: Big Sky Summer Honey. So are we: I’m excited to float the Blackfoot in my tube.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 April 29–May 6, 2010

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Dear race baiters…

Broad strokes

I’m standing up to the left’s smear artists and race baiters (the sheep) in their bullying tactic to discredit the Taxed Enough Already (TEA) Party. Don’t forget, my Christian bashing friends, only a few short years ago, a bully and his co-dependent followers convinced his entire population to load a race of people (religious group) onto cattle trains and lead them to slaughter. America’s “left” feeds from the very same philosophical well. Freedom means freedom from government coercion. Generosity is part of a free human’s character. Every social program that forces me to pay money to the government to subsidize out-of-wedlock birth, passive restraint dentistry on toddlers, the widespread removal of children from family groups, drugging children to make them passive, failing teachers, a criminal justice industry where the debris is swept, forces me to subsidize their crimes against humanity. They force us to leave our huge natural resources to waste here while we disrupt the culture of people overseas who would rather be left alone, then they send my neighbor’s kid over there to kill or be killed—defending my “national interest.” I’m done going along with this. The welfare/warfare state created over the last 100 years by gains from the left (codependents, control freaks and bullies), in both the Republican and Democratic parties, uses government to force others to get their priorities straight, resulting in tyranny and treating humans like animals. If you want to understand the human nature behind tyranny, read Animal Farm by George Orwell or Philosophy: Who Needs It? by Ayn Rand. Both authors spent their lives trying to explain the horror of statism, by any name. Or just rent One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. When you see Nurse Ratched, think Nancy Pelosi. To those trying to steal my grandbabies birthright—Come on! I’ll meet you in the political arena. You cannot justify your bloody history, so you resort to smears and lies. This battle is an intellectual one for the hearts and minds of America, but one that decent people must win. When the bleating sheep couldn’t drown the voices, the pigs sent vicious dogs out to rip the complaining animals to shreds. Let freedom ring! Rena Wetherett Missoula

My, my, my, how sure Connie Poten is in what she wrote in her April 15 letter (see “Clamping down”) and how wrong she is in many of her statements. She called anyone who says that trapping is not indiscriminate, unfair, cruel and wasteful a liar. I personally know trappers in the following professions who might take issue with that statement: deputy sheriff, lawyer, doctor, financial advisor and biologist.

you “ When see Nurse Ratched, think

Nancy Pelosi.

She says that trappers throw away two animals for every one they keep, yet cites no authority. I personally trapped beaver this year and caught no animals other than beaver. I also know quite a few trappers and know of none who fit the profile she presents. Trapping is no more loosely regulated than the recreational activities of hunting and fishing. I do not know anyone who waits two weeks to check foothold traps where the animal is expected to be alive. Martin sets may not be checked for two weeks, but they are dead and frozen, so I ask you: What does it matter if they are dead for a day, week or month as long as there is no waste of fur, which is prohibited by regulation? What I do think is odd is that she is so very incensed by a false conviction that two animals are wasted for every one utilized under the status quo, but she advocates for a new regulation that mandates that all damage control on public land be done by department employees and that the entire animal be disposed of (wasted) or used for public benefit, which is undefined. If she will admit that there are inexperienced or unethical slob hunters who do litter, violate regulations, wound animals and sometimes lose or waste animals, I will

admit that there are inexperienced or unethical trappers who do the same. If she does not care to tar all hunters with that brush, then I submit that neither can she tar all trappers. Passenger pigeons were extirpated by hunting and beaver were nearly extirpated by trapping, but this was before modern management. Since modern management, neither hunting nor trapping has extirpated any species. I urge everyone to go to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks website and go to the topic of trapping. Once there, read “Montana’s Information Sheet” and “Trapping and Furbearer Management in North American Wildlife Conservation.” Weigh the credentials, study the data and decide based on facts. Rick Hawk Kalispell

The right road Most of the debate around the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act has focused on the Beaverhead Deerlodge National Forest. That’s understandable because it’s the largest forest in the lower 48 states. The forest’s 3.3 million acres include 16 mountain ranges. Just about everyone has a favorite place in that forest, so it’s not surprising that everyone seems to have an opinion on the bill. What most people don’t know is that there are also 4,800 miles of road on the forest and the only legislation that proposes to do anything about them is Sen. Tester’s bill. The bill contains provisions requiring that timber and restoration projects reduce road densities to less than 1.5 miles of road per square mile. That’s a very high standard that reflects the input of conservation groups and sportsmen groups in the development of this legislation. Probably more than any other forest in Montana, the Beaverhead Deerlodge is a fisherman’s paradise. Tester’s bill wouldn’t just keep it that way, it would make it better by removing old roads and improving fisheries as a result. Tony Sadiku Missoula Correction: In last week’s article, “Controversial cuisine,” the name of Food Not Bombs member Reggie Herbert appeared incorrectly. The Indy regrets the error.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 April 29–May 6, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, April 21

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

President Obama names James Martin, director of Colorado’s Department of Natural Resources, the new head of the Environmental Protection Agency Region 8, which includes Montana, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and 27 tribal nations.

• Thursday, April 22 On Earth Day, the U.S. Navy flies an F/A-18 “Green Hornet” in Maryland powered by biofuel derived from Montana-grown camelina. “Today’s flight opens the door to a whole new world of possibilities with camelina,” says Sen. Jon Tester.

• Friday, April 23 Eugene Gonzalez, 47, is charged with felony deliberate homicide for allegedly beating Johnny Joe Belmerez to death in a downtown Missoula alley on April 12. Another man, Raymond Big Beaver, who remains at large, is also being charged in the fatal attack.

• Saturday, April 24 The Tennessee Titans select former walk-on Griz receiver Marc Mariani, of Havre, in the seventh round of the NFL Draft, and the Atlanta Falcons grab former UM safety Shann Schillinger, of Baker, in the sixth round. If Mariani makes the Titans, he’ll be coached by Jeff Fisher, whose son Brandon played with Mariani and Schillinger at UM.

• Sunday, April 25 Timothy Thomas Luplow, 52, strips off his clothes and masturbates in the parking lot near Bob Ward and Sons. Police arrest the registered sex offender for probation violation and indecent exposure. A day before, another man, whose name has yet to be released, goes on an indecent exposure rampage, allegedly displaying his genitalia to two women and intimidating another.

• Monday, April 26 Missoula City Council defeats Councilman Dick Haines’ motion to tweak the recently approved antidiscrimination ordinance. Haines says during the council meeting that he aims to clean up imprecise language in the law, which provides legal recourse to individuals who are discriminated against based on sexual orientation or gender expression.

• Tuesday, April 27 A legislative panel gets an earful from Montana residents who want answers to questions stemming from the state’s nebulous medical marijuana law. The public meeting in Helena comes as the Children, Families, Health and Human Services Interim Committee gets a jump on the issue before the Legislature reconvenes in January.

Volunteers from Free Cycles pedaled, pulled and pushed a towering wagonload of bicycle parts to Bonner Park Saturday for its annual Festival of Cycles. Each spring the event provides Missoula’s cyclists with free parts to build a new ride and mechanics to perform free repairs.

Environment Capturing carbon Reducing the nation’s output of greenhouse gases is no small task, but a recent investment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows the agency is banking on the potential of small solutions. This spring, the EPA awarded the threeemployee Missoula start-up Intellimet a $70,000 grant to develop a cheaper method of carbon sequestration. The goal is to capture C02 for $20 a ton, and Intellimet hopes to do it by implementing technology first marketed toward the mining industry. “The technology is what we call a platform technology,” says Intellimet Chief Operating Officer John Hammen. “We really think we can be groundbreaking.” Since relocating to Missoula from Silicon Valley during the 2008 economic upheaval, Intellimet has been working with mining companies around the western United States to remove heavy metals from mining sites. The key to Intellimet’s business model lies in a polymer spider web that works on the

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Page 6 April 29–May 6, 2010

molecular level to trap contaminants while allowing organic matter to pass through. Hammen says that it is one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly methods around, and will be just as useful for sequestering carbon. “Essentially the spider web has a chemical reaction with the carbon dioxide and it forms a chemical bond,” he says. “In order to release [the carbon] you have to expose it to heat.” Hammen points out that the carbon sequestration market is in its infancy, and one of the largest uncertainties is what will become of the carbon once it has been contained. Proposals for large-scale storage in underground or undersea compartments have met opposition from environmental groups, who say there are no assurances the carbon will remain in place. Hammen says that yet another uncertainty is how the technology will be marketed in the absence of government regulations forcing companies to reduce emissions. “That is the ongoing question, not just for Intellimet but for the [carbon sequestration industry],” Hammen says. “Of course the larger applica-

tion is to remove carbon dioxide from coal plants…That’s down the road.” Kyle Lehman

Business Lingerie with your latte So far, Danica Lemcke hasn’t heard many complaints about her frilly white bustier. Just a few women who don’t approve of her tamping espresso and steaming milk on Russell Street with so much skin showing have voiced concern. The guys? Well, they love it. “Usually, the reaction is, ‘Wow,’” says Lemcke, 19. Missoula’s coffee scene got a lot steamier this week, when the lingerie-clad women of Ooh La Latte joined the ranks of local drive-through baristas. The company’s slogan says it all: “Where our servers are even hotter than our drinks.” Trust us, this isn’t your grandma’s tea shack. And if it is, your grandma’s a cougar. “This isn’t G-strings and pasties kind of stuff,”


Inside

Letters

Briefs

says Ooh La Latte co-owner Tim Wilson. “It’s highclass, expensive lingerie that’s very tasteful. We’ve been very careful to ensure it’s done very tastefully.” Ooh La Latte follows in the footsteps of a rapidly growing trend in the Seattle area, where chains of coffee kiosks have turned up the heat by showcasing baristas in almost nothing. Of course, the stands have prompted strings of indecency complaints, but Wilson has no such fears for the Missoula market. He and his partners came up with the plan in October, and already have a second location staked out near the Harley Davidson dealership on Airway Boulevard. “We’re looking to expand,” Wilson says. “Our target is to have about eight of them in Montana over the next few years.” Early indications say the business will do just fine. Lacey Wisdom, 23, says she had roughly 40 cars drive up by early afternoon on Tuesday. Maybe it was the specialty drinks—Cha Cha Chai, Afternoon Delight, etc.—or maybe it was Wisdom’s revealing black-andwhite maid outfit. Part of her hopes it was the latter. After all, she and Lemcke are used to the attention. “We both worked at Hooters,” Wisdom says, adding that drivers have been rubbernecking all morning. “It’s essentially the same thing.” Alex Sakariassen

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Gary Adams of the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health inspection Service, due to the potential loss of livestock forage. But anglers figure to benefit. “It is of course going to help the fishermen,” says George Kesel, owner of Kesel’s Four Rivers Fly Shop in Missoula. “Any time there’s a large influx of any food form it’s going to help the fishermen. Grasshopper fishing is an extremely exciting type of fishing. And so there’s going to be a lot of people looking forward to this.”

Fly-fishing The angler’s “’hoppertunity” Gary LaFontaine, the eminent fly-fisherman, author and University of Montana graduate who died in 2002, wrote in his 1990 book, The Dry Fly: New Angles, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) annual grasshopper forecast map “might as well be a treasure map for fly fishermen interested in incredible grasshopper days.” This summer might bring the most incredible grasshopper days in 25 years. The USDA’s 2010 Rangeland Grasshopper Hazard map shows that about a third of Montana, including rangeland surrounding Missoula, can expect greater than 15 grasshoppers per square yard—predicted to be the biggest grasshopper infestation in Montana and other western states since the mid-1980s. The grasshoppers’ economic impact on Montana ranchers could be “huge,” says Helena’s

Count Missoulian Billy Pfeiffer among them. The 33-year-old avid fly-fisherman who holds a degree in aquatic wildlife biology and calls Gary LaFontaine his idol says it could be an epic year for terrestrial fishing—as long as water temperatures don’t climb too high. “There are definitely specific spots I go to grasshopper fish,” Pfeiffer says, “because I know that there’s a field that kicks tons of bugs in. There are a few spots in the upper Clark Fork that are just perfect. You walk down the bank on a day when there are a lot of ’hoppers out and you’ll actually be scaring them and they’ll be jumping into the water.” Kesel says he’ll keep an eye on the ’hopper hatch, expected in early June. If their numbers jump as high as expected, “I will have a lot of grasshopper flies in my shop,” he says. He adds: “It will certainly be a ’hoppertunity for good fishing.” Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

Transportation Bike lanes for Brooks? As Brooks Street prepares to be spruced up this summer—it’s due for new curbs, ramps and pavement—neighborhood residents, city officials and transportation experts alike are debating whether to use the opportunity to eliminate street-side parking and make way for bike lanes. “It’s going to be a really hot topic,” says Judy Smith, a member of the Rose Park Neighborhood Council Leadership Team who lives one block off Brooks. Bob Giordano of the Missoula Institute for Sustainable Transportation believes tacking bike lanes onto Brooks is a no-brainer. He says the lanes would help create a sustainable environment and healthy citizens. Plus, as the issue surrounding Brooks—officially an extension of both Highways 12 and 93— garners greater interest, Giordano says the debate speaks to a larger question for the community: “Are we going to shape our town to the highways, or are we going to have the highway fit into our urban context?” But some neighborhood residents argue two-wheeled commuters already have options, including the relatively calm Woodford Street, which runs parallel to Brooks. Creating a headache for residents and business owners who would lose street-side parking, they say, just doesn’t make sense. For example, Smith, a self-proclaimed alternative transportation advocate, says concerns voiced by her neighbors persuaded her not to push for bike lanes. “I support my neighbors’ right to be able to park in front of their homes,” she says. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Actfunded plan initially called for widening Brooks Street, a move that would have made room for both parking and new bike lanes. But local residents worried widening would drastically alter the historic gateway to Missoula. City officials nixed that plan in favor of the slimmer version. As construction begins in the coming weeks, locals have time to discuss the final product. Administrators will continue gathering public comment before making a final decision, which will likely come by the end of this summer. “The more dialogue, the better,” Giordano says. “Citizen voices matter. So, it’s good people are talking about these things.” Jessica Mayrer

BY THE NUMBERS

43.5

Gallons of beer consumed by the average of-age Montanan in 2009, according to The Beer Institute, which ranked Montana as number one nationally last year for per-capita beer consumption.

etc. In case you haven’t noticed, this week’s Indy is a bit preoccupied with beer. If you haven’t already flipped to the horoscopes or “This Modern World,” you may be wondering why we’re so hopped up on hops and malted barley. For starters, beer—much like coffee, nonprofit work and unleashed canines—is a pretty integral part of Missoula culture. Three different breweries run four local taprooms, none of which is more than seven miles apart. Each brewery boasts its own dedicated hoard of followers; people wear Bayern, Big Sky and Kettlehouse garb around town like sports fans in normal cities show an allegiance to certain teams. More recently, this phenomenon has spread to seemingly every corner of western Montana, as new breweries pop up—in Stevi, Lakeside, Bigfork—at a rate only surpassed by medical marijuana clinics. There’s a sense of pride in our craft beers, and they seem to say as much about where we live as anything. We tapped into this rich tradition years ago for the Indy’s Golden Growlers competition. In the summers of 2005 and 2006 we invited the entire staff, a few friends and the Zoo City Zymurgists (hey, someone had to know what they were doing) to our editor’s backyard and embarked on a blind “taste test” of about 30 different beers in hopes of declaring a winner. Sounds like fun, and it was. But let’s put it this way: When sipping 30 beers during one sitting, the only true winner is the local cab company and, if we remember correctly, a carpet cleaner. We miss the competition—and, based on a few scattered pleas for its return, so do some of you—but its short run needed to come to an end. Plus, we learned later that the Zoo City Zymurgists already do this particular taste test thing—like, officially— for the Garden City BrewFest. In fact, that event, which opens its taps Saturday, May 1, at Caras Park, does a pretty decent job of celebrating our local breweries with more than 60 beers available for tasting. So, based on our obvious affection for suds, Missoula’s support for local brewers, our desire to revive some element of the Golden Growlers and this weekend’s annual rite of spring, BrewFest, we’ve dedicated nearly every page of this issue to ales, lagers and the like. We promise not to do anything like it for another year—or at least until we find the stomach for an all locally roasted coffee issue.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Missoula Independent

Page 8 April 29–May 6, 2010

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Libation liberation Kettlehouse taps into global gluten-free trend by Matthew Frank

Long-suffering “celiacs” deserve a cold brew gluten-free beers that taste as good as The Great American Beer Festival’s one more than most, and Kettlehouse regular beers on tap and in the grocery gluten-free gold medal winner in 2007 and Brewing Co. has brewed a gluten-free beer store. 2008 was Anheuser-Busch’s Redbridge, the to quench their craving. “It’s definitely something I hear com- country’s most widely distributed glutenNow if only regular beer drinkers ing up more and more often,” says Julia free beer. The company declined to provide would keep their mitts off it. Herz, craft beer program director for the any sales data, but if local trends are any indiAccording to Kettlehouse bartender Al Brewers Association. “And for folks espe- cation, the beer has been hugely successful. Pils, even those who can guzzle all the bar- cially with celiac disease or with glutenGreg Munger, the Good Food Store’s ley-infused booze they want without gas- free diet desires, it’s a great option, beer and wine buyer, says he’s seen a signiftrointestinal upheaval have been asking for because a lot people do crave beer and icant increase in demand in recent years for the brewery’s new gluten-free beer, Seeley miss having it.” gluten-free beers, specifically Redbridge. Axe. That, Pils says, serves as the best evi“The challenge for me, actually, has Reflecting the growing number of dence that the Missoula brewery has tapped gluten-free beers, and the number of cus- been meeting that demand,” Munger says. into something tasty— “Redbridge on any given which, for a gluten-free day or month is typically beer, says a lot. one of our best selling “The interesting beer packages, and that’s thing,” Pils says, “is that up against [Kettlehouse] most of the people who Cold Smoke and everydrink it are not glutenthing else. It’s always intolerant, but they among the top 10 beer drink it because they packages.” like the style.” As craft brewers try If Kettlehouse barto cut into Redbridge’s flies are pleased with market share, they report the new offering, local a number of challenges, microbrew fans with most notably cost. celiac disease are Kettlehouse owner Tim downright giddy. The O’Leary says Seeley Axe Kettlehouse started has proven more expenbrewing Seeley Axe— sive and more labor get it?—last month with intensive. Beyond that, the gluten-free grain he describes trying to sorghum and, in the traensure no cross-contamidition of Belgian white nation between Seeley beers, bitter orange Axe and the brewery’s Photo by Carthrine L. Walters peel and coriander. For other beers as a “logisticeliac disease sufferers, cal nightmare.” He’s also Kettlehouse brewer Tommy Patches pulls a sample of the brewthe gluten proteins ery’s new “gluten-reduced” Seeley Axe from the vat. recently had the beer found in foods that contested in a laboratory, tain wheat, barley and rye damage the lining tomers clamoring for them, the Brewers which found the brew to be gluten-free, or of the small intestine, preventing it from Association added a gluten-free beer cate- at least containing less than 5 parts per milabsorbing nutrients and producing gory to its Great American Beer Festival lion (ppm), the test’s detection limit. Still, unpleasant symptoms. competition in 2007. The silver medal win- just to be safe, the brewery advertises the According to the National Institutes of ner that year was New Grist, brewed by beer as “gluten-reduced.” For now, the Kettlehouse plans to Health, more than two million Americans Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee, Wis. have celiac disease, or about one in 133 peo- Lakefront, according to its president Russ keep the beer available at its Myrtle Street ple. Among those with a parent or sibling Klisch, was the first brewery, back in 2005, taproom and gauge the response— diagnosed with the disease, as many as one to gain approval from the government to response to the taste and the physical response the beer elicits among sufferers of in 22 people may have it. But the vast major- make gluten-free beer. “There was a definition of beer from celiac disease. ity of people don’t know to get tested. “I hate to say it,” O’Leary says, “but for As celiac disease diagnoses have the federal government [dating back to increased, so too has the gluten-free food 1935] that said to call something beer it some people they just might not be able to and beverage industry. One market had to be made with 25 percent malted bar- drink beer. If we can make a beer and have researcher, Packaged Facts, reports that the ley,” Klisch says. “That’s what made beer it tested at less than 5 ppm, and somebody industry increased at an average growth rate beer…It was basically a new classification drinks it and has a problem, I think that’s saying that maybe they should just not even of about 28 percent from 2004 to 2008. Still, of beer for them.” the Brewers Association estimates that Today, Lakeside distributes New Grist bother. It’s a sad thing to think about, but gluten-free beer accounts for less than 0.1 to 32 states, according to Klisch. He says we’re doing our best, and I think we nailed percent of the beer market. Fortunately for Montanans should expect to see it in a it, and that’s as far as we can take it.” beer-loving celiacs, the Kettlehouse is one of handful of grocery stores in the coming a growing number of breweries working to months. mfrank@missoulanews.com


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Pint-sized prescription The Beer Doctor is in, and he’s planning a new brewery by Alex Sakariassen

Jim Lueders has spent the last two decades building an impressive resume in the beer brewing biz. He’s attended the Doemens brewing school in Germany, visited breweries in more than a dozen countries, and toured industry conferences across the states. He even helped crank out Bayern Brewing’s debut batches in Missoula in the late ’80s. But you won’t catch Lueders stirring mash or hauling grain in any one brewhouse for very long. In the world of microbrews, he’s peripheral—the man behind the brew tanks, so to speak. Clients know

in his Stevensville home, surrounded by brewing tanks and machinery of his own, Lueders remains soft-spoken and modest about his accomplishments. “It’s satisfying,” he says flatly. Lueders grew up in Illinois at a time when few Americans strayed from what he calls the “characterless” pilsners brewed by Budweiser and Miller. He had his Midwestern favorites —Stroh’s, Leinenkugel’s—but Lueders eventually began spending money on more flavorful import beers. By the time he exited college, he was immersed in homebrew

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Jim Lueders, known to microbrewery owners across the globe as “The Beer Doctor,” plans to open his own zero-emissions brewery in Stevensville in the near future.

him as “The Beer Doctor.” His job isn’t making craft beer, it’s helping breweries around the globe make it more efficiently. “He is a bona fide beer geek, I shit you not,” says Dale Harris, owner of the Zion Canyon Brewing Company in Springdale, Utah, and a former Lueders client. “The guy knows stuff about beer that people just shouldn’t know about beer.” Lueders is the founder, president and sole employee of Bitterroot-based Lueders Consulting, which for the past 18 years has fostered worldwide growth in the microbrew market. He offers services ranging from brewhouse installation to staff training and recipe formulation. With global beer enthusiasm on the rise, his business is booming. “I have more interest in craft brewing than I think I’ve ever had,” Lueders says. “I get calls pretty regularly now. It seems there’s a real interest in craft brewing and a lot of people who want to learn more about it and how to get into the business.” Over the years, work has taken Lueders to microbreweries in Japan, Africa and the Caribbean. But for all that international travel, he tends to undersell the romance of his jet-setting lifestyle. Sitting

culture, constantly tweaking recipes to get just the flavors he wanted. That obsession with brewing landed him in the backroom at Bayern as an assistant brewer in 1987. Five years and one German brewing education later, Lueders wound up in Portland as brewmaster at the then-new Saxer Brewing Company. According to Kerry Gilbert, who co-owned Saxer at the time, Lueders was a tireless employee who spent hours brewing five-gallon test batches of the company’s original beers. “I particularly remember the dark beer he did,” Gilbert says. “It was the most unbelievable stuff I’d ever tasted. He called it a stout, but it almost tasted like chocolate.” Lueders’ early work with Saxer eventually provided the framework for Lueders Consulting. He oversaw the entire building process in Portland, and assembled the German-manufactured brewhouse himself. Even today Lueders says he relies on that experience to help clients do the same. Work at Saxer didn’t last long. Gilbert says his business partner at the time decided to hire a brewmaster from Germany, a one-man decision that Gilbert believes was “the wrong one.” Saxer lasted until 1999,

and Gilbert says the beer was never as distinctive as what Lueders created. “I don’t think we ever got the taste that Jim got out of his little five-gallon deal,” Gilbert says. Lueders doesn’t shed any tears over his departure from Portland. Now he spends most of his time introducing newbies to the brewing process. For instance, shortly after leaving Saxer in the mid-’90s, Lueders traveled to St. Louis, Mo. and helped establish the Morgan Street Brewery. Co-owner and 20-year restaurateur Steve Owings remembers The Beer Doctor well. None of the Morgan Street partners knew the first thing about brewing, and found Lueders’ knowledge “tremendous.” “We just won the gold medal for the Golden Pilsner at the World Beer Cups,” Owings says. “That was one of Jim’s…We beat beers from all over the world with that thing.” Despite all the globetrotting, though, Lueders seems restless. Ten years ago, he hatched an unusual plan: to open a zeroemissions brewery in the Bitterroot, the first of its kind in the world. The idea came partly from his education with Zero Emissions Research and Initiatives—a global network of environmental projects—in the late ’90s. In fact, zero-emissions technology is the one subject that generates noticeable enthusiasm in Lueders. “Why have waste?” Lueders says. “Let’s use it all. Let’s not call it an output. Let’s call it an input for some other process…Then we operate more efficiently.” The concept for Lueders’ Wildwood Brewery is grand. Heat from the brewing process will keep the building warm. Spent grains will support a mushroom grow out back. Worms from the garden could be used to create alkali cleaners for the brewery’s equipment. In Lueders’ mind, nothing will be wasted. But first Wildwood needs to get off the ground. Lueders spends so much of his time helping other breweries get started that he’s found little time to work on his own. The brewhouse—which he bought from the owners of the former Saxer in 2002—will take another month or two to set up. The interior of the barn that houses Wildwood remains skeletal, with incomplete bathrooms and exposed concrete. He admits he’s months away from an opening. But The Beer Doctor does have one thing ready now: a full lineup of recipes ready to brew. asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Battle for the breweries Peter Pan can really fly!

A long legislative road leads to a mostly happy ending

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The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information call 728-3476.

Missoula Independent

Page 10 April 29–May 6, 2010

These days Montanans think nothing of walking into their neighborhood craft brewery, finding an awesome selection of taps facing them, and knocking back a pint of some incredibly fine, locally produced beer. But it wasn’t always like that. Way back in the ’90s, the legislative battles for the breweries were hot and heavy and, sometimes, rather nasty. Back in the day, beer came in cans or bottles and had names like Olympia, Pabst, Miller, Budweiser, Coors or Schmidt’s. There was a time when Coors was thought to be a high-end brew and was actually coveted if and when someone brought a few six-packs back from Colorado. The other much-desired brews came from Canada, where an icycold Kokanee on a hot summer day was considered pretty much being in heaven. Those days are long gone and not much missed by anyone who drinks our good local beers. Oh sure, you can still find those same brews filling grocery shelves, but nowadays they’re your last, not only, choice. Thanks to the microbrew revolution that swept the nation in the last two decades, virtually every state has at least a few local breweries kicking out their foaming treasures—even Utah, which is not known as a great place to get a drink. Craft brewing, however, didn’t immediately spring to life here in Montana. Instead, much like the cappuccino craze, it began in places like California and Seattle and slowly spread across the country. Those who know Montana history will rightfully recall that Big Sky Country had a veritable treasure-trove of local breweries during its early years. Butte, Great Falls, Helena and even Virginia City, among others, had breweries that were primarily started by immigrants who missed the foaming repast of their former homelands. But then came Carrie Nation with her ax, a very stupid national policy called Prohibition, and all those great little breweries simply faded away— although in many places, you can still see their signs painted on our old historic buildings. Prohibition also faded away—but not before making millions for notorious bootleggers, setting up enormous criminal ventures, and enabling gang control of the liquor business. Unfortunately, it was during the post-Prohibition era when many of Montana’s liquor control laws were written, and it’s safe to say the urge to divvy up the profits was para-

mount to setting up a reasonable, working system of supply and demand. Montana has what is generally known as the antiquated “three tier” system whereby we have producers, distributors and retailers. Woe be to those who should ever suggest that the three be in any way

session “afterAndsession, the Montana Tavern Association and the distributors killed those bills like baby seals on Newfoundland’s

ice floes.

changed—which is exactly the policy morass in which the fledgling microbrewers found themselves in the ’90s. Session after session brave legislators brought forth bills to allow microbreweries to operate legally in the state. And session after session, the Montana Tavern Association and the distributors killed those bills like baby seals on Newfoundland’s ice floes. The problems, at least as the tavern, distribution and Department of Revenue lobbyists told legislators, were straightforward. Bars are licensed to sell liquor at retail and heavily regulated by the state’s Liquor Control Division. Distributors are licensed and regulated to take liquor from either the state’s warehouses or wholesalers and deliver it to bars and restaurants. The pie was already cut into neat pieces and, surprise, surprise, no one wanted to share their slice with upstart microbrewers who not only wanted to produce beer, but wanted to sell it at retail to customers in their tap rooms. Further complicating the issue was the state’s quota system for liquor licenses, which produced a significant commercial value often running in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, and bar

owners didn’t want that license value reduced by more retail outlets for beer. That problem was exacerbated when the Legislature foolishly decided to tack gambling licenses onto liquor licenses, further increasing their value. And with at least one bar in every town in Montana, when the Tavern Association said “No,” the Legislature heard the message loud and clear from their local bar owners. To make a long and somewhat grisly tale a lot shorter and sweeter, the Montana impasse went on for years while the microbrewing industry continued to thrive and flourish throughout the nation. Eventually, it became obvious that even the entrenched interests couldn’t hold back the tide of change—to say nothing of public demand—and the Legislature finally, in the late ’90s, passed a bill allowing small breweries with under 10,000 barrels per year to produce beer and sell it in their own tasting rooms in limited quantities and with restricted hours of operation. The solution, as many craft brew aficionados will tell you, is far from perfect. Right now the law allows craft brewers to sell or give away up to 48 ounces, or three pints of beer per day, to individuals in their tasting rooms. They may also fill growlers—large glass jugs that hold about a half-gallon of brew—without limitation. They can also fill and sell various sized kegs and barrels for sale at retail outlets, but have limitations on their ability to self-distribute. Hence, most breweries still pay their silver and go through the middleman, the distributors, to get their ales to bar room taps. The system is okay, but not great. There are still many who find it inconvenient to be unable to serve the fly angler a foamy tall one after an evening of fishing, since the law demands that tasting room taps stop flowing at 8 p.m. And there are those, both brewers and customers, who find the “three pints and you’re out” limitation both a hassle and an unnecessary restriction on the personal choice of legal adults. Overall, though, Montana’s craft brewers have grown into a respected industry that works hand-in-glove with our grain growers to produce some of the finest beers in the nation—and I’ll tip a foam-topped pint to that! Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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In his wake Floyd Dominy, the colossus of dams, dies at 100 by Julianne Couch

Floyd Dominy, who made it his mission to improve nature by, among other things, damming the Colorado River at Glen Canyon and creating the more user-friendly Lake Powell, has died at the age of 100. Some had hoped that Glen Canyon Dam would go first, draining Lake Powell and restoring the river’s ecosystem. But Dominy, who was commissioner for the Bureau of Reclamation from 1959 to 1969, spoke of his pride in his achievement during an interview a decade ago: “Glen Canyon Dam and the creation of the most wonderful lake in the world, Lake Powell, is my crowning jewel.” One week before Dominy passed away in Virginia at his Angus farm, I spoke to him by telephone. I wanted to talk to the man I’d first learned about long ago from reading John McPhee’s Encounters with the Archdruid. I can think of no better way to write a story than the way McPhee did: You put two enemies in a rubber raft (along with a handful of unsuspecting strangers) and send them all down a wild river together. That’s what McPhee did with Dominy and David Brower, the Sierra Club president who considered the construction of Glen Canyon Dam his biggest environmental policy failure. McPhee set the stage with both scenery and character. His canvas was the Colorado River, with its mile-high rock walls and hundreds of side canyons. And his characters were equally memorable: Brower, the environmental leader who saw what would be lost to the rising waters; and Dominy, the determined dam-builder who learned as a young man in Nebraska that water in a river does no good at all if isn’t made available for people to use. In the end, it seemed that Dominy and Brower had a blast, drinking beer and occasionally bickering about whether remote stretches of the Colorado were valuable because they were untouched, or wasted because they weren’t being developed. I’ve never forgotten McPhee’s description of Dominy, smoking cigars on the raft trip and somehow able to keep his cigar lit

as the raft passed through a waterfall. Brower kept referring to the future Lake Powell as “Lake Dominy.” When I spoke to Dominy, I said I thought the trip sounded pretty exciting. “It was boring!” he said. “Boring, how could it be anything else? You can’t see out from the bottom of a canyon.”

Dominy was “convinced that nature could be improved, that it could—and should—be manipulated and mastered in order to make life less difficult for human

beings.

Some might interpret that statement as an indication of the kind of blindness to the need for natural processes that characterized the Bureau of Reclamation during Dominy’s day and for a long time afterward. Dominy argued that if the West were going to be developed, the waters of the Colorado River’s cycle of flood and trickle would have to be managed. Others doubted that intensively developing the West was a wise thing to do in the first place; they thought that the region should be left unpredictable and

fragile—that we should discourage settlement, rather than invite it. But Dominy was convinced that nature could be improved, that it could—and should—be manipulated and mastered in order to make life less difficult for human beings. That belief was planted during Dominy’s hardscrabble childhood and no doubt further developed during his early days as a county extension agent in parched northeastern Wyoming. He told McPhee about that experience: “I watched the people there—I mean good folk, industrious, hard-working, frugal—compete with the rigors of nature against hopeless odds. They would ruin their health and still fail.” Perhaps that prompted him to do some water management on his first farm in Fairfax, Va., building ponds and stocking them with fish for the kids. He and his wife decided to settle in Virginia because it was an easy commute to his Washington, D.C., office, he said. Dominy had a long career before retiring from the Department of Agriculture. All that government service paid off in the form of a “very nice” 100th birthday party on Capitol Hill, attended by members of Congress and others, he recalled. Dominy told me that he wasn’t surprised that he achieved his 100th birthday, because once he made it to 99, he could see it from there. He’d had colon cancer when he was 97, he said, and “survived that just fine.” He gave up cigars years ago but said he was still fond of whiskey, to which he partially attributed his longevity. Still, he acknowledged that he didn’t think he’d make it to 101. “I’m collapsing,” he said. Unlike the silt-filling reservoirs along the Colorado River, a few days later, on April 20, that’s just what he did, leaving the world a little less interesting in his wake. Julianne Couch is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She writes in Laramie, Wy.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Despite any assurance that our crappy economy is on the mend, members of Missoula’s Two Rivers Branch of the Industrial Workers of the World (aka the “Wobblies”) aren’t buying into that notion. They believe workers—in Montana and around the country—are still in a state of crisis. If you agree, or consider yourself part of this predicament, I’d recommend joining others in solidarity Saturday when Missoula’s annual May Day celebration kicks off with some political theater. Specifically, the rabble-rousing fun begins when a replica of Lady Ann Magee II—the yacht owned by packaging mogul Sir Michael Smurfit—appears at the river trail near Caras Park. Once it sets sail, expect to see your fellow laborers take over the helm. At that

point, you and your comrades will head to Kiwanis Park for a rally that includes speeches from labor organizers like Mark Anderlik. Although details are still in the works, Anderlik and others will discuss everything from local labor issues—like the shuttering of Smurfit-Stone Container Corp.’s linerboard plant—to the history of May Day. But the action doesn’t stop there. Plan to stick around for food, as well as entertainment from a host of local bands and spoken word artists. –Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY APRIL 29

PM at the School of Business Administration, in UM’s Gallagher Business Building. $25/$10 students. Find out more and register at missoulabarcamp.org.

If you’d like to help the city of Missoula learn how much our trails, sidewalks and bike facilities are used, consider becoming a non-motorized traffic count volunteer during a training session from 5–6 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free to participate. The count occurs Tue., May 4 from 4–6 PM. Call 258-4989. Renew your commitment to end racism when YWCA Missoula commemorates the Day of Commitment to End Racism with a screening of the documentary Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, which starts at 5:30 PM at the center room of the YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Get neighborly during Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features “Overcoming Bureaucracy: A Panel,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 5526081 or by e-mailing Erin at escott@ci.missoula.mt.us. If you’d like to review and comment on the environmental assessment for the Kearl Module Transport Project—which means Imperial Oil would haul overdimension loads through Montana—then get to an open house which starts at 6 PM, with a presentation/public hearing at 6:30 PM, at Meadow Hill Middle School, 4210 S. Reserve St. Free. View the assessment at the Missoula Public Library, or online at mdt.mt.gov/ pubinvolve/eis_ea.shtml.

SATURDAY MAY 1 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Create, contribute and connect with your fellow Missoulians during Missoula BarCamp 2010— described as a cross between a school, think tank, party and business incubator—which runs from 9 AM–5:30

Missoula’s May Day celebration begins at noon Saturday, May 1, at the river trail near Caras Park. Free. Call Dave at 363-5292.

SUNDAY MAY 2 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP.

MONDAY MAY 3 Those interested in issues pertaining to the homeless population are invited to a meeting of the Montana Homeless Network, which meets this and every Mon. at 10 AM in the small conference room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call John at 828230-6902. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

TUESDAY MAY 4 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

THURSDAY MAY 6 Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 April 29–May 6, 2010


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CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Albert Bailey, 27, and a 16-year-old accomplice phoned a bank in Fairfield, Conn., and said they’d be by in 10 minutes to pick up $100,000 in large bills. Their call warned no dye packs and threatened “a blood bath” if the money wasn’t ready. Bank officials immediately notified police, who showed up in time to stop the suspects after they picked up the money but before they could make their getaway. The robbers got what they wanted but “didn’t expect police to be in the take-out line,” police Sgt. James Perez noted, adding, “You can’t make this stuff up.” REASONABLE EXPLANATIONS - After police arrested Anthony Coffman, 28, for using a hunting knife to cut open meat packages in a supermarket in Edinburgh, Ind., and then throwing the raw meat on the floor, Coffman explained he’s a vegetarian and gets upset when others eat beef. He insisted God sent him to ruin the meat, adding he was trying to save little girls from food he believes would make them “chubby.” “He thought if he could save one chubby girl, he’s done his job,” police Deputy Chief David Lutz said. After a late-night argument with his wife, Gerald Lancaster, 84, fired a gunshot as she left their home in Houston, Texas, then went back inside. He didn’t come out when police arrived and remained inside for nearly six hours, even after a SWAT team arrived on the scene and tried to coax him out with phone calls and pleas from a bullhorn. At one point, they even fired tear gas into the home, but he still didn’t come out. Finally, officers broke through the door and arrested Lancaster peacefully. He explained to authorities that he hadn’t responded to their efforts because he was asleep during much of the standoff and didn’t realize police officers had surrounded his home. LOOK MA, NO EYES - Turkish pop singer Metin Senturk, who has been blind since he was 3, wept for joy after learning that he had become the world’s fastest unaccompanied blind driver. His average speed of 292.89 kph (181.59 mph) broke the previous record of 284 kph, held by a British bank manager. Former rally driver Volkan Isik followed Senturk in a separate vehicle and guided him by radio. Collier Sims, 24, won the first known blind-fencing competition, held at the Carroll Center for the Blind in Newton, Mass. “A lot of the fencing actions that we do, we can apply them to everyday life,” said the competition’s organizer, Cesar Morales, fencing coach at the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Mass., explaining that learning to use a fencing foil is similar to learning to use a white cane to navigate.

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WELL-HEELED THIEF - South Korean police arrested a 59-year-old man suspected of stealing shoes, which Koreans customarily remove before entering homes, restaurants and funeral parlors. A subsequent search found 170 boxes packed with 1,700 pairs of expensive designer shoes, sorted by size and brand. “Shoe theft is not unusual here,” Detective Kim Jeong-gu said. “But we gasped at this one.” The suspect, identified only by his last name, Park, is a former used-shoe vendor, convicted twice in the past five years of pilfering shoes. He was on parole when police spotted him outside the Samsung Medical Center funeral parlor. They observed him return several times pretending to be a mourner and swapping cheap shoes for expensive ones. UNKOSHER FOR PASSOVER - Cigarettes may contain traces of pig blood, according to Dutch researchers, who found cigarette companies using pig hemoglobin to make filters to trap harmful chemicals before they enter smokers’ lungs. Although cigarette manufacturers voluntarily list the contents of their products on their web sites, those are proven-dangerous ingredients. They lump pig’s blood under undisclosed “processing aids,” which “do not functionally affect the finished product,” said Australian public health professor Simon Chapman, who pointed out Jewish, Islamic and vegetarian smokers would find inhaling pig’s blood “very offensive.” GREEN ACRES - Detroit officials plan turning a quarter of the 139-square-mile city into fields and farms. Mayor Dave Bing said the city faces a $300 million budget deficit and dwindling tax base, and can’t continue to provide police and fire protection and other city services to all areas. The plan to “downsize” the heavily industrial city calls for large demolition swaths to cut through 91,000 vacant residential lots and 33,000 empty houses in blighted neighborhoods, creating pockets of green, semi-rural surrounding surviving neighborhoods. The biggest obstacle to implementation is getting hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal government to buy land, raze buildings and relocate residents, since the city has no money.

Image from card available at Rudy's.

AVOIRDUPOIS FOLLIES - Ads and catalogs using plus-sized models don’t work with their target audience, according to a study investigating the link between model sizes in ads and the self-esteem of consumers looking at the ads. “We believe it is unlikely that many brands will gain market share by using heavy models in their ads,” said Naomi Mendel of Arizona State University, who worked with researchers from Germany’s University of Cologne and Erasmus University in the Netherlands. Not only does the lower self-esteem of overweight consumers lessen their enthusiasm to buy products touted by people who look like them, she explained, but also “normal-weight consumers experienced lower self-esteem after exposure to moderately heavy models.” BIRDS OF A FEATHER- Citizens who oppose teaching the theory of evolution in schools are gaining ground by linking it to global warming and arguing that public schools should teach dissenting views on scientific theories in general. The result is more state legislatures debating measures that support the idea. “There is a lot of similar dogmatism on this issue,” said John G. West, senior fellow with a group advocating the teaching of intelligent design, “with scientists being persecuted for findings that are not in keeping with the orthodoxy.” SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Jacoby Laquan Smith, 33, admitted beating up his quadruple amputee girlfriend, but only after she hit him first because he yelled at her for blocking his view of television. Tiesha Bell, 28, “punched me in the groin,” Smith told a court in St. Paul, Minn., then hit him with a coffee canister, a bedpan filled with urine and her wheelchair. Bell conceded there was hitting on both sides, declaring, “We both need anger management.”

Missoula Independent

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hen Missoula trademark attorney Bob Lukes revived the decades-dead Highlander beer brand in May 2008, he advertised a simple request in the community: He wanted stories. Lukes had already seen plenty of memorabilia from the old Missoula Brewing Company’s standard brew—bottles, cans, boxes, signs, old tap handles, etc.—but the self-proclaimed beer history buff lacked the backroom anecdotes that made Highlander Missoula’s go-to brew for more than half a century. “I moved up here in ’85, and I was just loving the place and the history of the place and wanting to learn more,” Lukes says. “I started seeing this Highlander stuff. You go out to Fuddruckers and in one corner of it they’ve got this big collection of cans, or you’re in the Missoula Club and they’ve got that neon sign and painting…It just kind of got my fancy.” So shortly after Highlander’s return at the 2008 Garden City BrewFest, Lukes hosted a small bash at Sean Kelly’s with an open invite to any former Missoula Brewing Co. employee. And the reverie didn’t stop there. Lukes fielded stories

for the next year, by letter and by e-mail, from folks across the country. Some shared childhood memories of local businesses running contests on the radio, each offering the winner a Highlander sixer. Others recalled their teenage years working at the brewery, unloading 100-pound sacks of barley from railcars and washing glass bottles that were recycled five, six, even seven times. Lillis Waylett, now of Decatur, Texas, responded to Lukes’ plea with page upon page of insider brewery history. He remembered seasoned workers packing lunches of pretzels, cheese, chips or smoked whitefish, “anything to go along with a quart or two of beer.” Employees even had their own large pails, which they filled several times a day at a tapped keg of Highlander. Bill Steinbrenner, whose grandfather co-founded Missoula Bre wi ng Co. afte r the re pe al of Prohibition, says beer was essentially “part of their wages.” The overwhelming response from a thirsty and grateful public convinced Lukes he’d done the right thing bring-

ing Highlander back to the taps. But Missoula’s history of beer goes well beyond that signature blend of hops and barley. Montana has been a vital thread in the fabric of the nation’s beer industry since the late 1800s. The emergence of craft breweries and the everincreasing popularity of taprooms has only strengthened our devotion to that heritage—or, rather, to that smooth, heady liquid so favored by local residents.

issoula in the early 1870s contained a population of just over 100—hardly enough to fill a downtown bar on a Friday night these days. Half of the existing 66 buildings had been constructed after 1869. The Northern Pacific Railroad and subsequent building boom was still a decade off, making the Garden City every bit a frontier town. Yet commercial brewing started as early as 1874 under George Gerber, and as the town grew, the demand for beer skyrocketed. The University of Montana opened in

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FROM THE FIRST TAPPED KEG TO THE LATEST ROUND AT THE BAR, WE QUENCH YOUR THIRST FOR THE STORY OF HOW THAT COLD, CRAFT-BREWED PINT CAME TO BE. by Alex Sakariassen

Photo courtesy of Bob Lukes

The old Garden City Brewery, established in the late 1800s, sat at the base of Waterworks Hill near Rattlesnake Creek in Missoula. Over time the brewery became home to Missoula’s famed Highlander beer, a regional favorite that disappeared in 1964 and was recently revived.

Missoula Independent

Page 14 April 29–May 6, 2010


1893, ushering in additional drinkers, and by 1900 Missoula’s population numbered more than 4,000. That’s about the time barflies got an official name to go with Gerber’s beer: Garden City Brewery. Like all rural communities of the day, Missoula relied on local producers for its goods and beer was no exception. More than 30 breweries statewide started up in growing communities like Philipsburg and Anaconda during the th latter half of the 19 century. Bars in Missoula sold bottles delivered fresh from Garden City, and the Highlander brand officially hit the market in 1910, enjoying a decade-long reign before the U.S. Congress passed the Volstead Act in 1919. Prohibition spelled the end for Montana’s early hey-day of beer. Garden City Brewery held on for several years, producing soda and near-beer. But just days after President Franklin Roosevelt’s repeal of Prohibition in 1933, Highlander brewing operations kicked back into gear under the newly re-founded and renamed Missoula Brewing Company. The beer was once again a hit, generating fierce loyalty among drinkers across western Montana and catching the attention of West Coast beer mogul Emil Sick. Sick, the son of brewing pioneer Fritz Sick, inherited family interest in the highly successful and multinational Rainier Brewing Company shortly after the repeal of Prohibition. He spent much of the late ’30s and early ’40s expanding his beer portfolio, acquiring both the Missoula Brewing Co. and the Great Falls Breweries—producers of the popular Great Falls Select—in 1944. Highlander remained under the umbrella of Sick’s Rainier empire for nearly 20 years. Bill Steinbrenner never concerned himself much with the broader business interests at the Missoula Brewing Co. His grandfather, William Steinbrenner, had helped bring the Highlander name back to Missoula in 1933. But Bill Steinbrenner stuck to the brewery floor, working summers on the bottle line like so many other local teenagers. It was just another job opportunity, he says, like timber industry or mine work—except it had certain perks. “There were just tons of people in the state of Montana who had worked at the brewery for various summers between the ’40s and 1960 or so,” says Steinbrenner, now 73. “One reason people wanted to work at the brewery was you could drink all the beer you wanted, no problem—as long as you didn’t get drunk on a union contract.” Steinbrenner remembers the typical first-day gig for prospective employees. High school or college kids would unload 100-pound sacks of barley from railcars, before moving on to work the heavier bottle-washing machiner y. Steinbrenner says the former task weeded out about 20 percent of the applicants. By Steinbrenner’s account, beer had a drastically different presence in

Photo by Sarah Daisy Lindmark

In the past two decades, microbrews have become more popular in Missoula. More than a dozen breweries have opened statewide since 2000, bringing the total to 25.

Missoula society during the 1940s and ’50s. The high cost of transporting beer long distances meant the lion’s share of draft beer in Missoula was Highlander. Occasionally Steinbrenner, who says he had his first sip of beer at age two, got a taste of something else from the region. But beer was unpasteurized then, giving it a short shelf life and necessitating daily deliveries of fresh bottles and kegs. “When I was a kid, the only beers were Highlander, Kessler out of Helena, Rocky Mountain out of Anaconda and maybe Butte Special,” Steinbrenner says. “The beers were all very local. It was like the dairy business. You had your milk delivered to your door, and same with your beer.” Sick’s purchase of the Missoula Brewing Co. gradually changed the localized character of Highlander. Signs painted on buildings across the state proclaimed it “Montana’s Favorite.” The company altered its advertising strategy in the ’50s, adopting the now-familiar tartan label. Montana had already established itself as a player in the country’s beer industry with Leopold Schmidt, who created Centennial Brewing in Butte in 1879 before moving west to found the Olympia Brewing Company in Washington. The growing distribution of Highlander through the Rainier network made the brand a regional favorite and further solidified the state’s role in U.S. brewing history. However, this second wind in Missoula brewing was also destined to end. Sick began shedding his beer assets in the early ’60s, among them his entire Montana portfolio. Rainier’s Seattle brewery continued producing Highlander for a short time, but the brand died completely in 1964, when Missoula Brewing Co. closed its facility at the base of Waterworks Hill to clear the

way for Interstate-90. The costs of transporting beer through the Rocky Mountain West and competing with national conglomerates simply became too great. One by one, Montana’s other breweries folded, with the last—Great Falls Breweries, then owned by BlitzWeinhard—shutting down in 1968.

he disappearance of localized breweries across Montana resulted in a 20-year dry spell for the state, an era punctuated by what Worden’s Market owner Tim France calls “brand loyalty.” Large companies like Anheuser-Busch, Rainier and Olympia replaced hometown brews with mass-produced

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American pilsners. Community radio contests ceased, gimmicky local beer products became memorabilia. France says Montana drinkers chose a big-name beer and stuck to it. Rainier had its run, as did Lucky Lager, each generating a die-hard following that drank for the drink, not for the taste. “Nobody talked about Oly or Rainier or anything,” France says. “It was just a given.” When he first bought Worden’s Market 30 years ago, France sold about 6,000 kegs annually. Whether it was fraternity rush parties or a night with the guys, “beer was the social lubricant.” People just drank to drink, France says, end of story.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Missoula’s microbrew renaissance began with the founding of Bayern Brewing Company in 1987. Five years later, Bayern masterbrewer Jürgen Knöller collaborated with owners from the Rhino, Iron Horse and Worden’s Market to start the city’s first brewfest.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 April 29–May 6, 2010


Rhinoceros bar owner Kevin Head first arrived in Missoula for college in 1977, in the days when Olympia and Rainier were more widely accepted with local crowds than the likes of Budweiser and Miller. Imports were a luxury back then, Head says, something strictly reserved for those rare moments when beer was more than just a social norm. “It used to be that if you went over to a friend’s house and went into a refrigerator and they had a six-pack of Michelob, you would ask, ‘Well, what’s the occasion?’��� Head says. “Same with a six-pack of Heineken or Beck’s.” So when a seeming novelty began to emerge in the Missoula beer market in the late ’80s, no one knew quite what to think. Bayern Brewing introduced the city to the distinct flavor of craft beer in 1987, a bold move by German masterbrewer Jürgen Knöller that both Head and France recognized as an opportunity to turn local drinking culture on its head. “What I saw a lot were people who were willing to drink up and enjoy something over a longer period of time, rather than just get a glow and drink as much as possible,” Head says. “They were willing to buy up and drink less.” Worden’s Market and the Rhino teamed with Bayern and the Iron Horse Brew Pub—the microbrewery’s partner at the time—in 1992 to host the first BRIWFest in Caras Park (the first initial of the four businesses’ names made up the acronym). The event featured some 20 breweries from throughout the region, Head says, and helped expand the community’s awareness of fine craft beer. The foursome eventually handed the event off to the Missoula Downtown Association, creating the annual Garden City BrewFest. “It’s been a very welcome change, and it’s been a lot of fun,” Head says. “There’s a real experience in trying new things now, whereas before, you knew what you liked and that’s what you went for.” That change came slow at first. When Neal Leathers, Bjorn Nabozney and Brad Robinson entered the local scene by founding Big Sky Brewing in 1995, Rainier still held the monopoly on local taps. Big Sky’s debut brew, Whistling Pig Red Ale, appeared at a number of regional brewfests to mixed reviews. Leathers says the culture in the West at that time didn’t instill much confidence in the chances of local craft beer making it big. “We came in in that dead zone when Highlander was gone,” says Leathers, who moved to Missoula from Michigan in 1990. “When we came in here, because I was already a homebrewer and into craft beer, it was great just having Bayern Brewing. But I don’t think aside from Bayern there was anything I associated with Missoula beside the keggers, and even that was before my time. That was sort of the beer-drinking culture—big parties.” Head at the Rhino had already given microbrews a shot when Bayern

Missoula Independent

came onto the scene, increasing the number of available drafts at the bar from three to six to accommodate local tastes. But those at Big Sky were surprised how quickly Missoula’s prevailing attitudes toward beer morphed, making way for what most devout brewa-holics hail as Montana’s microbrew renaissance. Bars that once had two

Rainier handles within a couple weeks of starting the brewery. Talk about a strange switch, from Rainier to craft beer.” When Big Sky started brewing at its former Hickory Street location, there were fewer than 600 microbreweries established nationwide. But the early successes of Bayern and Big Sky gave the industry a strong foothold. Tim O’Leary

According to the Montana Brewers Association, Montana’s 25 micobreweries now produce more than 70,000 barrels of beer a year, employ roughly 200 residents and distribute to 19 states. draft beers now had four or five, and craft beers were even bumping popular domestics off the taps. “Rainier was still the hot number, and in Missoula alone that was, I think, the single largest impact we had on any beer,” Nabozney says. “We took 65

founded the Kettlehouse Brewing Company as a brew-on-premises operation the same year Big Sky opened. For its first few years, Kettlehouse acted as a community homebrew location, where individuals could craft their own batches of beer.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Kettlehouse Brewing Company started on Myrtle Street in 1995 as a brew-on-premises operation. In 2008, after years of brewing its own line of beers as a small-scale brewery, Kettlehouse owner Tim O’Leary opened a second location on North First Street to increase production.

Page 16 April 29–May 6, 2010

O’Leary says he’d grown familiar with the model while living in Boulder, Colo.—already a hotbed for microbrewing by the early ’90s. The idea worked, until the demand for craft beer by local bars and drinkers overwhelmed the number of homebrew enthusiasts taking advantage of the Kettlehouse facility. Greater business interests prevailed, and O’Leary began using the building on Myrtle Street to market a line of brews. Kettlehouse was an instant hit with classic American styles like Eddy Out Pale Ale. But the brewery quickly established a reputation for being edgy and experimental, implementing new-to-Missoula ingredients like hemp in the brewing process. O’Leary says local business owners proved an invaluable asset to early success at Kettlehouse, with bars like the Rhino eager to open taps to even the strangest beer. O’Leary even credits the Rhino for coming up with the name for his popular hemp porter, Olde Bongwater. One obstacle still stood in the way of serious expansion, however: Microbreweries could produce beer, but they couldn’t legally sell pints on-site. Most breweries allowed customers to fill growlers in the ’90s, allowing the growing hoards of loyal drinkers to take their craft beer home. Still, O’Leary says selling beers straight from the taproom was a pivotal marketing tool to lobby for, and represents one of the greatest hurdles the local beer industry has faced in decades. In addition to helping business, the taproom acts as a “Petri dish,” he says, or a place to test new brews before adding recipes to the regular line-up. “We had people that just wanted to come in and drink a beer,” O’Leary says. “We’d say, ‘Well, we can give you [space] and you can brew your own and when you bottle it you can sample your own bottle.’ But people wanted brewpubs in this state, and when your customers are asking for something, if you’re a smart business person you give it to them.” In 1999, O’Leary helped lead the fight to rewrite Montana’s laws governing taprooms. (See George Ochenski’s “Battle for the breweries,” page 10, for more on this topic.) The Kettlehouse’s growth had been hindered by the state’s limitations, and O’Leary believes the brewery wouldn’t have made it without the brand loyalty generated by on-site sales. By January 2000, after a contentious battle in the Legislature, O’Leary says “we were able to sell the first pint beer from a taproom in Montana.” The ability for microbreweries that produced fewer than 10,000 barrels a year to sell customers 48 ounces of beer—or three pints—opened the industry floodgates. More than a dozen breweries cropped up over the subsequent decade, including taprooms in small towns like Stevensville, Lakeside and Wibaux. According to the Montana Brewers Association, founded in 1998, Montana’s 25 micobreweries now produce more than 70,000 barrels of beer a year, employ roughly 200 residents and distribute to 19 states.

The sudden spike in Montana microbreweries mirrors in a large way what’s happening to beer culture across the country. Craft brewers nationwide sold over 9 million barrels of beer in 2009, and 1,595 microbreweries are now in operation—the most since before Prohibition, according to the national Brewers Association. “The newness of it all, it was like a little toy in Montana,” Nabozney says of the growth statewide. “People thought the whole idea, the whole concept of craft beer was just pretty cool.”

ead credits the rising popularity of craft beers in Missoula partly to the interest and ingenuity of local brewers. Mostly though, he says Missoula’s tastes evolved. The average citizen is more worldly these days, and most college kids have grown up with one or two brewpubs in their hometowns. Like the Rainier years, there’s a shifting loyalty. Only this time it’s shifting back toward the local product. “As people have come to enjoy a good beer, they’ve come to demand more choice,” Head says. “When [the Rhino] first started, most of the places had two, maybe three beers on tap. That was it. I think you’ll find now, because of the micros, that most have five to 10 on tap. That specifically is because the people are demanding it. They’ll go to the bars that have it. “People’s expectations have changed,” he continues. “Their palates have changed, and they want the better stuff.” At Worden’s, France says many consumers have simply grown bored with domestics. But the danger of boredom also applies to the microbrews. Big Sky, Kettlehouse and Bayern all need to release seasonals and specials on a constant rotation to stay competitive and hold the attention of consumers. Any of the local breweries would be the first to admit a competitive edge to the local industry. But they’re just as quick to point out how vital each is to the continued success of the others. “It’s a very symbiotic relationship that all us breweries have with each other,” Nabozney says. “We’re dependent on each other…Competition is good. It raises the bar. It raises the expectations of all the beer drinkers.” That competition continues to spur growth in Missoula. Kettlehouse gained so much popularity in the region that O’Leary opened a second brewery location on North First Street in spring 2008, largely to meet distribution demands. “Did I ever think it would go to this? No. I would have been happy to be 3,000 to 4,000 barrels keeping my buddies in canned beer for their ski trips,” O’Leary says. “It’s only icing on the cake that there’s a demand for it in western Montana, and in the region. We can’t send beer to Billings yet because we want to make sure we don’t run Missoula out of beer if the beer switch really turns on.”

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by Vote 0 1 May

O F F I C I A L BA L LO T

Arts & Entertainment

Nightlife

Best Art Gallery ____________________________________________________

Best Bar______________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Local Photographer __________________________________

Best Bar for a Stiff Pour ______________________________________

Best Local Writer __________________________________________________________________________________

Best Beer Selection ______________________________________

Best Movie Rental ________________________________________________________

Best Bloody Mary ________________________________________________

Best Movie Theater ________________________________________________

Best Casino ____________________________________________

Fashion & Beauty

Best Happy Hour ________________________________________ Best Karaoke Bar ________________________________________________

Best Cosmetics ____________________________________________________________________________________

Best Martini ____________________________________________

Best Day Spa________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Place to Dance ____________________________________________________

Best Jewelry_ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Place for Live Music ________________________________________________

Best Kids’ Clothing ____________________________________________

Best Pool Table ____________________________________________________________________

Best Lingerie ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Sports Bar __________________________________________________

Best Men’s Clothing ______________________________________ Best Place for a Hair Cut __________________________________

Food & Drink

Best Shoe Store ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Asian Food____________________________________________________________________

Best Tattoo Parlor __________________________________________________ Best Thrift Store____________________________________________________________________________________ Best Women’s Clothing ________________________________________

Goods & Services Best Auto Repair ________________________________________ Best Big Box Store ________________________________________________________ Best Bookstore __________________________________________ Best Car Wash __________________________________________ Best CDs and Music ______________________________________ Best Computer Repair Shop ________________________________ Best Department Store ____________________________________ Best Dry Cleaner

____________________________________________

Best Financial Institution ______________________________________ Best Furniture Store ______________________________________ Best Hardware Store ______________________________________ Best Hobby/Craft Shop ____________________________________ Best Laundromat

____________________________________________

Best Lodging ____________________________________________ Best Motorcycle/ATV Dealer ________________________________ Best New Car Dealer ______________________________________________________________ Best Pawn Shop __________________________________________________________ Best Pet Supplies ________________________________________ Best Plant Nursery ____________________________________________ Best Ranch Supply Store __________________________________ Best Store for Home Electronics ____________________________________ Best Store for Home Appliances ____________________________________ Best Store for Musical Instruments ______________________________________ Best Toy Store __________________________________________________ Best Used Car Dealer ________________________________________

Best Bakery ________________________________________________________________________________________

Not all elections are created equal. We’d probably agree there’s a slight difference between voting officials into office in Washington, D.C., and dialing for a dreamy teen crooner on “American Idol”—even if we do find Kelly Clarkson more influential than either Denny Rehberg or Max Baucus. But in the grand scheme of elections, one stands above the rest: Best of Missoula, our annual celebration of everything that makes Missoula special and quite possibly your most important voting experience ever. No, really. Ever. What other election offers you the opportunity to pledge your allegiance to a local restaurant, bartender or band? What other ballot tailors itself so exclusively to the place you call home—and to you—by offering more than 150 wide-ranging categories? And, more importantly, Best of Missoula doesn’t offer you a little sticker for your participation—we’ll throw a full-on bash to honor your role in the democratic process with our Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 8. Plus, making your voice heard is easy: Vote in hard copy by using this ballot, or visit www.missoulanews.com and vote online, where you’ll find 50 online-only categories. The rules are also pretty straightforward: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided below. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, May 10. With that, consider yourself registered, and let the most important voting of your life (at least until next year) commence.

Best Breakfast ____________________________________________________________________________ Best Budget Lunch__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Coffee ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Convenience Store __________________________________________ Best Delicatessen______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Desserts ____________________________________________________ Best Family-Friendly Dining ____________________________________________ Best French Fries ____________________________________________ Best Fresh Produce __________________________________________ Best Hamburger __________________________________________________ Best Ice Cream____________________________________________________ Best Liquor Store____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Mexican Food ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Microbrewery ______________________________________________________ Best Milk Shake ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best New Restaurant ____________________________________________________________ Best Outdoor Dining_ _________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Pizza __________________________________________________________________________ Best Pizza Delivery________________________________________________________________ Best Place to Eat Alone ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Restaurant __________________________________________________ Best Restaurant Service ____________________________________________________ Best Restaurant Wine List ____________________________________ Best Retail Beer Selection __________________________________________________________________________________ Best Retail Wine Selection ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Romantic Dining ________________________________________________________________________ Best Salad ____________________________________________ Best Sandwich Shop __________________________________________________________________________ Best Seafood __________________________________________ Best Steak __________________________________________________________________________________________

Sports & Recreation

Best Supermarket______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Bike Shop ______________________________________________________________________

Best Vegetarian Food ____________________________________________________________

Best Bowling Alley ________________________________________________________ Best Flyfishing Shop ____________________________________________________________________________

People & Media

Best Golf Course ________________________________________

Best Activist ____________________________________________

Name:______________________

Best Journalist ____________________________________________________________

Best Place to Get a Snowboard ________________________________________________

Best Local Sports Figure ____________________________________________________________________

Best Sporting Goods ____________________________________________________________________________

Email:______________________

Best Meteorologist __________________________________________________________________________

Best Store for Mountaineering Gear____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Radio Station __________________________________________________________________________

Best Store for Skis ________________________________________________________

Phone:________________________

Best TV Personality ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Health Club______________________________________________ Best Place for Paddle Sports Gear ____________________________________________

Best Store for Guns ______________________________________

Best Local Politician ______________________________________________________

Best Radio Personality __________________________________________________________

Best TV Newscast ________________________________________________________

Ballot Box Locations: Bernice's Bakery, Break Espresso, Bridge Pizza, Butterfly Herbs, Caffé Dolce (both locations), Computer Central, El Diablo, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Grizzly Grocery, Hastings, Hob Nob, Iron Horse, Iza Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Liquid Planet, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Rosauer's Reserve Street Bistro, Sushi Hana, Taco del Mar, Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), Tangles, UC Center Market, Uptown Diner, Westside Lanes, Wheat Montana, Worden's Market Missoula Independent

Page 17 April 29–May 6, 2010


Big Sky, already the largest producer of Montana beer, can’t stop growing either. The brewery currently distributes across most of the western United States, from the coast all the way to Minnesota. In 2009, Big Sky produced 36,500 barrels of beer—an increase of about 10 percent from 2007. With local passion for craft brews as strong as it is, Leathers says he’s even surprised Missoula hasn’t given rise to a fourth brewery. While the mass-produced domestics won’t disappear anytime soon, the return to prominence of fresh, local brew makes Missoula’s beer culture seem somewhat cyclical. Though the recipe may be different, and though the beer is now brewed in Whitefish at Great Northern Brewery, the triumphant return of the Highlander name goes a long way in proving the point. Lukes hasn’t worked up distribution beyond local taps yet, but based on the community’s initial strong reception to the new Highlander, he’s hosting a full-on Celtic bash for the brew’s 100th anniversary this July in Caras Park. “We’ve just signed the Young Dubliners to play,” Lukes says. “It’s going to be a free concert, they’re going to have a bunch of other Celtic activities out there. It’s going to be fun.”

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ink leaning h t gc in

One of the Missoula beer moments that really pops out for Lukes occurred downtown on a summer afternoon shortly after Highlander’s return. Lukes was cruising in a vintage truck tagged with Highlander’s tartan label and caught the eye of an elderly man who, upon seeing the familiar brand name, rushed home to retrieve an old Missoula Brewing Co. box. “So many people here have a story about, ‘I remember that’s all my dad used to drink,’ or stories about their grandfather,” Lukes says. “People come up to me and say, ‘We were remodeling our house last year and we opened up this wall and there were 30 cans of Highlander in there. The workers must have just put the cans in the wall.’ I’ve heard that story about a dozen times.” Clearly the Missoula community never really let Highlander go. Or perhaps it’s just that sudsy allure of beer, whatever the brand. France sums it up perfectly. “It’s the culture, man,” he says. “It’s the history.” Head prefers a conclusion that’s a tad more grand, though in no way overstated for those with an unquenchable thirst: “Beer is universal.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

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Page 18 April 29–May 6, 2010

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Kevin Keeter checks the brewing tanks inside Big Sky Brewing Company. Neal Leathers, Bjorn Nabozney and Brad Robinson established Big Sky in 1995, and are currently the largest producers of craft beer in Montana. In 2009 alone, the brewery cranked out 36,500 barrels of beer.


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Preparing–and pairing–food with beer FLASHINTHEPAN When food and drink cross paths, wine usually hogs the spotlight during the act of ingredient pairing. And when beer is on tap, the meal is all too often relegated to the role of sponge. This perception seems to be changing. The interwebs are flooded with beer-based recipes and beer/food pairing suggestions, while many big city restaurants have added beer sommeliers to their staffs to assist customers in ordering suds to complement their suppers. Some enthusiasts go as far as to claim that beer is more food-friendly than wine. While wine makers have only grapes to play with, beer makers can use bitter hops, sweet barley, bready yeast, as well as spices, nuts, fruit, chocolate, pumpkin, licorice, orange peel…basically anything in their brews. This opens the door to more complex and nuanced pairings beyond color-coded rules of thumb like “red wine with red meat, white wine with white meat.” Personally, I’m skeptical. A parallel is often drawn between lager and ale and white and red wines, respectively, allowing for easy conversion between wine pairing and beer pairing. But the number one rule in pairing food and beverage is that both should taste better because of it. And personally, I don’t think there is a beer in existence that will bring more out of a steak than the cheapest glass of red wine. And no beer, however sweet, will beat a good dessert wine alongside your lemon meringue pie. Beer with your cheese? Not unless the cheese is on pizza, inside a chile relleno, or on a burger. So the first question you should ask is: Does this food want wine or beer? In my opinion, foods that are greasy, salty and spicy are the best for beer. Spicy foods go well with hoppy beers like an IPA if you want to bring out and appreciate the spice. Alternatively, if you’re afraid of spice, you might want to smother it with a sweet, thick porter. Carbonation cuts grease, so heavily carbonated beer goes well with pizza. Yeasty beers make

by ARI LeVAUX

chunks, with hot sauce and tartar sauce, need beer like fries need ketchup. And then there is that delicately named tailgating delicacy: “beer-butt chicken.” Mix together 1 tablespoon paprika, 2 teaspoons of chili powder, 1 teaspoon of oregano, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 1/4 teaspoon cayenne powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder and 2 tablespoons of brown sugar. At both openings of the bird, gently pull the skin away from the flesh, slide your hand in, and gently separate the skin from the flesh all around the chicken. Rub the spice mixture onto the flesh underneath the loose skin. When the grill is hot, open a can of beer. Drink half, and add chopped garlic and onions to the can. Place the can upright on the grill. Lower the chicken so the can enters the body cavity. Cover, and cook until the wings hang loose. Of course, no discussion of beer and food would be complete without mention of the tribal dish of Wisconsinites: bratwurst and beer. In principle, the brats are bathed in warm beer, which often contains chopped onion and garlic, and black pepper. This adds moisture and flavor to the brats. I can only wade so deep into this topic because of a great schism Photo by Chad Harder in the beer brat community These days, halibut is my beer-battered protein between those who pre-cook their brats in warm of choice, and I use a recipe I pried from the propri- beer (not boiling, not even simmering, except for etor of the Cooper Landing Roadhouse in southern the occasional lazy bubble) before grilling, versus those who bathe their brats in beer after grilling. Alaska. Each camp has reams of documentation and To make the batter, use 1 cup Krusteaz pancake mix, 1/2 cup amber beer, 2 pinches of dried dill and anecdotal evidence for why their method is the one true way to prepare beer brats, none of which 1 pinch seasoned salt. Cut the halibut into 1 1/2-inch pieces. Dip them addressed the also sticky question of whether the in the batter, then roll them in Japanese panko beer must be Old Milwaukee. But at the risk of being pelted to death by cheese flakes. Place the battered pieces on wax paper so they don’t touch each other, and freeze. When curds, I’ll admit that, much to my surprise, soaking frozen, put them in a plastic bag and keep frozen the grilled brats in beer was preferable to the presoak. And my favorite beer for this procedure—and until ready for use. To cook, immerse the frozen battered chunks of for drinking with the finished product—was a microfish in hot grape seed or safflower oil. These fish brew pilsner. sense with bread, and a sweet beer nicely balances an acidic meal. But the bottom line is: Beer drinkers are often particular about their preferences, and not likely to switch types based on what’s on their plate. That’s why cooking with beer deserves more attention than pairing. And in keeping with the simplicity of wine-pairing lore, it’s the foods cooked with beer that are best washed down with beer. A good beer batter can be magical. Just ask my college date after she ate some fried chicken I’d marinated overnight in beer batter before frying. That meal got me a lot further than I probably deserved. (Liz, if you’re out there, you know it’s true).

What's Your Food IQ? Take Our Taste Test. www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Bernice’s: a Missoula’s staple; serving strong coffee and baked goods in the heart of the Hip Strip since 1978. Bernice’s will be celebrating spring’s vibrant colors and smells with Cupcake MayNia: 16 unique and delicious cupcakes all May long. Buy 16 cupcakes and get one free merchandise item! AND, stop by and see us at the Clark Fork River Market. We’ll be there bright and early on Saturdays beginning May 8th from 8AM to 1PM. If you miss the market, we’re open every day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making.

Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm-11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours Monday-Saturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything

from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

"Voted Best New Restaurant 2009" Now Open at 5 PM Live jazz Saturdays 6:30 PM Homemade Asian dishes with no msg and real ingredients. Featuring local organic MT beef. Premium teas including bubble tea and homemade desserts. 529 S. Higgins Hip Strip Missoula • 830.3237 Mon- Sat Lunch & Dinner www.izarestaurant.com

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Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of ... ice cream! ColdStone is home-made, super-premium and more delicious than it should be, it seems! Cast your eyes on all our mix-ins and choose your favorites, be it for a cone, icecream cake or ice-cream sandwich! Many a fine folk will find ... It's a Great Day for Ice-Cream! $-$$ Doc's Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. Open Mon-Thurs 7am-8pm, Fri & Sat 8am4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Harry Davids 2700 Paxson Street, Suite H • 830-3277 Kicking off in February is LIVE BAND KARAOKE and LADIES NIGHT at Harry David’s every Thursday night at 9:30pm. Drink specials for the Ladies! Part Karaoke / Part Dance night with the band Party Trained, this is your opportunity to sing like a rockstar with a live band backing you up – and it will be every Thursday! If Karaoke is not your thing – no problem the band will be playing in between karaoke songs to keep you on the dance floor! Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot.

All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave. 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

Help Mom Keep Smiling… Silver Jewelry Fine Soaps and Toiletries Quality Chocolates Essential Oils Select Teas And…Missoula’s Best Coffees!

Missoula Independent

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HAPPIESTHOUR Desperado Sports Tavern Claim to fame: A legitimate claim to the best wings in town. The meaty little suckers come slathered in buffalo sauce with huge flakes of red peppers, and only cost $9.95. They’re wicked hot, but don’t even think of ordering the sissy sauce. Atmosphere: Typical sports bar, with more than 30 high-def televisions. A tiered booth section gives viewers the impression of sitting in the stands. What you’re drinking: Mostly domestic beers, but a few local craft brews, like Kettlehouse Cold Smoke. No full bar. Who you’re drinking with: Wing eaters. In other words, Despo’s doesn’t cater strictly to the backwards-cap sports crowd. They’re there, sure, stationed in front of playoff hockey or early-season baseball games. But much of the bar appears completely oblivious to the TVs. Charming quirk: No table service. Order your drinks and wings at the bar, and then

retreat to your spot. This makes for a fun game of spotting rookies left waiting and wondering why they’re being ignored. Annoying inconvenience: Cash only. Even in Missoula, where people still use personal checks like it’s 1986, this Photo by Chad Harder seems unnecessarily antiquated. (And beware the high service charge at the ATM.) Happy Hour specials: $2 drafts and $6 pitchers from 4 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. If you’re ordering wings, trust us, and go with the pitcher. How to find it: Tucked in next to a tanning salon at 3101 S. Russell, down by the YMCA. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.


Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tan-

$…Under $5

talizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

ASKARI Old onion magic Dear Flash, Following your recommendation last year to make French onion soup with on-their-way-out onions, I ended up completing only the first part of the recipe—essentially boiling down 12 pounds of butter and onions in the oven for three hours at 400 degrees, stirring and scraping often, followed by another hour of the same on the stovetop. I allowed the results to cool and then froze it in sandwich bags for later use. These packets of sweet onion goodness are time-saving, almost universally useful and obscenely sweet, unlike any onion concoction I’ve ever eaten. What makes them so sweet? —Onion Sweetie

Q

They don’t call it caramelization for nothing. As the onions cook in the butter, the sugars turn to caramel. These caramelizing sugars are augmented by

A

even more sweetness as the onion’s carbohydrates break down into sugars. The sweetening process is greatly enhanced by the fact that as the onions heat up, the water in them evaporates, concentrating the remaining contents. Caramelizing the onions in the oven is a good way to go because there’s less risk of burning them than on the stovetop, but you still need to watch closely and stir regularly, being careful to scrape the sides of the baking dish as the onions cook down. I’m not sure why you switched from the oven to the stovetop, but I’m glad it worked for you. One more tip: If you use clarified butter (aka ghee), then you stand a better chance of not burning the onions, because clarified butter has fewer proteins, which raises the burning point. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

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Arts & Entertainment listings April 29–May 6, 2010

THURSDAY October

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Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit That’s one crazy game of hopscotch. UM student Ashley Griffith, pictured, performs during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which continues Thu., April 29–Sat., May 1, nightly at 7:30 PM with a 2 PM matinee Sat. at the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8.

We're proud THURSDAY April to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

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The Sentinel High School Art Club announces a call to artists interested in selling, showing or donating art for the club’s “Color Missoula” second annual art auction, which opens May 7 at the Downtown Dance Collective. The minimum cost to you is 25 percent of the total sale. Submissions are due by May 3. If interested, email a photo of your art, description, minimum bid, donation amount and contact info to Sally at sfriou@mcps.k12.mt. Call 728-2400 Ext. 7624. The Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., presents David Nash’s sculpture Crack and Warp Column, as well as the exhibit Sentinel

High School: Selected Art. Free to peruse. Nash’s exhibit runs through Oct. 31, and the Sentinel High art exhibit runs until June 27. Gallery hours are: Wed.–Fri. from 10 AM–5 PM and Sat.–Sun. from 10 AM–3 PM. Call 7280447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Outdoor junkies, don’t miss this: The UM Outdoor Program presents its Used Outdoor Gear Sale, which runs from noon–5 PM at the University Center Atrium. Free to attend. Any gear to sell should be dropped off at the UC between 7–11 AM, and the Outdoor Program collects 15 percent of the selling price. Call 243-5172. UM presents a student chamber recital, which starts at 2 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Because I said so: UM presents “China’s Human Rights Record and Why It Matters

to Us,” a talk with Columbia University prof Andrew J. Nathan, starting at 3:40 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2311.

nightlife Loss and an examination of life’s opposites hit the walls when UM MFA students Cathryn Sugg and Rebecca Weed present their respective thesis exhibitions Inbetween and Recollection, with an opening reception from 5–7 PM at UM’s Gallery of Visual Arts, at the Social Science Building. Free. Call 243-2813. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 30, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

G E T L O S T. ( I N M O N TA N A )

Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural. H A N D M A D E

F U TO N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Missoula Independent

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>PU[OLL_WLYPLUJLVMHSPML[PTL H[NL[SVZ[T[JVT -6<5+05)6A,4(5! Seats at a Broadway musical. A world-class museum. Drop-dead delicious cupcakes with your latte. Wildflowers along the M trail. An eye-popping trout. A plate of Thai food. And time to visit Yellowstone National Park while you’re in the neighborhood. Fi d

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If you’d like to help the city of Missoula learn how much our trails, sidewalks and bike facilities are used, consider becoming a nonmotorized traffic count volunteer during a training session from 5–6 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free to participate. The count occurs Tue., May 4 from 4–6 PM. Call 258-4989. Renew your commitment to end racism when YWCA Missoula commemorates the Day of Commitment to End Racism with a screening of the documentary Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, which starts at 5:30 PM at the center room of the YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide. wordpress.com. UM’s celebration of Montana Archaeology Month continues with the lecture “The Forgotten Thousands: Chinese Builders of the Northern Pacific Railroad,” which starts at 6 PM in Room 326 of UM’s University Center. Free. Get neighborly during the City of Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features “Overcoming Bureaucracy: A Panel,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 552 - 6 0 81 o r b y e - m a i l i n g E r i n a t escott@ci.missoula.mt.us. Donna Smith halts the war over bellybutton lint when she plays jazz and blues at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. If you’d like to review and comment on the environmental assessment for the Kearl Module Transport Project—which means Imperial Oil would haul over-dimension loads through Montana—then get to an open house which starts at 6 PM, with a presentation/public hearing at 6:30 PM, at Meadow Hill Middle School, 4210 S. Reserve St. Free. View the assessment at the Missoula Public Library, or online at mdt.mt.gov/pubinvolve/eis_ea.shtml. Keep it super sustainable during “Living Green: Two Community Conversations,” which starts at 6 PM with a potluck dinner, and is followed at 7 PM with presentations from UM prof Steve Running and gardener Molly Hackett, all at the University Congregational Church, 401 University Ave. Cost TBA. E-mail SteveMcArthur@aol.com. Party it up in threes during Birds & Bees LLC’s Menage A Trois Birthday Party, a birthday celebration for three of the organization’s volunteers which features food, music and a host of activities from 6–9 PM at Birds & Bees, 1515 E. Broadway St. Free. Call 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and

every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Petroleum free is the way to be during the Peace and Justice Film Series screening of Oil + Water, which follows two kayakers as they embark on a road trip without petroleum, starting at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Dig super deep during the Montana Museum of Art and Culture’s sponsored lecture “Recent Archaeological Adventures in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings,” a talk with Donald P. Ryan of Pacific Lutheran University which starts at 7 PM in the Masquer Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. She’s definitely not on the run: Karen Buley reads and signs copies of Nurses on the Run: Why They Come, Why They Stay, which starts at 7 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. 10 percent of proceeds from purchased books will be donated to nurse educator scholarships. Call Karen at 251-2507. This is beetle mania: Friends of Two Rivers presents a discussion with forester Eric Norris on the Mountain Pine Beetle infestation starting at 7 PM at Bonner’s Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 8985 Highway 200. Free. Call Judy at 258-6335. Let the flying spaghetti monster be your guide to questioning everything under the sun during another installment of Socrates Cafe, a philosophy discussion group which meets at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Classical pianist Jonathan Cambry tickles his instrument of choice while raising funds for his homeland during a Haitian relief benefit concert which starts at 7 PM at the University Center Ballroom. Free, but a donation is suggested. The Bitterroot Public Library presents the final installment of its “Foreign Film Night” with Fraulein, which starts at 7 PM in the west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents its rendition of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Tenor Joseph Licitra gives growlers something to howl about when he performs a student recital at 7:30 PM, in UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. I’m not so sure myself: UM presents “Does the Rise of China Threaten American Interests?” a talk with Columbia University prof Andrew J. Nathan which starts at 8 PM, in the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-2311. Folk it up and freak the funk out during Rotaract’s benefit concert for the Central

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Vaporizers Zongs Steam Rollers Bubblers Hookahs Herbal Cleansers

KAOS

(406) 728-4420 115 West Main, Missoula Open at 10am 7 days a week Missoula Independent

Page 23 April 29–May 6, 2010


Storyhill, formerly of Bozeman, turns up the folk emotion when they play Sat., May 1, at the Top Hat at 8 PM. Cover TBA.

Asia Institute, which features music from Wartime Blues, Zeppo, Kung-Fu Kongress and Javi starting at 8 PM at the Top Hat. $8 per person/$15 for two people. Get advance tickets from Nic Davis by calling 581-9763. All proceeds from the concert will go to help develop schools in Central Asia. Bowling and karaoke go together like passing strict immigration laws and upholding civil rights during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free.

See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ ridiculous at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Thu., Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Women give a thumbs up to spirits during Ladies’ Night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063

Hwy. 93 S., which features half-off drinks for women and occurs this and every Thu. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” offers up a mixture of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour mate Nima Samimi at 9 PM at Hot Springs’ Fergie’s Bar, 213 Main St. Cost TBA. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. Don’t wear black, just don’t do it: The Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., hosts the “Black Light Party” featuring a live set from Los Angeles rap duo New Boyz as well as DJ 4PLAY, starting at 10 PM. $25, with advance tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and 406 Motoring. Wearing white attire is encouraged. Stylish hair and threads find good company with hip shakin’ beats during the Betty’s Divine, BoomSwagger Salon and Dead Hipster-sponsored Spring Hair and Fashion Spectacular! which starts at 10 PM at the Badlander. Music by the Dead Hipster Dance Party follows. $3/free before 9:30 PM.

FRIDAY April

30

Y W C A M i s s o u l a , 1 1 3 0 W. Broadway St., is currently holding registration for its GUTS! summer program for girls, which runs June 22–27, July 6–11 and July 14–19. Early registration is due today. Suggested donation: $350. Call 5436691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org for a full rundown of the program.

Missoula Independent

Page 24 April 29–May 6, 2010


Do your part to help conserve the natural habitat of elk by heading to the Five Valleys Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Banquet, which occurs at the Hilton Garden Inn at 5:30 PM Sat., May 8. But in order to go, you must purchase a ticket today. $105 couple/$70 per person. Cost includes a one-year membership to the organization. Call Hailey at 825-0140. Wilderness advocacy mixes with horse packing demonstrations, hiking, mountain biking and music during the Montana Wilderness Association Annual Convention, which starts with registration at 4 PM at Grouse Mountain Lodge, 2 Fairway Drive in Whitefish. The convention runs each day through May 2. $50/$40 members/$20 volunteers/ free students with ID. Visit wildmontana.org for advance registration and a full schedule. Call 443-7350 Ext. 110.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. He’s got an eye for the gigantic: Dan Flores signs and discusses his book Visions of the Big Sky: Painting and Photographing the Northern Rocky Mountain West, from 5:30–8 PM at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Flores’ discussion starts at 7 PM. Call 721-2881. They spit some wicked adverbs and adjectives: UM MFA creative writing students Megan Kruse, Liz Newlon and Lehua M. Taitano present their MFA thesis fiction readings starting at 6:30 PM, in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call 243-5267. Teens find out the lowdown on a hoedown during “Friday Night Hangout: High School Only,

Friday Night Hoedown,” which runs from 7–11 PM at the City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave. $3. Open to grades ninth through twelfth only. Call 532-1555. They know a good fungus when they see it: The Montana Natural History Center (MNHC), 120 Hickory St., hosts a screening of Know Your Mushrooms at 7 PM. $4/$2 MNHC members. Larry Evans, who stars in the film, will be on hand to answer your fungal questions. Call 327-0405. The Missoula Alliance Church, 100 E. Foss Court, presents the Garden City Christian Music Festival, which features worship bands from Missoula area churches and starts at 7 PM at the church. Free, but a freewill offering will be taken. All proceeds will be used for completion of a church in Mexico. Visit macmissoula.com. Jugglers and tumblers abound during a dance performance featuring dancers from the River Street Dance Theater and music by Ellie Nuno and Tasha Athman—along with modern dance pieces by Laurel WallMacLane and Pam Erickson—starting at 7 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road. $9/$5 students and seniors with advance tickets at Chapter One Bookstore and the Music Box. Call 363-1203. A Gothic tale of revenge hits the stage when The Alpine Kids Theatre Project presents Sweeney Todd School Edition, with a performance at 7 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $15/$8 students. Visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets or call 862-SHOW. The University Center Theater presents a screening of Sherlock Holmes at 7 PM, followed by The Book of Eli at 9:30 PM. $7 double feature/$5 single feature/$4 double feature for students/$3 single feature for students. Call 243-5590. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in

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Missoula Independent

Page 25 April 29–May 6, 2010


SPOTLIGHT roller promenade In less than a year the Hellgate Rollergirls have proven that, sooner rather than later, blood will indeed become the new pink here in Missoula. Since its inception in September 2009, the all-female roller derby team has grown from a rad idea into a full-fledged nonprofit, with a practice space and calendar featuring rollergirl photos to boot. As it stands, these derby dames are making some serious strides. But they still have a ways to go before they can start kicking ass and taking names on the track. On Saturday, you can help them inch closer to their goal by donning your best “white trash glam” outfit during a prom fundraiser for the team. The event features all the usual prom fixings: a photo booth, the crowning of queen and king, and spiked drink specials. Of course, it wouldn’t be a prom without music. So prepare to rock out—mullet, NASCAR Tshirt and all—with tunes from local country punks Bird’s Mile Home, straight up WHAT: Moonshine Madness 2010 Prom Fundraiser for the Hellgate Rollergirls WHO: Bird’s Mile Home, The Graveyard Girl Scouts and Bridgebuilder

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Missoula Independent

Page 26 April 29–May 6, 2010

WHEN: Sat., May 1, at 9 PM

three-chord punk from Kalispell’s The Graveyard Girl Scouts (pictured here), as well as some post-punk and experimental offerings from locals Bridgebuilder. In return for an evening of white trash-inspired carousing, you’ll help these homegirls purchase materials that make their track safe, and you’ll also ensure that they’ll be able compete in upcoming bouts and derby exhibitions. —Ira Sather-Olson

WHERE: The Palace HOW MUCH: $5

UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/ $8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. They tell noise to bugger off. UM presents a student chamber recital, which starts at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. His eyes may be piercing, but his voice isn’t. Nashville’s Gary Allan gives country bumpkins something to swoon about when he plays country at 7:30 PM at the Adams Center. $29.75 plus fees at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. No saccharine pop tunes allowed: UM continues its student recital series featuring the student chamber recital at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

St. Paul, Minn.’s Storyhill keeps the rants to a minimum and the rollicking to a maximum when play folk and folk rock at Kalispell’s KM Theatre, 40 Second St. E., at 7:30 PM. $20, with tickets available at Noice Studio and Gallery, Colter Coffee and Red’s Roost. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents its rendition of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Gnaw on something sweet during the Whitefish Theatre Co.’s rendition of Willy Wonka Jr., with a performance at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $15/$12 seniors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 for tickets or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Lee Zimmerman gives his strings the feel-good treatment when he plays his cello at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361.

Bird’s Mile Home brings it correct without avians but with plenty of country punk when they play a record release party at Kalispell’s The Grateful Head Shop, 2458 Hwy. 93 S., at 8 PM. $3. The Graveyard Girl Scouts and Twitched Open. The Fabulous Country Kings designate you as the emperor of raw tbone steaks when they play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hiphop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke


rock, jam and country when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SATURDAY May

01

www.spectrum.umt.edu • 243-4828

Your heart, the planet and your farmerneighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–1 PM as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. If it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturday market.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. The Epic Youth Group with Missoula’s Christian Life Center hosts its Spring Fling Craft and Gift Sale, which runs from 9 AM–3 PM at Christian Life Center, 3801 Russell St. Free to attend. Call 542-0353. Create, contribute and connect with your fellow Missoulians during M i s s o u l a B a r C a m p 2 010 — described as a cross between a school, think tank, party and business incubator—which runs from 9 AM–5:30 PM at the School of Business Administration, in UM’s Gallagher Business Building. $25/$10 students. Find out more and register at missoulabarcamp.org. Superman and Iron Man give literacy a kick in the pants during Free Comic Book Day, where you can get a free comic today at Muse Comics, 2100 Stephens Ave. No. 107. Free. Call 543-9944. This is the good wood: The Western Montana Woodcarvers’ Show hosts a public viewing from 9 AM–5:30 PM at the Home Arts Building at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. $3. Call 723-4219 or 777-3642. Keep your stomach and your local farmer happy during the Hamilton Farmers’ Market, which offers local produce and crafts and runs from 9 AM–12:30 PM on the corner of Bedford and Third Streets in Hamilton. Free to peruse. This week: An opening celebration with a dragon parade, maypole dance and activities with Dances of Universal Peace. Call 961-0004. These pellets are like gold: The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project presents its annual Llama Manure Fundraiser Sale, which runs from 10 AM–4 PM at the PEAS Farm, 3010 Duncan Drive. $150 large pickup load/$85 small pickup load/$16 wheelbarrow load. Call 721-7513 and visit mudproject.org. An enthralling sorceress hits the screen in HD during this month’s installment of The Met: Live At the Roxy, which features a screening of Marry Zimmerman’s production of Rossini’s Armida, at 11 AM at the

Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. Show is sold out, but limited tickets will be available at the box office. $18 adults/$16 students and seniors plus ticket fees at any GrizTix outlet or griztix.com. Frolic around a maypole during the Moon-Randolph Homestead Maypole Frolic, the homestead’s annual fundraiser which features games, birdsong, kids’ activities, refreshments, maypole dancing, musical saw lessons and plenty more from noon–4 PM at the homestead, 1515 Spurlock Road in the North Hills. $10 per family/$5 per person. Includes shuttle service down to the ZACC’s block party. Call 728-9269. So much good beer: The Missoula Downtown Association presents the 2010 Garden City Brewfest, which runs from noon–8 PM at Caras Park and features 60 beers on tap, along with live music from The Lil’ Smokies, Secret Powers and Wartime Blues. Free to attend. To taste: $7 for a Brewfest commemorative glass and two beer tokens/$1 each additional token. Call 5434238. (See this week’s edition of the Indy.) The working clans unite during Missoula’s celebration of May Day, which starts with a bit of political theater at noon at the river trail near Caras Park. Free. The celebration then moves to Kiwanis Park, where speakers, food and music keep the solidarity strong. Call Dave at 363-5292 and visit tworiversgmb.blogspot.com. (See Agenda in this issue.) Shove these herbs up your mind: Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W., celebrates Herb Day 2010 with Montana Herb Gathering during a neighborhood herb walk starting at 1 PM at Meadowsweet Herbs. Free. Call 728-0543. Little greenthumbs can get a little greener when The Zootown Arts Community Center presents its Little Artist Workshop: Pots for Plants, where kids design their own mini pots for planting indoors or outdoors from 1–2 PM at the center, 235 N. First St. W. $15. RSVP by calling 549-7555 and visit zootownarts.com. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits. blogspot.com. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which starts at 2 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 2 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center.

Public Hours: Thurs. 3:30-7 pm • Sat. 11 am-4:30 pm

night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & G r i l l i n F r e n c h t o w n , 16 78 0 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. He supplies the glitch while you hop: New York City’s Machinedrum makes his return to the Garden City with a set of what’s likely to be glitchhop, IDM and other electronic styles when he plays the Palace at 9 PM. $8. Locals Conrad Hawkins, Phil Maher and Kid Traxiom open. So many Bills: A local showcase featuring bands with members either named Bill or a variation of such hits the Badlander when Wild China, The Box Cutters and The Blox play rock, blues and funk at 9 PM. Free. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Ball ‘N Jack lights a spark to all your fun parts when they play rock, blues and funk at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Blue Collar makes sure you wag your finger at the establishment just in time for May Day when they play classic rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. He’s all about the high life: Rapper Afroman, best known for songs like “Because I Got High,” brings his bloodshot rhymes to the Elks Club, 112 N. Pattee St., when he plays at 9:30 PM. $20/$15 advance at Piece of Mind. Includes hosting by Ray Stax with DJ Dirks, along with opening sets from Jordan Lane and Greenhouse, Young Jay, Koshir and The Convict Clique. Strange Brew just wants you to jump into that pool of plaster of Paris when they play classic rock and country at Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. They supply the creek, you bring the paddle: Miller Creek dips their fingers into a steaming hot cauldron of

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Missoula Independent

Page 27 April 29–May 6, 2010


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$18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s Performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. Party it up with your north Missoula neighbors during the Northside/Westside Block Party, which features music, food, silk screen printing and all around good times from 4–10 PM near the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. Free. Includes music by The River Creek Stream Boys, Baba Ganoush, Slowly But Shirley, and The Folk Ups. Call 549-7555. Bring munchies and a heady attitude: Missoula participates in the Worldwide Marijuana March to end cannabis prohibition starting at 4:20 PM at Jacob’s Island, near UM’s Footbridge. Free. Call 542-8696 and e-mail norml@montananorml.org. Visit worldwidemarijuanamarch.org.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. He wants more than a Facebook friendship: Keegan Smith and the Fam serve you friendly sides of pop, funk, soul and reggae when they play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. He’s not your average logger: Bart Colantuono, an avid outdoorsman and helilogger (helicopter logger), signs copies of his book Helilogging in a Sucker Hole from 6–8 PM at Hastings Books, 2501 Brooks St. Free. Visit axmen.com. Jazz makes the pad thai go down smooth when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents free live jazz from a rotating cast of local musicians at 6:30 PM this and every Sat. at the restaurant. Call 830-3237. Jugglers and tumblers abound during a dance performance featuring dancers from the River Street Dance Theater and music by Ellie Nuno and Tasha Athman—along with modern dance pieces by Laurel Wall-MacLane and Pam Erickson—starting at 7 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road. $9/$5 students and seniors with advance tickets at Chapter One Bookstore and the Music Box. Call 363-1203. A Gothic tale of revenge hits the stage when The Alpine Kids Theatre Project presents Sweeney Todd School Edition, with a performance at 7 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $15/$8 students. Visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets or call 862-SHOW. The University Center Theater presents a screening of Sherlock Holmes at 7 PM, followed by The Book of Eli at 9:30 PM. $7 double feature/$5 single feature/$4 double feature for students/$3 single feature for students. Call 243-5590. Enjoy a meal and some vino for a good cause during Grape Escape 2010, a benefit for the Community for Restorative Justice which starts at 7 PM at the Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 W. Harrier. $40 per person. Call 541-2756 for tickets and visit communityrestorativejustice.org.

Missoula Independent

Page 28 April 29–May 6, 2010

Help a nonprofit that promotes and provides info on holistic living, self-empowerment and sustainability during the Seedlings of Change inaugural fundraiser, which features appetizers, a silent auction, prizes and vintage love songs performed by Lori Conner and Dick Skultin from 7–10 PM at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. $25/$20 advance at the Elks Lodge or by calling 273-0591. Visit seedlingsofchange.org. They spit wicked spondees: UM MFA creative writing students July Oskar Cole, Molly Curtis and John Myers present their MFA thesis poetry readings starting at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 243-5267. The Discount Quartet wonders if you’d like to manhandle a jellyfish when they play jazz at Finn and Porter, 100 Madison St., at 7 PM. Free. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents its rendition of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Gnaw on something sweet during the Whitefish Theatre Co.’s rendition of Willy Wonka Jr., with a performance at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $15/$12 seniors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 for tickets or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. UM music composition student Lillian Reichert whips notes into shape when she plays a student recital at 7:30 PM, in the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. The Fabulous Country Kings designate you as the emperor of raw t-bone steaks when they play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. St. Paul, Minn.’s Storyhill never takes the long road with a bardic tale when they play folk and folk rock at the Top Hat at 8 PM. Cover TBA. Tra Le Gael chugs espresso for the workingman, and workingwoman, when they play Celtic music at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all laughing at your shortcomings at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free.


Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Wolf T-shirts and mullets encouraged: The Hellgate Rollergirls present their Moonshine Madness 2010 Prom Fundraiser, a “white trash glam” themed prom party featuring sets by Bird’s Mile Home, The Graveyard Girl Scouts and Bridgebuilder at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Also includes a photo booth, designation of prom king/queen and drink specials. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Strange Brew just wants you to jump into that pool of plaster of Paris when they play classic rock and country at Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. The Wild Coyotes opt out of your linseed oil massage party when they play rock and country at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Zeppo teaches you their concept of the rhythm method when they play blues and R & B at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. He’ll be your friend but not your daddy: Portland, Ore.’s Keegan Smith and the Fam returns with a serving of pop, funk, soul and reggae when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY May

02

This is the kind of mass I can really get behind: The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AM–noon at the meeting room of Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org. Get a taste of local food at a lower price and learn more about a participatory business model when you check out the Missoula Community Food Co-op’s Sunday Public Shop, a chance to shop at the co-op before you join from 10 AM–5 PM at the co-op, 1500 Burns St. Free to attend. Non-members are welcome to shop three times before becoming a member. Call 728-2369 and visit missoula communitymarket.org. This is the good wood: The Western Montana Woodcarvers’ Show hosts a public viewing from 11:30 AM–4 PM at the Home Arts Building at the Western Montana

#1 Reason to be good to the planet:

Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. $3. Call 7234219 or 777-3642. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s Performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. A Gothic tale of revenge hits the stage when The Alpine Kids Theatre Project presents Sweeney Todd School Edition, with a performance at 2 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $15/$8 students. Visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets or call 862-SHOW. An enthralling sorceress hits the screen in HD during this month’s installment of The Met: Live At the Roxy, which features a screening of Marry Zimmerman’s production of Rossini’s Armida, at 4 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $18 adults/$16 students and seniors plus ticket fees at any GrizTix outlet or griztix.com. Visit morrisproductions.org. Gnaw on something sweet during the Whitefish Theatre Co.’s rendition of Willy Wonka Jr., with a performance at 4 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $15/$12 seniors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 for tickets or visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

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nightlife Give it up for a literary legend: The Missoula Public Library Foundation presents “Rediscovering A.B. Guthrie,” a fundraiser for the foundation which features a basque dinner and wine, jazz by Eden Atwood and David Morgenroth, as well as a reading of Guthrie’s Occupation Sheepherder by the Indy’s Alex Sakariassen, from 6–9 PM at Caffé Dolce, 500 Brooks St. $65 with tickets at Fact and Fiction, Rockin Rudy’s and the Missoula Public Library. Call 258-3852. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s Performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children ages 18 and under. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. Founders keepers: The String Orchestra of the Rockies presents the Founders Concert, A Tribute to the Viola, featuring guest viola player Brett Deubner along with founding members of the SOR, with a performance at 7:30 PM at UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $20/$10 students with advance tickets available at Morgenroth Music, Rockin Rudy’s, Fact and Fiction or sormt.org. Reality and the imagined collide when UM MFA creative writing students Robert Brandon Henderson and Greg Lickenbrock present their MFA thesis fiction and nonfiction readings starting at 7:30 PM at Spirit of Peace, 506 Toole Ave. Free. Call 243-5267. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Men always get to bellow out a slick tune or two during Man Night featuring karaoke, which occurs this and every Sun. starting at 9 PM at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 251-5402.

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Page 29 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Missoula Independent

Page 30 April 29–May 6, 2010

Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 9:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from the The Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid.

MONDAY May

03

If by chance you’re thinking of stopping by the Missoula Public Library, don’t do it. The library is closed today for staff development. It reopens at 10 AM Tue., May 4. Call 721-BOOK. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

nightlife What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.alanon.alateen.org. Cash for Junkers gives your personality a thorough dry cleaning when they play Americana with a swing at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. They’ll raise their voice at you, and you’ll love it. UM’s University Choir and Chamber Choir present a recital at 7:30 PM, in the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-6880. They shred, but not too hard: UM presents the UM Guitar Ensemble Recital, which starts at 7:30 PM in Room 218 of the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. The Treasure State Chorale belts out the old and the new during its spring concert, which features work by Haydn, Mendelssohn and others and starts at 7:30 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. Free, but donations accepted. Call Francine at 396-3933. Alcohol and bowling go hand over foot during Monday Madness at Five Valley’s Bowl, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which features $1 bowling after 9 PM as well as $1.25 Coors Light cans this and every Mon. at the bowling center. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Get wobbly with free pool and bass-heavy music during Missoula Area Dubstep Monday, a new monthly dubstep DJ night which this month features DJs Lui, Giga, Mikee Sev and the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Men drink on the cheap and can enjoy a game of pigskin, as well as karaoke, during Men’s Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St.

Ste. H, this and every Mon. at 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAY May

04

You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955.

nightlife Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess what family of animalia the epihippus came from during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Keep your mind outta the gutter. Learn what exactly the “backdoor” is while wrapping your head around the “stop and go” and slurping down a fuzzy navel or sex on the beach during free poker lessons at 6 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Includes drink specials. Call 549-4152. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. Email terillovet@hotmail.com. Rock for emancipation: Drinking Gourd Montana presents a screening of Call + Response, a documentary about modern day slavery which includes music by artists like Rocco Deluca and Imogen Heap, with a screening at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Call 543-2597. He’s addicted to the white stuff: Author Doug Ammons plunges you into the world of whitewater kayaking when he signs and hosts a presentation for his book Whitewater Philosophy at 7 PM at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. The Center for Inspired Wisdom hosts its weekly speaker series with the topic “Cycles of Change,” a talk with Bill Kint and Carolyn Muldoon which starts at 7 PM at The Green Tea House, 415 Second St. E. in Whitefish. Donations accepted. Visit inspiredwisdom.org. Dance, play, reflect, and then dance some more. Turning the Wheel presents its adult tapestry series, a four-week series of creative movement exercises and improv expression with Lizzi Juda and Nathan Zavalney which runs this and every Tue. until May 25 from 7–8:30 PM at 1042 Monroe St. $32, open to those ages 16 and up. Drop-ins welcome. Call 8303285 or e-mail ann.stevenson@gmail.com.


UM’s School of Music presents presentation with writer Mark its Honors Convocation, which Matthews which starts at 7 PM starts at 7:30 PM in the UM at the Historical Museum at Music Recital Hall, in the Music Fort Missoula, Building 322 Building. Free. Call 243-6880. at Fort Missoula. Free. Call 7283476 and visit fortmissoula What’s that spell? The UM museum.org School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th What’s that spell? The UM School Annual Putnam County of Theatre and Dance presents Spelling Bee, with a performthe musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, ance at 7:30 PM in the Montana with a performance at 7:30 PM Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s $18/$14 students and senPARTV Center. $18/$14 students iors/$8 children 12 and under. and seniors/$8 children 12 and Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit under. Call 243-4581 for tickets umtheatredance.org. or visit umtheatredance.org. Sean Kelly’s invites you to anothThey’ll knock the wind out of ya: er week of free Pub Trivia, UM’s Symphonic Wind which takes place every Tue. at 8 Ensemble plays at 7:30 PM, PM. And, to highlight the joy of at the University Theatre. $10/ discovery that you might experi$5 students and seniors. Call ence while attending, here’s a 243-6880. sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Hump day isn’t just for binge Ready? A mohel is a Jewish drinking anymore. It’s also a day man trained in the practice of for playing games of chance with what? (Find the answer in the other like-minded booze lovers calendar under tomorrow’s when Sean Kelly’s presents nightlife section.) Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call You have practiced in front of the 542-1471. mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where Her voice is like butter, baby. Like open mic night features a butter. Donna Lee Smith plays drum set, amps, mics and smooth lounge jazz with Mike recording equipment and awaits Freemole starting at 8 PM at you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Kalispell’s North Bay Grille, 139 Call 273-9992 to reserve your First Ave. W. Free. Call 755-4441. They’re hooked on knives, not phonics. The cast of the MCT Community Theatre performs Peter Pan Fri., April spot. A pirate, a flying boy and a land 30–Sat., May 2 and Wed., May 5–Sun., May 9, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Prices and times of shows Chance mixes with money and where life is never planned vary. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org. prizes during bingo night at the hits the stage during the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, MCT Community Theatre’s 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which occurs Performance of Peter Pan, when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. ment at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. this and every Tue. starting at 8 PM at the bar. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call Ste. H, which runs this and every Wed. starting which starts at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for Free. Call 251-5402. 370-3200. with a sign up at 6:30 PM and the game start- the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, ing at 7. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight $18/$15 children ages 18 and under. Call 728takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed as well as impressive business contacts, when players, includes one free drink per player. Call PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 830-3277. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, another round of song, dance and hilarity with Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to Center. Free. Call 728-9117. the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—durplay a few of your own, when the Canyon Fine food, fermented beverages and an auction circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to ing this month’s installment of its popular Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this help benefit Whitefish’s youth in the arts and the Good Food Store, where you can knit cabaret, which starts at 8 PM at the and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern sports during the 21st annual Project purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, Whitefish Wine and Food Fest Auction, BYO yarn and needles, and check out mtactors.com. with free beers for performers. You can pick your friends, and you can pick which runs from 6–9 PM at Grouse Mountain missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Ladies get their drink on and celebrate them- Lodge, 2 Fairway Drive in Whitefish. $50 per Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy your nose, but neither will help you emit that selves with $1.50 well drinks during Ladies’ person/$500 table, with advance tickets at both cravings by attending bimonthly meet- high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Night at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Imagination Station, The Towne Printer and ings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Ave., which runs this and every Tue. starting at the O’Shaughnessy Center box office. Call science fiction convention, the first and third Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. 862-5371. Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s A mohel is a Jewish man trained in the practice of circumcision (ouch!). Slap guitarist Dan Dubuque gives his guitar a You chug while they chug and belt out an aria. Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. benevolent beating while Kevin Van Dort The Montana Lyric Opera presents another Being square will never be as much fun as it is The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include shoots shades of indigo from his trusty axe installment of Opera on Draft: Learn to Sing at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when they play blues and rock at the Italian in Five Beers or Less, which runs Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. Badlander at 9 PM. Free. from 6–8 PM at the Badlander. $5. Visit and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. at 9 PM. Free. Boise, Idaho’s Jonathan Warren and the mtopera.org. Bad skin be gone: Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Get a wicked case of “bowling finger” during Billygoats slip a rutabaga into your rucksack If you know the difference between His Knobs Third St. W., presents the Dr. Hauschka Skin Five Valley’s Bowl’s Wicked Wednesday, when they play progressive bluegrass at the and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Care Class, which is hosted by trained repre- which features $2 bowling after 9 PM plus $2 Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. YETI opens. Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the sentative Katrina Farnum and starts at 7 PM at cans of Bud Light this and every Wed. at the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club Meadowsweet Herbs. Free. RSVP requested by bowling center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. invites players both new and old to see how calling 728-0543. many ways they can get to that magical num- Just think of that Marvin Gaye song: Birds & Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of ber 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. Bees LLC and the UM Women’s Resource PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Whip In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Center present “Let’s Get it On,” a sexual It” by Devo (believe me, the beer helps), durFamily Storytime offers engaging experi- finesse workshop on coitus taught by Billie ing Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 ences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pic- Becker which runs from 7–8 PM in Room 333 PM. Free. tograms and more at 6:30 PM at the Missoula of the University Center. $5 suggested dona- No intensive training required: The Silver Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. tion. Call 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool Jump right in during The History of the First presents beer pong this and every Wed. startall day with drink specials this and every Wed. cue, consider joining a weekly pool tourna- Decade of Smoke Jumping: 1939–1949, a ing at 9 PM at the bar. Free, with prizes. Call 251-5402.

WEDNESDAY May

05

Missoula Independent

Page 31 April 29–May 6, 2010


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THURSDAY

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nightlife Keep it metallic when the Montana Museum of Art and Culture presents an opening for the Western Cast Iron Art Conference Exhibition—which opens in UM’s Paxson and Meloy Galleries and features cast iron and bronze works by artists like Elizabeth Kronfield and Matthew Wicker—with a reception from 5–7 PM in the lobby of UM’s PARTV Center. Free. A free keynote address by Kronfield and Wicker occurs at 7:30 PM in the University Center Theater. Call 243-2019. If you’d like to help the city of Missoula learn how much our trails, sidewalks and bike facilities are used, consider becoming a nonmotorized traffic count volunteer during a training session from 5–6 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free to participate. The count occurs Sat., May 8, from noon–2 PM. Call 258-4989. Go ahead and hogtie me: Birds & Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St., presents the Thai-Tie Party, an intro into bondage which includes a practice session and a curry feast from 6–9 PM at Birds & Bees. $20, includes dinner. RSVP required by calling 544-1019. Visit aboutsexuality.org. The W.C. Worth Blues Players hit the wild notes when they play blues at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. Just say yes: UM’s Peace and Justice Film Series continues with a screening of The Yes Men Fix the World—which details the shenanigans of two men who pose as corporate executives— with a screening at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Keep the info freely flowing during “Access Across America,” a talk with David Cuillier of the Society of Professional Journalists which starts at 7 PM in Room 316 of UM’s Don Anderson Hall (aka the Journalism Building). Free. E-mail Ian at asiamarquand@msn.com. You chug while they chug and belt out an aria. The Montana Lyric Opera presents an installment of Opera on Draft: Learn to Sing Italian in Five Beers or Less, which runs from 7–9 PM at the Craggy Range Bar and Grill, 10 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $5. Visit mtopera.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with

a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents another round of song, dance and hilarity with a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—during this month’s installment of its popular cabaret, which starts at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com. A pirate, a flying boy and a land where life is never planned hits the stage during the MCT Community Theatre’s performance of Peter Pan, which starts at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. He’s all about his bass droogs: Alex B returns with his instrumental hip-hop and downtempo grooves when he plays this month’s installment of Bass Face at the Top Hat at 9 PM. $15/$12 advance at Rockin Rudy’s. Locals E-Team, sAuce and Ert and Bernie open. Utah’s David Williams wards off firing squads with the power of his dusty axe when he plays folk at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Locals Wartime Blues open. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. I have to say, one of the greatest things about Missoula is its sense of community and neighborliness. This week, you can get a taste of what I’m talking about when you party it up with your northerly neighbors at the Northside/Westside block party, a soiree which runs from 4–10 PM Sat., May 1, near the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. It’s free and features live music courtesy of bands like The River Creek Stream Boys, along with a potluck, food vendors and activities like screen printing and interactive art installations. Consider it a prime opportunity to connect with your fellow Garden City peeps. But before you head to the north, I ask that you quench my thirst for your future endeavors by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 30, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


Well folks, it seems as though the prime time to camp has finally arrived. Heck, I’m sure many of you have already started pitching your tents in yonder hills. But if you’re like me, and you’re sorely lacking in quality camping equipment—or your good stuff is beat to shreds from years of use—I have a solution. A very cheap and sustainable solution. On Thu., April 29, bring your wallet and get ready for a treasure hunt of sorts during the UM Outdoor Program’s Used Outdoor Gear Sale, which runs from noon—5 PM in the University Center. It’s free to attend, and if you’d like to get rid of some of your own gear, be sure to bring it by the UC between 7 and 11 AM. Here’s one other piece of info you should know: The outdoor program collects 15 percent of the sale price of your gear. Call 243-2804. Also, Fri., April 30, marks the final day that you can drop off your used outdoor gear for the Nature-Link Institute’s Gear for the Garhwal drive. Drop-off locations are at UM’s Outdoor Program, Pipestone Mountaineering, The Trail Head and Aerie Wilderness Medicine. Visit nature-link.org and call Eric at 370-2294. If you have a soft spot in your heart for elk, you can do your part to help conserve their natural habitat by snatching a ticket to the Five Valleys Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Banquet, which occurs at the Hilton Garden Inn at 5:30 PM Sat., May 8. But in order to go, you must purchase a ticket by Fri., April 30. $105 couple/$70 per person. Admission includes a one-year membership to the foundation. Call Hailey at 825-0140. Then, aim your sights (and I don’t mean your Beretta) toward two elegant rock formations on Fri., April 30, when the Rocky Mountaineers hit up Glacier National Park for a three-day excursion to Gunsight and Edwards mountains. Free. The plan is to hike and ski up the Gunsight Pass Trail to the Sperry Glacier area on Friday, and to ascend the peaks on Saturday and Sunday. Conditions could be dicey, so be sure to pack skis/snowshoes, an ice axe, cram-

pons and winter camp gear. Call Forest Dean at 240-7612, or e-mail him at mtnear1@gmail.com, for the departure time. Or go deep into a fungal jungle Fri., April 30, during a screening of Know Your Mushrooms, a doc which follows mushroom experts Gary Lincoff and Larry Evans on their hunt for wild mushrooms and begins at 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC), 120 Hickory St. $4/$2 MNHC members. Call 327-0405. Once the fungus has exited the building, snag some sleep and be an early bird Sat., May 1, so you can join the Five Valleys Audubon Society during a birding trip to Brown’s Lake and the upper Blackfoot Valley, which starts with an 8 AM meet up at UM’s Adams

other pertinent topics. $175. Space is limited, so RSVP quickly by calling 888-5454. You can pull these weeds, but I wouldn’t advise smoking them: The Mount Jumbo Advisory Committee hosts its annual Mount Jumbo Weed Pull, which begins Sat., May 1, with registration at 9 AM. The pull follows from10 AM–1 PM, and costs $5 to register. Besides pulling up nasty weeds, you’ll get trained in native plant ID, and you’ll reseed the areas where you pulled. As a green bonus, all “champion” pullers get a cash prize for their efforts. Call Giles at 543-2532. Push your chain to the limit Sat., May 1, when you glide with members of Missoulians on Bicycles (MOBI) during the Rock Creek Ramble, a 52-mile ride which departs at 10 AM from the Eastgate parking lot off of east Broadway St. Free. There’s also talk of lunch at Eckstrom’s Stage, so bring an appetite. Call Eleanor at 728-8636 and visit missoulabike.org. Also, MOBI has a ride scheduled for Sun., May 2. It’s the 55-mile Cheese Burger Boogie to Stevi, and departs at 9 AM from Montana Lil’s, 3801 Brooks St. Free. Call Tom and Sue Roy at 728-8319. Or turn your yard into an isle of earthly delights on Sat., May 1, during the MNHC’s Native Plant Garden Workshop, which runs from 1–4 PM at the center, 120 Hickory St. David Schmetterling leads the class and will no doubt rock your gardening world with info on garden design, and use of space and structure. $40/$35 MNHC members. RSVP required by calling 327-0405. On Mon., May 3, getting wet and doing kayak rolls isn’t just a dream anymore when you sign up for the UM Outdoor Program’s Kayak Roll Clinic, which runs from 8:30–10:30 PM on May 4 and May 6 at UM’s Grizzly Pool. $45. Call 243-5172 to RSVP. Finish things off Wed., May 5, by bursting your senses with the fecund during the Clark Fork Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society’s Wildflower Hike on Mount Photo by Carthrine L. Walters Sentinel, which starts at 6:30 PM. Free. Meet at the corner of Center parking lot. Free. As for the avian ogling, expect to witness Beckwith and Madeline Avenues, east of UM’s Forest Service waterfowl, raptors, sandhill cranes and other migrant birds. Call Larry Research Lab. Forest ecologist Paul Alaback leads the hike, which could include up to 130 different flower species for your perusing Weeks at 549-5632 and visit fvamissoula.org. Pack it up and pack it in Sat., May 1, during the Smoke Elser led pleasure. Call Paul at 728-4696. Now go pitch a tent, and feel free to fill me in on your favorite Wilderness Outfitting and Packing Course, which runs from 9 AM–5 PM, and at the same time Sun., May 2, at the Glacier Outdoor camping hotspots. Center in West Glacier. Elser—who’s considered an outfitting legend of calendar@missoulanews.com sorts—will cover horse handling, packing, camping techniques and

Get your work published in the 2010 Best of Missoula issue! Show us what “Best of Missoula” means to you... it could be a painting, a photograph, a drawing, etc., but it must somehow incorporate the Missoula Independent and it must somehow be totally awesome.

Winning entry will be featured in the Best of Missoula issue on July 8th. Submission Formats: PDF • TIFF • JPEG • EPS Entries may be submitted via e-mail to LFoland@missoulanews.com or delivered to 317 S. Orange, Missoula MT 59801

Contest Rules: Entrants represent and warrant that their submission is their original work, it has not been copied from others, and it does not violate the rights of any other person or entry. All entry materials become the property of the Missoula Independent and will not be acknowledged or returned. The copyright in any submission shall remain the property of the entrant, but entry in this contest constitutes entrant's irrevocable, perpetual permission and consent, without further compensation or attribution, to use the submission and the entrant's name and city and state for editorial, advertising, commercial and publicity purposes by the sponsor and/or others authorized by the sponsor, in any and all media now in existence or hereinafter created, throughout the world, for the duration of the copyright in the submission. Sponsor and/or others authorized by the sponsor shall have the right to edit, adapt, and modify the submission. Each entrant releases and discharges the sponsor, the judges, any party associated with the development or administration of the contest, their employees, agents or representatives or any of their parents, subsidiaries, sister companies, or affiliates from any and all liability in connection with the contest, including without limitation, legal claims, costs, injuries, losses or damages, demand or actions of any kind. More info: 543-6609 or lfoland@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 33 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Label of love Two artists who pour themselves into a brewery’s image by Erika Fredrickson

As you sit at the bar on a Saturday night, or barbecue with friends in the backyard, it’s easy to take for granted the label on your local beer of choice. It’s the one you nervously pick off the bottle of Big Sky IPA or Bayern Oktoberfest while flirting with the person next to you. It’s the gleaming design you crush under thumb when you empty the last drop from that can of Eddy Out. But the fact is, what you’ve got in your hand, dear beer lover, is a piece of art. In our quest to pay tribute to all things beer this week, we introduce you to two artists who make your beer pretty.

director at The Shirt Shop, he started winning art bids. Walk into almost any grocery or convenience store in and around Missoula and you can see Sherman has realized his dream. Every Cold Smoke, Double Haul and Eddy Out from the Kettlehouse Brewery is his design. Sherman says beer label art takes a particular eye. He’ll stand in front of beer coolers for long periods of time to study all the colors and textures he has to compete against in order to figure out how to best make his beer labels stand out on the shelves. One of his requirements as a commissioned artist is to give the cans a basic, uni-

Local beer labels include the Kettlehouse’s Double Haul, left, created by graphic artist Rick Bayern’s Doppel Bock, painted by Monte Dolack.

Rick Sherman

Rick Sherman used to walk down to Sundance Natural Foods, the local health food store in Eugene, Ore., with his toddler daughter and let her pick out his evening beers according to which labels she liked best. “She would really take the time to examine the pictures before she would decide,” he says. “I ended up with this great collection of really beautiful art piece labels.” It was the late 1980s, when microbrews were starting to pop up all over Oregon, and Sherman, who was taking graphic design classes at Lane Community College at the time, began to daydream about walking down to the store and seeing an array of his own art on those sixers stacked in the cooler. “The whole concept of illustrated labels started really coming in with the microbrew industry,” he says. “That became a kind of identifying part of a small brewery was their labels. And it became one of my professional goals.” After moving back to his native Montana and splitting time between outdoor labor and graphic design as the art

Missoula Independent

Page 34 April 29–May 6, 2010

form style so that people can immediately identify them as a Kettlehouse beer. And, at the same time, he’s given each type of beer an associated color so people can quickly pick out the IPA from the Scotch Ale, for instance. He went for solid colors: a black-to-red fade for Cold Smoke, sky blue for Double Haul and caramel brown for Eddy Out. Images of skiers, kayakers and fly-fishers complete the look of the beer cans to evoke Montana outdoor recreation. But it’s the simplicity of the images that matters. “You don’t have to recognize that there’s a skier there,” says Sherman about the Cold Smoke label. “The simplicity of the image itself on the red background has a tendency to stand out on the shelves as opposed to something busy.” Sherman works with Kettlehouse owner Tim O’Leary to come up with design concepts. For Double Haul (named after a type of fly-fishing cast) Sherman took photos of O’Leary casting on the Bitterroot River to create the design. For Eddy Out, he shot over 1,000 photos of Kettlehouse bartender Cheyenne Rogers kayaking on Brennan’s Wave.

“The Kettlehouse is like a family,” says Sherman. “They pull themselves into the artistic process, so it’s fun to work with them.” Monte Dolack

What do you get when you cross Monte Dolack with a Doppel Bock? You get a beer label overflowing with snowy peaks and majestic mountain goats. The prominent local painter has worked with Bayern Brewery since its inception in 1987 (though he’s not the only artist they use) to create labels for several of their beers, including their Doppel Bock, Pilsener, Dancing Trout, Maibock and Oktoberfest. Bayern owner Jürgen Knöller originally commissioned Dolack because he was already a fan of the artist’s work. So, rather than being asked to produce a particular design, Dolack’s free to stick with his own style of painting—though he still has to keep in mind the idea of marketing a Montana-made beer. “I like to work with themes of culture and music or conservation and the environment,” says Dolack. “But the beer is a little bit different. I started making posters in the mid-’70s for small independent groups, doing things for concerts and events and it kind of reminds me of doing that.” Dolack mostly has to think about the image and not so much the logistical aspect of creating a beer label. He paints a picture that distinguishes each beer (a prairie with a windmill signifies the amber, for instance) and Knöller works with designer Eileen Chantos to make that painting into a label. “I try to keep a nice consistent format so they’re usually the same size and laid out in a similar way,” says Dolack. “But the way that the painting is employed in the design of the label is Sherman, and usually a little different because it’s in an oval form or it has lettering across it. And I don’t do that part.” Dolack has, however, had a hand in helping to define Bayern’s values. He was part of the infamous name change that switched Bayern’s Trout Slayer (a brand Big Sky brewery now uses) to Dancing Trout in order to portray a more conservation-minded label. His painting of a fisherman hugging an over-sized fish created some controversy among beer drinkers who expressed dismay with the overromanticizing of catch-and-release fishing, but it made a statement for Bayern, nonetheless. Currently, Dolack is working on a commissioned piece to commemorate the Great Burn of 1910. But he says he’s eager to work again on art projects as popular as a beer label. “It is fun to be part of the culture,” says Dolack. “And the beer labels are things in pop culture usage that connect with what we do. Artists like to have things in museums too, but it’s nice to make things that are used by people.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Movie Shorts

Drinking Songs

Bruce Springsteen Nebraska Columbia

We drink a variety of beers, for a variety of reasons. Nothing goes better with beer (sorry, pretzels) than music, and any serious lover of suds and songs will agree there’s an optimum album for every beer-drinking situation. I don’t want to listen to Leonard Cohen, say, while I’m blowing off steam at Happy Hour, but you’d be surprised at how effective Strauss’ “Also Sprach Zarathustra” is when hitting the beer bong. Sometimes beer helps you wallow. When you’ve lost your job, your apartment, your girl and your car (like Bill Murray at the beginning of Stripes), crack

Dale Watson

Cheatin’ Heart Attack Hightone Records

The boilerplate choice for redneck cry-in-yourbeer music is probably Merle Haggard, maybe some George Jones. But when you’ve been dumped and deceived, and your broken heart is burning with anger and bitterness, that’s when you want to stake out a stool near the jukebox in some grimy dive bar, order up a cold bottle of Bud, and tell

Jimmy Buffett

Songs You Know By Heart MCA

All right, enough with the wound licking. Cheer up, Sparky! Summertime’s coming, and it’s time to ice down a tub full of Mexican brew (the colder it is, the better it tastes). Put on your best Hawaiian shirt (remember, it’s a sin to tuck ’em in) and hook up all the sprinklers for a backyard barbecue / Slip ’n Slide party. Rim your porch with tiki torches and plug in that big ol’ boombox so the neighbors can get involved. We’re thinking beaches, boats and babes now, and no one does that scene better than Jimmy Buffett.

Reverend Horton Heat The Full-Custom Gospel Sounds Sub Pop

Stopping by your favorite watering hole after work, or maybe a hard-fought softball game? That’s when cold draft beer acts as a catalyst, the barley glue that binds us all together in our drinking establishment of choice, where we celebrate life, accomplishment, friendship, or maybe just a crisply turned double play.

open a big can or three of Foster’s and put on Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska, an album that’s as desolate and haunting as an empty refrigerator. But its desolation has a noble beauty, which lends your pity party a sort of dignity. While you’re blubbering over getting laid off, “My Father’s House” will shift your sorrow to your broken-down relationship with your dad. “Atlantic City” will provide a kinship with its determined loser, and “Johnny 99” shows you just how far a desperate man will go. The knockout punch is “Reason to Believe,” which delivers a glint of hope, just as you’re about to swallow a bottle of pills. (Bob Wire) the bartender to keep ’em coming. Plug a few bucks into the jukebox and play Dale Watson’s Cheatin’ Heart Attack. It’s pure, it’s potent and it’s miles away from the sugary dreck that’s oozing out of Nashvegas these days under the guise of “country music.” Watson’s hearty baritone spins out tale after tale of cheating, lying, boozing and leaving. “Hole in the Wall” is not about some tiny beer joint; it’s actually about a guy who gets in a fight with his woman and literally punches a hole in the wall. “Sorry about that hole in the wall / I’ll fix it with some spackle and Pine-Sol.” “Caught” puts the boot on the other foot, when the cheater is “caught in a motel room / the tangled sheets smell like sweet perfume.” This is longneck country. (Bob Wire) You could go for the sprawling greatest hits collection Boats, Beaches, Bars and Ballads, but four CD’s of Jimmy might be too much of a good thing. Stick to Songs You Know by Heart, one disc of all killer, no filler, good-timin’ sing-alongs. Give me a can of Tecate with some salt and lime (and maybe a tequila chaser), and I’ll be belting out “Why Don’t We Get Drunk and Screw” so loud that they’ll hear me up at Flathead Lake. Your Aunt Ruthie might disapprove, but hey, who invited her, anyway? (Bob Wire) For me, nothing provides a better soundtrack to a few pints of locally brewed IPA than Reverend Horton Heat. On a payday Friday, hoist that frosty glass o’ suds and start rubbernecking to The Full-Custom Gospel Sounds, an album that is sure to get your adrenaline pumping and your blood pressure running in the red. “Beer:30” will have you dancing on your stool, and “Nurture My Pig” should induce a bar-wide shout-along to the chorus. The hilarious songs will keep the laughter coming and the beer flowing. Set ’em up, bartender, and hit me with some more of those peanuts. We live in an amazing era. Used to be you’d go to your neighborhood tavern and choose from maybe 200 songs on the old Seeburg. Now, with unlimited choices provided online, you can navigate your way to the perfect musical companion to your beer-drinking mood pretty much anywhere you are. Bottoms up! (Bob Wire)

•BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN FORESTRY •MASTER’S DEGREE IN HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT •Combat Tour of Duty - Director, Iraqi Police Service, Iraqi Security Forces, First Marine Division, Camp Blue Diamond, Ar Ramadi, Al Anbar Province, Iraq •Retired from the USMC as a Colonel (O-6) on 31 May 2005 after 30 years of Service •Resident Deputy in the Seeley-Swan area •Uniform Patrol Officer •Deputy Coroner •Search and Rescue Coordinator •Rescue/Recovery SCUBA diver •Law Enforcement Dog Handler •Smokejumper Liaison Officer •Detective •School Resource Officer •Boat/Personal Watercraft •Patrolman •Civil Officer •Snowmobile Patrolman •Jimmy Kaaro Award presented at the Montana Law Enforcement Academy for obtaining the highest academic record during Basic Class # 55, 1984 •Achieved perfect score - final exam, Basic Class # 55; 1st time ever accomplished, 1984 •Purple Heart Medal for being wounded in the line of duty, 1992 •Armed Action Medal for being involved in a gun battle, in the line of duty, 1992

•Life-Saving Ribbon for saving the life of a dying hunter, 1998 •1992 Local Law Enforcement Officer of the Year, Missoula Exchange Club •1992 International Assn. of Chiefs of Police/ Dupont Kevlar Survivor’s Club Award •1993 Montana State Law Officer of the Year, Montana Sheriff & Peace Officers Assn •1994 Certificate of Commendation from President Clinton; presented at The White House, Washington, D. C. •1998 Domestic Violence Peace Officer of the Year, Missoula Area Dom.Viol. Council •2001 Montana Law Officer of the Year, American Legion •Fire Control Technician, Salmon River District, Klamath National Forest (two years) •U.S.F.S. Smokejumper, Region One, 120 + jumps; fought fires throughout West & Alaska, eight years (four years prior to regular military service, and four years after)

CURRENTLY A SENIOR DEPUTY SHERIFF II WITH 28 YEARS WITH THE MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

"For the first time in nearly a generation, we have the opportunity to bring real change to the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department."

"Fully bring the Sheriff’s Department into the 21st Century by re-vamping the philosophy, strategy, and tactics of leadership and management. Initiate progressive change by improving morale and ‘leading from the front.’ Inspire, motivate and challenge the personnel to excel." For More Information please visit www.parcellforsheriff.org

406-754-2535 • 406-210-1561 • reparcell@blackfoot.net (Paid for by Robert E. Parcell, Democrat, 213 Holland Lake Rd, Condon, MT 59826)

Missoula Independent

Page 35 April 29–May 6, 2010


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Sudsy sculptures Flathead ceramicist creates custom growlers

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Missoula Independent

Page 36 April 29–May 6, 2010

by Erika Fredrickson

If every golden era has its accessories, Tim chose to take continuing education classes in ceramics Carlburg has the perfect tool for Montana’s micro- at Bellarmine University in Louisville to keep his teaching license from lapsing. But it wasn’t brew age: custom ceramic growlers. until three years later, when he was The Kalispell-based ceramicist has creout of the military and had moved to ated commercial beer growlers out of the Flathead, that he threw himself clay for Flathead Lake Brewing into the craft. At Flathead Valley Company, Madison River Brewing Community College he worked in the Company, Blackfoot River Brewing studio part time and then got a job at Company and Glacier Brewing Whitefish Pottery for a year and a half Company. He also makes custom before setting up his own business. growlers for individuals who want to have a drinking vessel that fits their The process for making ceramic personality. growlers is intensive. Carlburg gets stoneware clay from the Archie Bray “One woman said that she and her Foundation in Helena and molds it girlfriends like to go out and get rowdy into the basic jug form. It dries for a at the bars,” says Carlburg. “And whencouple of hours before he adds gromever they talk about going out they talk mets for the swing top and a handle. about the ‘horns coming out.’ So I He air dries the growler for a week made her a devil horned growler.” before firing it in the kiln for 12 hours No request has proven too difficult at 1,800 degrees. It dries for another for Carlburg. He’s designed growlers day, after which point he creates the inscribed with military insignia for logo or hand-painted design and then army retirement ceremonies. He’s fires it again for 12 hours at 2,300 made matching growlers for wedding degrees. After a final cooling and the party presents, and created others that attachment of a swing top, it’s done. sport family crests. And, recently, he He finishes about 10 growlers per sent a commissioned growler decoratday, but the entire process takes ed with sailboats and islands to Guam between two and four weeks—somefor the territory’s homebrew club. times more when demand is high. Carlburg got the idea for custom growlers while sipping a pint of beer at Carlburg plans on taking some Flathead Lake Brewing Company in of his newest growlers to Butte in Woods Bay just over a year ago. He July for what marks his third appearplayed around with the thought for a ance as one of 25 juried artists at the while, trying out different growler National Folk Festival. Considering sizes and thicknesses, figuring out how the fact that growlers now make up to make it work. 90 percent of his sales (at $50 each “They looked more like the origior more, depending on the cusnal moonshine jugs,” Carlburg says. tomization), he’s eager to push that “But the cork tops I was using just didside of his pottery business. n’t hold the carbonation very well.” “People here do love their beer,” Fortunately, the owner of the Carlburg says. “We have an amazing Flathead Lake Brewing Company gave brewing community. Talking to him some swing tops—think of Grolsch some of the head brewers, what we brand beer bottles—from the brewery’s have going on in western Montana brown glass growlers to experiment and even out in Billings is on par with. The swing tops kept the carbonawith what they’re doing over in tion as long as any screw cap, Carlsburg Portland and Seattle. It’s really comsays, plus they gave the growlers a ing of age here.” more old-world look than the ordinary T i m C a r l b u r g m a k e s The Beer Age, indeed. Maybe, glass growler. The glaze Carlburg used ceramic beer growlers after the apocalypse, when future kept the growler design from rubbing for specific breweries, as archaeologists dig through the off over time, and the thickness of the w e l l a s c u s t o m - m a d e remains of Montana’s landscape, clay material provided enough insula- designs for individual they’ll discover Carlburg’s ceramic beer drinkers. tion to keep the beer cold up to four growlers and realize how much we hours, even in direct sunlight. truly loved our locally brewed beer. “I took the fruits of my labor back to the Flathead “That’s the neat thing about pottery,” says Lake Brewing Company and [the owner] really liked Carlburg. “If it’s taken care of properly, it will outlast all the idea,” Carlburg says. “So it all grew from there.” of us.” Carlburg got into ceramics when he took a class For more information on Tim Carlburg’s for his K-12 art education degree at the University of ceramic growlers visit carlburg pottery.com. Wisconsin in Madison. After graduation, he was stationed in Fort Knox, Ky., as active duty military, and he efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Films on tap Classic beer moments from the big screen by Andy Smetanka

This might surprise you, coming from someone who lived Jay’s Upstairs to the hilt for a decade, but the last time I barfed from drinking too much beer was in 1989, and it was on a ferry from Stockholm to Helsinki. Applying brilliant logic, I determined it would be more cost-effective to gun four or five 12 percent Danish beers from the duty-free shop than pay ferry-disco prices to maintain my buzz all night. I briefly regained consciousness a few hours later to find myself hurling my guts over the railing into the Baltic. Getting a good bit of it on my pants as well, or maybe it was there from earlier, but either way it was a shame because I didn’t have a change of clothes and I had to make my way home from the ferry terminal in crusty yellow chaps, essentially, of the previous night’s buffet. Don’t really have a point with that story. Nor can I tell you exactly why I chose some beer-related movies over others in a crowded field for this list in honor of the upcoming Garden City BrewFest. Completely offtopic is this wonderful Magnetic Fields lyric I want to share: “I see that kiss-me pucker forming / But maybe you should plug it with a beer.” Anyway, here they are in declining order of beerelevance. Kegger (2009)

Great documentary, albeit of interest chiefly to Missoulians and baby-boomers in particular. Kegger fetes the ’70s heyday of the Aber Day Kegger, the mother of all American beer busts, which mixed hundreds of kegs and thousands of people to make thousands of drunk people in ankle-deep beer mud with Bonnie Raitt performing. From the glorious stock footage, very well shot, this annual event looks like the best time ever. Amazingly, it was all to raise money for the UM Mansfield Library, and, depressingly, nothing even remotely like it will ever happen in Missoula again. Strange Brew (1983)

One of those movies you feel like you’ve seen even if you haven’t, or maybe never want to, or want to again, simply because you’ve been around people quoting it endlessly in bad Canadian accents your whole life. You hoser! Take off, eh! Toque, toque, toque! This is seriously the only “Canadian” movie some people can name. The Saddest Music in the World (2003)

Another one, appropriately, from our northern cousins. At the peak of the Depression, Winnipeg beer baroness Lady Port-Huntley (Isabella Rossellini) announces a contest to determine which country has the most depressing music. Destitute immigrants descend on Winnipeg to compete for the whopping cash prize, which also comes with a bonus plunge into a vat of golden nectar. Because it’s a Guy Maddin movie, Rossellini also has two artificial legs (ever since a lover’s drunken father mistakenly amputated them), made of glass, and filled with beer. Contains the marvelous all-purpose racial epithet “foreign onion-peeler.”

Blue Velvet (1986)

Speaking of Isabella Rossellini, this David Lynch movie merits a mention solely for its perverse product placement of Pabst Blue Ribbon— not, as the menacing Frank reminds us, a libation to be savored at room temperature. Is Blue Velvet behind PBR’s enduring hipster cachet? Discuss with teammates when the company sponsors your totally retro tetherball tournament this spring. Beerfest (2006)

Not as good as Super Troopers, but streaks better than Club Dread, Beerfest finds the Broken Lizard gang wandering around Europe trying to scatter a loved one’s ashes and stumbling across “a Fight Club with drinking games.” Despite the title and notional subject matter, as always the humor here is more stoner than lagerlout, and the ending leaves the door open to a most entertaining THC-quel. Smokey and the Bandit (1977)

Hard to believe, but 40 years ago college students back east could actually pay for school by road-tripping west and returning with cases of Coors to sell to friends at marked-up prices. Or so it says in Dan Baum’s excellent biography Citizen Coors. Having recently seen a documentary about the “clean flicks” video-editing industry, I can’t help but wonder how the truckload of Coors so central to the plot of Smokey and the Bandit could be spirited away for a clean-flick version without reducing the movie to an incomprehensible 20 minutes. Octopussy (1983)

Only mentioning this one for the scene where James Bond (Roger Moore) hitches a ride to a nuclear weapon stashed in a circus cannon with a kindly German couple who try to force their picnic feast down his throat. The “Und Bier?” line became a running joke for my friend Donovan and me in sixth grade, both of us still a few years away from beers not sanctioned by our respective fathers in occasional supervised bonding situations.

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Leaving Las Vegas (1995)

Between rinsings with strong spirits, a suicidal Nicolas Cage occasionally sips a beer for pleasure, or uses the bottle as a stand-in penis to make love to his prostitute girlfriend before finally croaking to a Sting soundtrack. Perfect! The beer-drinking parts, in comparison, seem downright wholesome, but also make Cage’s character look like a double loser for not killing himself quickly enough. arts@missoulanews.com

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Antiques Camera/ Photo Store Florist Home Accessories Lawyer Pet Care/Boarding Property Management Company Real Estate Agent Veterinarian

Or you can still vote the old-fashioned way by completing the paper ballot on page 17

Missoula Independent

Page 37 April 29–May 6, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET Who’s ready for a remake? Jackie Earle Haley replaces Robert Englund as Freddy Krueger, disfigured face and all, as he revels in terrorizing a gaggle of Elm Street residents—including Kyle Gallner and Katie Cassidy—in their dreams, and eventually, in reality. Carmike 10: 4:10, 7 and 9:40 with an additional Fri. show at 12:05 AM and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Village 6: 7 and 9:40 with an additional Fri. show at 12:05 AM and additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 1:15, 2:45, 3:45, 5, 6:15, 7:30, 8:45 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 2:45, 3:45, 5, 6:15, 7:30, 8:45 and 9:15. BARBIE IN A MERMAID TALE Barbie lives it up in this cartoon as a surfing champ in Malibu, until she finds out that she’s also a mermaid. Eventually though, her new appendage helps her do things like rescue her mother, as well as save an ocean kingdom. Village 6: 1 only on Sat.–Sun.

Noise

Art

Montana’s Absaroka-Beartooth mountains. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:30.

NOW PLAYING ALICE IN WONDERLAND Tim Burton makes his 3-D mark in this phantasmagorical classic, which features Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska and Anne Hathaway. Carmike 10: 4 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. THE BACK-UP PLAN Jennifer Lopez is eager to settle down and have kids but can’t seem to find the right dude to be her mate, so she opts to get preggers via artificial insemination. Oddly enough, the day the procedure occurs is also when she meets Alex O’Loughlin—a single guy who just might make the cut as a baby’s daddy. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun.

DVD

Movie Shorts

DATE NIGHT Steve Carrell and Tina Fey are suburbanite parents with a marriage that’s going stale. In an attempt to inject a little spice into their lives Carrell decides to take Fey to an upscale restaurant, only to find out they’ve become the targets of some seriously corrupt cops. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7 and 9:30 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Village 6: 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:20, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 4, 7:20 and 9:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. DEATH AT A FUNERAL Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence and an assortment of family and friends gather to mourn the death of their father. Of course, things go awry, especially when someone gets dosed with psychedelics,

THE LOSERS Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Chris Evans, Idris Elba and others unleash the mother freakin’ fury—at least try to—against CIA agent Jason Patric, who left the band of mercenaries for dead during a covert op in a Bolivian jungle. Village 6: 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:55, 6:40 and 9:15 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9.

IRON MAN 2 Robert Downey Jr. returns as Iron Man, the well liked industrialist with a few metallic tricks up his sleeve. This time around, however, Downey Jr.’s got the government pleading for his technological secrets, and dudes like Mickey Rourke after his head. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Thu. only at 9 and 12:01 AM. Showboat Cinema in Polson: Thu. only at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: Thu. only at midnight.

OUR FAMILY WEDDING America Ferrera and Lance Gross are lovey doves eager to tie the knot. That’s until their dads—Forest Whitaker and Carlos Mencia—get in the way and threaten to ruin their special day. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. PHISH 3-D Nope, you’re not tripping. It’s your favorite jam band, and they’ve been visually amplified in this concert film from their Festival 8 gig—the one where they played for three days, and covered the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main St. Carmike 10: 7 and 10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 8:30. SWEETGRASS Contemporary cowboys in Montana get a spot on the screen in this documentary which follows the last sheep ranchers to summer their herd in

Missoula Independent

KENNY CHESNEY: SUMMER IN 3-D Country fans will rejoice as they witness Kenny Chesney rocking out on stage—sleeveless muscle shirt and all—in this visually enhanced concert flick that showcases his tour from last summer. Carmike 10: 1:30 only on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri. at 7:30 and Sat.–Sun. at 2. THE LAST SONG Estranged dad and former concert pianist Greg Kinnear uses the almighty power of music to patch up any rough spots with his daughter Miley Cyrus in this adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ book. Village 6: 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:45 and 6:15 with an additional Fri.-Sat. show at midnight.

FURRY VENGEANCE Brendan Fraser’s a naïve developer who is lured into believing that building over a nature preserve is a totally great idea. The animals he’s displacing, however, aren’t going to take it—and they do their best to screw with Fraser until he loses his cool for good. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:25 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:25, 4:45, 7 and 9:25 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:55, 7 and 9:25.

KICK-ASS Aaron Johnson is a nerdy teen who’s obsessed with comics and is lacking on luck with the ladies. At some point, he brings his fixation to life by becoming a superhero—and soon enough, people like Nicolas Cage start emulating his pulverizing moves. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9:15 nightly with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 9:10 Mon.–Sat. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:40 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON This 3-D animated flick follows Hiccup, a scrawny Viking teen who was brought up to mercilessly slay dragons. But things change when he befriends a “different” dragon that makes him realize they aren’t so evil after all. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:05 and 9:45 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:30 and 9:45 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton in 2-D: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 3-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 7 and 9:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:45, 6:30 and 8:45.

Something tells me that won’t make bath time lots of fun. A Nightmare on Elm Street opens Friday at the Carmike 10.

shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. CLASH OF THE TITANS Sam Worthington (Perseus), the Greek warrior and son of Liam Neeson (Zeus) decides to wage battle against demons and freakish beasts in his quest to defeat the hellraising ways of Ralph Fiennes (Hades). Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:45 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:30 with an additional Fri. show at midnight. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 3-D: Fri. at 12:30, 3:30, 6:50 and 9:20 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 amd 9:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Sun. at 4:15 and 9:45 with an additional Fri. show at 1:15, an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 7:15 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45.

Page 38 April 29–May 6, 2010

and Rock and Lawrence learn their dad was getting down on the down-low. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Stadium 14 in Kailispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:30 and 7:05. DIARY OF A WIMPY KID Zachary Gordon tries his best to navigate his way through pre-teen life in an institution filled with “morons.” Village 6: Sat.-Sun. only at 1:45 and 4:15. HOT TUB TIME MACHINE John Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson and Clark Duke are all down-on-their-luck dudes who decide that getting hammered in a ski resort hot tub is a good idea. When their night of debauchery ends, they wake up realizing they’ve been transported back to 1986. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:30 and 10 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Wed. at 4:05 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Thu. at 4:05 only. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

THE RUNAWAYS Kristen Stewart is badass shredder Joan Jett and Dakota Fanning rocks the role of vocalist Cherie Currie in this biopic that traces the origins and success of this all-girl 1970s rock band. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. THE BOUNTY HUNTER Gerard Butler has trouble finding work as a bounty hunter, until he snags the lucky gig of going after his bail-jumping ex—Jennifer Aniston. Along the way, Aniston evades Butler’s cuffs, and in the process they both find themselves in some sticky situations. Carmike 10: 4:05, 7 and 9:40 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:20, 7:05 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., April 30. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 39 April 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 6, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

April 29–May 6, 2010

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Table of contents

Luna Says,

Come in for a Free Luna Card

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Freewill Astrology . . . .C4 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C6 Sustainafieds . . . . . . .C12 This Modern World . .C15

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Felony warrant charging him with a probation violation following a conviction for possession of dangerous drugs.

AGE: 26 HEIGHT: 5’9” HAIR COLOR: BLACK EYE COLOR: BROWN

PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825. Vegas Swingers Event www.JPJustParties.com

LOST & FOUND Found Car Keys near Florence bridge 4/21/10. Wells Fargo fob. Call to identify 777-0854 runaway lawn chairs Two lawn chairs escaped from Slant Street backyard last snowy Monday night (Apr 5). Grey, woven fabric backs; heavy swivel base; black metal frame. Please call 370-5072. Thanks.

TO GIVE AWAY FREE CYCLES MISSOULA. Kids bikes are always free. Monday & Thursday: 3:00-7:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00-3:00. 732 South 1st West YELLOW LAB. Free to good home. Purebred 3 year old male has all shots. 406-493-2614

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Walk it.

Kayak & Fitness Symposium Spend a relaxing weekend paddling, practicing yoga, eating healthy organic meals, journaling, pampering yourself and more at this Memorial Day Symposium at Deep Bay Resort on Flathead Lake. 5/28 to 5/31. Email: Bobbie@GlacierSea Kayak.com for complete packet of information & registration.

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VOLUNTEERS



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Meals On Wheels urgently needs volunteer drivers and substitutes weekdays between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Valid Montana driver’s license required, mileage reimbursement available. Interested in a rewarding volunteer role? Call Missoula Aging Services at 728-7682

hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

INSTRUCTION

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

CURTAIN MAUL I’m a theater performer, and there’s a tendency among theater people that disturbs me: dreadful over-the-top flirting. I’m a portly, bearded guy pushing 40. At my last show, I was sitting in a seat minding my own business when a young woman in the cast I barely knew came and sat on my lap. I’m straight, so naturally, I enjoyed this. But, when I responded by putting my hand on her knee, she jumped up as if she’d been electrocuted and ignored me for the rest of the show’s run. Humiliating. To preempt that humiliation, is there a polite time, perhaps when rehearsals begin, to announce “I’m not your daddy or Santa Claus, and I’m not gay, so if any of you young ladies come sit on my lap, you might find my hand on your knee. Comport yourselves accordingly.” —Miscast “Dear Advice Goddess, I’m so troubled. Hot young women sit on my lap.” Well, definitely start wearing pants fitted with those spikes they use to keep pigeons off liquor store signs, or at least sew golf cleats to the front of your jeans. Or, if this sounds like a lot of bother, you could just consider yourself mildly lucky, and leave it at that. In your defense, it’s not like you’re some chronic knee molester, constantly dropping to all fours in rehearsals—all the better to grope the ingenue’s patella. You were apparently supposed to consider this a sort of static lap dance. (You don’t get to touch the stripper when you’re getting a lap dance— at least not without tossing her a couple extra hundreds.) Of course, in a strip club, the rules are clear. In drama group, it’s harder to differentiate between “I want you” lap-sits and look-but-don’ttouch “I want you to pay homage to hot little me.” There are many ways to communicate, but women who wish to avoid being misunderstood will find the spoken and written word far more effective than the silent language of butt cheeks on a man’s thigh. Let’s be honest: What disturbs you isn’t the “dreadful over-the-top flirting,” but the dreadful leaping up from your lap as if electrocuted. The answer isn’t making preemptive announcements—not unless you’re in some race to humiliate yourself before other people can get to it. You just need to act like the kind of guy who’d be dangerous for a girl to tease. For a role model, I suggest the one-eyed, boozing, chain-smoking, gourmet food-hoovering poet/novelist Jim Harrison, who looks and sounds like the product of drunk sex

between a pirate and a grizzly. At 73, with his mere presence, he makes young player-dudes seem to have all the sexual mojo of Julie Andrews. (As a woman, you get the sense that if you get too close, he just might grab you with one of his big paws, pop a truffle on you, and wash you down with a swig of Spanish wine.) In other words, your problem isn’t that you’ve been humiliated, but that you’re acting humiliated, letting this girliepoo set the tone. Instead of hanging your head and hoping to evaporate, refuse to be shunned by teasing the tease: maybe pointing to your knee and asking if she’d like another ride on her new pony, or grinning and sticking out your hand, fingers wriggling, as if it might get loose and make another run for her leg. This should not only give you your superpowers back, but teach her an important lesson: If you’re over 12, and you plop down on a man’s lap, you aren’t going to be asked what you want for Christmas.

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 April 29 – May 6, 2010

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PET OF THE WEEK

I’m a 38-year-old guy in decent shape, but my prematurely graying hair makes me look much older. Should I try some of that hair dye for men I see at the drugstore? —Color Me Uninformed

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advice goddess.com)

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call MCAT

Bruce- 546-5541

MEN OF HAIRCOLOR

Men self-dyeing their graying hair are today’s version of bald men who thought they were fooling people while looking like a small animal dropped off a tree and landed on their head. It’s understandable that you don’t want to look “distinguished” at 38—a word 28-year-old girls use to describe their grandpa. But, what’s worse than going prematurely gray? Going prematurely the color of fresh baby eggplant, like so many do-it-yourself Mr. Clairols. Others go way too dark; for example, lightskinned Jewish guys who end up looking like they hair-robbed Benicio Del Toro. If you must dye, make tracks for the salon. But, consider the look of self-acceptance: seeming comfortable in your own skin (and gray hair). You might call this the other “Just For Men”—just for men who’d rather avoid being the guy who posted in a web forum, “Just for Men hair color turned the skin around my mustace (sic) a reddish purple color. How do I fix this?”

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

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"Millie"- Let's be realistic, most people, even in Missoula, know that Pit Bulls can come with a bad reputation. Well Millie is certainly working to change that, and she's only a year old! Nothing about her says "bad dog" instead her personality screams goofy! From her silly grin, missing teeth, dangling tongue, to full body dance, Milly is a crack up! She is a happy-go-lucky gal with a great attitude, and she loves everyone and everything she meets! Visit her at the Humane Society of Western Montana, Tues.-Fri 16p.m. and Sat.11a.m.4p.m.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT A book is the only place where you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. Edward P Morgan FACT & FICTION 220 N. HIGGINS AND ON CAMPUS Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Coun seling. Sliding fee scale. Lic ensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moon- dance Healing Therapies/ Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Experienced Heath Care Provider available for assistance with seniors for personal care, doctor’s

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549-0119

317 SW Higgins


EMPLOYMENT

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CAKE DECORATOR, F/T,P/T, Msla. A Missoula grocery store is hiring a CAKE DECORATOR. This position starts out part-time (20+ hrs/week) but will turn into full-time the early part of June. Individual needs at least 6 months of cake decorating experience. Duties also include maintaining a clean kitchen area and assisting in bakery associated tasks. Must be available Sunday-Monday and work shift is daytime. Employer desires a motivated, reliable and dependable individual. Pay starts at $8.60 per hour. #2977393 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

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BARTENDER-CASINO RUNNER, P/T, Msla. Local liquor store-casino is hiring a reliable, Bartender-casino runner. Must have previous experience, will not train; will be working 20 hours per week. Flexible on hours worked. Salary is $7.25 an hour plus tips. Must be able to pass a drug test and must have references that can be checked. Must be of legal age to serve and sell alcohol. Requires mature work ethic. #2977395 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

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COOK WANTED for Custom Harvesting Crew. Must be able to plan meals, purchase supplies, and cook for a crew of about 40 people. Position is for Six months. Must be willing to travel with Crew to Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Montana. Driver’s license is required, room and board supplied. Please fax Resume to Walter Harvesting, Attn: Rob at 1-403-327-0267 or email to rob.k@waltertrucking.com HOUSE MANAGER — RELIEF, P/T, Msla. House Manager Relief Staff needed for addiction services organization. Under general supervision assists with providing supportive services to residents of home; assist with keeping house & apartments safe & secured; assist with general functioning & maintenance of house. Assist with meds, ensure residents complete household chores & comply with rules, meal prep, answer phone, monitor & maintain resident records, conduct urine testing, anti-abuse monitoring, breath tests & complete household tasks. Need working knowledge of substance abuse, addiction & recovery; familiarity with primary Axis I & II diagnoses; family system dynamics; thorough knowledge of community-based resources & process of referral; ethical performance standards; knowledge of laws & rules relevant to chemical dependency & confidentiality; demonstrated knowledge of appropriate boundary setting. Deliver & follow written & verbal instructions; communicate effectively verbally & in writing; demonstrate competency in multitasking, problem-solving, time & crisis management; reliability in performing duties of position including awake attendance during work hours. Requires GED or HS diploma; or a year experience in substance abuse/addiction field. If recovering, requires 1

year of abstinence in recovery program. Pay $10/hr. Will fillin for vacation & sick leaves. Schedule will vary; must be available for all shifts, all days of week. #2977399 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HOUSEKEEPER/LAUNDRY, P/T, Msla. Local skilled nursing and assisted living center is seeking housekeepers. Will provide housekeeping services such as laundry, sweeping, mopping, vacuuming, making beds and other general cleaning as assigned. Need attention to detail and able to follow facility protocol. Must enjoy working with the elderly, able to work independently and with a team, and be neat and clean in appearance. Background check will be conducted. Days of the week vary and include weekends. Will work approximately 30 hours per week, day and swing shifts. Pay starts at $7.25/hr. Business is on a bus line. HIRING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. #2977415 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Ladies needing $$ If you like to dance and entertain for parties, call 214-5944 MOTORCYCLE PARTS AND SALES PERSON, F/T, Msla. Missoula employer is seeking a full-time experienced MOTORCYCLE PARTS AND SALES PERSON. This is a motorcycle shop and employer strongly prefers those with Motor Sports experience (6 months) and retail sales experience in a motorcycle parts business. Must have a motorcycle endorsement with good customer service skills. This is a fulltime position working five days per week. Work days and shifts will be discussed at interview. Pay starts at $8.50/hr. Business is a nonsmoking environment. Employer does conduct background checks. #2977414 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 PRE-SCHOOL STAFF, P/T, Msla. A nationally accredited daycare facility is seeking an early morning P/T PRESCHOOL STAFF worker to monitor a small group of preschoolers prior to the start of school. Hours are 4:30 am to 8:00 am, Monday-Friday. No child care experience required, willing to train. Salary range $7.25 to $9 per hour, depending on skills, performance, experience, and training. Will need tetanus shot, CPR and First Aid or you will be able to obtain these certifications after employment for increased pay. Employer will offer the wonderful benefit of paying for schooling so individual can obtain an Associates degree or a minor in Early Childhood Development, as well as offer a $700.00 bonus for each semester of Early Childhood education you complete. #2977407 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PSYCHOSOCIAL REHAB/SUPPORT SPECIALIST, F/T, Msla. An expanding Mental Health agency is seeking full-time friendly & patient Rehab and Support staff to work with severely mentally ill adults. Must be able to adapt skills, evaluate needs, communicate effectively

& develop social supports. One year of experience in working with this population is preferred. Requires high school diploma or GED, a valid driver’s license, good driving record & ability to be insured for company vehicles, own a reliable vehicle, have own liability insurance & be willing to use own vehicle to transport clients. Background check is required. Work hours & days may vary. Pay is $10.00/hr; $12.00 after probation + mileage reimbursement; benefits include medical insurance after probationary period and paid vacation after 1 year employment. Certified results of Basic Spelling, Typing, and Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 tests required. #2977368 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 QUADRIPLEGIC NEEDS HELP. Monday-Friday: 9:00-10:00 p.m. Every other weekend: 7:00-9:30 a.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m. 9:00-10:00 p.m. Also fill-ins. $10.95/hour. Call Dan 721-9265 REAL ESTATE LOAN PROCESSOR, F/T, Msla. Local bank is seeking a full-time REAL ESTATE LOAN PROCESSOR to provide administrative support to work unit, in addition to performing duties associated with loan processing such as preparing and processing approved new loans and renewals. Will assist officer in the information for the loan committee and prepare loan file with all appropriate documentation. A combination of education and experience equivalent to a high school diploma and minimum three years real estate loan processing work experience. Starting wage is $10.30/hr with an excellent benefit package. Work days Monday-Friday, 8:00am5:00pm. CLOSE DATE: 04/30/10 #2977409 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/ statejobs.asp Summer Childcare aid position available in Clinton. MTWF 27pm, Thursday: 2-10:30pm. Direct care of children 0-12 years in a childcare group home setting. 18 or older to apply. $8/hour. Training through May, regular hours begin May 1. Temporary position with possible continuation. Send resume to clintondaycare@hotmail.com. Closes May 12. THE MONTANA CONSERVATION CORPS EXPEDITION PROGRAM seeks individuals aged 15-17 years old who are interested in an outdoor adventure that combines education, job skills training, and fun! Session dates are June 13-July 10, or July 18-August 14. Crews are based out of Kalispell, Missoula, Helena, Bozeman or Billings but youth from across the state are eligible. Youth interested in a challenging and rewarding experience this summer, are encouraged to contact Jennifer Rusnak at 406-5874475 or by email at: jen@mtcorps.org More information and applications are also available on the web at

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 April 29 – May 6, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): “In a recipe for salsa published recently, one of the ingredients was misstated, due to an error,” said an apology run by a local newspaper. “The correct ingredient is ‘2 tsp. of cilantro’ instead of ‘2 tsp. of cement.’” This is an example of the kind of miscue you should be alert for in your own life during the coming week, Aries. As long as you pay close attention and spot the tiny booboos as they arise, you won’t end up dipping your chips into a gritty, gravely mess. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A little knowledge can be dangerous. I constantly meet people who have boxed themselves into tight spots by misusing their smattering of astrological information. There’s no better example of this than the superstition about Mercury retrograde, which is supposedly a bad time to begin anything new. During one such period last year, an acquaintance of mine decided to delay accepting a dream job offer as editor of a magazine. By the time Mercury returned to normal, the magazine had hired another applicant. I wish I’d have known, because I would have told her what I’ll tell you: Some of America’s biggest, most enduring Fortune 500 companies began when Mercury was retrograde, including Disney, Goodyear, and Boeing. The moral of the story: Of all the signs of the zodiac, it’s most important that you Tauruses don’t worry about launching new projects during the current Mercury retrograde. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Would you really prefer it if you had no problems? Do you imagine you’d enjoy life more if everything was pure fun and smoothly easy? Here’s an astrological perspective: People who have an over-abundance of positive aspects in their natal horoscopes often turn out to be lucky but lazy bums who never accomplish much. So I say, be thankful for the complications that are visiting you. I bet they will make a man out of you if you’re a woman, or a woman out of you if you’re a man. If you’re white, they’ll help you get blacker, and if you’re black, they’ll make you whiter. Catch my drift? As you do your best to solve the knotty riddle, you’ll become better balanced and more versatile than folks who are rarely challenged.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s the most important rule for you in the coming week: Keep your eyes fixed on a vision of your shining destiny. If you do, you’ll be unflappable, indefatigable, and irrepressible. Your luck will be so crazy good it’ll be almost spooky. Noble deeds you did in the past will finally bring the rewards you deserve. Allies will conspire to assist you, sometimes in ways you couldn’t have predicted. I’m not exaggerating, Cancerian. If you stay focused on the highest prize, you’ll live a charmed life.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1990, my rock band World Entertainment War played at a San Francisco nightclub on the same bill as the Beatnigs, an assemblage fronted by Michael Franti. Their avant-garde industrial music featured band members rhythmically hitting a steel bar with a power saw and slapping a long chain against a piece of sheet metal hanging from the back wall. Fast-forward to 2009, when Franti’s latest band Spearhead released a catchy romantic pop ditty titled “Say Hey (I Love You),” which reached number 18 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. I predict a comparable development for you in the next six months, Leo: moving from a state of raw, dark, obscure power to a state of bright, refined, accessible power.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mangosteens and rambutans are exotic fruits that grow in faraway places. The mangosteen is creamy and purple, with a peachy citrus taste, while the rambutan is like a big hairy red grape. This is a perfect moment, astrologically speaking, to invite them into your mouth. Likewise, the time is right for you to consider welcoming other colorful, striking, and foreign elements into your life. So maybe consider making friends with a Paraguayan acrobat. Sing Vietnamese folk songs. Read the memoirs of an Iranian exile. Exchange conspiracy theories with an Icelandic fairy.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reader named Emory proposes that we add a new meme to the cultural lexicon: interpersonal intellectual orgasm. Here’s how he describes it: “It happens when your conversation with another person becomes so intense that nothing else matters except the dialog you’re creating together. The two of you are so in-tune, so intellectually bonded, that the sensation is almost like making love. For that time, it’s like that person is in you and you are in that person; you are one because you understand each other so completely.” I bring this to your attention, Libra, because you’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when the interpersonal intellectual orgasm is far more likely than usual to occur.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Unlike people who cheat on their mates, polyamorists carry on two or more intimate relationships but don’t lie about it. Their lovers know about each other and have agreed to the arrangement. I applaud those who have the inclination to pull off this tricky work, even though I personally couldn’t manage it. Handling just a single intense bond takes improbable amounts of my ingenuity. If I were trying to weave my fate together with more than one partner, I wouldn’t have any energy left over to write these horoscopes or do anything else. How about you, Scorpio? You’re in a phase when splitting your attention might be tempting, not just in regards to your love life but in other areas, too. Whether that’s the right thing to do, I can’t say. Here’s what I do know: You can either go deeper or wider, but not both.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Never bear more than one trouble at a time,” wrote author and clergyman Edward Everett Hale. “Some people bear three kinds—all they have had, all they have now, and all they expect to have.” That’s good advice for you, Sagittarius. Please just stick to the trouble you have, and drop the other two kinds. There’s no need to fill up your beautiful head with extra torment. Besides, you’re much more likely to wrestle the current trouble into submission if you’re not weighted down by unnecessary extras.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What excites you? What makes you itch with a longing to be surprised? What fills you to the brim with curiosity and an agitated sense of wonder? You may not know even half of what you could potentially realize about these matters. Have you ever sat down and taken a formal inventory? Have you ever dedicated yourself to figuring out all the things that would inspire you most? Do it sometime soon, please; attend to this glorious task. According to my reading of the omens, it’s prime time to do so.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s a good thing Margaret Mitchell suffered a broken ankle back in 1925. She got so bored as she lay around the house recuperating that she started writing a book. Eventually it blossomed into the 423,000-word blockbuster Gone with the Wind, which sold 30 million copies and won her the Pulitzer Prize. Judging from your current astrological omens, Aquarius, I suspect that you too may soon be offered an opportunity disguised as a ho-hum problem.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I was pleased when I discovered a website with a video of quirky songstress Cat Power singing David Bowie’s iconic song “Space Oddity.” I love her, I love Bowie, and I love the tune. And yet a wave of disappointment broke over me when I realized, 30 seconds into the performance, that it was actually a car commercial. I felt duped. Appalled. Outraged. Any pleasure I’d gotten from the experience was ruined. Don’t be like me, Pisces. You, too, may soon receive a blessing that has some minor annoyance. Don’t overreact like me. Look past the blemish and enjoy the gift.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 April 29 – May 6, 2010

EMPLOYMENT www.mtcorps.org Visit us on Facebook and watch an MCC Expedition rap! Facebook.com/ MontanaConservationCorps

PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIORAL CARE COORDINATOR, F/T, Msla. Missoula area mental health organization is seeking a Behavior Care Coordinator to work with children with autism. Will be responsible for implementing individual support plans; assessing strengths & skills in daily living; assisting individuals with special needs in identifying, developing & participating in a variety of meaningful activities to increase functional independence. Pay is $10.40/hr plus full benefits. CLOSES 05/04/10 @5pm. #2977406 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Creative Manager Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, detail-oriented creative projects manager passionate about working with people, and bicycling, to plan and manage print and web projects. The candidate must research and procure materials in a timely manner for visual communications media such as magazines, catalogs, websites, newsletters, posters, and packaging. This is a full-time position with benefits. This position is based at Adventure Cycling’s headquarters in beautiful and recreation-friendly Missoula, Montana. Please submit a resume and cover letter as soon as possible to Adventure Cycling, c/o Sheila Snyder, Chief Operations Officer, P.O. Box 8308, Missoula, MT 59807. You can also submit your application electronically to ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. Application deadline: The position is open until filled. Please submit resume by May 10th. We will start reviewing applications and arranging for interviews on May 17, 2010. Mortgage Loan Originator First Security Bank - min. 5 yrs mortgage loan origination exp w/documented evidence of personal production volume. Base + commission w/benefits. Closes 4/30/10. To apply, click on the “Join Our Team” link at www. fsbmsla.com. EOE Russell Square Alberstons is now taking applications for experienced Retail Meat Cutter. Pay for experience, great benefits. Apply at store or online at www.albertsons.com. No phone calls please.

SKILLED LABOR TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546 Truck Drivers: Owner Operators and Company Drivers needed. Western 7 states and coast to coast. Montana based carrier. 3 years minimum experience. Call 406-266-4210

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION ASST PROFESSOR, WELDING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM, F/T, P/T, Msla. Seeking a tenure-track ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, WELDING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM. The individual will be responsible for development and teaching of assigned courses, shop and equipment organization and maintenance, student advising, assisting in placement and follow-up activities, and participation in faculty committees and related activities. Applications will be reviewed beginning May 15, 2010 and will be accepted until position is filled. Position is projected to begin, August 15, 2010. #2977365 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

attorneys and other referral sources. Exempt position; salary is base + commission with an excellent benefit package. Finalists for this position must be able to successfully pass a credit and background check. #2977404 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RELIEF ROUTE SALES REPRESENTATIVE, F/T, Msla. Local bakery has an opening for a RELIEF ROUTE SALES REPRESENTATIVE to sell, load and deliver various bakery products to retail and institutional customers throughout Western Montana. Hrs. 40 to 55 hours per week. Work hours somewhere between 2:00 AM & 4:00 PM weekdays, weekends and holiday, schedule to be discussed. MIN REQUIREMENTS: MUST have a SOLID work history, 1+yrs at previous employer; a MIN 1 YR SALES EXP, no “truck drivers” ; a valid driver’s license with proof of vehicle insurance; a clean driving record & provide a current driving record issued from department of licensing prior to an interview; be able to lift up to 40 lbs, plus maneuver large bulky racks; able to communicate with all levels of store & institution staff; possess a positive safe work ethic and be dependable; and be willing to join Teamsters

Union upon hire. Individual must be able to pass pre-employment background check, drug screen, and physical. Closes 4/26/10 at 6:00 pm. #2977413 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 Bartenders in demand. No experience necessary. Meet new people, take home cash tips. Up to $200 per shift. Training, placement and certification provided. Call (877) 435-2230 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com NOW HIRING: companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. MT-4186

Wildland Fire Training, Basic wildfire training, May 17-21. 406-543-0013.

HEALTH CAREERS LPN - LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time LPN for assisted living facility, will provide outstanding care to residents. Work shift is 10:00pm 6:00am, four nights per week and will work every other weekend. Pay is depending on experience. Must have a current LPN license to apply. IMMEDIATE NEED. #2977378 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SALES MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATOR, F/T, Msla. Local bank is seeking a full-time MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATOR. This position promotes loans to real estate agents, builders, developers, financial planners/CPAs,

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406-270-2522

PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT INVITATION TO BID AIRPORT IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MISSOULA, MONTANA Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received and publicly opened at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 20, 2010 by the Missoula County Airport Authority at the Airport Terminal Conference Room for the construction of “Airport Improvements” to include the following: Water and Sewer Development For the Construction of a New Air Traffic Control Tower This work is to include all tools, equipment, materials and labor to complete this project. Bids must be sealed and delivered: Missoula County Airport Authority, 5225 Highway 10 West, Missoula, MT 59808 at or before 2:00 p.m., local time on Thursday, May 20, 2010, and marked “Bid for Airport Improvements at the Missoula International Airport.” The bidder’s name, address and state

Contractor’s Registration Num ber shall appear in the lower left hand corner of the envelope. All bids must be accompanied by lawful monies of the United States or a Cashier’s Check, a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Bank Money Order or Bank Draft, drawn and issued by a National Banking Association located in the State of Montana, or by any Banking Corporation incorporated under the Laws of the State of Montana, in an amount equal to not less than ten (10) percent of the total bid, payable to the order of the Missoula County Airport Authority as liquidated damages in the event said successful bidder shall fail or refuse to execute the contract in accordance with the terms of his bid. After a contract is awarded, the successful bidder will be required to furnish a separate Performance and Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract. Plans, specifications, bidding and contract forms may be inspected at the Airport Director’s Office –

Missoula International Airport, or at offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at 1 Engineering Place, Helena, Montana; 315 N. 25th Street, Suite 102, Billings, Montana; 2880 Technology Blvd West., Bozeman, Montana; 1321 8th Avenue North, Suite 104, Great Falls, Montana; or 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana. Copies of these documents may be obtained from the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59803 – Phone: (406) 542-8880, on the payment of Seventy-five Dollars ($75.00) nonrefundable, for each complete set. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive irregularities. The Contractor will be required to comply with the wage and labor requirements and to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedule of wage rates established by the United States Department of Labor as referenced in the Contract. Contractors and any subcontrac-

tors doing work on this project will require registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Avenue, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800-5566694. Contractors are required to have been registered with the Department of Labor and Industry prior to bidding on this project. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the bid documents and specifications. The Bidder is required to submit a Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities (included in the Proposal form). A Contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for

award each bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in these specifications. The proposed contract is under subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. The Missoula County Airport Authority has established an overall DBE goal for the year. Under this contract, the Airport Authority is adopting a race-neutral means of facilitating DBE participation. The bidder shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, or sex in the performance of this contract. The bidder shall carry out all applicable requirements of 49 CFR Part 26 in the award and administration of DOT assisted contracts. As required by 49 CFR Part 26, the Airport Authority is required to create a bidders list, consisting of information about all DBE and non-DBE firms that bid or quote on DOT-assisted contracts. The purpose of this requirement is to allow use of the

bidders list approach to calculating future overall DBE goals. As per the requirements of the Proposal section, all Prime Bidders submitting bids on this project must submit, with his or her bid, a list including the name, address, and DBE/non-DBE status of all subcontractors and suppliers that bid or quote for work under this contract. Failure to provide this information, as outlined in the Proposal section, will make the bidder non-responsive and not eligible for award of the contract. This contract will be funded in part by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration. Therefore, award of the Contract by the Sponsor will be made subject to concurrence of FAA. Bidders may not withdraw Proposals for a period of ninety (90) days after the bid opening date. The pre-bid conference is hereby established at 2:00 p.m. (local time) Tuesday, May 11, 2010, at the Airport Terminal Conference Room, Missoula International Airport. A tour of the work site at the Missoula

International Airport will be conducted following the pre-bid conference. Signed: /s/ Cris Jensen Airport Director Missoula County Airport Authority MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of Missoula County Auditor room 212 in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, in the City of Missoula, Montana until 3:00 o’clock PM., May 6, 2010 at which time bids will be opened, for the purpose of: Construction of a Secure Warehouse at the Missoula County Detention Center. Bids will be received for one single contract, the General Contract, which shall include all work for the construction of the project. A pre-bid walkthrough at the site (Missoula County Detention Center) will be held on Monday April 26, 2010 at 10 AM local time. A review of the site will be conducted. Bidders are encouraged to attend, however it

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 April 29 – May 6, 2010


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

d s

"Battle of the Bands"–who would win?

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Maggie Gyllenhaal's brother 5 Tallahassee's st. 8 Earthy shade 13 Fix text 14 "___ Boot" 15 Weasel out (on) 16 "You'd think Band A would hold up, but it's flimsy. Band B wins." 19 Like some computer errors 20 Blood type for about 6% of the U.S. pop. 21 They follow B 22 Unable to work, perhaps 24 First responder 26 Comp. storage sites 27 Forever, it seems 31 "Charter" tree 33 Diamond Head locale 35 "Band B wins, since Band A only has a tolerance for booze." 39 Drink from (a bowl), like a cat 40 Cutesy-___ 41 Four Holy Roman Emperors 43 "Drop Band A on Band B? Band B wins, no contest." 46 Art ___ 47 Suffix for orange or lemon 48 Gaelic tongue 49 "Ben-___" 51 Abbr. in some town names 53 Furthest degree 55 Fertile Crescent's place 57 Golfer Aoki 59 Inspected diamonds? 64 "Band B wins, because it's pointy and doesn't digest well." 67 Early actress Langtry 68 Dir. opposite WNW 69 "Scientific American Frontiers" host Alan 70 Didn't dine out 71 "Slippery When ___" (Bon Jovi album) 72 Spotted

1 Constantly napping member of the Wiggles 2 Song from Sarah McLachlan's "Surfacing" 3 Highland Games garb 4 "At Last" blues singer ___ James 5 Prez on the dime 6 Kitschy illumination 7 Part of AARP 8 "___ the fields we go..." 9 "Mad Money" network 10 Job search insider 11 Spurred (on) 12 Hull wreckers 15 Stringy cleaner 17 Mr. Manning 18 "Isn't that something?" 23 ___ Lobos 25 California/Nevada attraction 27 The whole thing 28 Burrito add-on, for short 29 Fashionable sandal 30 Drive-thru drink 32 Villainous surname in the Super Mario Bros. series 34 Request to the dealer 36 Blacksburg sch. 37 What automobile interiors may drown out 38 Geologic time periods 42 Sault ___ Marie Canals 44 Candle type 45 Hound healer 49 "Se ____ espaÒol" 50 "___ wisely" 52 Reptilian warning 54 Clueless response 56 Obesity drug Orlistat, more familiarly 58 Not too many 60 CEOs may have them 61 Stripper's fixture 62 "The Neverending Story" author Michael 63 Jimmy of sausage 65 Half of an eternal balance 66 Ready to roll

Last week’s solution

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0465

PUBLIC NOTICES is not a mandatory meeting. All work is to be performed in accordance with the resolution and plans on file with the Missoula County Facilities Management department in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula County, Montana. All work shall be performed under the supervision of Architects Design Group PC and Missoula County Facilities Management. Prospective bidders may secure copies of the plans and specifications from Architects Design Group PC, 1 Sunset Plaza, Kalispell, Montana, (406) 2577125 or Missoula County Facilities Management, 200 W. Broadway Missoula, Montana, (406)-258-4756 upon submitting a plan deposit of $200.00. The plan deposit is 100% refundable upon return of complete sets of the bidding documents, in good condition, within 10 days after bid opening. Plans will also be available at the following Exchanges: Missoula Plans Exchange Center, 201 North Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 Ph: (406) 549-5002. Builders Exchange of Billings, 2050 Broadwater Avenue, Suite A, Billings, MT 59102 Ph: (406) 652-1311. Spokane Regional Plans Center, 102 East Boone, Suite 102, Spokane, WA 99202 Ph: (509) 328-9600. Great Falls Builders Exchange, 202 Second Ave. S., Great Falls, MT 59405 Ph: (406) 453-2513. Northwest Montana Plans Exchange, 2303 MT Hwy 2 East, Kalispell, MT 59901 Ph: (406) 755-5888. Bidders wishing to obtain more than one set of plans may do so by request to ADG or Missoula County Facilities. Charges for such documents will be made to cover reproduction and handling costs and is not refundable. Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier’s check or bid bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bids as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Construction of a Secure Warehouse and addressed to the Missoula County Auditor, Missoula Montana” The successful Bidder, if awarded the contract, shall within a period of 10 days from the date of award enter into a formal contract and furnish an approved Performance Bond and Labor and Materials Payment Bond each in the amount of 100% of the Contract as provided in the “Instructions to Bidders.” Each bidder shall be registered with the Montana Department of Labor, in accordance with Montana Statue, and provide Missoula County a current copy of his Montana Contractor Registration Certificate. No Contractor may withdraw his Bid for a period of 30 consecutive days from the date of opening of Bids, except as provided in the “Instructions to Bidders” By order of the Board of County Commissioners this 13th day of April, 2010. /s/ Barbara Berens, County Auditor /s/ Larry Farnes, Facilities Manager Missoula County Government SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANK, INC., A Montana Corporation, Plaintiff, Against JOHN L. CROSS, LEI ANN CROSS, LOUIS L. CROSS, JORDAN C. CROSS, LUCAS S. CROSS, WHOLESALE FIREWORKS STORES, INC., ABSOLUTE WATER SPORT RENTALS, INC., a-d 5 STAR FINANCE AND MORTGAGE, INC., Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. (No warranty is made as to whether items listed as “cartons of fireworks” are full cartons or not.) On the 11th day of May

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 April 29 – May 6, 2010

A.D., 2010, at 10:00 o’clock A.M., at 17225 US Hwy 93 N., in the Town of Evaro, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, towit: TO BE SOLD IN ONE LOT - FIREWORKS: 11 shelves of fireworks on display, 26 cartons of sparklers, 421 cartons of fireworks, 18 partial cartons of fireworks, 13 boxes of fireworks, 14 large display packages of fireworks, 25 miscellaneous packages of fireworks, miscellaneous fireworks on 3 display tables 5’X20’ with 16 plastic tubs and 15 lids, 1 white plastic waste basket partially full of 36” Morning Glories, 1 plastic crate of Safety Shooter Bases, 4 plastic crates of punks, 9 cartons of punks; TO BE SOLD IN ONE LOT, IF POSSIBLE, OR SEPARATELY, IF NECESSARY, TO BE DETERMINED BY DEPUTY SHERIFF – MISCELLANEOUS: 1 package of 8’ fluorescent light bulbs; 1 Sharp XE-A101 cash register; 1 Royal cash register, Model #P330W-2741G6, Serial #00023641; 1 Panasonic phone/answering machine; 6 Lifetime 6’ folding utility tables; 4 camp chairs; 1 Igloo rolling cooler; 1 Werner 8’ fiberglass folding ladder; 1 Lift Master commercial garage door opener; 2 stands (black plastic with metal legs); 1 hand truck; 1 homemade sawhorse (out of 2X4s); 4 fire extinguishers; 2 claw hammers; 2 staple guns; 2 pliers; 1 Stanley 30’ tape measure; 1 small roll of metal wire; 7 extension cords; 2 surge protectors; 1 plastic crate with electrical cords and surge protector; 8 indoor flood lights; 1 foam board 20”X30”; 2 white waste baskets – empty; 1 plywood 4’X8’ OPEN sign; 3 cardboard “Fireworks parking” signs; 1 plastic sign face for outdoor lighted sign – broken; 2 dry erase boards; 4 banners; 1 partial box of waste basket liners; 1 plastic crate of business documents, office supplies, etc.; 1 plastic crate containing rat poison; 2 used paint cans; 1 container of nails; 2 paper signs posted in office area; 2 desk containers of pens & scissors; 1 push broom; 1 regular broom; 1 cleaning bucket with cleaner; 2 broom handles taped together; Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. No warranty is made as to the condition or title of the personal property. Dated this 29th day of April A.D., 2010. MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ John R. Hinckley, III, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT COMBINED NOTICE FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT and NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS (FONSI/NOI/RROF) April 8, 2010 John Adams,, Environmental Certifying Officer Office of Planning and Grants, Missoula County Mailing Address 435 Ryman Missoula, MT (406 )-258 -3688. TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: On or before May 14, 2010, the above-named Missoula County will request the Montana Department of Commerce (DOC) to release $450,000 of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds provided under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended (PL 93-383) for the following project: Mountain Home Montana Transitional Living. This project will use funds for construction of five independent residences at 2606 South Avenue, Missoula,

MT 59804, as well as for business and classroom space to provide a home and services to homeless young mothers and their infants. The project will be built to the north of an existing building. This is a multi-year project.. Finding of No Significant Impact It has been determined that such request for release of funds will not constitute an action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and accordingly the above named Missoula County has decided not to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190). The reasons for the decision not to prepare such Statement are as follows: The project site is a previously developed residential property, in a developed area. Review of the proposed activity and consideration of the various applicable state and federal regulations relevant to the project, from effects on water to the Endangered Species Act, identified no significant impacts.. An Environmental Review Record documenting review of all project activities in respect to impacts on the environment has been made by the above-named Missoula County. This Environmental Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination and copying upon request between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. No further environmental review of such project is proposed to be conducted prior to the request for release of CDBG project funds.. Public Comments on Findings All interested agencies, groups and persons disagreeing with this decision are invited to submit written comments for consideration by the County of Missoula to John Adams, Office of Planning and Grants, on or before May 13, 2010. All such comments so received will be considered and the County will not request release of funds or take any administrative action on the project prior to the date specified in the preceding sentence. Release of Funds The County of Missoula will undertake the project described above with CDBG funds provided by DOC under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. Missoula County is certifying to DOC that John Adams, in his official capacity as Environmental Certifying Officer, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to environmental reviews, decisionmaking, and action; and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The legal effect on the certification is that upon its approval, the County may use the CDBG funds and DOC will have satisfied its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Objections to State Release of Funds The Department of Commerce will accept an objection to its approval of the release of funds and acceptance of the certification only if it is on one of the following bases: (a) that the certification was not in fact executed by the chief executive officer or other officer approved by the Department of Commerce; (b) that the applicant’s environmental review record for the project indicates omission of a required decision, finding, or step applicable to the project in the environmental review process; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by DOC; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the stand-

point of environmental design.. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and may be addressed to: Department of Commerce, Community Development Division, 301 S. Park Avenue, P.O. Box 200523, Helena, Montana 59620. Objections to the release of funds on bases other than those stated above will not be considered by DOC. No objection received after May 28, 2010, will be considered by DOC. John Adams Environmental Certifying Officer April 8, 2010 Office of Planning & Grants Missoula, MT 59802 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Northwestern Energy represented by WGM Group to work within the Butler, Grant and LaValle creek floodplains. The project is located in Section 35 Township 14N Range 20W, Section 7 Township 13N Range 19W and Section 34 Township 14N Range 20W and includes directional boring for the placement of a natural gas line twice below anticipated scour level of the creeks.. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 10-07 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 21, 2010. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258- 4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST A RELEASE OF FUNDS Publication Dates: April 27, 2010; April 29, 2010. Responsibility Entity: Montana Department of Commerce – Housing Division Address: 301 S. Park Ave. Rm 240, PO Box 200545, Helena, Montana 596200545 Telephone: 406-841-2820 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the Montana Department of Commerce and Mountain Home Montana, Inc. Request for Release of Funds On or after May 14, 2010, the Montana Department of Commerce (MDOC) will submit a request to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the release of HOME Investment Partnership Program funds, under Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 to undertake a project known as Mountain Home Montana Transitional Living Apartments for the purpose of new construction of a 5-unit apartment building for low income single parent households. Finding of No Significant Impact The Montana Department of Commerce has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the Montana Department of Commerce, 301 S. Park Avenue, Room 240, Helena, MT and at Missoula County, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT. It may also be examined or copied weekdays at either office from 8:00 AM to

5:00 PM. Public Comments Any individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project may submit written comments to the Montana Department of Commerce, Housing Division. The posted public comment period extends from April 27, 2010 through May 13, 2010 . All comments received by 5:00 pm on May 13, 2010, will be considered by the Montana Department of Commerce prior to authorizing submissions of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. The MDOC is certifying to HUD that Bruce Brensdal, MDOC Housing Division Administrator consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to environmental review, decision making, and action; and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows Rocky Mountain Development Council to use program funds. Objections to Release of Funds HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the Montana Department of Commerce’s certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following basis: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the Montana Department of Commerce; (b) the Montana Department of Commerce has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental qualify. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to HUD at 1670 Broadway Street, 25th Floor 8ADE, Denver, CO 80202-4801. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period. Bruce Brensdal, Administrator Housing Division, Montana Department of Commerce MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF HEARING MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on May 19, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., Mountain Time, in Room 201, Second Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Richard A. Reep, Robert T. Bell, and Cory R. Laird (the “Applicants”) in order to finance a portion of the costs of designing and constructing an office building located at Lot 8 of North Reserve Business Center on Stockyard Road in Missoula County (the “Project”) and to pay certain costs of issuance of the Bonds. The Project is expected to cost approximately $820,000.


PUBLIC NOTICES When finished, it is anticipated that the Project will provide approximately 4,000 square feet of office space. The Project will be owned by the Applicants or a legal entity to be formed under Montana law comprised of the Applicants (the “Borrower”). The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bond issuance is $667,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrower and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County, and the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrower pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County except money payable by the Borrower to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution or Bonds, contact Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, or Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, Missoula County, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or by calling 406-721-5700. Dated: April 20, 2010. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF HEARING MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on May 19, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., Mountain Time, in Room 201, Second Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana,

for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Craig A. Langel (the “Applicant”) in order to finance a portion of the costs of purchasing 50% of the assets of Radio Way LLC, a Montana limited liability company, consisting of a 6,000 square feet office building located at 2700 Radio Way in the City of Missoula, Montana and remodeling, renovating, furnishing and equipping the building (the “Project”) and to pay certain costs of issuance of the Bonds. The Project is expected to cost approximately $1,225,000. The Project will be owned by the Applicant or a legal entity to be formed under Montana law comprised of the Applicant (the “Borrower”). The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bond issuance is $631,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrower and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County, and the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrower pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County except money payable by the Borrower to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution or Bonds, contact Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, or Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, Missoula

MOTHER’S DAY The Mommy Shoppee A Maternity Boutique Maternity - Nursing Consignments 406.728.2208 401 S. Orange Missoula, MT

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SERVICES County, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or by calling 406-721-5700. Dated: April 20, 2010. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, HEREBY NOTIFIES MISSOULA COUNTY TAX PAYERS THAT THE SECOND HALF OF 2009 REAL ESTATE TAXES LEVIED AND ASSESSED WILL BE DUE AND PAYABLE BEFORE 5:00 P.M. ON JUNE 1, 2010. UNLESS 2009 TAXES ARE PAID PRIOR TO THAT TIME, THE AMOUNT THEN DUE WILL BE DELINQUENT, WILL ACCRUE INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5/6 OF 1% PER MONTH AND WILL BE ASSESSED A 2% PENALTY FROM THE TIME OF DELINQUENCY UNTIL PAID. ..IF YOU INTEND TO PROTEST YOUR TAXES, YOU MUST MAKE PAYMENT BY THE DUE DATE AND MUST INCLUDE A LETTER OF PROTEST WITH YOUR PAYMENT. THE LETTER OF PROTEST MUST INCLUDE YOUR NAME, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION, GROUNDS FOR PROTEST AND THE AMOUNT YOU ARE PROTESTING PURSUANT TO MCA § 15-1-402. /S/ VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF MISSOULA Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-10-43 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT N. MORGAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Toni Morgan, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Morales Law Office, PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of April, 2010. /s/ Toni Morgan, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Probate No. DP-10-42 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LEONARD J. HUBBLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Samuel H. Ballam, III, P.R., return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane, P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED

this 7th day of April, 2010. /s/ Ronald A. Bender, WORDEN THANE, P.C., Attorneys for Applicant MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP10-51 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ELVIRA GIULIANI, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will b forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MARILYN GIULIANI, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of April, 2010. /s/ Marilyn Giuliani, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-29 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JERRY GRANT GREENOUGH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lana Greenough, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested in care of Paul E. Fickes, Esq., Christian, Samon & Jones, PLLC, 310 West Spruce, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 9th day of April, 2010. /s/ Lana Greenough, PO Box 321, 51 St. Regis Street, St. Regis, MT 59866 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Case No. DV10-438 Robert L. Deschamps III NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Seng Favtxhim Thao, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKEN NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Seng Favtxhim Thao, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Seng Favtxhim Thao to Shane Seng Favtxhim Thao and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 18th day of May, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 in courtroom number 2S. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 7th day of April, 2010. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Maria Cassidy, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP10-44 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BERNADINE L. MARMON, Deceased. NOTICE IS

HEREBY GIVEN that William Clarence Marmon has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to William Clarence Marmon, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Anne Blanche Adams, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of April, 2010. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234. /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP10-39 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HOMER W. ROCK, JR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed CoPersonal Representatives of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Glenda Marie Rock and Lee LaRoche, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 26th day of March, 2010. /s/ Glenda Marie Rock, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Lee LaRoche, Co-Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy Gibson MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DR10-115 Summons for Publication In re the Marriage of David L. Johnson, Petitioner, and Genine M. Packert, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: You, the Respondent, are hereby summoned to answer the Petition in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Petitioner within twenty days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. Title to and interest in the following real property will be involved in this action: DATED this 7th day of April, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Amy M. Day, Deputy Clerk

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV10-126 AMENDED SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. M. SHEILA MURPHY and C. MAX MURPHY Plaintiffs, vs. NUTEC COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. d/b/a ROCKY MOUNTAIN COMMUNICATIONS, Inc., ELMER ANDERSON and all

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 April 29 – May 6, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES Notice of Ballot Drop Off Locations and Accessibility Designations & Notice of Voting System Exhibition, Diagrams and Voting Instructions

Statement of the Location of Mail Ballot Drop Off Locations and Accessibility Designations for the May 4, 2010, School/Special District Election:

Drop Off Name and Location

All drop off locations will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Accessibility Designation (A – Accessible, I – Inaccessible)

Courthouse (Election Office) 200 W. Broadway, Missoula

Acc

Fairground’s Election Center Fine Arts Building #15 1101 South Ave W, Missoula

Acc

Notice of Voting System Exhibition, Diagram and Voting Instructions: Please note that the county’s voting systems are on public exhibition at the Missoula County Fairground’s Election Center. Please see diagrams of the voting system(s) and ballot arrangement and instructions on voting below. SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE ON AN AUTOMARK VOTING SYSTEM The AutoMARK is a ballot-marking system that will be in use during the upcoming election. Its main purpose is to allow voters with disabilities and other special needs to mark a ballot privately and independently. If you wish to vote on the AutoMARK, please inform the election judge at your drop off location that you would like to do so. You will need to insert the ballot you received by mail into the machine. After the system accepts the ballot, the system will provide instructions on how to vote the ballot. In order to make the ballot easier to read, you can change the contrast and font size. You can mark your choices by touching the screen or by using the keypad, which features written and Braille markings. The AutoMARK system will confirm your selections on the screen and by audio. After you verify that your selections are correct, the system will fill in your choices on the ballot and print the ballot. The ballot will then go to an election judge for depositing in the ballot box. If you need assistance at any time during the process, simply request it.

SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE FOR AN OPTICAL SCAN BALLOT COUNTING SYSTEM The following is a diagram for the 650 Ballot Counters that will be used to tabulate ballots on Election Day.

TO VOTE: 1. To vote, you must blacken the oval completely.

SAMPLE SECRETARY OF STATE (Vote for One) John Doe Thomas Jefferson Jane Q Public VOTE BOTH SIDES – CHECK BALLOT TO SEE IF THERE ARE ISSUES PRINTED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT TO BE VOTED ON. 2. USE A #2 PENCIL OR BLACK INK TO MARK YOUR BALLOT. An Optical Scanner will count your ballot. If you use any other type of pen, it may not be counted correctly by the Scanner. OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR BALLOT: When marking your ballot you should NOT make an X or a check mark. You should NOT cross out, erase, or use correction fluid on the ballot and if you make an error, you should request a new ballot. READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY! If you mark more candidates than you are allowed to mark for that position, it is considered an overvote. You may request a new ballot if you overvote in any race. If you do not correct your ballot, that race will not count because of the overvote; however, the remainder of your ballot will be counted.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 April 29 – May 6, 2010


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 SADIE

Sadie is a beautiful young black Lab who was left behind when her owners moved. The landlady kept her safe, had her spayed, and brought her to us so that we could find her a good home. We hope to do just that!

549-3934 SKY

SHEP

Shep was quite shy and very thin when he was brought to the shelter as a stray, but now he's warming up and filling out nicely. He thinks the shelter is okay, but of course he really wants a home and family again.

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M AYA

Maya is a pretty ball of fluff who is going to grow up to be quite an outstanding adult. She's only about 10 weeks old, but she's already been spayed, and this happy, friendly little lady is also well on the way to being housebroken.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

G A RT H

Garth is such a friendly guy that we're amazed he was brought to the shelter in a trap. Surely anyone could have just picked him up and carried him through the door! He certainly hopes someone carries him out to a home soon. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

2420 W Broadway

www.missoulafoodbank.org

2310 Brooks

For more info, please call 549-0543 3075 N Reserve

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

6149 Mullan Rd

H A RV E Y

Harvey is older, and sometimes his arthritis makes him a bit cranky, but most of the time he's happy just relaxing and watching the world go by. However, this sweet guy would prefer a home with better views than our cat room!

All the staff loves this super fun lady! She is always so happy to see you, which certainly lifts our spirits! Also she is a perfect hiking friend on- or off-leash, and she loves fetch, especially in the river! Fellow Pittie lovers have to meet Sky!

RICK

Rick was brought to the shelter because the other family cats were mean to him. He's so quiet and unassuming that we can't imagine what their problem was, but we do know he'd love to have a new family choose him and make him feel special.

ROSE

Thanks to so many people's kind donations we have now raised enough money for Rose's surgery. Now we just have the task of matching her with a loving, caring, patient family willing to see her through her recovery. Flowers for every bride. Affordable flowers with an artistic flair. The Flower Bed Behind Vann's Appliances in the old yellow church building.

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CHARLIE

Charlie is also a sensitive fellow, who honestly just doesn't care for all this alone time he has to spend at the shelter. He loves people and will do anything to make them happy, as long as he gets a best friend in return.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

ASTRO

Can you believe this little jumping bean is still at the shelter? He is super sweet, and knows lots of fun tricks, including my favorite, “roll over!” He has lots of energy and gets along with other dogs.

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FA L A F E L

Hasn't anyone been listening? Wobs is seriously the best cat! She may be deaf but nothing will get in her way! Life is about fun and she will show you! Anything can be made into a toy, and she'll even put on a performance for you!

Falafel is a gorgeous young, tan and brown Mainecoon X who has come so far in her short life. She was born to a feral colony outside of town, but she and her brothers and sisters were rescued and brought inside for socialization.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

237 Blaine • 542-0077

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 B E V E R LY

They threw her out of the car and sped off in a cloud of dust and gravel. Beverly was devastated that her family would do such a thing. She didn’t know what to do or where to go….and the kids in the neighborhood pelted her with rocks every time they saw her.

EMMA

They found her living in an alley. She had made a nest in an old abandoned couch where she hoped to have her babies. Three days after her arrival at AniMeals, Emma had four beautiful kittens. She was such a good mama that she even became a surrogate to two other abandoned kitties.

SASHA

My world was a scary place before I came to AniMeals. I hid a lot, trying hard not to incur the wrath of “the man.” He was angry all the time. I was an emotional wreck when I arrived, but when constant fear is replaced by quiet calm, an amazing thing happens.

THE COUNT

His is the most interesting cat in the world. He has dashing good looks, but is somewhat humble and soft-spoken. Everything you have heard about him is true. Other cats aspire to be him. His charm is so contagious, vaccines were created for it. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 April 29 – May 6, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’ title thereto, whether such claim or possible claims be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SEND GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAME DEFENDANTS: Nutec Communications, Inc. d/b/a Rocky Mountain Communications, Inc.; Elmer Anderson; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’ title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent. YOU ARE HEREBY Summoned to answer to the Complaint in this action as filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs’ attorneys within 20 days after service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana and described as follows: A tract of land located in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as Tract 38 of Certificate of Survey No. 47. WITNESS my hand this 13th day of April, 2010. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: Gayle Johnson, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-10-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGARET JANE JACOBSEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Helen J. Lee, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at Dye & Moe, P.L.L.P., PO Box 9198, 216 West Main, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. Dated: April 16th, 2010. /s/ Helen J. Lee, Personal Representative NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Primary Election to be held on June 8, 2010, will close at 5:00 p.m., on May 10, 2010.. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election office up to and

ADULT

including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election office on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive** electors of Missoula County are entitled to vote at said election.. **Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the polling place in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county.. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address.. DATED this 25th day of March, 2010. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy NOTICE OF SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated February 5, 2003 Grantor: Lei Ann Cross, 199 Cross Country Road, Polson,, Montana 59860 Lei Ann Cross, 17600 Highway 93 North Missoula, Montana 59808 Lei Ann Cross, 110 Main Street, Suite 7 Polson, Montana 59860 Lei Ann Cross, P.O. Box 549 Polson, Montana 59860 Borrowers: Lei Ann Cross and John L. Cross 199 Cross Country Road Polson, Montana 59860 Original Trustee: First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., P.O. Box 549, Missoula, Montana 59806 Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula 2601 Garfield Missoula, Montana 59801 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807- -8957 Date and Place of Recordation: February 6, 2003 in Book 698, Page 1312, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana. The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 20th day of July, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: A tract of land located in the E_ of Section 23 and the W_ of Section 24, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, M.P.M., Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 24; thence S.00º01’E., along the West line of said Section 24, 3798.38 feet to the true point of beginning; thence

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/28/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200705387, Bk. 793, Pg. 202, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Douglas J. Nyberg and Tammy Bowshier Nyberg, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 246 of Pleasant View Homes No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 25, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $223,358.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $212,268.09, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 7, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default

occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwest trustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71562) 1002.148793-FEI

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/23/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200337626, Bk 719, Pg 83, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James Kaufman and Gretchen Kim Kaufman, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the E1/2 NE1/4 SW1/4 and all that part of the NE1/4 SE1/4 SW1/4 lying North of US 12 as now constructed, all in Section 26, Township 12 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book No. 481 of Micro Records at Page 1534. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for WFASC 2003-16. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $224,955.70. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $218,662.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 13, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public

sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwest trustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71485) 1002.149552-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200728739, Bk. 808; Pg. 376, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael D. Brooks and Mirabai Henley was Grantor, Provident Financial, Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: LOT 10A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5801, LOCATED IN THE WEST ONE-HALF OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 23, WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 9, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $330,647.14. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $310,100.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. PLEASE NOTE: The Maturity Date is March 31, 2010, at which time full satisfaction is required. No reinstatement will

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC

EROTIC

S.68º07’10”E., 337.82 feet to the Northwesterly right-of-way line of the Northern Pacific Railway; thence S.43º33’20”W., along said railway right-of-way line, 165.15 feet; thence N.66º11’30”W., 411.11 feet to the Southeasterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 93 on a non-tangent curve (radial) line through said point bears S.75º43’30”E.’ thence Northeasterly along said Highway right-of-way line and said non-tangent curve, being concave to the Northwest and having a radius of 2945.0 feet, 94.3 feet to a point on a tangent line; thence N.12º26’20”E., along said Highway right-of-way line, 46.95 feet; thence S.68º07’10”E., 155.74 feet to the true point of beginning. LESS AND EXCEPTING that portion deeded to the State of Montana recorded in Book 666 of Micro Records at page 1060. TOGETHER WITH improvements including a 1972 Great Lakes mobile home, Title No. M487388, upon which Beneficiary holds a first lien security interest. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 349 of Micro Records at page 1612. Subject to easements and encumbrances of record. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the abovenamed Grantor, and all of her successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the Deed of Trust in the amount of Four Hundred Fifty-one and 30/100ths Dollars ($451.30) each for the months of November 2009 through February 2010, totaling One Thousand Eight Hundred Five and 20/100ths Dollars ($1,805.20); together with late charges in the amount of One Hundred Four and 83/100ths Dollars ($104.83); and the failure to pay real and personal property taxes and assessments for the years 2008 and the first one-half of 2009. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Forty-four Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-nine and 26/100ths Dollars ($44,359.26), plus interest thereon at the current rate of Eight Percent (8.%) per annum (variable), from and after the 18th day of October, 2009 to March 2, 2010, in the amount of One Thousand Three Hundred Two and 83/100ths Dollars ($1,302.83); plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Nine and 72/100ths Dollars ($9.72); plus all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law.. DATED this 9th day of March, 2010. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807 -8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula. This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 9th day of March, 2010, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. ((SEAL) /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the State of Montana. Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: January 6, 2013

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be accepted after that date. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwest trustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 8034.20042) 1002.149615-FEI Mi NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/29/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200728835, Bk 808, Pg 472, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Colleen M. Combs & Steven R. Combs, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 34 of Shelby Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 11, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $160,400.75. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $152,999.36, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 21, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance


PUBLIC NOTICES will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72183) 1002.150336-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200733230, Bk 811, Pg 102, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael L. Padrotti and Traci L. Padrotti, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 6 of 44 Ranch, Phases 1 and 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 16, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $334,451.05. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $311,224.72, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 26, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure

costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwest trustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72393) 1002.150878-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/02/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200924381, B: 848, P: 1028, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Monica I. Stewart and Gregory Mergenthaler, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 in Block 3 of El Mar Estates Phase 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 17, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $186,883.09. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $183,300.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 28, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are

also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwest trustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72405) 1002.151081-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/08/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200432133, Book 743, Page 662, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Scott Parsneau, a married man, as his sole & separate property was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Capital Family Mortgage Company of Montana was Beneficiary and Insured Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 of Mulberry Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 17, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $171,174.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $157,577.09, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 28, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are

incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01709) 1002.151103-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 14, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the N 1/2 of Section 22, township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M. Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534. Less and excepting that portion of Tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534 more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Tract C2, Certificate of Survey No. 3534, thence northwesterly, along the Frontage Road right-of-way, along a non-tangent curve, whose center bears C29&#186;00’21” W., 4074.20 feet, an arc length of 160.00 feet; thence N27&#186;33’07” E., 574.09 feet; thence S.62&#186;26’40” E., 160.00 feet; thence along the East boundary of said Tract C2. S.27&#186;33’12” W., 575.00 feet to the point of beginning. Debra Ann Finley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated August 7, 2001 and Recorded on August 13, 2001 in Book 666, Page 567, as Document No. 200119620 and Re-Recorded on September 5, 2001 in Book 667, Page 860, as Document No. 200121908. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,214.17, beginning August 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 23, 2010 is $143,642.86 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $5,776.20, late charges in the amount of $135.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $136.33, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.04 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to

all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 4, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 4, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3525426 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 21, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK M OF CAR LINE ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Doreen M Bermingham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 30, 2006 and Recorded on March 31, 2006 under Document # 200607104. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2006-2, MortgageBacked Notes, Series 2006-2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $852.14, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 4, 2010 is $98,968.87 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $2,411.42, late charges in the amount of $105.15, escrow advances of $76.03, and other fees and expenses advanced of $150.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and pro-

tect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 10, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2010 ASAP# 3534320 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 8, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 4 of MOUNT JUMBO VIEWS, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Steven D. Wall, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated September 30, 2005 and Recorded September 30, 2005 at 03:43 o’clock P.M. in Book 761, Page 593, under 200525823. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and

Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,799.11, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 20, 2010 is $459,599.50 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $26,156.88, late charges in the amount of $1,575.00, escrow advances of $4,218.43, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,757.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $73.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 29, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On January 29, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3519874 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 April 29 – May 6, 2010


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RENTALS APARTMENTS 1404 Toole: 2-bedroom, downtown, dining area, big shared yard, cat allowed? $695, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 2406 Leo: 2-bedroom, 2-story duplex, garage, dishwasher, hook-ups, 1 baths, cable paid, $775, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

MOVE IN SPECIAL!! 2455 McDonald 2bd/1ba apt, dw, w/d hkups, storage, off-street parking, vaulted ceilings, A/C. $705-775/mo. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 Quiet, private, partly furnished 1 bedroom. 8 miles from town on Bitterroot River. No smoking, no pets, very responsible. $550, 273-2382

RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com SUSTAINABLE APTS Rentals: Apartments SUSTAINABLE APTS: low VOC paint, recycling, energy star appliances, solar panels, garden plots, community room, and more. Orchard Gardens: 1 bd:

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HOUSES 7506 Gardenia 4bd/2ba home, corner lot, dw, w/d

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 April 29 – May 6, 2010

hkups, vaulted ceilings, storage, lg yard, A/C. $1195/mo. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

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RENTALS PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

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REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1 Mile S. of Florence, views all around —on the pavement. 3 Bd/ 2 Bth home w/ open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, views of Bitterroots.. Porch swing. Hot tub, and storage shed are all included. 333 Martin Lane. $249,900 MLS# 10000160 JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 150 ft Flathead Lk Ftg 3B/2B Manufactured Hm. Boat Dock, level grass-to-lake 1.46 acs in Elmo. $495,000 / Real Living Greater Montana 406-239-7588 3 Bed, 2.5 Bath, double garage w/ Fireplace. 1/2 + acre lot, view of Lolo Peak. $259,000. MLS#10001969. 4716 Aspen, Upper Rattlesnake. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com 5 acres & a 4 bedroom home on a branch of the Clark Fork on Third Street minutes from downtown! . House sits towards water. Your own private retreat beckons across the water. Enjoy quiet while you watch the wildlife and fish for trout. Private showings only. 3720 S. 3rd W. $679,999,

MLS#906926. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 7097 Mormon Creek $177,000 A MUST SEE HOME!!! COZY, WELL MAINTAINED 2 BEDROOM HOME, A PARK LIKE SETTING ON APPROX 1/2 ACRE FENCED IN LOT, BEAUTIFUL MATURE TREES . FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS HOME PLEASE CALL HEATHER AT BERGUM REAL ESTATE 406-241-4018. Affordable, nice, like-new single family home in central Missoula with 3brm, all aplliances, awesome open floorplan and only $169,900, 1947 12St 327-8787 porticorealestate.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 10,000 Sq Ft Lot, open floor plan, double attached garage, lots of storage, living room & family room, close to Good Food Store, and more. $223,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED SOUTH HILLS HOME ON A 13,000 SQ FT LOT. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, gorgeous interior, hardwood floors, incredible

yard, great mountain and valley views. $199,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com CUTE ROSE PARK/SLANT STREETS NEIGHBORHOOD BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2+ bonus rooms, hardwood floors, arched doorways, built-ins, single garage, fenced yard, mostly finished basement, and much more. $239,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy17 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Development potential, almost 2 acres, vintage farmhouse & duplex, additional undeveloped ground. Preliminary Plat City Council Approval in place, contact agent for details, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1.03 ACRES IN THE LOLO CREEK VALLEY. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Main floor master suite, great room, family room & rec room, formal and casual dining rooms, great mountain and valley views. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Fantastic North Side Home Wonderful new 3 bed/1.5 bath home (total remodel in 2003) is close to downtown, Farmer’s Market, the Northside trail system, and much more. Ample space for a garage if you desire. Enjoy summer BBQ’s on the new trexdeck and nice yard. Call Devin Khoury for your showing 207-8200. Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12 porticorealestate.com Fantastic, like-new, 4Bdrm, 2Bth, open floorplan, affordable at $229K, Next to Fantastic Community Garden and close to Good Food Store and bike trail. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com FISH THE BLACKFOOT RIVER FROM YOUR BACK YARD. Beautifully landscaped 4 Bdr/2 Bath home on 1.2 acres on the Blackfoot River just 10-15 minutes from Missoula. Open floor plan, great deck with hot tub overlooking the river and much more. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit.. www.mindypalmer.com

Fully remodeled 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 1 car garage condo w/ new carpet, paint and appliances. Fully furnished w/ leather couches, flat screen TVs, and oak & walnut furniture. $156,000. MLS#908062. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com Great 3bdr house with hardwood floors, fireplace, nice sized kitchen and big backyard with garden space, fruit trees and garage with shop area. 933 Woodford 3278787 porticorealestate.com Home and guest house on 2 leased lots. Borders state land. Snow mobile, cross county ski, hunt or hike right from your door. 1.5 miles from Seeley Lake. 6 miles from Cottonwood Lakes. MLS# 10002415. $167,000. 0 Morrell Creek Road. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Msg:12591 for pics Immaculate home in great neighborhood. 2 bdrms, 2 bth, familyroom, sauna, nice yard, Vintage touches, hardwood floors, everything’s in fantastic condition! 135 Kensington 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Log cabin with no close neighbors. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire

Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 906248 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Msg:12590 for pics Lower Rattlesnake 1438 Harrison St. For Sale by owner (Really!) 2BD/1BA. Small home, large yard. “Handy Man Special “ Fixer Upper” Whatever you want to call it... It’s a steal at $165K OBO. Chris 728-9434 New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates —all on one level with nearly 2000sf on a large corner lot . 30+ acres of easements to enjoy Grant Creek and Clark Fork tributaries. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great room, open floor plan, double garage, unobstructed views of the Bitterroot Mountains, great yard. $219,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

NORTHSIDE BUNGALOW WITH A GARAGE/SHOP. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, great location close to Downtown, large fenced back yard, and much more. $180,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com Older Home with Vintage charm in wildly sought after Missoula neighborhood. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, beautiful floors. This charmer has incredible possibilities. 321 Tremont 3278787 porticorealestate.com One of a Kind Listing, Nine Mile Schoolhouse with all the charm, romance and history one would expect. Unlimited possiblities an outstanding property. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com PRICE REDUCED East Missoula—321 Speedway—don’t miss this immaculate property with large heated shop garage and attached garage, beautiful 3 bed, 2 1/2 baths with deck, stamped concrete and privacy fencing. perfect for family, students at U, or work at home in shop. $219,900 MLS 10001025. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C13 April 29 – May 6, 2010


REAL ESTATE Really cute craftsman style, 3Bdr, 1Ba home priced to sell. This home has all the charm of the 20s and original floors. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

access, golf and shopping $79,999 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Msg:12890 for pics

Spacious, light-filled Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2 Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms & 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths, a really nice big backyard with patio. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

20 Acre Ranches Near Growing El Paso, Texas. Only $12,900 $0 Down, $99/month. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee. Free Map & Pictures. 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com

SPECTACULAR BITTERROOT VIEWS. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath Stevensville area home on 10 acres. High ceilings, beautiful hardwood floors, fireplace, spacious master bedroom, deck with hot tub, and much more. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy19 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byowner missoula.com OR call 550-3077

MANUFACTURED HOMES .80 Acs on a Creek: Very nice level land near Turah, Power, Well, Shop set up for a manufactured home, or build! $124,900 Real Living Greater Montana 406-2397588

LAND FOR SALE

20 ACRES. Creek, power box on county road runs through property. Rural and private. Missoula County. $99,000/make offer. 544-9040 Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere.com Text:44133 Msg:12589 for pics Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. $99,999. MLS#908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $159,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

secured legitimate “Non-Bankable” Loans with substantial equity. Cash for “Seller Held” contracts and mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC, 619 SW Higgins, Ste 0, Missoula, MT. 59803. 800999-4809 MT. Lic #000203

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LENDING WITH A CONSCIENCE. Private funding for

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $184,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN HAWAI’I REAL ESTATE ~ BUYER’S MARKET homes-condos-land. Average temperature in the 70’s. Susie Spielman, RS, Windermere C&H Properties. Cell: 808-6403100 or E-mail: susie.spielman@hawaiiantel.net 20 years experience. FREE INFO~NO PRESSURE~NO OBLIGATION

Lara Dorman Realtor GRI

12958 Kimwood Dr., Lolo • $189,900 Well cared-for 4 bed, 2 bath home located on cul-de-sac. Many updates include: painted exterior, tile bath surround & tiled shower in master bath, new counters in kitchen, windows have been replaced, pergo in kitchen, new fixtures in baths. Large garden area w/fruit trees. Yard is fully fenced in back. MLS#10002632

Our Mission at Portico is to honor diversity, build community and create a lifestyle that promotes the health and well-being of our planet.

406.531.5582 laradorman@aol.com 1500 W Broadway, suite A Missoula

On the corner of Broadway and Russell

100%

2404 Fleet St, Missoula. $199,900

Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula! The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! mls#10001348 • www.11815benchroad.com

3 Bed, 2 Bath home. Fenced back yard! Underground sprinklers, seller is leaving all appliances. Great location and great price! MLS #10002076

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

Shelly Evans 544-8570

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION. For the past 4 years. Give us a Try!

Jodie Hooker 239-7588 Jerry Hogan 546-7270 Kevin Plumage 240-2009

19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river 333 Martin Lane Price just reduced to $239,000

Grant Creek Log home on 26+ private acres $489,900

Joy Earls Open house May 2, 12:30-2:30

Visit me on Sunday at this sparkling one level home with hot tub....all on 1 fenced and landscaped acre. Just one mile south of Florence, paved all the way to the front door! MLS#10000160

Large open living room & kitchen with separate dining area that leads onto deck. Master suite with private bath, walk in closet and extra closet! Yard is private & low maintenance. Garage/shop 321 Speedway, heated w/ alley access. East Missoula

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Flathead Lake Views

$169,000 Nice 2+acre property between Elmo and Dayton with views of Flathead Lake and Chief Cliff. Property has shared well and septic approval.

Downtown Sweetheart

514 W. Spruce St. • $269,000

UNDER CONTRACT

Joy Earls 531-9811 Call me to HELP YOU SHOP FOR HOMES OR to HELP YOU SELL YOUR HOME TODAY!!!

joyearls.mywindermere.com RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C14 April 29 – May 6, 2010

• 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home • Addition for possible den or office • Shop & extra space in dbl garage • Zoned for multifamily or commercial • $129,900 • MLS#906610 Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics

• 3 bdrm/2 bath/10 Acres • Covered deck / fenced acreage • 28 x32 garage / 40x49 Quoncet shop • RV hookups behind garage • $259,900 • MLS# 902389 Text:44133 Message: 12589 for pics

• 3Bed/2 Bath/2 Car Garage • Lg kitchen, hickory cabinets • In floor radiant heat, fireplace • Fenced and landscaped yard • $229,900 • MLS# 10000024 Text:44133 Message: 12887 for pics

• 3 acres fenced & ready for horses • 3 Bed / 2 Bath / 24x18 outbuilding • 499 Grandview, Stevensville • Great views & easy access • $185,000 • MLS# 10002488 Text:44133 Message: 12888 for pics

1920’s era house has been revamped while retaining all of its original charm. Updated electrical, plumbing, handicapped accessible bath, security alarm, offstreet parking, underground sprinklers, and air conditioning in harmony with original bullseye woodwork, mahogany flooring, high ceilings, and all right downtown on West Spruce. Zoned B2-2 for a variety of commercial or residential uses. MLS#10001940

1839 W. Central • $189,900 Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOUSE • Sun. 5/2 • 12:30pm-2:30pm

5501 Bonanza Missoula

Appreciate a true neighborhood defined by few homes and sidewalks on a quiet cul de sac where backyards border Open Space and have easy access to the wonderful hiking trail system through the hillsides and along GrantCreek. The owners of this beautiful home in Prospect Meadows invite you to familiarize yourself with the lifestyle they've come to cherish and share. Call their agent Pat McCormick for more info or a tour today.

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 priscillabrockmeyer.com

pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

Georgetown Lake lots MLS# 10001763 $160,000 Sold together or will sell separately MLS# 905530 and 905531. Year round accessibility

23+ acres in Helena MLS# 80949 $2,500,000 Zoned cemetery - Start at the ground level! Ready for your design.

Buying or Selling - Call Anne

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C15 April 29 – May 6, 2010


Family Pack Fresh 81% Lean Lean Ground Beef

California Lemons

Western Family Sour Cream

3 $1 for

$1.99

99¢

lb.

16 oz.

2 lb. Bag Key Limes

Gold'n Plump Cut Up Chicken

$1.99

each

$13.99 18 pack cans

Western Family 8 oz. Shredded Cheese

Red Hook or Kona Brewing

2 $3

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for

$4.99

Tecate

6 pack

52 oz.

Small Haas Avocado

Pace Salsa or Picante

2 $1

$1.99

Beringer's California Collection Wines

24 oz.

$4.99

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.75 liter

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$3.99

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Bacon-Blu Potato Salad

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Lynn Wilson 10" Flour Tortillas

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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


Image from card available at Rudy's.

Moon-Randolph Homestead May Day Frolic Saturday, May 1, 12pm - 4pm Traditional May Pole dance, food, festivities and FUN! Then take the shuttle service to the Northside/Westside Block Party 4pm - 10pm • North 1st Street West between Woody and Grand Music, potluck, art. Bring a t-shirt for printing! Bring pre-made art. Info - Moon-Randolph: 728-9269; Block Party: zootownarts.org or 549-7555

for the Milltown Garden Patch Friday, May 7 • 5pm - 8pm Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway Please join us to raise funds for the Milltown Garden Patch, an organic community garden. More info: milltowngardenpatch.org

WORLD HEADQUARTERS

RECORD HEAVEN

CDs - Gifts - Jewelry - Clothing • 237 Blaine • 542-0077

Vinyl - Recorders - Turntables • 821 S. Higgins • 542-1104


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