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MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 23 • June 10–June 17, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Forest bill collaborators resist Senate changes Up Front: Popular downtown bar hit with gambling charges Ochenski: Tea Party all talk, little action during primary


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 23 • June 10–June 17, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Forest bill collaborators resist Senate changes Up Front: Popular downtown bar hit with gambling charges Ochenski: Tea Party all talk, little action during primary


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nside Cover Story

Fans consistently bummed out by the mega-business of professional sports deserve something more pure, less fame-obsessed and, well, more fun than what’s being offered in major venues. At least that’s the thinking of former Indy editor Zach Dundas, and serves as the impetus for his first book, The Renegade Sportsman, which covers bike polo, drunken running, bike messenger racing and many more wild aspects of our alternative sports culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Sean Kelly's features specials from around the world.

Moussaka Layers of locally raised lamb, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, with a blend of Mediterranean spices finished with béchamel sauce & baked. Served with vegetables & grilled flat bread.

News Letters Swan Crest Run, Tester and junk food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Week in Review Mavs still winning, Election Day and parking . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Briefs Cobell, MEPA and I-161 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Etc. Perhaps a physician could help kill Hinkle’s bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Up Front AmVets charged with running illegal gambling operation . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Up Front Forest bill collaborators resist Senate changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Ochenski Making sense of the primary election results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Writers on the Range Spring rituals feel different in light of oil catastrophe . . . .11 Agenda Sustainability Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Chewing the fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Happiest Hour Bowl Dog Lounge & Casino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Ask Ari Beating blockage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 8 Days a Week Gooaaaaalllllll! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Mountain High Swiftwater Rescue Technician Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Scope Nomadic musician Dan Dubuque finds his strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Noise System and Station, Miller Creek, The Melvins and Josh Ritter . . . . . . . . . .31 Books Northwestern floats for television fans only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Film At least Ashton Kutcher’s big on Twitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-12 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny ADMIN & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Marie Noland FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2010 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 June 10–June 17, 2010


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning in downtown Missoula

Q:

This week former Indy arts editor Zach Dundas discusses the wild and often hilarious world of alternative sports. What’s your non-mainstream sport of choice? Follow-up: Tell us your worst mishap or wipeout while engaging in the sporting life.

Katt Ahlstrom: Kickball. I played on the Poon Tang Clan last year. But did you score? In high school I was a forward in soccer and was making a shot and put my foot through the goalie’s face. I cried more than she did.

Meryl Storb: Mountaineering. I spent the last six months hiking around South America. High side: Being dump-trucked on Lochsa Falls and losing the raft.

Michael Gill: Kickball. I played on the Kappa Mafia team last year. Spruced up and branching out: I got stuck hanging upside down 25 feet up a tree while snowboarding at Big Mountain. I was doing a trick.

In 2008, the Forest Service permitted a 30-person, 34-mile Swan Crest Run without the prior benefit of public comment or an Environmental Assessment (see “etc.,” June 3, 2010). The Forest Service is now considering an application for a two-day, 50-person, 100-Mile Run. Runs elsewhere have grown to over 1,000. Parts of Jewel Basin indeed already receive “20 or greater parties per week” levels the Flathead Forest Plan says compromises the ability of bears to utilize their limited habitat. Hiking clubs and other groups can minimize their impact by traveling together as a single party. An organized run of 50 people spread out over 36 hours and 100 miles adds a lot of cumulative impact to the Swan Crest, in addition to already existing uses. If approved, a commercial permit will also set a precedent for others wanting permits for bigger runs, mountain bike rides, motorcycle rides and heli-skiing. The Swan Crest need not become one more mountain range overrun with people and extreme sports. Commercializing the Swan Crest will kill the goose that laid the golden egg. The reasons the Swan Crest attracts people are the very same reasons the Forest Service should prepare an Environmental Assessment before deciding whether to allow commercial uses there. Swan View Coalition spent years securing a volunteer agreement to establish a quarter-mile nature trail on the Flathead National Forest. The public comment process helped us move the trail to a less pristine area with lower environmental impacts. A sincere public involvement process by the Forest Service could bring about a similar relocation of group runs to less sensitive areas; ones that could use the publicity and trail restoration work. Keith J. Hammer Chair Swan View Coalition Kalispell

Tester’s transparency

Colin McLean: Beer Darts. You set up three beers in a triangle and put a ring around it. If you get a dart in the ring it’s one point; get a dart in a beer and it’s three points. The loser has to shotgun a beer. Sore bum: While snowboarding I hit my ass on a log so hard I couldn’t walk for days. It was a bummer.

Missoula Independent

Running wild

Page 4 June 10–June 17, 2010

Last Thursday, members of the Last Best Place Wildlands Campaign called on Sen. Jon Tester to make public a new draft revision of the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act (FJRA), which was put together by the U.S. Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee and given to Sen. Tester last month. Since the committee’s draft includes significant new language, we believe it’s in the best interest of all Montanans for Sen. Tester to make the draft available for public review and input. This step will

ensure transparency and give all members of the public an equal opportunity to review the new draft. Unfortunately, as I write, Sen. Tester has refused to share the new draft with the general public or the Montana media. Instead, Sen. Tester’s office has opted to only share the draft with the timber industry and political insiders. Perhaps Sen. Tester’s refusal to be open and transparent with this new draft has something to do with its contents. For example, the committee’s new draft drops the unsustainable mandated logging on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge and Kootenai National Forests and drops Sen. Tester’s arbitrary 12-month timeline for environmental analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The committee’s new draft also adds language requiring that any project must

Driving while

“ fat (DWF) is a hazard that could kill anyone at any time…

maintain old growth forests and retain large trees, while focus hazardous fuel reduction efforts on small diameter trees. Dropped in the draft are also several of the controversial anti-wilderness provisions, including Sen. Tester’s proposal to allow ATV herding of livestock in wilderness, as well as wilderness landings for military helicopters. Recent articles make it clear that Sen. Tester and the timber industry won’t support any bill that drops mandated logging and NEPA timelines. However, what about the Montana Wilderness Association, Montana Trout Unlimited and the National Wildlife Federation—the groups that have been the loudest supporters of the original bill? Are these groups seriously not going to support the committee’s draft revision, which by any objective measure should be viewed as a positive step in the right direction? If you’d like to get some answers, and if you think you have a right to a stake in the future of public lands man-

agement in Montana, please contact Sen. Tester’s office directly. Demand that Sen. Tester share a copy of all drafts of his FJRA, so all members of the public can review it and provide input. Anything less just won’t provide transparency and serve the public process, nor would it bode well for the future of public lands management. Matthew Koehler Last Best Place Wildlands Campaign Missoula

Weighing in I’d like to weigh in on a substance abuse issue that gets little attention. When life is threatened, children’s health risked, and everyone endangered, it’s time to criminalize the offending substance. Recent studies demonstrate that women pass the condition to their fetuses, then continue feeding addiction to their growing children. These parents should be sent to rehab and their kids removed until they get clean. America is addicted to junk food. Obesity is epidemic. Our Christian nation needs to crack down on the deadly sin of gluttony. Fast food joints lurk on every street corner fueling this wicked habit. From McDonalds to mini-marts there’s no escaping the pushers. Ubiquitous billboards entice our kids with detailed depictions of doughnuts, pizza and other fiendish temptations. Victims so immense they’re forced to drive gargantuan gas guzzlers easily get a fix without leaving the comfort of their bucket seat. Clutching Big Macs in swollen fingers, Big Gulps shoved between pudgy knees, cigarettes dangling from puffy lips, cell phones propped under multiple chins, all hyped up on a sugar high, they hit the roads. Driving while fat (DWF) is a hazard that could kill anyone at any time when massive heart failure strikes at 85 mph on the freeway. As Arizona profiles people for looking suspiciously un-American, these lessthan-anonymous overeaters can be easily apprehended. Fat chance of that because, unlike drunks and druggies, food junkies can’t run (very fast) and they can’t hide behind a badge, in a suit or under a robe. Although the preceding is hyperbole, it’s no more absurd than the current medical marijuana debate. A better case can be made against fat than pot, proving fatheads shouldn’t judge potheads. Wanda LaCroix Arlee

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 June 10–June 17, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, June 2

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Daniel A. Nielsen, 22, allegedly strangles and smashes a wine bottle over the head of transient Corey Gere at the Citi Lodge Motel on West Broadway. Court records state Nielson had been drinking and smoking marijuana. He’s charged with aggravated assault and assault with a weapon, both felonies.

• Thursday, June 3 A couple dozen cyclists ride through Missoula pulling stand-ins for Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Director Jim Lynch and the head of ExxonMobil Canada as part of a demonstration against the proposed Kearl Module Transportation Project. The protesters stage a mock trial in front of MDT’s office accusing Lynch of being in bed with ExxonMobil.

• Friday, June 4 In Times Square, “American Idol’s” Kara DioGuardi selects University of Montana student and Flathead High graduate Ethan Thompson’s catchy ditty as the winner of Folger’s “Best Part of Waking Up” jingle contest. The win nets Thompson and his band $25,000, as well as the opportunity to hear their song in a commercial.

• Saturday, June 5 Hundreds of area high school graduates don caps and gowns as members of Missoula’s class of 2010 receive their diplomas. It could be a tough haul from here, though, as Missoula County’s unemployment is currently 7.7 percent, higher than any other time since 1992.

• Sunday, June 6 The Missoula Mavericks’ winning streak reaches 23 games after the team takes a double header against the Bitterroot Red Sox at Lindborg-Cregg Field. The Mavs improve to 31-1 on the season, and kicks off conference season play this week.

• Monday, June 7 After hearing from several bicycle advocates, as well as from homeowners concerned about losing neighborhood parking spaces, the Missoula City Council votes 7-5 in favor of painting bike lanes on Brooks Street between Higgins and Mount avenues.

• Tuesday, June 8 Residents head to the polls to vote in Montana’s primary election. One voter is delayed trying to get to the Meadow Hill precinct when a dozen students sprint across the street in pursuit of a giant balloon that had flown off school grounds. Undeterred, the voter casts his ballot, collects his “I Voted” sticker and wonders just a little about teacher supervision at the school.

Bonnie Wallace from Phoenix, Ariz., trims stray straw with a weed whacker during a hands-on workshop on straw bale house construction in Missoula on June 2. In an effort to increase awareness of the craft, homeowners Claire Steinberg and Ben Tuholske organized the seven-day workshop, attracting 25 participants from as far away as New Zealand and France.

Hunters I-161 in the crosshairs Kurt Kephart says during his 36 years tracking big game in Montana, accessibility to prime hunting grounds has significantly dwindled. “It’s just a totally different attitude from what it was 35 years or so ago,” he says. The problem became more acute in 1995, Kephart claims, when the Montana Legislature passed a law securing licenses for outfitters, who then often supply them to well-heeled clients. More than that, Kephart says outfitters lease prime hunting grounds from private landowners, making it even tougher for the average person to compete for access. That’s why the Billings contractor, through his advocacy group Montana Public Wildlife, is gathering signatures ahead of a June 18 deadline to place Initiative 161 on November’s ballot. The measure would abolish outfitter-sponsored nonresident licenses and nix the requirement that licensed outfitters supervise hunts conducted by out-of-state clients. It would also

increase the cost of a nonresident big game license 43 percent and a combination deer license by 61 percent. None of that, of course, sits well with outfitters. They say raising fees will spook out-of-state hunters and, in turn, decimate Montana’s outfitting industry, which generates $167 million in economic activity annually. “Why do you want to destabilize that?” asks Mac Minard, executive director of the Montana Outfitters and Guides Association. Kephart maintains higher fees will benefit Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Block Management Program, which leases private land and makes it available to the hunting public. But Minard says upping license costs will decrease demand and, in turn, strain the Block Program. “That would be catastrophic,” Minard says. “From our point of view, the issue is about preserving the hunting heritage of the state of Montana.” Critics of I-161 allege Montana Public Wildlife signature gatherers are breaking the rules. In fact, the Montana Secretary of State’s Office has received 16 formal complaint forms alleging election law

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 June 10–June 17, 2010

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violations. Those complaints have not been verified and are currently under review. Kephart calls the allegations bogus, and says he’s willing to take the heat if it means changing what he sees as inequities. “I just felt compelled,” he says, “to try to change it.” Jessica Mayrer

Legislature Big rigs spark MEPA bill The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) has yet to green-light Imperial Oil’s plan to lug massive oil sands modules through the state. But if it does, Missoula Rep. Carol Williams is gearing up to ensure that the next procession of “big rigs” won’t be waved through so easily. Williams is currently working on draft legislation aimed at revising the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), the state’s bedrock environmental law. “The two things I’m looking at,” she says, “are extending that comment period so it gives people more time to get their thoughts into the department, and then also to say you have to


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

have an EIS [environmental impact statement] to do anything this extensive.” The EIS requirement and a longer public comment period were MEPA requirements, Williams explains, until they were stripped during the 2001 and 2003 legislative sessions. “During the Martz administration everybody was running around trying to see how we could make it easier on business to do business,” she says. Earlier in the year Imperial Oil, an ExxonMobil subsidiary, asked MDT to approve a permit that would allow the company to transport more than 200 oil processing modules—weighing some 170 tons and measuring 24 feet wide, 30 feet high and up to 210 feet long—over Lolo Pass and through Missoula en route to the Port of Sweetgrass. The 300-mile Montana leg would constitute just one segment of the equipment’s journey from South Korea to the Kearl Oil Sands project in Alberta. Accommodating the rigs requires about $22 million worth of highway modifications. The project, according to Williams and many of its opponents, ought to be subject to more thorough environmental scrutiny. “They shouldn’t have been taken out in the first place,” Williams says of MEPA’s original EIS and public comment requirements. “We had the best environmental protection laws in the country at the time, and now we don’t. At least we’re not as bad as Idaho…but I don’t think that’s particularly something to brag about.” Matthew Frank

City Council Police to cover more turf The Missoula City Council Monday night approved an ordinance that will extend police authority to five miles outside city limits. The measure’s passage, by an 8-4 vote, comes after months of wrangling between Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir and members of the City Council who worried the ordinance would divert resources from Missoula’s urban core to diffuse county areas. “I feel pretty strongly that we don’t want to start providing city police services in the county,” Councilman Bob Jaffe said during Monday night’s council meeting. Despite such concerns, Muir pushed for the measure, maintaining that his department is challenged by blurry jurisdictional boundaries. His officers now travel through pockets of county land— overseen by the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department—to arrive at annexed city territory. That, Muir argued, leaves law enforcement vulnera-

Ochenski

Range

ble to civil litigation. He proposed the ordinance in April to help municipal law enforcement do its job more efficiently. But with a tight budget already cutting police patrols, Jaffe wasn’t the only councilperson who voiced concern that Missoula’s police force is stretched thin enough already. Councilman Roy Houseman explained his “no” vote by sharing conversations held with local business owners who said police already take too long to arrive at calls in downtown Missoula. “That’s why I can’t support this,” Houseman said. Some residents at the meeting expressed the same sentiment. Tina Sunderland told the council she rarely sees criminal activity at home in East

Missoula, but when she comes to work in Missoula, she regularly spots people drinking, doing drugs and engaging in sexual activity in the parking lot outside of her downtown workplace. “We call 911 and don’t get a quick response,” she said. Jaffe proposed a workaround that would have expanded the authority to arrest 250 feet outside city limits, while allowing Missoula police officers to track down individuals suspected of committing crimes within the city up to five miles outside municipal boundaries. Jaffe also suggested providing authority to respond in emergencies and to offenses personally observed while en route to annexed city areas. That didn’t fly with Muir or a majority of the council. Police will assume expanded authority beginning July 7. Jessica Mayrer

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Cobell Settlement setbacks Browning resident and Blackfeet member Elouise Cobell is now well into her 15th year battling the federal government over money owed to individual American Indians, and what hope she had of an end is fading as critics continue to pick apart the multi-billion dollar settlement she landed late last year. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., cast a wide net over tribal governments across the nation in April, hoping to rally critics of the contentious Cobell v. Salazar settlement. His letter to tribal leaders outlined major changes to the historic legal agreement, and so far he’s gained several significant supporters in Indian Country. The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians last month submitted a letter to Barrasso agreeing with his proposed amendments. Then, on May 26, the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association (GPTCA) drafted a resolution to the same effect during a conference in South Dakota. The documents underscore the increasingly complex views of the settlement among American Indians. “We did not oppose or support the settlement,” A. Gay Kingman, executive director of the GPTCA, says of the group’s resolution. “What we did is try to get more funds in the hands of the landowners. We feel this is our responsibility, to try to get the landowners as much as we can for the wrongs that were done to them.” Barrasso’s amendments include revisions to how portions of the $3.4 billion settlement will be handled, including the $1.4 billion in reimbursements for Individual Indian Money accounts mismanaged by the Department of the Interior. Specifically, he proposes setting aside $50 million as a reserve for any individual payments deemed insufficient and capping attorney fee claims for plaintiffs at $50 million. The letters of support for Barrasso’s changes shattered earlier sentiments that the settlement was the greatest political victory ever for American Indians, adding to a series of shakeups that have caused the case to drag on into 2010. The most notable hitch—beyond Barrasso’s criticisms—has been the U.S. Senate’s continued inability to pass the agreement. Five congressional deadlines have come and gone since the settlement was reached in December, and the Senate now has until June 15 to cast a final vote. If not, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs, Dennis Gingold, has said his clients will likely renew litigation. Alex Sakariassen

6

Grizzly bears trapped and relocated in the Flathead Valley by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks in the past two weeks. Several were reported as problem bears after killing local chickens and livestock.

etc.

Sen. Greg Hinkle, R-Thompson Falls, appointed himself leader of the opposition to physician-assisted suicide earlier this spring by declaring his intent to draft a legislative ban of the contested practice. But for someone charged with heading one side of this important debate, he commands an embarrassingly limited understanding of the issue at hand. Legislators on both sides are eager to clarify the Montana Supreme Court’s December ruling that gave physicians a legal defense in prescribing life-ending medication to terminally ill, mentally competent patients. Proponents point to legislation already on the books in Oregon and Washington that provides strict criteria for the practice—psychiatric evaluations, written consent observed by an impartial witness, etc.—as a good starting point for building on the court’s decision. Hinkle’s talking points are, shall we say, less researched. He’s claimed for weeks that physician-assisted suicide will wrongfully endanger patients who might actually survive their illness. Even patients with stable HIV and years to live could receive a prescription, he says, and he’s gone on record stating that once medication is prescribed, a patient’s life is out of his or her hands. Death is under the control, he says, of a doctor or family member. Hinkle couldn’t be more wrong. Physician-assisted suicide is a voluntary alternative for those suffering extreme pain or indignity at the end of life. In 2009, doctors in Oregon prescribed life-ending medication to 95 patients, only 53 of whom elected to take it. The majority of those were already in hospice care. When we spoke with Hinkle, he repeatedly referred to the medication as if it were administered intravenously. Wrong again. The most common form is an oral dose of a barbiturate—or depressant. As a key voice in this debate, he should know that. Hinkle says his main reason for drafting the Montana Patient Protection Act is to stop greedy heirs seeking family inheritance from coercing their elders into requesting lifeending medication. But the argument seems to be more a smokescreen for ideological unease than informed opinion. (And, some believe, simply a front for the conservative Montana Family Foundation’s interests.) If Hinkle bothered to read Washington or Oregon’s laws—which he admits he hasn’t—he might find his concerns for the elderly adequately addressed. Given Hinkle’s comments, and his serious lack of working knowledge of physician-assisted suicide, we can only hope someone will act accordingly and aid his bill in dying.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 June 10–June 17, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Busted hand AmVets charged with running illegal gambling operation by Jessica Mayrer

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 June 10–June 17, 2010

Missoula County Prosecutor Fred Independent, and claimed the charge to veterans of the armed forces. But Van Valkenburg filed charges last week was an attack fueled by the local gay Might says he’s held his own, donating against AmVets manager Mike Might for community, which is, he said, unsatisfied money to construction of local war veterrunning an illegal gaming operation at with its tenuous claims to the Ryman an memorials and service groups. Street watering hole. the popular downtown bar. “We give to the Salvation Army, Van Valkenburg alleges Might illegal“We are not a gay bar,” Might said last food bank, schools, supplies for ly operated 11 video gaming machines winter. “They want it as theirs exclusively.” Honduras,” he says. for nearly 20 months. If convicted on all But members of Missoula’s LGBT Without documentation, Adams 12 counts, including one felony charge community say their allegations of dis- doesn’t buy it. He also bristles at Might’s for unlawfully obtaining money by gam- crimination and criminal activity—then contention that AmVets, which has for bling, Might could face 10 years in prison and now—are about far more than just a years profited off of the local LGBT comand a $55,000 fine. turf war. The local post falls under the munity, isn’t a gay establishment. When contacted by the Independent, national AmVets service organization’s “Being part of a gay community in such Might said he disputes the charges, but charter, and is therefore tax exempt. That an isolated and rural place—this is history refused additional comment. “Until I see paperwork, I don’t have a lot of things to say,” he said. Over the years, AmVets has been a destination spot for Missoula’s local lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. Independent readers consistently vote the underground Ryman Street bar a favorite queer hangout in the annual Best of Missoula poll, with victories every Photo by Cathrine L. Walters year since 2007. According to charging Charges of illegal gambling filed by the county prosecutor are just the latest probdocuments, Might, who’s lem facing popular downtown bar AmVets. Manager Mike Might also faces scrutiny from the Montana Department of Labor, members of Montana’s LGBT community managed AmVets for and AmVets’ national headquarters. decades, told state gaming officials that he simply put off renewing his status doesn’t sit well with some, includ- going back several decades—the importance licenses. “He said that it was really stupid ing Tim Adams, who serves on the of a physical space that’s supportive of gay on his part,” the records state, “but Western Montana Gay & Lesbian people really just can’t be understated in between health problems and running two Community Center Board of Directors. Montana, because there are so few of them,” businesses it just didn’t get done.” “I definitely find it offensive and mis- says Adams. “That’s why it’s also particularly The charges are the latest in a string leading that when you have a sign above upsetting to me, is to know that people go of allegations for the popular establish- your establishment that says that you’re down there and think they’re participating ment. Between 2001 and 2008 the part of a national service organization, peo- in a safe space. And then they have the Montana Department of Labor (DOL) ple are going to assume that the money and owner of the establishment, or the manager, filed four Workers’ Compensation liens the profits that are being spent there are just basically slap them in the face and say, ‘Oh, we’re a veteran’s organization.’” against the bar totaling approximately going to help out veterans,” Adams says. $13,000. The DOL files such liens when Adams says that’s largely why he conThe latest charges against Might are an employer is penalized for failing to tacted state officials in March to inquire prompting leaders from the national provide workers’ compensation cover- about AmVets’ business affairs. According AmVets headquarters in Maryland to scrutiage and doesn’t pay the penalty. to charging documents, it was Adams’ nize the local chapter, says Jay Agg, nationIn 2008, the DOL took Might to court inquiry that triggered the criminal inves- al communications director for AmVets. “Should the Montana Fourth Judicial for not providing AmVets’ payroll records at tigation by the Montana Department of District Court, Missoula County, determine the agency’s request for approximately six Justice into Might’s gambling licenses. Generally, tax records for nonprofit Post 3 did in fact violate any laws or ordimonths. Might eventually provided DOL with the payroll documentation and paid entities like AmVets are public informa- nances, AmVets National Headquarters will the state claims. Three of the four cases tion. But according to Internal Revenue take immediate and appropriate action at were paid and subsequently closed, accord- Service records, because the operation that time, possibly including the revocaing to DOL spokesperson Casey Kyler-West. claimed less than $25,000 in annual tion of Post 3’s AmVets charter,” Agg said in Meanwhile, in January, a woman earnings between 2005 and 2008, AmVets a written statement. confined to a wheelchair alleged that was not required to file a tax return. In Might is scheduled to appear in Might and his staff discriminated against turn, it’s impossible through a public court June 15 for his arraignment. her based on her disability. Might disput- records search to document exactly how ed the allegation in an interview with the much the organization has contributed jmayrer@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Hanging together Forest bill collaborators resist Senate changes by Matthew Frank

Environmental groups that have sup- er, have remained quiet. The Wilderness Service opposed the mandate and NEPA ported Sen. Jon Tester’s forest bill find them- Society (TWS), for instance, one of the timeline, as well. The discussion draft was obtained by selves between a rock and a hard place. groups among the inner circle that negotiLast week a new “discussion draft” of ated the bill, declined to comment on the Matthew Koehler of the Last Best Place the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act (S. 1470) draft after inquires from the Independent. Wildlands Campaign, which last week emerged from the Senate Energy and But the group has already stated where it called on Tester to release the document to Natural Resources Committee lacking the stands. It testified during a Senate subcom- the public, to no avail. While the document has sparked bill’s logging mandate, a key component of mittee hearing last December in support of intrigue, Bill Wicker, spokesman for the the compromise that lies at the heart of a bill dropping the mandate. originally hammered out among conserva“We oppose congressionally mandat- Senate Energy and Natural Resources tionists, loggers and recreationists last year. ed treatment levels in the bill,” the testi- Committee, warns observers not to put too Removing the requirement to log some mony read in part, “because they, a) neg- much stock into it. 10,000 acres a year in the Beaverhead- lect the root causes of the problems this “It’s a real document,” he says. “It’s Deerlodge and Kootenai national forests bill is intended to address, b) set an not some counterfeit or bogus document would appear to make the bill more appeal- adverse national precedent, c) create that somebody put together. But it’s siming to the environmental community. ply for discussion purposes and But it’s not so simple. In an effort to everyone will get together again preserve the disparate coalition that and [change it even more].” created the bill, the environmental Tester’s office says it was the first groups involved in the negotiations discussion draft it had seen. Wicker have refused, so far, to support the new says it was distributed to members of draft, or any draft that excludes assurthe committee and the Forest Service, ances for the timber industry. and he believes Tester also distributed it to groups that helped draft the bill. With the designation of about RY Timber, for one, received a copy 660,000 acres of new wilderness in from Tester’s office about two weeks Montana on the line, it leaves some ago. “When we first got it,” Regan says, of Montana’s foremost environmen“we all understood it was the first shot tal advocates in the uncomfortable Photo by Chad Harder out of the gate by the committee’s and unlikely position of backing the timber industry—or stuck saying A Senate committee’s “discussion draft” staffers.” A Tester spo-kesperson removes the logging mandate in Sen. Jon declined to say why the discussion draft nothing at all. Tester’s forest bill. That change would appear The Montana Wilderness to be good news for environmental groups— was distributed to collaborators. Association (MWA) immediately reject- but not if they want the bill to pass. In any case, with both Tester and ed dropping the logging mandate. Wicker’s offices declining to release Director Tim Baker stated last week that his unreasonably high expectations, d) fail the document to the public, opponents of group will not support legislation that does to provide the agency the resources it the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act have not contain adequate assurances for their needs to do its job, and e) most impor- renewed the same criticism that has partners in the timber industry. Baker was tant, we do not believe this approach will dogged the bill ever since Tester introunavailable to comment further, but MWA work on the ground.” duced it last summer—that the process has Conservation Director John Gatchell says Bruce Farling, director of Montana lacked transparency. the partnership forged to create the bill is a Trout Unlimited, another coalition memWith less than 40 working days “serious commitment.” ber, sees the discussion draft as lacking remaining in the current legislative ses“In a state like Montana,” Gatchell meaningful provisions for fish, wildlife and sion, Tester’s bill faces another chalsays, “your word is really important, I water quality that were in the original bill— lenge: Even if the Senate committee think, so it’s got to be gold, or people see omissions he believes should make conser- puts the original language back in vationists reluctant to embrace the docu- place, it’s doubtful the bill will pass you as un-credible, and for good reason.” Ed Regan, resource manager at ment. But more than anything, Farling before summer recess. Townsend’s RY Timber, echoes MWA’s com- downplays the significance of the draft. “Look what’s in the pipeline ahead “It’s one product from a larger process of [Tester’s bill],” Wicker says. “They’ve mitment to the bill’s original structure. “All along we’ve agreed to support of making sausage and I wouldn’t go over- got to finish that financial reform bill. You’ve got a climate resolution coming each other on this thing,” Regan says, board reading too much into it,” he says. The discussion draft includes other up on Thursday. You’ve got all kinds of “and without the legislated mandates the logging and stewardship work just changes besides removing the logging legislation related to the oil spill. becomes an empty promise…I guess mandate. It also removes the 12-month You’ve got immigration reform lurking MWA is living up to its words. It would timeline for environmental analysis under there. You’ve got a Supreme Court the National Environmental Policy Act, and nominee you’ve got to confirm, etc. So expect the same from us.” Most importantly, Tester himself drops controversial and unprecedented it would be a challenge. But that’s what wilderness provisions, including those we do around here, and it’s certainly stands by the original bill. “Make no mistake,” he said in a state- allowing helicopter landings for military within the range of the doable—if ment, “if the timber mandates are not training exercises in wilderness. Generally, everybody agrees on what the bill part of the deal, I’ll pull the plug on the all of these are changes other environmen- should look like.” tal groups not at the negotiating table have whole thing.” Other environmental groups, howev- outwardly supported. The U.S. Forest mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 June 10–June 17, 2010


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More smoke than fire Tea Party all talk, little action on Election Day

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Missoula Independent

Page 10 June 10–June 17, 2010

For all the sound and fury from the Tea Party, Montanans might have expected more fireworks in this week’s election. But that didn’t happen. Nor did the predicted tidal wave of disgruntled voters throw the bums out. In fact, when the dust settled and the final ballots were counted, it was pretty much the same old, same old in Montana and not much different nationally. The incumbents usually won and the preferred candidates of the Republican and Democrat parties continued to dominate the votes of their loyalists. The state’s top-tier race was supposedly a fiercely contested Democratic runoff to determine who would face incumbent Congressman Denny Rehberg. Instead, it turned into a yawner. Dennis McDonald, the hand-picked candidate of the Democratic Party machine, crushed young Tyler Gernant with almost twice as many votes. Gernant was portrayed as having this fired-up campaign of enthusiastic young supporters, but in truth barely edged out co-challenger Melinda Gopher, who had a late start and virtually non-existent campaign spending. If this primary was boring, however, the general election race between Rehberg and McDonald promises to be anything but. Look for one of the most vicious and dirty campaigns in Montana’s history as McDonald and the Democrats go after Rehberg for his lame incumbency and role in the late-night drunken boat crash on Flathead Lake last year. Rehberg and the Republicans, meanwhile, will pound McDonald for his role as a lawyer defending Mafia hit man Jimmy “The Weasel” Fratianno. “Ugly” would be the word best describing what’s headed our way from now until November in this particular match-up. A troubling indicator for Democrats is that Republicans outnumbered them in this primary race more than two-to-one, with a mere 60,000 Dems casting ballots compared to 127,000 Republicans. Rehberg alone captured more votes than all the Democrats combined and chocked up almost four times as many votes as McDonald was able to muster. If this is enthusiasm on the Democrats’ side to dump Rehberg, they’ve got a lot more work to do. If you believed the pundits, the Tea Party and the Montana Conservative Alliance (MCA) were supposed to pull the Republican candidates so far to the right edge of the road that two wheels would be in the gravel. But in most of the primary races where radical rightists took on less radical Republicans, the vot-

ers decided it was a better idea to keep their wheels on the road. A good example would be the House contest between former state Sen. John Esp and Joel Boniek in Park and Sweetgrass counties. Boniek was one of the wildest of the right-wing wild bunch in the last legislative session, but was edged out by Esp who

Rehberg alone “captured more votes than all the Democrats combined and chocked up almost four times as many votes as McDonald was

able to muster

told reporters that he “knew the people” in his district and they “weren’t going to be jumping on these kinds of bandwagons.” His win was echoed by similar results in which Chas Vincent of Libby, a definite right-winger, defeated Rhoda Cargill almost 4-to-1, despite her endorsement by extreme conservatives. The same thing happened in Dillon, with Jeff Wellborn defeating Ron Lake. The radical right can claim at least a few wins, however, such as MCAsupported candidate Lee Randall’s victory in southeast Montana. But overall, their efforts bore little fruit. On the national scene, the electorate’s predicted anti-incumbent mood turned into something more akin to apathy than rage. In one of the most high-profile races nationally, the expected dumping of Democrat incumbent U.S. Sen. Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas didn’t happen, despite a determined and expensive effort by organized labor unions to defeat her. Instead, Lincoln turned the tables by claiming her “vote could not be bought” and, in a classic example of a Pyrrhic victory, left liberals, the unions and their candidate Bill Halter in ashes. Adding insult to injury Lincoln declared the unions were “special interests” and claimed they wanted to “manipulate the

votes.” That former President Bill Clinton went to bat for Lincoln in an ad using the same theme of manipulation may have helped her win, but shows little regard for the Democrats’ long-time union allies and reveals a fracturing of party unity that bodes ill come November. In another high-profile race, beleaguered Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada will face a Tea Party candidate in the fall election. While this may give the Tea Party something to crow about, the general perception is that Reid hoped the Tea Party’s candidate, Sharron Angle, would win because she’d be easier to defeat in the general election due to her radical views. Speaking of radical, California turns out to be an eye-opener as this normally Democrat-leaning state tossed up two very conservative Republican women to seek two of the state’s most important seats. Former Hewlett-Packard chief executive Carly Fiorina dumped $5.5 million of her own money into the three-way primary campaign to win the right to challenge Sen. Barbara Boxer in November. Fiorina is hard-core anti-choice and says she’ll go after Boxer for her support of the federal bailouts and President Obama’s controversial health care overhaul. In a similar contest, former eBay CEO and billionaire Meg Whitman dropped an astounding $71 million of her own money to gain the opportunity to challenge former California governor Jerry Brown to see who will replace outgoing Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. If nothing else, it promises to be a direct clash of ideology and, from all indications, likely one of the most expensive races in the nation. While it would be risky to draw too many generalizations from the results from 12 state elections, some things seem clear. The radical conservatives hit the beach, but not as the predicted tidal wave. The Democrats, however, are far from safe. Obama’s embattled presidency has left many former supporters deenergized and skeptical. If the national results in November echo what we saw in Montana, where twice as many Republicans voted as Democrats, Obama and his party have a lot more challenging work ahead to retain their Congressional majorities. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Oil and water Spring rituals feel different in light of Gulf disaster by Christina Nealson

making a bad decision to forego safety measures. It’s not just because our government backed away from regulation. It’s not due to Dick Cheney’s secretive Energy Task Force, which apparently determined that the $500,000 shutoff switches (mandated in Norway and Brazil to prevent catastrophes like this one) were an econom-

I look out at “newly greened sage, the La Plata Mountains in the background, well aware that this nightmare has with our—my—

addiction to oil.

ic burden on the industry and passed on requiring them in U.S. waters. As Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh says, “We are here to awaken from our illusion of separateness.” I look out at newly greened sage, the La Plata Mountains in the background, well aware that this nightmare has everything to do with our—my— addiction to oil. Through my consumptive habits, I enable the oil companies to keep racking up profits. Several years ago, I limited my plane flights to one a year and encouraged friends to do the same. “Oh, but I can’t,” they replied. Soand-so would be hurt if I didn’t show

Christina Nealson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She writes from her home in Mancos, Colo.

www.spectrum.umt.edu • 243-4828

everything to do

up for their (fill in the blank: wedding, graduation, funeral, reunion, etc.), they said. And of course, for us baby boomers: “I’ve got to see the grandkids!” topped the list. But where will change start if not with us? Imagine a phone call to that niece, cousin or sister telling them that you won’t be attending their gradation because of energy consumption; that it’s imperative to switch gears and make choices on behalf of the earth. Take one plane trip a year and make it count. Or if your family is a top priority, move and live closer. Close your eyes and imagine what Philippe Cousteau saw 25 feet down: clouds of granular water the likes of which researchers say now forms massive plumes hundreds of feet deep that stretches for miles. The pungent smell of diesel fuel, gasoline and oil. His hazmat and diving suit had to be degreased; his skin needed to be carefully cleaned because the touch of that water would cause it to burn. From 12,000 to 19,000 barrels of oil or much, much more continue to pour into the ocean every day. No, says Philippe Cousteau, the ocean cannot take this. No, he says, a hurricane will not wash it all away and make it clean again. Unlike the Mancos River Valley, the Gulf has no rite of spring, no seasonal cleanup to scour the riverbanks. It’s rafting season here in the Four Corners region of the Southwest. Rafts made from petroleum products, petroleum tires under the car and gasoline to drive to the put-ins. Don’t forget the poly-pro wet suits for warmth and those large, soft inflatable pads to sleep on. It’s springtime in the Rockies, but for many creatures of the sea, it’s a dark, sad time of death.

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The Mancos Valley reverberates with the gush of its namesake river in an annual rite of spring runoff. These waters are a perfect metaphor for starting a new life—allowing winter’s rigidity to melt and wash away. In this high mountain ranching valley of Colorado, the first water flows through irrigation spigots and onto hay fields. The swallows return and rebuild their mud nests under the eaves of the barn; foals hug their mothers’ sides under newly leafed cottonwoods. All is rejuvenation. Meanwhile, there is the black, slimy gush filling the Gulf of Mexico— a flood of oil so gargantuan it is difficult to wrap our minds around it until we go online or turn on the television. The video of Philippe Cousteau (grandson of Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau, who brought the oceans into our living rooms on television) diving into the sullied Gulf waters makes even the toughest among us gasp. “It’s a nightmare,” he says, as he moves through suspended particles of oil and muck, a few large fish looking eerily out of place in the background. Susan Shaw, a marine toxicologist and director of the marine Environmental Research Institute, took a dive recently as well. She described a “surreal and sickening scene” as she passed through an orange-brown pudding mix of oil and dispersants. She witnessed phytoplankton, zooplankton and shrimp enveloped in dark oil, and larger fish feeding on the poisonous oil dispersal droplets, mistaking them for food. At a time when the world is consumed with religious violence and the so-called war on terror, perhaps it’s time to ask the creatures of the sea: “Who are the terrorists?” This is not a trick question. As much as we want to dump the blame on some other, it is not simply the fault of British Petroleum Oil executives trying to save an extra day and

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Lost Ladybug Insect Camp Campers will spend four days meeting local bug experts, searching for ladybug species, and reporting their findings to researchers at Cornell University.

June 21-24 • $155 Hey grandchildren,

Learn with your grandparent at UM MOLLI Summer Adventures in Science camps. Explore the science of visual perception and artistic expression, July 12- 13. Call 243.2905 for details.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 June 10–June 17, 2010


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When it comes to housing, I’d say green building is where it’s at. I mean, what’s cooler—not to mention more cost efficient, friendlier to our fragile environs, and distinctive— than building your dream abode with materials like old stadium bleachers and recycled tiles? If you agree, I’d suggest getting your green on during homeWORD’s annual Sustainability Tour, which offers an in-depth look at nine local buildings—including some seriously swanky homes, condos and apartment complexes—built or retrofitted using a range of sustainable materials and methods. This includes the Bardsley Home, pictured above, which was mostly built from goods collected at Home Resource. Other structures, like the Loken Home, utilize trim salvaged from stadium bleachers, while UM’s FLAT

THURSDAY JUNE 10 The Sustainable Business Council keeps on keepin’ the discussion green during its Sustainability Shot Series lecture titled “Social Justice and Sustainability: Environment, Economics and Population,” a talk with Blue Mountain Clinic’s Anita Kuennen that begins at 5:30 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. Free. Call 824-7336 and visit sustainablebusinesscouncil.org.

FRIDAY JUNE 11 Celebrate Jeannette Rankin’s 130th birthday and dedicate the Missoula Community Peace Park during a celebration for both that begins with a commemoration at 6 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Park, just south of the Madison St. bridge. Free. A walk to the Peace Park on the North Hills follows, which includes the unveiling of a new peace bell. Attendees are encouraged to bring food to share. Call 543-3955.

SATURDAY JUNE 12

(Forum for Living with Appropriate Technology) uses passive solar technology and real-time energy monitoring. Besides getting a glimpse of some of the most ecofriendly buildings in town, tourists get a free brew from Bayern Brewery after the tour, and a peek at the brewery’s bottle recycling operation. For a firsthand look at those who put their money where their sustainable mouth is, this excursion shouldn’t be missed. —Ira Sather-Olson HomeWORD’s Sustainability Tour is Saturday, June 12, from noon to 5 PM and begins at Home Resource, 1515 Wyoming St., Ste. 100. Prices vary for guided tours, so visit homeword.org for tickets or call 532-4663.

If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.alanon.alateen.org.

TUESDAY JUNE 15 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org.

Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

MONDAY JUNE 14

THURSDAY JUNE 17

Women’s Voices for the Earth presents Integrating Equity and Diversity into Environmental and Social Change, a workshop with facilitator Angela Park from 10 AM–4 PM in the small meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. $75. Pre-registration required by calling 543-3747 or by e-mailing courtney@womenandenvironment.org.

Snag a locally made playhouse for your kid or animal while also helping a local organization during Southgate Mall’s Playhouse and Pet Palace Auction: A Benefit for the Boys & Girls Club of Missoula, which features over 10 playhouses on display for you to bid on at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Bidding runs each day until 6 PM, Thu. June 24. Call Trisha at 721-5140 Ext. 19.

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Don’t be a freedom hater: Robert Brown of The John Birch Society presents the talk “Exposing the Enemies of Freedom and How to Defeat Them,” at 6 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call Gloria at 251-5961 or Nancy at 722-3167.

Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict (and no mediation) by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/ social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 June 10–June 17, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN Authorities investigating a bank robbery in St. Cloud, Minn., nabbed their suspect after officials at Mystic Lake Casino observed him depositing cash into slot machines in exchange for credit slips. “In effect, he was laundering his money through the casino,” police Sgt. Martin Sayre said. Casino officials became suspicious because Salamo Nam Rakotojoelinandrasana, 23, was exchanging bills covered with red dye, which the bank used to mark the stolen money. When Kenneth Parkerson, 28, sneaked into the screened patio of a home in Coral Springs, Fla., carrying a video camera, he was confronted by homeowner Ireneusz Fajkis, a firefighter who also happens to be a mixed martial arts fighter. Fajkis chased the intruder, tackled him to the ground and beat him up before calling the police. “I picked the wrong house,” Parkerson reportedly told the hospital nurse who treated his wounds. WHEN CATASTROPHIC OIL SPILLS AREN’T ENOUGH A Pentagon report warned that trash in space might bring a halt to commerce and communications on Earth. Noting that space is “increasingly congested and contested,” the Defense Department’s interim U.S. Space Posture Review explained that potential crashes between satellites and debris—such as refuse from old rockets, abandoned satellites and missile shrapnel—are threatening the $250 billion space-services market that provides financial communication, global-positioning navigation, international phone connections, Google Earth pictures, television signals and weather forecasts. Scientists said that space collisions could set off an uncontrolled chain reaction that might make some orbits unusable because they are too littered with debris. GIVE AND TAKE Georgia’s Gwinnett County has asked some 180 county workers to return more than $39,000 they received in bonuses 16 years ago. Authorities blamed the overpayments on a payroll anomaly that occurred when the county adjusted employees’ payroll cycles. A Pennsylvania man who won a $2,001 slot machine jackpot at Erie’s Presque Isle Downs & Casino not only must give back the money, but also faces criminal trespass charges. The 55-year-old Waterford Township resident had previously banned himself from casinos under a state program for problem gamblers. REASONABLE EXPLANATIONS After a North Carolina jury convicted Michael Ryan of first-degree murder, he told a Gaston County judge that he wants to be sentenced to death but without actually being executed. He explained that being on death row would gain him the respect of his fellow inmates. Appearing in federal court in Billings, Mont., Dale Leroy Satran, 46, admitted illegally killing a bald eagle but said he thought it was a porcupine. After inspectors condemned a three-year-old, five-story condominium building in Norristown, Pa., because its load-bearing cinderblock walls weren’t filled with concrete and steel rods, as required by code, builder R. Bruce Fazio insisted the hollow walls came “as a surprise to me.” He blamed the masonry contractor, although he couldn’t recall the person’s name. PRACTICAL PLANE GEOMETRY Secret Service agents questioned Alabama high school geometry teacher Gregory Harrison, whose lesson in parallel lines and angles used the example of assassinating the president. Joseph Brown, a senior in the geometry class at Jefferson County’s Corner High School, said Harrison “was talking about angles and said, ‘If you’re in this building, you would need to take this angle to shoot the president.’” Special agent Roy Sexton decided the teacher’s remarks didn’t constitute a credible threat, but school Superintendent Phil Hammonds said, “We are going to have a long conversation with him about what’s appropriate.” Afterwards, Harrison publicly apologized as part of a negotiated settlement that lets him keep his job. LEMMING SEE, LEMMING DO The same day Apple toppled Microsoft as the world’s leading technology company, it announced it is investigating the apparent suicides of 11 workers at the Chinese factory that makes Apple’s iPhones. While denying that working conditions at the Foxconn Technology plant in Shenzhen prompted the deaths, Foxconn officials said they have begun putting safety nets on buildings to discourage suicide attempts by the company’s 800,000 Chinese employees. SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION State police said they arrested Anthony Dodson, 34, in Uniontown, Pa., after he threatened his girlfriend with a meat cleaver while they argued about the British Petroleum oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Guy Edward Jones, 60, landed in jail after he set fire to his house in Sissonville, W.Va., because, according to Kanawha County sheriff’s Lt. Sean Crosier, he was mad at his wife for not having dinner ready when he came home. A husband and wife and their three children were driving near Clarksville, Tenn., when the two adults began arguing. At one point, Montgomery County sheriff’s Deputy Blake Neblett reported, the 23-year-old man told his wife to “shut up.” When she refused, the man jumped from the moving vehicle. He was airlifted to the hospital in critical but stable condition. DRIVING WHILE DISTRACTED Ohio truck driver Thomas Wallace, 45, pleaded guilty to manslaughter after his rig rear-ended a disabled car on the New York State Thruway and killed the driver. Authorities said Wallace didn’t see the victim’s vehicle because he was watching pornography on his laptop computer. Authorities said a single-car crash in Garbutt, N.Y., that sent four teenagers to the hospital was caused by driver Bryan Parslow, 19, who fainted while he and the other three were trying to hold their breath when driving through the hamlet. Monroe County Sheriff’s investigators said that after Parslow lost consciousness, the car left the road, struck a tree and then hit a large boulder. The teens told deputies at the scene that they were all holding their breath as part of a game they had played before. SHIKSAPPEAL The Toronto police department has added a new hate-crime victim category: “non-Jewish Shiksa.” The term “Shiksa” is a slur for non-Jewish woman, making the category not only redundant, but also baffling to the Canadian Jewish Congress, which accused the Toronto Police Service of pushing the anti-hate law “to its most absurd level.” Noting that the police also investigated hate crimes against teachers, feminists, infidels, police, Nazis and pedophiles, CJC CEO Bernie Farber said, “You just can’t apply it to literally everything.”

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Page 13 June 10–June 17, 2010


n the introduction to his new book, Zach Dundas acknowledges that most sports fans “prefer their competitive athletes sober, aerodynamically shaved, and honed to a pitiless muscular edge. They prefer their events ‘organized.’” Not Dundas. While attending a cyclocross race—an event he describes as “a rustic form of bike racing that combines grueling obstacles, hellacious ascents and descents, a fetish for bad weather, athletic masochism, and rabid beer consumption”—Dundas had an epiphany. Fans consistently bummed out by the mega-business of professional sports deserved something more pure, less fame-obsessed and, well, more fun than what was being offered in major venues. They deserved to know about events like cyclocross. Dundas’ epiphany led to a cross-country journey into our country’s burgeoning alternative sports landscape—and to his first book, The Renegade Sportsman, which was released this month. We caught up with the former Indy arts editor and current Portland, Ore.-based freelance writer to learn more about his theory on the future of sports, how 1970s stadium rock is like professional basketball and to discuss something called “soccer.”

I

Indy: The Renegade Sportsman is based on something you’ve dubbed the “Two Futures of Sports Theory.” Please explain. Dundas: Well, as I was conceiving of the book, it struck me that we never think about sports as a cultural movement, like music or art. Because 90 percent of the attention paid to sports goes to mainstream, major league sports, we tend to view sports as this weird combination of big business and celebrity gossip. And yet sports, like music or art or literature, is a manifestation of culture before anything else. In music, even people who are just fans of mainstream pop recognize the role played by the

band that plays in the corner bar—the grassroots level of chaos that keeps the overall organism alive. So my Two Futures of Sports Theory (which has a pretentious name by design) tries to apply that thinking to sports. Obviously, the major leagues will just keep getting bigger, barring civilizationwide catastrophe. But I also think there is an opportunity for a much more cohesive, vibrant, grassroots sports underground to thrive at the same time, and that the two can feed off of each other. Indy: Each chapter delves into a different alternative sporting culture. What

ZACH DUNDAS, AUTHOR OF THE RENEGADE SPORTSMAN, EXPLAINS HIS WILD JOURNEY INTO THE UNDERBELLY OF AMERICAN SPORTS CULTURE. Illustrations by Robert Rusignola

Missoula Independent

Page 14 June 10–June 17, 2010


criteria did you use for choosing what made the book, and what didn’t? Dundas: It was like porn—you know it when you see it. I was really attracted to sports that are being organized, or even invented, by the participants themselves as we speak. Roller derby fits that bill, as does bike polo. I wrote at length about a bike race in Iowa, the Trans-Iowa, which is effectively staged by one man but has nonetheless achieved a certain legendary status. I was looking for that kind of dirty-fingernailed Yankee ingenuity, mostly. At the same time, there’s a broad spectrum within the book—I wrote about the Cresta Run, which is this crazy sledding event in Switzerland that seems to attract European aristocrats almost exclusively, just because I think it’s cool and bizarre. Indy: Which sport made the biggest impression on you, for better or worse? Dundas: It’s hard to argue with the Trans-Iowa. It’s a cycling triple-century over the worst backroads you can imagine, out in the middle of nowhere. (The Iowa-style middle of nowhere, not the Montana-style middle of nowhere, i.e., you’re surrounded by seas of corn.) Just physically, it’s a monumental task and achievement—I really doubt that many professional athletes, in any sport, could outdo the guys who finished in the top five, in about 25 hours. Culturally, it was a reminder that this part of the country that people tend to think of as very boring and conventional is actually home to a bunch of very creative, engaged people. I think that resonated with me as a Montanan. And just personally, everyone involved in the race has this kind of folkloric stature, from Guitar Ted, the guy who runs the race, to Ira Ryan, the cycling fanatic who won the edition I witnessed.

Indy: Almost every sport involves— requires?—the consumption of alcohol in some way. Did you need more Bengay or detox after your research? Dundas: You know, in retrospect I probably over-emphasized the drinking, mostly just to be funny and set the right tone of serious unseriousness. People seem to be pretty struck by that as they read it. I think it’s important to note that even among the Hash House Harriers, the so-called “drinking club with a running problem,” there are people who are teetotal. I guess I’m saying that it’s a matter of attitude and approach rather than overall consumption.

about the best way to evolve. There are some bike polo players who can’t wait to cash that first Red Bull sponsorship check, and others who fairly vehemently want the sport to remain grassroots-controlled. It’s possible that there is a viable middle ground. I think roller derby, which has seen such phenomenal growth and yet has remained amateur and player-owned, is in the process of finding out. Indy: How did growing up in Montana, and your time in Missoula, contribute to your view of sports culture? Dundas: I think Montana fosters an

doors person and a serious reader. I am neither a great writer nor a great sportsman, but I’m trying on both counts. Indy: Aside from soccer (see excerpt on page 16), what’d you play during your time in Montana? Dundas: As I say in the book, I am not personally a great example of the Montana lifestyle, but I certainly did a bit of fishing, an extremely small and unsuccessful amount of hunting, some wilderness hiking, some rafting, some mountain biking, all that. When I was a kid, I played a bit of basketball (I was terrible) and briefly started at linebacker for the

“The overblown, grandiose and occasionally silly nature of major league sports somehow recalls Jefferson Starship to me. Meanwhile, I was trying to write about people who are the modernday sports equivalent of The Slits.” Indy: Which one of the sports you discovered has the best chance of eventually reaching a wider audience? (And is that a good thing or a bad thing?) Dundas: Bike polo and roller derby are both becoming full-fledged international sports, with established competitive calendars and broad, deep groups of players and fans. At the same time, I think both could remain relatively underground and still be very healthy and vibrant. Certainly, within both sports, you would find a wide range of opinions

appreciation for the DIY approach to life. That can mean playing in your own band, or it can mean shooting, gutting and skinning your own deer. It means that some people do both those things, which is a combination that, as I have discovered since moving to Portland, is sort of lost on people elsewhere. Even in the 21st century, Montana remains a fairly unmediated, authentic place. And I think Missoula, specifically, obviously exposed me to both great writers and great sportsmen and -women from an early age—it does not seem remarkable to me, at all, for someone to be both a serious out-

city champion Roosevelt Rebels flag football team. What can I say? I was a nerd by choice. Indy: Knowing your passion for soccer, what’s your expert analysis heading into the 2010 World Cup, and who do you think will ultimately hoist the trophy in South Africa? (Needless to say, your answer will constitute the entirety of the Indy’s official World Cup preview.) Dundas: Everyone is looking to Spain to stage a defining performance and make good on their promise as the most stylish and tactically sophisticated team in world

Missoula Independent

Page 15 June 10–June 17, 2010


football. They have the horsepower, but also a history of flameouts on the big stage. Likewise, the best player in the world right now, Lionel Messi, has never really proven himself with Argentina, and he must cope with having crazy Diego Maradona as his coach. Holland has potential to be a beautiful team. I don’t think we’ll see a repeat of the French and Italian tours de force of 2006—those teams are past their sell-by dates. England finally has a brilliant manager, but I remain unconvinced. Sadly, I don’t think the African teams will show much beyond their usual flashes of brilliance and their fatal inconsistency. While I don’t believe the United States will make it past the Round of 16 (or beat England this coming Saturday), I do think we have a team to be proud of. We’ve got players who have roots in Mexico, Haiti, Nigeria, Canada, Brazil, Scotland and elsewhere, many of whom made a conscious choice to represent the U.S. We’ve got white dudes, black dudes, Hispanic dudes. It’s not the old suburban-collegiate soccer factory anymore, either. Clint Dempsey grew up the only Anglo kid playing in the all-Mexican leagues down on the Texas border. Landon Donovan grew up poor in California. Jay DeMerit got zero attention coming out of college, paid his own way over to London

and painted houses for spending money while he scrapped his way up through the minor leagues, all the way to the Premiership. Win or lose, this team is the real America. Indy: You make a detailed comparison between mainstream sports and 1970s stadium rock in the book. How’s that work, exactly? Dundas: The overblown, grandiose and occasionally silly nature of major league sports somehow recalls Jefferson Starship to me. Meanwhile, I was trying to write about people who are the modern-day sports equivalent of The Slits. Indy: Have you sworn off mainstream sports entirely? Dundas: Not at all. I am really enjoying the NBA Finals, and looking forward to abandoning society, more or less, for a month of World Cup action. I think it’s great that the best in the world have an outlet for their skills. I just think everyone else needs an athletic outlet, too. Zach Dundas reads from The Renegade Sportsman Tuesday, June 15, at 7 p.m., at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third Street W.

BEWARE THE CARNIES BEFORE SEARCHING FOR THE WORLD’S WILDEST GRASSROOTS SPORTS, DUNDAS CAPTAINED PERHAPS THE WORST TEAM IN MISSOULA SOCCER HISTORY Excerpt of The Renegade Sportsman by Zach Dundas reprinted by arrangement with Riverhead, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., Copyright (c) 2010.

T

he world soccer explosion, well under way elsewhere, hadn’t quite happened yet in late-1990s Missoula. Social trends tend to wash over Montana about a decade late. (About half the time, this is a good thing). Isolation breeds creativity, so my friends and I were used to making our own fun. Sometimes that meant hauling a rented generator down to the riverside to power a show by an extreme-leftist punk band on tour from North Dakota. All too often it meant those weekends aptly described as “lost.” In ’97 and ’98, it meant the Carnies Football Club. The Carnies wore black T-shirts. Our team crest consisted of a wobbly, hand-drawn shield bearing a skull, a switchblade, and a bottle marked “XXX.” When I solicited a sponsorship at a sports bar the owner gave me a blank look and said, “Soccer, huh? Well, I guess. We wanna see you guys in here after every game, ordering puh-lenty of beer. Think you can do that, buddy?” Yes. I can’t say for sure, but I feel confident that Missoula Co-Rec Division 1 never before saw and never again would see a team as awful as us. For our debut match, about thirty rookie Carnies, lured perhaps by the team captain’s talk of puh-lenty of beer, showed up. Our sideline resembled a protest against the World Trade Organization, and every substitution opportunity devolved into total chaos. If memory serves, we trailed a well-kempt team from a law firm 5-0 at halftime. The referee—a tallow-skinned, fifty-something character who wore a vintage Santos FC warm-up suit and chain-smoked straight through the break—strolled over. “Captain,” he said, “you’ve got to get your team organized.” I didn’t ask if he had any teargas I could borrow. We did bag a consolation goal in the second half. A Carnie striker, one of a handful of our players with real experience, nailed a scorcher from twenty-five yards out.

Missoula Independent

A fantastic goal from any perspective, it must have looked equally beautiful to him. Before the game, he told me he had ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Page 16 June 10–June 17, 2010

As the season progressed, the Carnies improved—a little. A Belarusian named Pavel, a paternal gent with salt-and-pepper hair whom none of us had ever met, mysteriously started showing up promptly at game time to play for us. He proved good for a couple of goals a game. Our pugnacious goalkeeper, a National Guardsman who both served in Afghanistan and played bass for Missoula’s most venerable punk band, put a little muscle in our defense. So did the linebacker from the Montana Grizzlies football (the other kind) team, recruited by my brother, who spent much of his time in Carnies black trying to start fights with opposing players. Our female players, it turned out, were much better than our men—for some reason, the Carnie women tended to be physically fit and less lifestyleimpaired than their male counterparts. I don’t know why. Other teams—genuine amateur athletes seeking bona fide recreational competition, I suppose—seemed unimpressed by our freewheeling approach. “This is ridiculous,” one snotty hotshot whined to a referee. “These guys don’t belong out here.” His team had scored three goals in fifteen minutes while dodging homicidal slide tackles, so maybe he had a point. That didn’t stop me from screaming “That was for you, motherfucker!” when we (Pavel) leveled the score in a game that we (Pavel) almost stole. The Carnies put together an immaculate winless streak. No other team, however, could match our party record. About half the core squad, including the hapless cap’n lived in a nine-bedroom decommissioned nunnery behind Missoula’s oldest Catholic church. By postmatch midnight, a choreographed wrestling match usually took place in the living room, with Heinz 57 used as fake blood. We chewed over tactics, technique, and lineups, but soon enough the day’s result started to feel irrelevant compared to olive-oil belly flop contests on the kitchen linoleum. Sadly, Pavel never joined us. I believe he was a religious man.


Missoula Independent

Page 17 June 10–June 17, 2010


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Chewing the fat FLASHINTHEPAN I’ve always enjoyed casual conversation, and rarely been averse to chewing on a nice hunk of fat. But the expression “chew the fat” never resonated with me, until some muchileros showed me the phrase’s literal meaning. Muchilero means backpack, and the muchileros are a tribe of Argentine wanderers who camp their way across some of the finer parts of the landscape, banding together around the fire by evening to drink matè, play guitar and plan the next day’s adventures. It was next to one such fire, under a starry night in San Martin, that I understood fat chewing. A piece of meat had been cooked over wood coals. Red wine was flowing. There was a bowl of salad, a loaf of bread, and everyone ate his share. As we lingered in our joyous collective afterglow, I sat there chewing the fat with the muchileros, as I literally gnawed on a bone to which a glob of fatty material was attached. Several times I put my bone back on the grill to heat up and remelt. The matrix of fat and connective tissue attached to that bone continued to surrender flavor as I chewed. I imagine language evolved in ancient scenes like this, around the same fires that hardened the spears and cooked the meat of our ancestors, while keeping away the wolves. They chewed the fat, told stories, worked on their communication skills and planned the next day’s adventures. In addition to stimulating conversation, some anthropologists believe that cooking food facilitated human brain development by increasing the efficiency with which calories are extracted from food. Because cooking produces soft, energy-rich foods, fewer calories are spent in digestive efforts, leaving a higher margin of caloric recovery. This supposedly allowed our brains—the most energy-intensive organ we have—to grow. Though fire was the original stove, today’s cooks have largely left it behind. With the loss of fire, we’ve also lost touch with the feelings and flavors associated with it. But fire remains available, at our service, a genie in a bottle that can be conjured anywhere, any time. And when we do, the experience of tending hot coals takes us to an archetypal place of

by ARI LeVAUX

Your meat should be at room temperature, seasoned with salt and pepper. Some meat cooks love their marinades. But I say if you have good meat, you should be able to taste it. If anything, I’ll serve my simply cooked meat with a sauce. Lately I’ve been into chimichurri, an Argentine garlic and herb vinaigrette. Chimichurri is best prepared a day ahead so the flavors can develop. It will continue to age nicely for a few days in the fridge. Applied to fire-cooked meat, the spicy, oily, acidic fragrance of the chimichurri interacts with the slightly crispy, slightly smoky, slightly charred exterior of the meat to create the kind of harmonic dissonance that would make Mallmann cry. To make chimichurri, dissolve a tablespoon of coarse salt into a cup of water. Chop a head of garlic, a cup of fresh parsley and 1/4 cup fresh or dried oregano (or marjoram) and add it all to a blender. Blend, adding 1/4 cup red wine vinegar and then 1/2 cup olive oil. Finally, blend in the salt water. Transfer to a jar with a tight-fitting lid, and keep in the refrigerator. When your coals have burned down and you’re ready to cook meat, make sure the grill grate is clean, and oil it with a Photo by Ari LeVaux piece of fat or an oil-soaked paper towel. You should be able to hold your hand at One common rookie maneuver in this depart- grill level—a distance of 2–4 inches from the ment is to start cooking before the fire completely coals—for about two seconds before the heat burns down to coals. This exposes your food to lick- forces it away. The meat should sizzle when it hits ing flames that can char the food and make the the grill. The following instructions are intended for this smoke flavors too strong. Start the fire about an hour before you want to hot of a grill, and for an inch-and-a-half-thick steak. cook. Spread the coals evenly under your grill grate Adjust the times appropriately to your conditions. After five minutes, lift the steak and rotate 90 and wait for them to develop a layer of white ash. Some woods burn hot and quickly, some have degrees—this prevents over-burning by the hot metal sweet smoke, and some throw a lot of sparks. grate. After four more minutes, turn the steak over Hardwoods are generally better for cooking than are and repeat the process, turning 90 degrees after five soft woods. Wood from fruit trees is a safe bet, minutes. After that final turning, it’s two minutes to although, true to form, chokecherry wood has bitter medium rare. Chewing the fat continues to guide and reflect smoke. Cherry, on the other hand, is one of the best, burning hot without too much flame, and producing human evolution. As the primal act of cooking with a sweet smoke. Apple is right up there with cherry. fire contrasts with the newer, sophisticated arts of Hickory, alder and mesquite are common, good wine and sauce making, a harmonic dissonance options. Whichever wood you use must be fully dry. develops. It’s even better than a burned tomato. smoke and ash—which, by the way, we’re now told are carcinogenic. In his recent cookbook, Seven Fires: Grilling the Argentine Way, Argentine chef Francis Mallmann writes: “I adore dissonance in food—two tastes fighting each other. It wakes up your palate and surprises you…The right amount of burning or charring can be delicious and seductive: a burnt tomato, for example, has a dark crust bordering on bitter, while the inside is soft and gentle in texture and taste.” Applying the right amounts of smoke and fire to your food is a delicate act, and easy to overdo. You want these harsh flavors to be team players, and not take over.

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Missoula Independent

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Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Bernice’s: a Missoula’s staple; serving strong coffee and baked goods in the heart of the Hip Strip since 1978. Stop by and see us at the Clark Fork River Market. We’ll be there bright and early on Saturdays beginning May 8th from 8AM to 1PM. If you miss the market, we’re open every day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest

Page 18 June 10–June 17, 2010

produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm-11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours Monday-Saturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery...Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza.

Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$


the Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross • 549-5595 Bright was my face when quickening steps followed my desire for a ColdStone creation; and enjoyed, a dipped waffle bowl, upon whose top shone glorious chocolate and sprinkles, as from a rampart's edge, I overlooked the shakes, the smoothies, the cookies and, above all, the ice cream cakes, decorated exactly how I wanted them–a vast milky river, stretching in the sun. It was then I realized: It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$ Doc's Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. Open Mon-Thurs 7am-3pm, Fri & Sat 8am-3pm, Sun 8am-3pm. $-$$ Front Street Pasta & Wraps 247 W. Front Street • 728-6655 Can't decide? Front Street Pasta and Wraps has something to satisfy every craving. We have everything from giant wraps to wok tossed dishes. Spicy peanut sauce goes great with just about everything. Vegetarian friendly menu is great for the non-meat eater. And now you can enjoy a cold beer or a glass of wine with your meal. So step off the beaten path of Higgins and ride into Front Street Pasta and Wraps. Just next to the Carousel on West Front Street. Open M-F, 10am-8pm. $ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Harry Davids 2700 Paxson Street, Suite H • 830-3277 Kicking off in February is LIVE BAND KARAOKE and LADIES NIGHT at Harry David’s every Thursday night at 9:30pm. Drink specials for the Ladies! Part Karaoke / Part Dance

night with the band Party Trained, this is your opportunity to sing like a rockstar with a live band backing you up – and it will be every Thursday! If Karaoke is not your thing – no problem the band will be playing in between karaoke songs to keep you on the dance floor! Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave. • 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch 11:302PM and dinner 5PM-close. LIVE JAZZ Thursdays FREE $-$$

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HAPPIESTHOUR Bowl Dog Lounge & Casino Why you’re here: Because apparently Westside Lanes is striving to be like the Bitterroot’s Qwivals Family Fun Center—but with alcohol. Brilliant! Beyond Westside’s best-in-town bowling lanes and arcade games, visitors can swing away in the batting cages or putt around on the mini-golf course. And you can do it all while buzzed after Bowl Dog Bar & Lounge’s two-for-one Happy Hour. But be careful: If you have too much fun you might end up embarrassing yourself during karaoke. Who you’re drinking with: On a recent Monday evening, I stroll in and belly up next to Jerry, a congenial census worker from Frenchtown who tells me I just missed the Happy Hour specials, which end at 6 p.m. He offers to buy me a drink to make up for it. Jerry had just spent all day driving around with his shih tzu Pepper trying to cajole people into telling him their race and telephone number. It was his first time in Bowl Dog. “Whoa!” he said of the clean, four-year-old

bar with about a dozen flat screens. “I gotta come back here.” Who entertains you: Alas, despite all of the reasons to come back to the Bowl Dog, many will come for one thing and one thing only: the bar’s famed karaoke, which happens Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday nights. I avoid karaoke like sweat-soaked bowling shoes, so in lieu of sharing a first-person Bowl Dog karaoke experience, I ask the bartender, Maggie Cummings, about the most pathetic thing she’s seen on stage. “White boys rapping,” she says. “If you don’t have any rhythm, stick to Neil Diamond.” Where to sing Neil Diamond: 1615 Wyoming Street. —Matthew Frank Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

June

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Bolivia Fair Trade "One of our favorite roasts."

$10.50/lb.

Father’s Day is June 20th

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Missoula Independent

Page 19 June 10–June 17, 2010


Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

THIRD THURSDAYS

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

DISH DINE SHOP

Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on all-natural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

LADIES NIGHT OUT DOWNTOWN MISSOULA

PARTICIPATING STORES OPEN UNTIL 8PM ART MUSEUM AL & VIC’S BAR CHANCE TOMISSOULA WIN A MKLAREN JAMES BAR THE PHOTO BOOTH LIQUID PLANET $50 DOWNTOWN GIFT CARD! THE TRAIL HEAD SEAN KELLY’S

ALARA BETTY’S DIVINE CELTIC CONNECTIONS HIDE & SOLE HOUSE

J. ELAINE’S BOUTIQUE LAUREL CREEK LOOPY MACY’S MISS ZULA’S

YELLOWSTONE PHOTO

THE RHINO

VISIT MISSOULADOWNTOWN.COM/THIRDTHURSDAY F O R A L I S T O F PA RT I C I PAT I N G M E R C H A N T S & M O N T H LY S P E C I A L S !

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$

$…Under $5

Join Blue Canyon for their signature brunch with some special Father's Day selections.

For more information or to make reservations call 541-BLUE.

DATE NIGHTS AT BLUE CANYON

3

courses for

$35

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 5497979. $$–$$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 • www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Enjoy a Rocky Mountain summer high with Albert, vineyard dog, who says “bring a picnic ~ I’ll share.” $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

per couple

Dear Flash, I’ve been eating psyllium husk powder, on the advice of a friend, to treat some, shall we say, bowel-related problems. Basically, I’ve been feeling that more food is going in my mouth than what’s coming out the other end. And what does come out the other end is, shall we say, sloppy. Well, the psyllium husk is clearly helping. It’s gotten to the point where the smell of it in the morning, when I take my first dose, has the effect of loosening my bowels that the smell of coffee used to have. The quantity of material that’s been leaving my body has been epic. I’m very happy with it, and also curious as to what psyllium husk is, and what is going on. —Too Much Information

Q

When you say you’ve been “eating” psyllium husk powder, I hope you mean you’ve been drinking it, after mixing it in water. Eating dry psyllium husk can lead to choking and other blockage problems in the throat.

Page 20 June 10–June 17, 2010

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$

$$–$$$…$15 and over

Beating blockage

A

Missoula Independent

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

ASKARI

All Dads receive a free Bloody Mary or draft beer with brunch purchase.

Thursdays & Sundays

SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$

Psyllium husk comes from the small seed of the isabgol plant, aka Plantago ovata, which grows in high arid regions of India and Pakistan. The husk is water-soluble and extremely absorbent, soaking up as much as 15 times its mass in water. It’s also extremely fibrous, and those fibers are like rebar in the sloppy contents of your intestines, reinforcing that goop into a solid fortified matrix. Meanwhile, the psyllium husk powder attracts water from elsewhere in your body, which creates a heavy mass in your bowels. That mass, assisted by the gelatinous consistency of the wet husk, creates something of a greased torpedo, and it’s bombs away. Just don’t overdo it. Too much psyllium husk can create a blockage in your intestine, and cause you to be dehydrated as it absorbs water from your blood and tissues. Drink lots of water when using psyllium husk. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net.


Arts & Entertainment listings June 10–June 17, 2010

8

days a week

THURSDAY October

29

Downtown ToNight, which features food, kids’ activities and music from Bad Neighbor starting at 5:30 PM at Caras Park. Free. Call 543-4238 and visit missouladowntown.com. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict (and no mediation) by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northern rockiesrisingtide.org. Boulder, Colo.’s Salem tickles your toes and massages your brain when they play jazz and funk with spoken word and Afro-Cuban beats at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Jazz makes the pad thai go down smoothly when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents free live jazz from a rotating cast of local musicians at 6:15 PM this and every Thu. at the restaurant. This week: Keaton Wilson and Steve Kalling perform. Call 830-3237.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that THURSDAY is committed June to earning your trust.

Create something dramatic out of nothing during the Open Field Artists’ Theatre Lab, a theater workshop that occurs this and every Thu., Sun. and Mon. at 7 PM at the Quaker Meeting House, 1861 S. 12th St. W. Free. E-mail openfieldartists@gmail.com.

David Ackroyd proves he is flightier than the sword when he performs as John Barrymore during the Alpine Theatre Project’s production of Barrymore Thu., June 17, at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $37/$30/$25 depending on seats/$18 for students. Call 862-SHOW for tickets or visit alpinetheatreproject.org.

10

Grab your art appreciation goggles and be ready to become the gatekeeper of aesthetic knowledge during an art guide training session from 4–6 PM at the Missoula Art

Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call Renee Taaffe at 728-0447 Ext. 228. Economics and Population, a talk with Blue Mountain Clinic’s Anita Kuennen that begins at 5:30 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. Free. Call 824-7336.

nightlife It’s time for dinner and a summer show with hundreds of your fellow friends during

Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night for the layperson, begins with sign ups at 7:45 PM and trivia at 8 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes $7 pitchers of Bayern beer, prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. Email Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 11, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Native Plant Sale

20% off Saturday 1-3

Helen Attowe Natives Soil Amendments • Questions

1845 S. 3rd W. • 542-2544 M-Sat 9-5:30, Sun 10:30-4:30

>PU[OLL_WLYPLUJLVMHSPML[PTL H[NL[SVZ[T[JVT -6<5+05465;(5(Âť:/0./73(05:! 21st Annual Lewis & Clark Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 25-27 Retrace the footsteps of the Corps of Discovery along the banks of the Missouri River at this family friendly festival. Botanical walks, float trips, a Native American art show, birding walk, Lewis & Clark encampment and a concert by the Mission Mountain Wood Band.  NL[SVZ[T[JVTNYLH[MHSSZ

Missoula Independent

Sweet treats on Friday, June 11, plus 25% off the goods... Now who wants cake?

Nature Boy 829 S. Higgins 11-6 Mon-Sat 728-1408

Page 21 June 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 17, 2010


Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. They’ll singe you with their dirty rhymes: San Francisco female hiphop duo TOAST keeps the biting humor flowing when they play the Palace at 9 PM with Missoula native DJ Pony P and DJ Pozibelle. $5. Locals Tonsofun, Linkletter and Traffic open. Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations and a bit o’ karaoke with help from the band Party Trained during Ladies’ Night and Live Band Karaoke at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Thu. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. California’s Trevor Green prefers his greens funky fresh when he plays folk, bluegrass and jazz with String Band Theory, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA.

FRIDAY June

11

Get your mule appreciation on during Montana Mule Days, which runs June 11–13 and offers an array of events including chariot races, a flapjack race, log pull, and plenty more starting with halter classes and trail classes at 8 AM at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. $10 all three days/$5 per day. Call 777-2331.

Soak up an array of works by Montana artists when the Missoula Art Museum presents its opening of Behind the Vault Doors, an exhibit that features work by Gennie DeWeese, Freeman Butts, Rudy Autio, Walter Hook and others and opens at 10 AM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Hours are: Wed.–Fri. from 10 AM–5 PM and Sat.–Sun. from 10 AM–3 PM. Call 728-0447. Boogie down during the Love Your Mother Earth Festival, which features vendors, workshops and a host of music including sets by Dan Dubuque, Miller Creek, Colorado’s Whitewater Ramble and others starting at 5 PM at Rock Creek Lodge, 7 Rock Creek Road. $50/$40 advance until June 10/$10 per car to camp. Also includes a dome with DJ sets by Kris Moon and others. Get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market, UM’s box office and griztix.com. Visit loveyourmotherfestival.com. (See Scope and Noise in this issue.) Celebrate the legacy of our glacial friend to the north with art during an opening reception for the Montana Museum of Art and Culture’s Glacier National Park Centennial Exhibition, which features work by artists like John Fery, Julius Seyler, Winold Reiss and others with the reception running from

Thanks to the Clean Indoor Air Act: • The heart attack rate in Montana will be reduced by at least 19%. • Incidence of lung cancer, heart disease and other debilitating, costly diseases will decrease. • Healthcare dollars will be saved when fewer Montanans are exposed to secondhand smoke.

Our Clean Indoor Air Act keeps Montanans healthy.

http://tobaccofree.mt.gov

Missoula Independent

Page 22 June 10–June 17, 2010

5–7 PM in UM’s Meloy and Paxson galleries, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Keep climbing those aesthetic steps during the Zootown Arts Community Center’s (ZACC) Second Friday opening of Casimir ten Broek: From Then till Now, an exhibition of works by Broek based on people in various stages of climbing during a reception from 5:30–8:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Free. A subsequent exhibit titled f8 (Vision in Motion): a collection of paintings by Matthew Riley opens at the same time in the ZACC’s hallway gallery. Call 549-7555. Folk and Americana goes hand and hand with fermented spirits when Bruce Threlkeld plays the Ten Spoon Winery Tasting Room, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Celebrate Jeannette Rankin’s 130th birthday and dedicate the Missoula Community Peace Park during a celebration for both that begins with a commemoration at 6 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Park, just south of the Madison St. bridge. Free. A walk to the Peace Park on the North Hills follows, which includes the unveiling of a new peace bell. Attendees are encouraged to bring food to share. Call 543-3955. Witness oil paintings, as well as pastel, watercolor and bronze works during the Montana Professional Artist Association’s Group Art Show and Sale, which begins with an opening reception from 6–10 PM at the Bitterroot River Inn and Conference Center, 139 Bitterroot Plaza Drive in Hamilton. Free. The show continues Sat., June 12, from 10 AM–8 PM, and Sun., June 13, from 10 AM–4 PM. Visit montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com.

nightlife Charlie Seitz, Pete Hand and Candice Neeves give your greens a


reason to scream with delight when they play The Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, from 7–10 PM. Free. Call 728-5132.

Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free.

Enjoy a dramatic gothic romp during the Whitefish Theatre Co.’s production of Charles Ludlum’s The Mystery of Irma Vep, with a performance at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $18/$16 students and seniors. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefish theatreco.org.

Get to pimpin’ for a good cause during the Hellgate Rollergirls Pimps-n-Hoes Party, a “fun-raiser” for the local roller derby team that includes music by Dead Hipster DJs and begins at 9 PM at the Palace. Free, but bring dollar bills for some rollergirl merch.

The Big Sky Film Series kicks off its summer run with Picasso And Braque Go To The Movies, a film that explores the effects of the technological revolution, with a screening at 7:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. Free. Jay Aiken keeps Clay at bay when he plays a solo set at the Raven Restaurant and Bar in Woods Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork on 39 Orchard Lane, at 8 PM. Free. Call 837-2836. The Bigfork Summer Playhouse, 526 Electric Ave. in Bigfork, presents Fiddler on the Roof, with a performance at 8 PM at the playhouse. $20–$15 depending on seats. Visit bigforksummerplayhouse.com for tickets and a complete schedule of shows. Enjoy a rollicking Western musical when the Hamilton Players present Annie Get Your Gun, with a performance at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton. $14/$8 children 12 and under. Call 375-9050 for tickets or visit hamiltonplayers.com The Roadhouse Band pumps laughing gas into the heads of airheads when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of

The Lifers resist your Machiavellian mood swings when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1110 Strand Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Blue Collar doesn’t want anymore of your upper crust pizza crust when they play classic rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Russ Nasset and The Revelators indicate it’s high time for your pomade intervention when they play country and rockabilly at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Reverend Slanky examines the intricacies of your nose cone where they play funk and soul with the Van Dort Trio at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SATURDAY June

12

The Love Your Mother Earth Festival continues at Rock Creek Lodge, 7 Rock Creek Road, and features workshops at 10 AM, and music all day starting at 11 AM by Trevor Green, Andrea Harsell, Warsaw Poland Bros., YAMN! and others. $50/$40 until June 10/$20 day pass/$10 per car to camp. Also includes a dome with electronic music sets by Nadis

Warrior, ir8prim8 and San Francisco’s Eprom. Get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market, UM’s box office and griztix.com. Visit loveyourmotherfestival.com. Slip into something biblical when author Robert Bassett signs copies of The Song of Isaac, from 10:30 AM–noon at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Check out the greenest homes in our burg during homeWORD’s eighth annual Sustainability Tour, which runs from noon–5 PM, with the tour departing from Home ReSource, 1515 Wyoming St. Ste. 100. $25 guided bus tour/$20 guided moped tour/$10 guided bike tour/$10 guided walking tour/free biking and walking tour for kids age 12 and under. Visit homeword.org for tickets and call 532-4663. (See Agenda in this issue.) Bring the veggies but not the meat during the Western Montana Vegetarian Society’s vegan barbecue veggie burger/veggie hot dog outdoor cookout, which starts at noon at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. Free, but bring a potluck dish, as veggie hotdogs/burgers are provided. Call Sue at 529-2018. Wiggle it out when Sam’s Spade Garden Tools and Wares presents the last installment of its “Grow Your Soil” lecture series with a discussion on worms by Rod Daniel, which begins at 1 PM at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1293. So much meat: Help stamp out hunger by gnawing on an array of local barbecue food during The Montana Food Bank Network/Big Sky Brewing Co.’s Big Sky BBQ Festival, which features food along with music by Tom Catmull and The Clerics, County Line, Russ Nasset and the Revelators and Zeppo from 3–9 PM at Big Sky Brewing, 5417 Trumpeter Way. $3/free children under age 12. All

The Historical Museum at Fort Missoula & the Rocky Mountain Museum of Military History will be presenting the fourth annual

“STORIES IN STONE” at the Fort Missoula Post Cemetery This event will commemorate the 132nd anniversary of the establishment of Fort Missoula. Listen to the stories of the men, women, and children buried at the Fort Missoula Cemetery, including two Medal of Honor recipients, Influenza Epidemic victims, and S.A.T.C. students, and others. Storytellers will interact with the audience with stories and tidbits of Fort Missoula History.

Sunday, June 13 from 1:00 to 3:00 admission is free, open to all For more information, call 728-3476

Missoula Independent

Page 23 June 10–June 17, 2010


Missoula Independent

Page 24 June 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 17, 2010


Before

proceeds benefit the Montana Food Bank Network. Call 721-3825. Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. You’re not dreaming: Missoula’s Odyssey rocks the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

nightlife Help local actress Jennifer FlemingLovely—who was selected as Miss Montana United States 2010—get to the National Pageant in Las Vegas during the Miss Montana United States 2010 Fundraiser Dinner, which features food, music, a raffle and plenty more from 6–9 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $30. Call 5297850 to RSVP. Malarkey lets your hangnail hang freely in the wind when they play jigs and perhaps an Irish ballad or two at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Jodi Marshall and Steve Kalling keep the butter melting on your bread when they play jazz at Finn & Porter, 100 Madison St., from 7–9 PM. Free. An office worker, bricklayer, cheerleader and homeless vet all face some sort of revelation or another when author Phil Condon reads and signs copies of Nine Ten Again, at 7 PM at the Grizzly Claw Trading Company in Seeley Lake, 3187 Hwy. 83. Free. Call 677-0008. Celebrate the work of 91-year-old Drummond artist Bill Ohrmann during a screening of Be Thou Always as a Guest, a documentary on the artist by UM prof Sean O’Brien with a screening at 7 PM at The Opera House Theater in Phillipsburg, 140 S. Sansome St. $7, with free food and drinks at a reception after the screening. Call Sean at 549-7151.

Enjoy a rollicking Western musical when the Hamilton Players present Annie Get Your Gun, with a performance at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton. $14/$8 children 12 and under. Call 375-9050 for tickets or visit hamiltonplayers.com

After

“J” 5 Weeks, 24 Pounds, 17 Inches.

MEDICAL WEIGHT LOSS *HCG *Wellness Coaching *Education *Medication

The Roadhouse Band pumps laughing gas into the heads of airheads when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free.

Real person. Real results.

This isn’t a lonely hearts club: The Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., presents a Saturday night dance with Heart to Heart playing from 8–11 PM at the center. $5. Call 543-7154.

Free consultation 541-8090

Blue Smoke keeps you medicated with their vaporous vibes when they play classic rock and folk at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but passthe-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, bootybusting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. DJ Bionic keeps the remixes and mash-ups flowing while you shake it when he plays at 9 PM at The Underground, a new downtown dance venue in the basement of the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. Free. Enter from the southwest basement entrance. The Lifers resist your Machiavellian mood swings when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1110 Strand Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Portland, Ore.’s System and Station splits atoms with their axes when they play rock and indie rock at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Locals Victory Smokes and Airstream Safari open. (See Noise in this issue.) Wild Chicken offers to deep fry your fingers for fun when they play Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277.

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associated w/ River City Family Health

Photo: David Dodge, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Missoula Independent

Page 25 June 10–June 17, 2010


SPOTLIGHT

glacial aesthetic

TRY THIS SHISHA RECIPE IN YOUR HOOKAH

Banana Peach Smoothie Mix Banana, Peach and Vanilla in your bowl to make a great refreshing smoothie. To cool down on a hot day, try throwing ice in the water.

NEW STORE HOURS: Sun.-Wed. 10am -8pm • Thurs.-Sat. 10am-9pm

115 West Main, Missoula

If the glaciers in Glacier National Park are likely to disappear by the time I’m an old man in diapers, I might as well soak up as much of its beauty as I can, right? Right. Well, here’s my problem: Like many of you, I can’t always travel up to our giant neighbor to the north. But thanks to those aesthetic pushers at the Montana Museum of Art and Culture (MMAC), you and I have an alternative option that’s closer to home. This week the museum unveils its Glacier National Park Centennial Exhibition—an exhibit of paintings, photos and other art that celebrates the splendor of the park, and also examines the traditions of the Blackfeet, Salish and Kootenai tribes that call the place home. But there’s another aim, too: It recognizes the importance of the Great Northern Railway’s (GNR) route through Glacier, which, by some accounts, was a key spark to the park’s artistic history. As for the exhibit’s highlights, let’s start with John Fery, the late Austrian-born landscape painter whose work is pictured here. He was commissioned back in the day by the GNR to paint the leviathan landscapes along the rail’s route in order to entice would-be visitors to check out the park. And

it worked wonders, apparently, since the railway eventually purchased some 362 paintings from Fery. Other pieces worth checking out include snapshots by the late photog Edward S. Curtis. He snapped striking pics of American Indians before Glacier was even a park, and is perhaps best known for producing The North American Indian—a 20-volume series of photogravures and text documenting various American Indian tribes that was published between 1907 and 1930. That’s just the tip of this artistic glacier, as it were, but it ought to satiate at least some of your thirst for this magical place before its namesake features are gone for good. —Ira Sather-Olson

WHAT: Opening of the Glacier National Park Centennial Exhibition WHO: Montana Museum of Art and Culture WHEN: Fri., June 11, from 5–7 PM WHERE: Paxson and Meloy Galleries, in UM’s PARTV Center HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: Visit umt.edu/montanamuseum or call 243-2019

SUNDAY June

13

The Love Your Mother Earth Festival finishes off its final day at the Rock Creek Lodge, 7 Rock Creek Road, and features workshops at 10 AM, and music all day starting at 11 AM, by Moonshine Mountain, The Workers, Secret Powers and others. $50/$40 until June 10/$20 day pass/$10 per car to camp. Get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market, UM’s box office and griztix.com. Visit loveyourmotherfestival.com. Yet another opportunity to buy local fruits, veggies, as well as arts and crafts hits Missoula during the Carousel Sunday Market and Festival, which runs from 1–5 PM this and every Sun. at the New Park parking lot, between A Carousel for Missoula and the Caras Park pavillion. Free to attend. Call 549-8382. Enjoy a rollicking Western musical when the Hamilton Players present Annie Get Your Gun, with a performance at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road in Hamilton. $14/$8 children 12 and under. Call 375-9050 for tickets or visit hamiltonplayers.com

Missoula Independent

Page 26 June 10–June 17, 2010

Help a local named Rhonna Cowan Sweeney— who suffers from pancreatic cancer—get to the John Hopkins Cancer Center for surgery during a spaghetti dinner and raffle, which runs from 3–7 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. $5/$3 children

nightlife Pedals hit the screen during Ride the Divide, a documentary that chronicles several Tour Divide bicycle racers as they pedal their way down the Continental Divide from Banff, Alberta to the New Mexico/Mexico border, with a screening at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $10, with live music and a Q&A session included. Visit ridethedividemovie.com.

MONDAY June

14

Women’s Voices for the Earth presents Integrating Equity and Diversity into Environmental and Social Change, a workshop with facilitator Angela Park from 10 AM–4 PM in the small meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. $75. Pre-registra-


tion required by calling 543-3747 or by e-mailing courtney@womenandenvironment.org. City Club Missoula continues its City Club Forum series with “AmeriCorps VISTA in Missoula: The Daly Mansion, 251 Eastside Highway near Hamilton, presents the seminar Principles of Aboriculture, a talk on trees with expert Bob Underwood that covers info on tree health, well-being and plenty more starting at 4 PM at the mansion. $5. RSVP required by calling 3755624 or 363-6004.

nightlife What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Don’t be a freedom hater: Robert Brown of The John Birch Society presents the talk “Exposing the Enemies of Freedom and How to Defeat Them,” at 6 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call Gloria at 2515961 or Nancy at 722-3167. El 3-Oh! swaps frankfurters for frankincense when they play gypsy jazz at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, from 7–10 PM. Free. On Center Performing arts presents Life is Beautiful, a recital that starts at 7 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $12. Call 542-0730 for tickets or visit oncenter.biz. The Bad Larrys give you one more reason to be better than good when they play Maragarita Mondays at the Raven Restaurant and Bar in Woods Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork on 39 Orchard Lane, at 8 PM. Free. Includes $2 margaritas. Call 837-2836. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlander’s Service Industry Night, which runs this and every Mon. and includes drink specials for service industry workers starting at 9 PM. Free. Also, if you’ve got an iPod, bring it in and they’ll play it. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. This week: A birthday party extravaganza for bartender Tara Emery featuring DJs Kris Moon, Hendawg, The Siren and the Milkcrate Mechanic.

TUESDAY June

15

Habitat for Humanity of Missoula celebrates its Youth Week with a host of activities including Intro to Building for Kids, where kids learn basic building skills with longtime Habitat worker Dick Twilde from 1–3 PM at UM’s College of Technology, 909 South Ave. W. Free. Space is limited and registration is required by June 11, so RSVP by calling 549-8210.

Be the benevolent roof raiser for those who need a home during “Habit for Humanity 101,” an info session about becoming a volunteer for the organization which starts at 5:30 PM in the board room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 549-8210.

nightlife Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. Email terillovet@hotmail.com. On Center Performing arts presents Life is Beautiful, a recital that starts at 7 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $12. Call 542-0730 for tickets or visit oncenter.biz. Don’t expect Karen Buley to be on the run when she reads and signs copies of Nurses on the Run: Why They Come, Why They Stay, which starts at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. 10 percent of proceeds from purchased books will be donated to nurse educator scholarships. Call 721-2881. Pedals hit the screen during Ride the Divide, a documentary that chronicles several Tour Divide bicycle racers as they pedal their way down the Continental Divide from Banff, Alberta to the New Mexico/Mexico border, with a screening at 7:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10, with live music and a Q&A session included. Visit ridethedividemovie.com. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What does “dryness” in alcoholic spirits describe? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Chance mixes with money and prizes during bingo night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which occurs this and every Tue. starting at 8 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402.

Get your Ass to Montana Mule Days! June 11, 12, 13 IT'S A HAIR-STEEZ SHAKEDOWN EVERYDAY AT BOOMSWAGGER!

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call (406)777-2331 for details

The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. It’s time for a metal/punk injection courtesy of Louisville, Ky.’s Lords, who bring tha fury at 9 PM at the Palace. $6. Locals Velcro Kicks! and El Zombi Gato open. The Wild Coyotes tear you a new ear hole when they play country and rock at the Sunshine Station in Phillipsburg, 3830 Hwy. 1, at 9 PM. Free. Don’t expect deadwood when California’s Dead Winter Carpenters play Americana, folk and bluegrass at the Top Hat at 11:30 PM. Cover TBA. Chicago’s The Giving Tree Band opens with indie folk/Americana at 8:30 PM.

WEDNESDAY June

16

Your weekly lunch date with almost everyone comes at 11 AM at Caras Park during Out to Lunch, which features food vendors, kids’ activities and music this week by the Strange Brew. Free. Visit missouladowntown.com.

nightlife Joan Zen keeps the good vibes freeze-dried when she plays the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Don’t get too emotional during “The Moral and Emotional Lives of Animals and Why They Matter,” a talk with University of

Missoula Independent

Page 27 June 10–June 17, 2010


a talk by Fery’s grandson John B. Fery and runs from 5–7 PM at Kalispell’s Hockaday Museum of Art, 302 Second Ave. E. $10/free Hockaday Museum members. Call 7555268 and visit hockaday museum.org.

Colorado prof Marc Bekoff that starts at 7 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6605. Guitarists Bill Mize, Jim Coyle and Phil deGruy awe you with their stringy tricks when they play folk and blues at UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building, at 7:30 PM. $15, with tickets at Rockin Rudy’s. Call Larry at 543-0342. Her sultry voice keeps your crab cakes sizzling. Jae Hatt plays a mixture of rock and folk starting at 8 PM at Kalispell’s North Bay Grille, 139 First Ave. W. Free. Call 755-4441.

nightlife

First one to get the PBR wins a teeth cleaning. Lords brings the fury with a mix of metal and punk when they play Tue., June 15, at 9 PM at the Palace. $6. Locals Velcro Kicks! and El Zombi Gato open.

You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: “Dryness” in alcoholic drink describes the lack of sweet taste. But who cares about taste, right? Right? Bozeman’s Formerly Known As cures your frostbite by slinging you punk and ska-influenced punk when they play with Browning’s Goddammitboyhowdy at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Locals Trainsong open. It be gettin’ hot in here: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents another round of song, dance and hilarity with a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—during this month’s “hot summer” installment of its popular cabaret, which starts at 9 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $9. Visit mtactors.com.

THURSDAY June

17

SisterMonk keeps your funk cauldron bubbling when they play gypsy funk mixed with rock and Latin grooves at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Idaho’s Equaleyes opens. Montana museums and artists get an artistic high five during a screening of Allen Powers’ Behind the Vault Doors, a documentary that celebrates Montana’s community of artists during a screening/artist reception from 5–8 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Celebrate the legacy and work of late landscape artist John Fery during a reception for John Fery: Artist of the Rockies, which features

It’s time for dinner and a summer show with hundreds of your fellow friends during Downtown ToNight, which features food, kids’ activities and music from Big Sky Mudflaps starting at 5:30 PM at Caras Park. Free. Call 543-4238 and visit missoula downtown.com.

Nibble on some potluck foods with your neighbors during the Missoula Urban Demonstration Project’s MUD Mingle, which runs from 6–9 PM at MUD, 629 Phillips St. Free. Bring a potluck dish to share, as well as your own plates, cups and utensils. Call 721-7513 and visit mudproject.ning.com. You can do it: Author Judy Wright hosts a presentation and signs copies of Building SelfConfidence with Encouraging Words, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. An old school actor gets celebrated on the stage during the Alpine Theatre Project’s rendition of Barrymore, which follows late actor John Barrymore as he reminisces about his glory, with a performance at 8 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $37/$30/$25

depending on seats/$18 for students. Call 862-SHOW for tickets or visit alpinetheatreproject.org. It be gettin’ hot in here: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents another round of song, dance and hilarity with a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—during this month’s “hot summer” installment of its popular cabaret, which starts at 9 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $9. Visit mtactors.com. Jump into a local salmagundi when locals What Rhymes with Oranges plays rock with folk rocker Kevin Koutnik and Lauren Wagner at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Don’t go huffing elephant tusk dust when Colorado’s Elephant Revival plays folk/Americana with California’s Dead Winter Carpenters at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. If you’re like me and you think hip-hop needs more female power, than by all means don’t miss San Francisco’s TOAST, an all-female hip-hop duo that hits the Palace Thu., June 10. I’ve only been able to check out their MySpace music page, but I’ll tell you this: Their songs are rad, funny, sarcastic and totally raunchy. So show these ladies some Missoula love, and show your love to me by kindly sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 11, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Recycling in the Schools SCHOOL RECYCLING SPONSORS FOR THE 2009-2010 SCHOOL YEARS



These companies and individuals have funded school recycling in Missoula schools. Missoula Valley Recycling provides bins, regular curbside pickups, and in-school presentations. Home Resource acts as the 501 c3 not for profit sponsor. We wish to recognize and appreciate these entities that have helped improve our schools and environment.

Also thanks to:

School Sponsors: Hellgate High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CS Porter Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Willard School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawthorn Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lewis and Clark Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................................ Lowell Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paxon Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franklin Elementary School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missoula International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rattlesnake Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Target Range Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Willard School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meadow Hill School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Russell Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contributions from The Independent, Pat McCormick, Jeremy Rockin' Rudy's/Knights of the Round Table Brown, Sarah Kragelund, Barbara Riely, Julie Little, and Aubre Pacific Recycling Dunkum.We need more sponsors! For less than the price of this Patricks Hospital add space, you or your business could sponsor a school for a The Crystal Limit whole year. Pattee Creek Market and Brown/Piittenger, and Weidner families Allied Waste Company Kent Brother's Auto and Open Road Bicycle/Nordic Cedar Mountain Software and Twin Cranes Dental Good Food Store Glenn Kreisel Jill Pearlman Dale's Dairy and Missoula Power Equipment Missoula Federal Credit Union Missoula Federal Credit Union John Thompson and Kathy Rogers St. Patrick's Hospital Gold’s Gym Home Resource

Thanks for really making a difference! Learn more at: www.missoulavalleyrecycling.com Missoula Independent

Page 28 June 10–June 17, 2010


It’s that time of year again folks, and the Bob needs your help. Not all 1.5 million acres of the Bob Marshall Wilderness, mind you, but key sections of it are definitely looking for some lovin’ from your eager fingers. Here’s the deal: The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation (BMWF) is kicking off its series of summer trail projects and is looking for a few good volunteers to hook the foundation up with some slick restoration skills. While it’s too late to sign up for the BMWF’s first few outings, you still have time to RSVP for this one: It’s a “weed attack” project of sorts that runs June 21–25 up on the Rocky Mountain Front. You’ll camp at the base of Black Reef and spend the bulk of your time pulling or spraying an infestation of spotted knapweed like a good restoration ninja. If that sounds intriguing, register by Mon., June 14, for this jaunt, and note you have to pay a $50 refundable deposit for this multi-day project. Click to bmwf.org/volunteer.php for details, and call Keagan at 387-3808 to register. After you’ve gazed intently at the BMWF’s website, slip into something waterproof at 9 AM Fri., June 11, so you can join the Montana River Guides as it hosts another installment of their Swiftwater Rescue Technician Course at its office in Alberton, 10 Sawmill Gulch Road. $295. Contact Mike at 777-4837 or e-mail rivers@montana.com to register. Visit montanariverguides.com. Once you dry off, spend the evening staring at the sky Fri., June 11, as you take in stars, nebulae and other ethereal delights during another public observing night at the Blue Mountain Observatory, which begins at 10:30 PM. Free. Visit www.physics.umt.edu/bluemountain for directions and call 2435179 for weather/cancellation updates. This next one’s got “awesome” written all over it: The Montana Chapter of the Sierra Club keeps your outdoors prescription during the Bear Creek Overlook Day Hike on Sat., June 12, at a TBA time and meeting place. Once you depart, you’ll witness the beauty of the Bitterroot Mountains via a canyon overlook during this five-mile jaunt. The trip is limited to the first 15 people, so RSVP quickly and get the

final word on a meet-up time by contacting Mary at mowens320@gmail.com or calling 493-1139. Or give a mountain a piece of your mind and body as you join the Rocky Mountaineers during the Castle Crag trip and summit climb in the Bitterroots, an overnight excursion with Sean Bennett that runs Sat., June 12–Sun., June 13. Free. Bring overnight equipment and perhaps an ice axe for this outing, and call Shawn at 493-4892 to make plans on a departure time. Visit rockymountaineers.com. Let your soles hit the ground in a fury during the Run Wild Missoula-sponsored Pengelly Double and Single Dip trail race, a 13.5-mile or 5.5-mile race that takes you up Mount Sentinel and begins with day-of registration at 7:30 AM Sat., June

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

12, at the East Field of UM’s Riverbowl. $20 for the doubledip/$10 for the single-dip. Early registration is recommended, so visit runwildmissoula.org to sign-up. Fly extra high without using your medical sage supply on Sat., June 12, when the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) presents its Saturday Discovery Day—Butterflies of the Rattlesnake, a butterfly ID/history session with insect whiz Byron Weber that also includes tips on how to catch those winged buggers from 10 AM–1 PM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. Free, but advanced registration is required. Call 327-0405 to RSVP.

On Sun., June 13, push your pedals for a purpose when you join Missoulians on Bicycles for the Mission Meanderings, a 75 or 95-mile ride that begins with a carpool from Missoula at 8 AM. You’ll then meet in Ravalli at 9 AM for the 95-mile ride, or at Moiese at 10 AM for the somewhat less strenuous but equally hardy 75-mile ride. Free. RSVP with Patty by dialing 745-4549. Visit missoulabike.org. Get intimate with some weeds on Tue., June 15, when the Montana Chapter of the Native Plant Society presents its Dyers Woad Pull 3, the last weed pull of the season that helps raise money for the organization and begins at 6:30 PM at the Mount Sentinel Trailhead. Free. Visit mtnativeplanets.org/25. Better yet, relax with a moving picture Tue., June 15, when you witness bicyclists pushing their spandex pants to the limit during a screening of Ride the Divide, which begins at 7:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10. I don’t want to spoil it for you, but here’s a quick synopsis: The documentary follows cyclists who navigate an array of intense terrains along the Continental Divide from Banff, Alberta to the New Mexico/Mexico border. They bike over 2700 miles, and, by the looks of the trailer, it’s pretty darn hardcore. Visit ridethedividemovie.com. On Wed., June 16, get thee to UM’s Outdoor Program, in the Fitness and Rec Center, so you can sign up for an inflatable kayak trip that occurs on June 18, as well as an 8-mile hike on an alpine summit near Missoula during the Cha-paa-qn Day Hike on June 19. $37 for the kayak trip/$30 for the day hike. Visit umt.edu/outdoor and call 243-5172. Later on Wed., June 16, let fire ecologist/botanist Peter Stickney and forest ecologist Paul Alaback fire you up with ecological facts during the Mount Sentinel Fire Ecology/Wildflower Hike 3, which begins at 6:30 PM on the south side of UM’s Campus, on the corner of Beckwith and Madeline Avenues and east of the Forest Service Lab. Free. Call Paul at 531-7953. Finish off on a fishy note Thu., June 17, at 4 PM when you meet with the Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group for a tour of the fish ladder at the Rattlesnake Creek dam. Meet at the Rattlesnake Trailhead parking lot at 4, and prepare for a meeting to follow the ladder ogling. Free. Visit rattlesnakecreekwatershedgroup.org. Shine on you crazy stewards, and keep on pulllin’ like there’s no tomorrow. calendar@missoulanews.com

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MON-FRI 10-7PM SAT 9-6PM SUN 10-5PM Missoula Independent

Page 29 June 10–June 17, 2010


scope

Home on the road

Missoula Independent

Nomadic musician Dan Dubuque finds his strength by Erika Fredrickson

At the Clark Fork River Market in Missoula, you can sounds Harper made. At the same time, he incorporat- just happens and I hate myself for it. I’m not a badass find Dan Dubuque, chin down, completely immersed ed the shredding quality he had learned with playing as far as getting girls. But that’s why I can play too. I get in the task at hand: plucking the strings of his lap slide classic rock. And he never cared about the lyrics no better because I’m sometimes miserable.” guitar to make the notes quiver and bend, and thump- matter what they were. Dubuque is starting to make a name for himself. “I don’t listen to lyrics. I don’t feel them,” This summer he has almost five shows a week ing the instrument’s hollow body with resonating beats. He can’t read music, but he can hear a song and Dubuque says. “Bob Dylan, too, I don’t feel what he’s booked across the state, from Missoula to Hot play it almost immediately. He plays originals and often saying at all. I sure love his music, like ‘Don’t Think Springs to Bozeman to Billings, and places in he covers the classic rock and metal he grew up with Twice.’ I hear the notes—what makes the song—and, between, as well as Jackson Hole, Wyo. His recent on the Flathead Reservation: AC/DC, Tool, Metallica. boom, I can play it. I bet I can play it better.” win at an open mic contest at the Buffalo Jump The times he has worked other jobs—as a firefight- Casino in Gallatin Gateway got him several hours of Other times he plays pop or folk music he’s discovered from reading music articles–at the moment he’s into er, a porn delivery driver, a grocer—he’s felt complete- recording at a studio in Bozeman. And this week, for the Gorillaz song “Plastic Beach” and hip-hop bands like The Roots. For the last three years, Dubuque has been making a living entirely off of his music. He lives out of his 2009 Honda Civic and makes copies of his CD demos with press packs at the Missoula Job Service. He spends his days marketing himself—calling up bars, farmers’ markets and concert venues to book a show wherever he can, so that he doesn’t have to resort to a part time job. And it’s not easy. “I’ve been traveling around in my car almost three years now after my girlfriend dumped me and kicked me out,” he says. “I actually deserved it. I’m very flawed and I can’t do simple things. But music, I’ve always had that.” Dubuque’s mother is Bolivian and his father is a white Montanan who grew up in Billings. The family spent Dubuque’s early years in Washington, D.C., where he Photo by Cathrine L. Walters ran around with a wild crowd. Dan Dubuque grew up on the Flathead Reservation and now lives out of his 2009 Honda Civic. He makes a living off of His dad decided to move the playing his lap slide guitar. “I’m very flawed,” he says, “and I can’t do simple things. But music, I’ve always had that.” whole family back to Montana when Dubuque was 11. “My dad was sick of me getting into trouble so we ly incapable. Even when he was playing music he dealt the second year in a row, he plays with 50 other came out here, to Polson,” he says. “So I grew up with with a lot of rejection, most often from locals in Polson bands for the Love Your Mother Earth Festival at Rock all the rez boys–I could pass as one of them—and the who, he claims, were jealous that he was able to make Creek. A few weeks ago, even in the rain, he made rednecks on Flathead Lake, listening to grunge and money off his music. He was also rejected from cowboy $450 at the Clark Fork River Market in just two hours. bars in small towns that either didn’t like the uncon- And he hopes that soon he’ll be able to winter in fishing with nightcrawlers.” Dubuque learned to play guitar and dobro by lis- ventional sound of his music, or didn’t like him Venice Beach, where he has friends, and where he tening to the heavy, sludgy rhythms of Soundgarden because of his dark skin. can play on the promenade of Santa Monica for twice Dubuque oscillates between loving and despising the amount he makes at the market. But for now, and Pantera. When he started playing in public or at parties, nobody wanted to hear anything original. his situation. He feels lucky, he says, that he can make he’s trying to keep his emotions in check. Instead, everyone requested the classic rock and metal a living off of music. He feels bad complaining when he “I’m pretty sensitive at times. But I feel like my knows that his mother, who was forced to work farm- music keeps getting better,” he says. “And when I can they heard on the radio. “You had to know how to play that or you’d get ripped land in Bolivia, lived under horrible conditions that tell people are digging it, that they’re happy, I’m don’t even compare. But at the same time, he’s alienat- happy too.” on hard as soon as you tried to get on stage,” he says. That was okay with Dubuque, because it was music ed from the rest of the world—partly because his obsesDan Dubuque plays the Love Your Mother he loved, too. But then he heard Ben Harper play slide sion with music interferes with his relationships, part- Earth Festival at Rock Creek Lodge Friday, June 11, guitar on the popular song “Pleasure and Pain,” and he ly because of racial issues and partly because he’s shy. through Sunday, June 13. Go to www.loveyour“The problem is, as much as I like to play, it’s just motherfestival.com for schedule info. $50. was floored by the sound. He almost immediately bought a Weissenborn lap slide guitar from a Canadian a drug,” he says. “I’m using it to escape. I like to keep instrument maker to try to emulate the same sweet people distant. I don’t mean to scare them away but it efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Page 30 June 10–June 17, 2010


Scope

Noise

Books

System and Station I’m Here to Kill Latest Flame

The best moments of System and Station’s EP occur when the band diverges from its shimmering rock sameness and evokes elements of 1990s postrock edge. Parts of “We See Ourselves Shining Brightly,” for instance, remind me of Jane’s Addiction on Ritual de lo Habitual, the way the band sings, “Ohhh-oh, ohhh-oh!” over a jungle of layered drums and echoing guitar. “Patterns” busts out angular guitar that evokes prog rock goodness from earlier eras. But it’s only at these times when System and Station tries something different (i.e., bongos and acoustic guitar on the title track) that the otherwise

Miller Creek Miller Creek self-released

Miller Creek may be Missoula’s best-known jam band. They’ve developed a dedicated fan base over the years, as evidenced by their pervasive bumper stickers and the devoted attendance of “Creek Freaks” at their shows. On the band’s debut album (recorded at Club Shmed), the locals noodle their way through 14 tunes selected from an extensive repertoire, offering up rock, blues and a little bit of country. Comparisons abound, of course, and the big names come to mind first; it’s clear Miller Creek

The Melvins

The Bride Screamed Murder Ipecac

Like pro-wrestling legend Ric Flair, venerable sludge metal outfit the Melvins don’t know when to quit. Their latest, The Bride Screamed Murder, opens with stentorian guitars bellowing their arrival—so far no surprises here. But this band has always embraced surprise and “The Water Glass” quickly dismisses guitar in favor of syncopated military drumming and call-and-response vocals that convinced me to drop and give King Buzzo 20. “I’ll Finish You Off ” features—dare I say it—soaring vocals, which is where the album really starts to

Josh Ritter

So Runs the World Away Pytheas

When Josh Ritter appeared on the scene just over 10 years ago, it was already apparent that he was a musician whose poetic vision exceeded the confines of any genre. Since then, he has grown into an astoundingly focused and standout songster, and his new album, So Runs the World Away, is truly masterful. Dubbed a troubadour, Ritter is indeed a storyteller for our time; his lyrics are as much narrative poetry as

Film

Movie Shorts

ethereal collection of songs finds some grounding. Clearly the Portland, Ore.based band is full of talented musicians: When you listen closely you can hear the way complex rhythms underlie smart riffs to make an airtight wall of sound. But it’s not that gripping in the end. Triumphant rock moments emerge, only to be instantly muffled by psychedelic waves of sound. When a sense of anxiety rises to the surface of a song it’s immediately dulled by space rock and threads of hazy guitar jamming. Without an edge, I’m Here to Kill doesn’t make much of an impression. (Erika Fredrickson) System and Station plays the Palace Saturday, June 12, at 9 PM with Victory Smokes and Airstream Safari. $5.

Karen Buley Reading & Signing

NURSES ON THE RUN Tuesday, June 15th 7:00 pm

Fact & Fiction Downtown 220 North Higgins, Missoula

takes cues from Phish, String Cheese Incident and others of that ilk. I also hear strains of more obscure late-’90s jammers like Percy Hill and God Street Wine. And while Miller Creek is in good company with these folks, the similarity in sound is my one gripe. Clearly, here are four very talented, dedicated musicians who write compelling lyrics, harmonize well and play excellently together. And yet, based on this album, their sound is nothing new. This is perhaps due to the common phenomenon that jam bands, when stuffed into a studio, sound cramped. Perhaps it’s only on stage, when the band is live and in the groove, that the familiar sound blossoms into something fun and danceable. (Melissa Mylchreest) Miller Creek plays with 50 other bands at Love Your Mother Earth Festival at Rock Creek Lodge Friday, June 11, at 9 PM. $50 ooze with the torpid power of “classic” Melvins sludge rock. And, dude, the organ is rad. Odd vocal grunts, seamless time shifts and the bombastic power of the drumming duo make tracks like “Electric Flower” and “Hospital Up” epic American heavy metal weekend jams. Too bad the album disintegrates as it meanders toward its end. A cover of The Who’s “My Generation,” although a forceful live staple, lacks energy and originality. Wait, I get it. We’re apathetic and derivative these days; it’s supposed to lack energy! Nope, it doesn’t work. The Melvins may still have a few good matches left in them, but the tights are getting a little snug in all the wrong places. (Jason McMackin) anything else. And yet, the cinematic worlds he creates are at once odd and everyday, timely and timeless. “The Curse,” for instance, is an astonishingly poignant waltz about a love affair between an archaeologist and a mummy. “Folk Bloodbath” is a stirring modern recreation of the classic “Delia.” The lighthearted tunes, “Lark” and “Lantern,” recall Simon and Garfunkle. Comparison to great storytellers like Bob Dylan are not a stretch; Ritter holds his own among the epic American cannon. Backed by a flawless band and broad orchestral sound, this Idaho native often draws on distinctly American themes—from pines and Appaloosas to Arctic exploration and outlaws, all glowing details gleaned from history and natural history. In this newest creation, he’s given us an undeniably remarkable album. (Melissa Mylchreest)

Missoula Independent

Page 31 June 10–June 17, 2010


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Missoula Independent

Page 32 June 10–June 17, 2010

by Azita Osanloo

Die-hard fans of the Discovery Channel’s hugely Sverre and his own brother Karl were among the first popular documentary series “Deadliest Catch” (now to fish the dangerous waters of Alaska’s Bering Sea. It airing its sixth season) will no doubt eat up Sig was Sig’s father who built the Northwestern in 1977, Hansen’s new memoir, North By Northwestern. In it, the same boat Sig took over as captain in 1990, at the the captain of the now-famous crab-fishing vessel (the ripe old age of 24. titular Northwestern) tells the story of his and his The Hansen brothers knock on wood each brothers’ upbringing in the largely Scandanavian time they say the Northwestern has had no fatalineighborhood of Ballard in the northwestern part of ties, permanent injuries or major mishaps—under Seattle (Sig and his brothers spoke fluent Norwegian their father’s tenure or theirs. Sverre Hansen wasat home, prompting Sig’s first-grade teacher to send n’t as fortunate with his earlier boat, the wooden home a note that read: “TEACH HIM ENGLISH. STOP Foremost, which burned and sank in the Bering SPEAKING NORWEGIAN.”) Sea in 1969, leaving Hansen Some fans will respect Sig’s and his three-man crew bobno nonsense approach to life: bing in stormy waters for “As far as I could see, the only hours until another fishing worthwhile thing about high boat came to their aid. Each school was auto shop,” and othchapter of the memoir opens ers will be attuned to his occawith an installment in the sional sentimental offerings, as story of the Foremost’s harwhen he relates the story of rowing end, soberly remindtelling his mother he loved her ing Sig’s fans that the fisherfor the first time. He admits, men on “Deadliest Catch” are “When I was younger, the whole merely inheritors of a truly idea of saying you loved somedeadly legacy. Hansen admits one was foreign to me.” When a he doesn’t know what his buddy shamed a then-18-yearfather would make of the old Sig into telling his mother he modern-day Northwestern loved her on the phone, Sig franchise: the brothers sell Tacquiesced, quietly whispering, shirts, camisoles and, yes, “Okay, love you, Mom.” Mom ladies’ thongs with the ship’s was noticeably touched: “I could North By Northwestern emblem on them. hear her choke. ‘Ja, ja,’ she said, Sig Hansen and Mark Sundeen Segments describing the nervously, in her Norwegian hardcover, Thomas Dunne Books Foremost’s story are the most accent. She’d never heard that 336 pages, $25.99 gripping of the entire memoir. from me. ‘Love you, too.’ Click.” By contrast, the sections that make up the majority of the Hansen’s memoir, co-written by Missoula-based outdoor writer Mark memoir wherein Hansen tells his own story and Sundeen, not only tells the story of how Sig and his attempts to weave it in with the history of two younger brothers, Norman and Edgar (deck- Norwegian sailing in general, are lacking by comparhand and engineer, respectively, on the ison. Truth be told, the sea captain just ain’t much of Northwestern), were raised to live up to their a storyteller (let the hate mail commence). The book’s narration ultimately echoes some father’s intimidating command of the Alaskan waters where he taught his sons to fish (“Deadliest older relative who begins telling a story, loses his Catch” regularly reminds its viewers that Alaskan direction somewhere in the middle, but keeps talkcrab-fishing is the most dangerous occupation in the ing anyway. While there’s no doubt Hansen knows country), it is also the story of that father himself, more about the legacy of Norwegian fishing tradiSverre Hansen. As Sig himself points out, “The tions than most, his summary of that history media portrays my brothers and me and the other reminds me a little of that history teacher I once captains and crew [on ‘Deadliest Catch’] as the ulti- had who, years later, admitted he was only a chapmate tough guys. To which I say: You ain’t seen noth- ter ahead of the class the whole semester. In one ing. You should have seen my dad…my granddad, instance, Sig informs us that the “Hansens are not my Uncle Karl, and all the men who came over from the first Norwegians to set sail in search of advenNorway or ventured north from Seattle to pioneer ture and riches.” the crab industry long before cable television, GPS, For some, the shortcomings in storytelling satellite phones and computer depth finders and won’t matter. The book, after all, is already a bestplotters. Hell, they were doing it in wooden boats.” seller, and it does possess charm and a genuine As best he can, Sig does let us “see” Sverre, who voice. If anything, North by Northwestern is a fine died from a heart attack in 2001. He interlaces his own book for those who are already fans of “Deadliest story with that of the earlier generation’s emigration Catch.” Nothing wrong with that but, next time, from Norway, specifically the island of Karmoy (Sig’s I’m going to reach for something a little less franfamily still visits Karmoy at least once a year). In tribu- chise-oriented and a little more story-worthy. tary detail, Sig discusses his father as both a fisherman and a parent. A third-generation deep-sea fisherman, arts@missoulanews.com


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Times Run 6/11 - 6/17

Dead on arrival

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by Andy Smetanka

The most interesting thing about Ashton in the same realm of twinkling opulence, but he is Kutcher onscreen is that he’s Ashton Kutcher. And soon disabused of the notion that Killers will be it’s really not even all that interesting. However little anywhere near as well-crafted, funny, entertaining, attention you might pay to celebrity news, you’re or just plain good. probably aware that Kutcher is married to actress And it isn’t. Just nowhere near at all. Killers is full Demi Moore, 16 years his senior, and stepfather to of scenes that Max Fisher from Rushmore would be Moore’s three daughters by ex-husband Bruce proud to have written: packed with clichés and deliriWillis. So there you go: The most interesting thing ously unaware of it, but not in a good or funny way about Ashton Kutcher is Demi Moore. here. It’s as though the film lexicon of writers Bob I recently read, with a sort of low-grade interest DeRosa and Ted Griffin and director Rob Luketic con(and in the New Yorker, thank you, not Us or In Touch), sisted solely of low-rent hit-man movie tropes. that earlier this year Kutcher took part in a U.S. State Department technological delegation to Russia, where he lambasted the teenage Russian founder of a wild-and-woolly chat site for some of the unregulated content his stepdaughters had encountered in their otherwise chaste wanderings through wholesome cyberspace. More recently, Kutcher became the first Twitter user to garner more than a million followers, narrowly beating out CNN. Now there’s a hell of a statement on what people find interesting and worth paying attention to. “Nothing can save you now—or save this movie.” Some two dozen movies into his career, Kutcher is still best known for the TV role of Michael Kelso on the 1998–2006 Fox It might have been more entertaining to unpack a series “That ’70s Show.” Here again, another mildly few of them, have a little fun, send them up a little. But intriguing footnote: The “Michael Kelso” entry on oh, no: In the scene where Ashton’s professional dudeWikipedia is much longer and many times more whacker tries to resign from the “blank blank blank,” as interesting than the entry for Ashton Kutcher. It he calls it, the agency which recruited him right out of paints a marvelous psychological portrait of the ami- college, there isn’t the faintest whiff of ironic self-awarecable dumbbell, carefully delineating the subtleties ness when his aging mentor says “You can’t just walk (including the same spurts of sensitivity and left- away, Spence,” and Spence replies, “Watch me.” field erudition that occasionally escape from Homer It would be one thing if Killers played the actuSimpson) of an oddly complex character in a show al work of Kushton’s killer for laughs. For a while with a comic sensibility that’s barely a cut above you just don’t know which way the movie’s going to “Three’s Company.” go: after Kutcher, the first actors we see are On the face of it anyway. Most of the cast of Catherine O’Hara, Heigl, and Tom Selleck sitting in “That ’70s Show” seems to be in on some kind of a row, clearly mother, daughter, father. Such obvijoke—the smirking Topher Grace most conspicuous- ous stunt casting doesn’t bode well, for starters ly. Also Kurtwood Smith, otherwise best known as because nowadays any movie with O’Hara in it is the Loch Ness Father from Dead Poets’ Society and bound to be a little silly. You can probably think of badass gangster Clarence J. Boddicker in RoboCop. 20 other comedies that either have her giving essenGrace and company do away with things that sit- tially the same performance, or have another actress coms could never have gotten away with in the actu- playing the exact same character. Look, the rich al ’70s, like the round-robin weed-cam that starts mommy is drinking again! She loves to drink! Ha ha rolling only after the implied smoking has been ha! That’s so funny and original! What a lush! completed off-camera. Kelso, for his part, just looks Then the guns come out. Kushton snaps a gunhappy to be hanging out, part of the gang. If memo- man’s neck in a reverse bear hug and dives over the ry serves, certain characters arrive to enthusiastic TV side of a yacht with the seconds-dead corpse still audience applause in each episode and Kelso is one wrapped in his arms. As Kutcher disengages and swims of them; you almost hear clapping when Kutcher off and the dead man drifts downward, so too sinks makes his first appearance in his movies. any last little bit of optimism that Kutcher, the writers, Killers, his most recent feature, opens on the director Luketic and Killers itself have any sense of French Riviera and Kutcher first appears speaking what they want the movie to be. It’s a ludicrous mudFrench and doing spy stuff. His French is not bad, or dle, and as much Kutcher’s fault as anybody’s. at any rate it’s mumbled enough to somehow sound For as instantly forgettable as this movie was, authentic. That’s sort of interesting. But whether I’m still haunted by one detail: the banality of the he’s sticking explosives to helicopters or romancing dead man’s footwear. That’s about how deep I got innocent hot-American-tourist-on-the-rebound into Killers. Katherine Heigl, Kutcher shows zero affect, zero actKillers continues at the Wilma Theatre. ing, zero investment in the movie. The viewer might fondly recall the superb Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, set arts@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 June 10–June 17, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK THE A-TEAM Old-school television gets a cinematic makeover when four Special Forces soldiers—including Liam Neeson and Bradley Cooper—get set up, then locked up, and then break free. From that point, lots of things explode as they try to track down the dude who screwed them...but you didn’t see that coming, did you? Carmike 10: 1:15, 2, 4:10, 5, 7, 8 and 9:45. Village 6: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in

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NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: BATTLE OF THE SMITHSONIAN Ben Stiller stops by his old museum job to say yo to his homies—the exhibits that magically come alive at night—only to find out that he’s going to have to do some serious legwork in order to keep them from being locked away in the dark recesses of the Smithsonian Institution. Carmike 10: 10 AM only on Tue.

NOW PLAYING DINOSAUR TRAIN Kids can satiate their interest in dinosaurs with this toon that follows a Tyrannosaurus rex named Buddy and his train-bound adventures

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ing for his technological secrets, and dudes like Mickey Rourke after his head. Carmike 10: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:45 only with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. KILLERS Katherine Heigl gets punked by Ashton Kutcher—well, in a way—when the duo ties the knot and Heigl realizes that Kutcher’s line of work means bullets will blaze, and rude dudes will come crashing through their living room windows. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9 nightly with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. Pharoahplex in

9:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:10, 2:40, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:20 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME Jake Gyllenhaal’s the rugged, sword-wielding sidekick to dazzling princess Gemma Arterton as they set their sights on swiping up a dagger—that has the power to turn back time— from Gyllenhaal’s not-so-noble uncle Sir Ben Kingsley. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:20, 7:15 and 9:55. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:55, 3:40, 6:50 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. ROBIN HOOD Arrows soar and a despotic sheriff gets his just deserts in this adaptation of the classic tale that features Russell Crowe as Robin Hood, and Matthew MacFadyen as the oh so corrupt Sheriff of Nottingham. Carmike 10: 1, 4:15 and 7:20. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:45, 3:20, 6:40 and 9:15 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. SEX AND THE CITY 2 Your favorite sexually empowered home girls— who are now mostly married—escape from the Big Apple for a trip to Abu Dhabi where cultures clash, motherhood gets hashed out over cocktails, and old flames get a slight spark. Carmike 10: 1:15, 4:35 and 7:50. Village 6: 9:40 only. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 9:10 only. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:30 and 6:30.

He doesn’t want you to split the vote. The Karate Kid opens Friday at the Carmike 10.

Kalispell: 12:05, 1:05, 3:05, 4:05, 6:05, 7:05 and 9:05 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:05 and midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15. BABIES The wonders of rugrats come alive—crawling, crying, laughing and all—in this documentary that traces the first year in the life of four babies that live in Mongolia, Japan, Namibia and San Francisco. Wilma Theatre: Nightly at 7, with no show on Tue. and a Sun. matinee at 1. THE KARATE KID Yet another remake surfaces in this face-lifted plot that features an uncommonly calm and composed Jackie Chan teaching some neck snappin’ kung fu moves to Jaden Smith, a Detroit native and newbie to Beijing, China who aims to bruise up some bullies. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7:05 and 10:05. Village 6: 1, 4, 7:05 and 10:05. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: noon, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9, with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10 and midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15.

Missoula Independent

through jungles, oceans, and other ancient ecosystems. Village 6: 1 only on Sat.–Sun. GET HIM TO THE GREEK No baklava was harmed in this latest offering from Judd Apatow that follows the antics of sexed up English rocker Russel Brand, who gets courted by record label intern Jonah Hill to play a gig in the City of Angels. As is par for the course, Hill has a hard time keeping Brand away from sex, absinthe, and candy coated drugs. Village 6: 1:45, 4:35, 7:20 and 10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO This adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s book of the same name follows a middle-aged journalist and a tatted up hacker who forge an unlikely alliance as snoops trying to shed light on the 40-year-old disappearance of a teen. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 9 with no show Tue. and a Sun. matinee at 3. IRON MAN 2 Robert Downey Jr. returns as Iron Man, the well liked industrialist with a few metallic tricks up his sleeve. This time around, however, Downey Jr.’s got the government plead-

Page 34 June 10–June 17, 2010

Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 3:45, 7:15 and 9:40 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. LETTERS TO JULIET Amanda Seyfried tours the Italian town where Romeo and Juliet is set, and happens to stumble across a group of people who answer love letters left on a wall for Juliet. For some reason, she decides to join in on the action—and in the process, Seyfried helps Vanessa Redgrave hook up with her long lost Italian stallion, and ignites her own flame with Christopher Egan. Carmike 10: 1:45, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:50. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 3:55 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. MARMADUKE Round up your dawgs for yet another movie with a talking dog. This one follows Marmaduke, voiced by Owen Wilson, who moves with his family to Orange County to live the California dream. What follows could be considered a lesson in canine adaptability, as Wilson learns to get down with fellow canines like Kiefer Sutherland and, um, Fergie. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7 and 9:15. Village 6: 1, 4, 7 and

SHREK: THE FINAL CHAPTER Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz and Eddie Murphy get CGI and 3-D treatment as voiceovers in the final installment of this series that finds Shrek navigating a puzzling world after making a bum deal with Rumpelstiltskin. Carmike 10: 1:45, 4:45, 7:30 and 9:55. Village 6 in 2-D: 1:30, 4:30, 7:15 and 9:35. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:10, 1:15, 2:35, 3:50, 4:55, 6:45, 7:35, 9:15 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9. SPLICE Adrien Brody and Sarah Polley think their lofty science experiments with DNA are a good thing, but boy are they wrong, especially when their curiosity concocts an alienlooking hybrid humanoid. Village 6: 4:10 and 7:10 with an additional 1:15 show on Fri. and Mon.–Thu. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:20, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., June 11. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton–363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


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THE POWER OF POSITIVE SINKING How do you know whether a guy is worth staying with, or if you’re on a slowly sinking ship? My boyfriend of three and a half years treats me well, but he suffers bouts of depression and his divorce six years ago has hung a shadow over our relationship. He’s never told me he loves me, which I need at this point. His divorce also left him financially scarred, and he’s taken a roommate, who happens to be female, to stave off foreclosure. It turns out she was raped some time ago. Soon after moving in, she told my boyfriend she was uncomfortable with others in the house having sex. She doesn’t have a job now, so even afternoon trysts are out. I think it’s terrible what happened to her, but I also find it awfully presumptuous of her to dictate this aspect of our lives. We can’t have sex at my place, except when my kids can stay at my mom’s. I needed more from my boyfriend even before the roommate came, but too often now, there’s only that seven-minute exhausted call at 11:45 at night. I’m disturbed that he’d basically sell out our relationship for some rent money. —Sexless In The City Are you on a slowly sinking ship? Well, if this were the Titanic, DiCaprio and Winslet would’ve had time before the ship went down to have four kids, three affairs, and a bitter divorce. It’s terrible, what happened to his roommate, but moving into somebody’s place and then announcing, “Oh, by the way, I’m traumatized by people having sex…” is like saying, “Did I mention that I’m deathly allergic to cats? Not to worry, I hear they don’t feel a thing when they get put down.” Of course, a guy who wants to have sex with his girlfriend but takes in a roommate who’s “uncomfortable” with it passes on the bad news: that he’ll be giving said roommate time to pack, not that he’ll be sleeping with the girlfriend from 11:45 to 12:02, but only over the phone, and he really does mean “sleeping.” If you were boyfriend-shopping right now, imagine answering this ad: “Emotionally and financially devastated divorced man with deeply troubled roommate seeks girlfriend: no pets, no sex, no ‘I love you.’” Clearly, what you really need to hear isn’t “those three little words” but those eight: “I just can’t give you what you want.” Chances are, you succumbed to what economists call “the sunk cost fallacy”—investing more and more time in this relationship

because you’ve already invested so much time. You should instead be looking at what the guy currently has to offer: basically, seven minutes a night for you to work on convincing him “If you really loved me, you’d be living out of your car.” Is it possible he’ll change? Sure it is—if he wins the lottery and meets a good witch who’ll wave her magic wand over him, instantly curing his depression, or if you can invent a time machine so he can go back and stay in bed with a hangover on the day he met his now ex-wife. On the bright side, you should find it easier to coax him into saying “I love you”…at gunpoint, or by attaching jumper cables to his nipples.

PAST CONTROL My boyfriend of three years has always suspected that I had a sexual history with one of my male friends. I lied and said I didn’t. (The sex was a one-time mistake, three years before I met my boyfriend.) The problem is, I have lunch with this friend two or three times a year to catch up (always in public places). So far, I’ve refused to stop seeing my friend, which hurts my boyfriend. Should I cut him off to spare my boyfriend’s feelings? —Just Friendly Poor Booboo, does he have an ouchie day, two or three times a year, whenever you bring home mints from the Olive Garden? There’s a telltale sign— that you had lunch. Your boyfriend, like too many grown adults, is under the impression that life should always be one long Princess Cruise. Sure, he feels jealous (and apparently, that you’re sleazy, trampy, and not to be trusted). Being jealous is human nature, and reflects insecurity on his part, which you shouldn’t be catering to by cutting friends out of your life. Continue keeping mum about your sexual history, and help your boyfriend feel more secure by letting him know how hot and wonderful you find him, and by being touchy-feely, like you can’t keep your hands off him. Of course, these tactics are most effective if you also avoid returning from lunches three days later, claiming to have escaped your kidnappers, the Mexican drug kingpins.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 June 10–June 17, 2010

BODYGUARDS WANTED. FREE Training for members. No experience OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part-time. Sign-on Bonus. 1-615-228-1701. www.psubodyguards.com Coordinator – Int’l Student Motivated, flexible, self-starter w/creative problem-solving skills. Enjoys teens, community service, PR. Recruit host families, supervise foreign high school students. Comp & travel perks! P/T, Flex hrs. Apply online at www.pax.org or email benu@pax.org. Live Goods Merchandiser in home improvement store / big box arena. This position will include Customer Service, Merchandising Live Goods (plants, trees & shrubs), some Sales Assistance and Inventory Maintenance. Merchandiser will assist in maintaining the live nursery product; Assist with merchandise processing and placement according to plano-grams; Ensure products are correctly displayed. Merchandiser will work with the Live Nursery Specialist, Store Management Team and District Manager for Live Goods. Weekly hours and schedules are flexible (part-time) and will be arranged with Team Lead. 9946046 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 P/T COORDINATOR FOR EXCHANGE STUDENTS - Recruit

hosts, provide support and activities. Must love teens. Make friends worldwide! www.aspectfoundation.org

DOE. Fax resume: 406-327-3894 Phone: 406-327-3895

OPPORTUNITIES SKILLED LABOR COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) *Great Pay. *Great Miles. CDL-A required. New to trucking...we will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. 866-2592016. Swift TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher 6/10 & 6/19. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS PT Medical Billing. PT Office Assistant. FT EEG Technician. Pay

NURSING PROGRAM Tenure Track Nursing Faculty The University of Montana College of Technology invites applications for two full-time, tenure track, academic year positions for Nursing Faculty in the Department of Health Professions. Applications will be reviewed beginning June 30, 2010 and will be accepted until position is filled (projected to begin August 15, 2010). For further information and application instructions, please visit www.umt.edu/jobs or www.cte.umt.edu ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer

CARPENTRY PROGRAM Assistant Professor/Program Director

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-7763068

ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part-time to $7,500/month full-time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-800330-8446 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com

GARAGE SALE SEASON!! It's a great time for a GARAGE SALE! And a great time to advertise yours in the Indy – garage sale ads are specially priced at only $5.95 for up to 20 words. Call the Independent classifieds department today!

543-6609 Deadline: Monday at noon MISSOULA

Independent

The Bitterroot Youth Home is seeking an individual to supervise youth, coordinate school attendance, perform facility maintenance, manage the house budget, coordinate the day program and perform administrative responsibilities in our Hamilton facility. Hours are approx. 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Wage $10/hr., includes benefits. Applicant must possess a BA Degree, excellent written and oral skills, be outgoing, personable and committed. Fill out House Manager application online at www.youthhomes.com or contact Human Resources at 406-721-2704 ext. 221 for assistance in applying. Closes June 16 at 5:00pm

NURSING PROGRAM Full-Time Adjunct Nursing Faculty

The University of Montana College of Technology invites applications for a full time, tenure track, academic year position for an Assistant Professor/Program Director for the Carpentry Program in the Department of Industrial Technology. Applications will be reviewed beginning June 7, 2010 and will be accepted until position is filled (projected to begin August 15, 2010). For further information and application instructions, please visit www.umt.edu/jobs or www.cte.umt.edu

The University of Montana College of Technology invites applications for a full-time Adjunct Nursing Faculty position and Program Advisor to teach the RN Associate Degree on-line Nursing courses.

ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer

ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer

Applications will be reviewed beginning June 30, 2010 and will be accepted until position is filled (projected to begin August 15, 2010). For further information and application instructions, please visit www.umt.edu/jobs or www.cte.umt.edu


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years

MARKETPLACE

experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220

DR. HAUSCKA LOVES YOU! MEADOWSWEET HERBS 180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice’s M-F 10-6 Sat 11-5 728.0543

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark- (406)728-2629

Escape with Massage- $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Healthy Hummingbird Massage 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 27: Couples,Swedish, Deep Tissue, Hot Stone, Pregnancy, Cupping and Headache Treatment. Rates: $55/hr. $75/1.5hr., Student rates:$45/hr, $65/1.5hr Contact: Souta 2076269, Erica 396-6868 Mary 5965842, and Jeremy 493-4376 Online Scheduling Available www.healthyhummingbird.com IF YOU USED TYPE 2 DIABETES DRUG AVANDIA and suffered a stroke or heart attack, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

My books are like water; those of the great geniuses are wine. (Fortunately) everybody drinks water. -Mark Twain FACT & FICTION 220 N. HIGGINS AND ON CAMPUS Paradigm Reiki and Oneness Sessions $40 oneness blessing circles 1st Saturday of each month, 3rd Tuesday evenings of each month. $10 donation asked. 549-0289. PENIS ENLARGEMENT. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps. Gain 1-3 inches permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures. 619-294-7777 h t t p : / / w w w . d r j o e l kaplan.com (discounts available) Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293

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Steel Buildings Discounted Priced To Sell. 24x30 - 120x250. Will Deal. www.scg-grp.com Source#01S. 406-545-4580

ELECTRONICS HIGH-SPEED INTERNET available virtually anywhere through satellite! FREE standard installation. FREE 24/7 customer support. Lowest price ever! Call now-limited time offer from WildBlue 800-818-3574

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers!

APPLIANCES Frigidaire dishwasher 5-level wash, $299. Call Dean at Brand Source, 240-2945.

FURNITURE Echo Echo Home Furnishings Worth Repeating. Call 214-1327 or visit us online at www.echoechomt.com. Wooden bunk bed frames with detachable ladder $175. Mattresses available. Call Dean at Brand Source, 240-2945.

MUSIC ACCESS MUSIC. GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

Missoula Massage Clinic MASSAGE FOR YOUR SLEEPLESS NIGHTS & CHRONIC ACHES AND PAINS

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Expectant parents come learn what a doula is, then meet several local doulas, and find one who's right for you.

17 YEARS EXPERIENCE Serving Sanders County in Plains Serving the Bitterroot Valley in Stevensville Now also located at the HealthWise office in Missoula

Call Ali for more info 626-4045 Missoula Doulas Find us on Facebook

1004 South Ave Corner of Stephens & South Call for appointment or questions

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1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

RENT

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Dr. Christine White, ND 542-2147 • 2204 Dixon

Consignment Gallery

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missoulamassageclinic.com

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RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

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PADMA YESHE DROLMA-- Director Visit calendar of events at www.eternalsprings.net 180 S. 3rd. St. W. • Above Meadowsweet Herbs • 406.240.6182

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AUTHENTIC MONGOLIAN YURT. Complete with traditional folk art & yaak fur. 3 layers, 22’ diameter. Very clean & sturdy. Will sacrifice for $7,000/OBO. Serious inquiries only 406-493-8948

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* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

MISC. GOODS

Forklift For Sale Exide RC 3000 Series Electric Forflift with charger. Runs well and doesn’t leak. 3000# capacity. Asking $2500 obo fob Missoula. Contact Paul at 728-1660.

EXP. 6/17/10 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Call our Mental Health Therapist, Lois Doubleday, LCPC today! www.bluemountainclinic.org

Hypnosis & Imager y

317 SW Higgins

1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 www.montanamusic.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 June 10–June 17, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): The “secret” is in plain sight. The “hidden resource” is freely available for anyone who intends to use it with integrity. The “lost key” is very close to where you left it when you last used it. The “missing link” is missing only in the sense that no one recognizes it for what it is. The “unasked question” is beaming toward you from three directions. The “wounded talent” will be healed the moment you stop thinking of it as wounded and start regarding it as merely unripe. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s time for some image medicine, Taurus. Wherever you are right now, I invite you to look down at your left palm and imagine that you see the following scene: an infinity sign whose shape is made not by a thin black line but by a series of small yellow rubber duckies. The duckies are flowing along slowly in continuous motion. They are all wearing gold crowns, each of which is studded with three tiny rubies. With resonant tones that belie their diminutive and comic appearance, the duckies are singing you your favorite song. It makes you feel safe, brave, and at home in the world. What else can see you see there? What happens next? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you have long conversations with the image in the mirror this week, I won’t call you a megalomaniacal narcissist. Nor will I make fun of you if you paint 15 selfportraits, or google yourself obsessively, or fill an entire notebook with answers to the question “Who am I, anyway?” In my astrological opinion, this is an excellent time for you to pursue nosy explorations into the mysteries of your core identity. You have cosmic permission to think about yourself with an intensity you might normally devote to a charismatic idol you’re infatuated with.

MARKETPLACE MUSIC All strings are 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM MORGENROTH MUSIC Rent from Morgenroth Music Center For your special occasion. Sound System Digital Piano Karaoke System. Reserve it today MORGENROTH MUSIC 1105 W Sussex, Missoula. 549-0013, www.montanamusic.com.

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533 WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

GARAGE SALES Yard Sale Saturday June 12th and Sunday June 13th, 8am to 12pm. 1200 Montana, MSLA, 59801. Rock and Ice Climbing Gear, tables, shelving, clothing, electronics. Going to the Peace Corps, everything must go!

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads



CANCER (June 21-July 22): The website “Nietzsche Family Circus” features collaborations between the sappy family-oriented comic strip “Family Circus” and the austerely portentous wisdom of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Judging from your current astrological omens, I’d say this is a perfect time for you to expose yourself to this stuff. (It’s at http://www.losanjealous.com/nfc/.) You need to toughen up some of your weepy, sentimental urges and brighten up some of your somber, melancholic tendencies.

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com





Clothing & Accessories

for Women EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Tu - Fri 10-6 Sat 10-5 In Stephens Center, across from China Gardens Msla • 728-DEJA (3352) www.dejanustyle.vpweb.com



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I want to be everywhere at once and do everything at the same time,” writes one of my Scorpio readers, J.T. He’s in luck, because according to my analysis, your tribe is about to enjoy a phase much like what he describes. “No more of this linear, one-dayat-a-time stuff,” he continues. “I want a whole week packed into each 24-hour turn of the earth, with heavy doses of leisure time interwoven with thrilling bouts of hard, creative labor. I want to live in a secret garden with ten years of solitude and hang out at a street fair raging with conviviality. I want to sing with angels and romp with devils in between walking the dog, exercising at the gym, and chatting to perfectly ordinary people. I want enough money to fill a swimming pool, and I want to live like there’s no such thing as money.”

It's a great time for a

GARAGE SALE!



Call the Independent classifieds department today!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): One of the leading intellectuals of the 20th century, British author Aldous Huxley, wrote more than 20 books, including Brave New World. In his later years he made a surprising confession: “It is a bit embarrassing to have been concerned with the human problem all one’s life and find at the end that one has no more to offer by way of advice than ‘Try to be a little kinder.’” In accordance with your current astrological omens, Capricorn, I’d like you to take a cue from Huxley in the coming week. Proceed on the assumption that the smartest thing you can do—both in terms of bringing you practical benefits and increasing your intelligence—would be to deepen, expand, and intensify your compassion.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Early in Marcel Proust’s novel In Search of Lost Time, the narrator stumbles upon a dizzying epiphany while having a snack. He dips a small cake into his cup of tea, and when he sips a spoonful, the taste of the sweet crumbs blended with the warm drink transport him into an altered state. Inexplicably, he’s filled with an “all-powerful joy” and “exquisite pleasure” that dissolve his feelings of being “mediocre, contingent, and mortal.” The associations and thoughts triggered by this influx of paradise take him many pages to explore. I mention this, Aquarius, because I expect that you’re about to have your own version of this activation. A seemingly ordinary event will lead to a breakthrough that feeds you for a long time. Be alert for it!

543-6609 DEADLINE: Monday at noon MISSOULA

Independent

Outlaw Music Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

And a great time to advertise yours in the Indy – garage sale ads are specially priced at only $5.95 for up to 20 words.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you live on the Danish island of Mando, your only hope for driving your vehicle to the mainland and back is when the tide is low. During those periods, the water often recedes far enough to expose a rough gravel road that’s laid down over a vast mudflat. Winter storms sometimes make even low-tide passages impossible, though. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, there’s a comparable situation in your life. You can only get from where you are to where you want to go at certain selected times and under certain selected conditions. Make sure you’re thoroughly familiar with those times and conditions.

GEAR UP FOR SUMMER 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments

Sectional Sofa



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Environmentalist Bill McKibben says that humans are transforming the planet so drastically that we shouldn’t refer to it as “Earth” any more. To acknowledge the fact that we’re well on our way to living on a very different world, he suggests we rename our home the “Eaarth.” By this logic, maybe we should rename your sign Piisces. The changes you’re in the process of making this year are potentially so dramatic that you will, in a sense, be inhabiting a new astrological sign by January 2011. In your case, however—unlike that of our planet—the majority of your alterations are likely to be invigorating and vitalizing. And you’re now entering a phase when you’ll have maximum opportunity to ensure that successful outcome. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 June 10–June 17, 2010

Used Pressure washer. Hotsy High Pressure washer $695. 239-6253

Large Oak-look wardrobe closet. $150 OBO 273-2250 or 493-2581

ADULT EROTIC Entertainment

406-543-1851

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’ve read my horoscopes for a while, you know I’m the least superstitious astrologer on the planet. I champion the cause of reason and logic, praise the beauty of science, and discourage you from constantly scanning the horizon for fearful omens. And yet I’m also a zealous advocate of the power of the liberated imagination. I believe that the playful and disciplined use of fantasy can be a potent agent for benevolent change in your life. That’s why, in accordance with the current astrological configurations, I suggest that you spend some quality time in the coming week having imaginary conversations with the person, living or dead, who inspires you the most.

WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

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PUBLIC NOTICES

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Gather your rewards, Leo. Soak up the blessings. Collect the favors you’re owed. It’s harvest time for you: your big chance to reap the fruits you’ve been sowing and cultivating these past 11 months. And no, don’t try to stretch out the process. Don’t procrastinate about plucking the ripe pickings. This really is the climax. The time for your peak experience has arrived. If you postpone the harvest for another two weeks, your beauties may start to go to seed. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What are you waiting for, my dear Virgo? Your future power spot has been exerting a strong pull on you. It has been calling for you to come and seize the clout you deserve. But you have not yet fully taken up the offer. As your designated nag and cheerleader, it is my sacred duty to wave a red flag in front of your gorgeous face and command you to pay attention. In my opinion, you need to drop what you’re doing, race over to the zone of engagement, and pounce. You’re more than ready to stake a claim to the increased authority you’ll have a mandate to wield in the coming months.

WANTED TO BUY

4 built-in recliners, console & wedge.

$1795.

Call Dean at Brand Source, 240-2945.

CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Monday, June 21, 2010, at which time bids will be opened and read for anticipated construction of Westview Park – Lolo, Basketball Court Resurfacing Project. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications on file in the Department of Public Works Office, and shall be performed under the supervision of the Public Works Director or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 258-4753. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Westview Park – Lolo, Basketball Court Resurfacing Project” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF HEARING MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on June 16, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., M.T., in Room 201, Second Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Dodge Holdings, LLC (the “Borrower”) in order to finance a portion of the costs of construction of a 3,500 square foot, 1.5 story building to house two separate businesses, consisting of Alpine Physical Therapy (a business that provides evaluation and treatment of orthopedic physical therapy patients) and The Studio (a health club that provides fitness services) and furnishing and equipping the building (the “Project”), to pay certain costs of issuance of the Bonds and to pay other eligible costs, if any. The Project is expected to cost approximately

$667,875. The Project will be owned by the Borrower. The Bonds shall be payable solely from loan repayments to be made to the County by the Borrower. The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bond issuance is $450,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrower and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County and shall not constitute or give rise to a pecuniary liability of the County or a charge against its general credit or taxing powers, and the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrower pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County, except money payable by the Borrower to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution or Bonds, contact Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, Missoula County, or Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, Missoula County, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 or by calling 406-7215700. Dated: May 18, 2010 B Y ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: Mill Street & Bedard Street, located in SE 1/4 Section 34, Township 15N, Range 21W – Townsite of Frenchtown. From Mill Street; previous closing E-25 #275 West End Block 13 to Bedard Street, Bedard Street between Block 13 and 20. To Mill Street to Demer Street Previously Closed Portion E-25 #254 and Commissioners Journal E-25 #301. And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit. (For more information, please see petition on file in the Clerk & Recording office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula, MT.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. Resolved Encroachment of house (existing) in Bedard Street. 2. Connect already vacated streets. 3. Return property to tax rolls. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County


PUBLIC NOTICES Commissioners at their regular meeting on June 23, 2010 at 1:30 p.m., Room 201, MISSOULA County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk and Recorder 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: May 26, 2010

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE MISSOULA COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROPOSAL The MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will be conducting a PUBLIC HEARING on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, at 1:30 P.M. in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway. The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments and questions concerning an application for funding to be submitted to the Montana Department of Commerce (MTDOC) for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds not to exceed $225,000. If awarded funds, the County will loan $207,000 to Northwest Paint, Inc. for working capital. Additional information concerning the proposal will be presented at the public hearing. If you are unable to attend and would like additional information, or wish to comment in writing or by phone, please contact: Cindy Wulfekuhle, Principal Grants Administrator, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802, or email cwulfeku@co.missoula.mt.us, or phone (406) 258-3795. Comments concerning the proposal must be received by Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Persons needing special accommodations to participate fully in the meeting should contact Cindy Wulfekuhle no later than June 15, 2010, to allow adequate time to make needed arrangements.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, in the City of Missoula, Montana until 10:00 A.M., June 21, 2010, at which time bids will be opened and read in the conference room, for the purpose of providing 5,920 tons of inch minus crushed gravel, 13,300 tons of pit run material and 5600 tons of 2 inch minus crushed gravel. All work is to be performed in accordance with the specifications on file in the Public Works Department, and shall be performed under the supervision of the County Engineer or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula Montana, 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE lowest responsible qualified bidder whose bid proposal complies with all the requirements. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Bid for Gravel” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works Department6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF HEARING SEELEY LAKE MISSOULA COUNTY SEWER DISTRICT - ANNUAL ASSESSMENT The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a Public Hearing on Thursday, June 17, 2010, at 6:30 p.m. at the Seeley Lake Museum and Visitors Center (aka “The Barn,” 2920 Highway 83, south end of Seeley Lake near the Golf Course) for the purpose of obtaining public comments on collecting a $108 per lot assessment for lots within the Seeley Lake Missoula County Sewer District for the operations and maintenance costs of said District for Fiscal Year 2011. This hearing constitutes compliance with 7-13-2307 M.C.A., Hearing on Protest to Levy Tax. Any property owner situated within the District may appear and protest the levy of the tax or any matter pertaining thereto. The Commissioners will conduct the Public

Hearing on Thursday, June 17, 2010, at 6:30 p.m., at the Seeley Lake Museum and Visitors Center (aka “The Barn,” 2920 Highway 83, south end of Seeley Lake near the Golf Course). Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information may be obtained by contacting Randy Gordon, Seeley Lake Sewer District at (406) 360-7224; or Pat O’Herren, Rural Initiatives, at (406) 258-4981 or by e-mail at poherren@co.missoula.mt.us. DATED THIS 4TH DAY OF JUNE, 2010 BY ORDER OF THE MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF POST ELECTION AUDIT Notice is hereby given that a post election audit of the June 8, 2010 Primary Election, which is open to the public, will be starting at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, June 18, 2010 at the Missoula County Record’s Center, 2147 Ernest Avenue, Missoula, Montana. DATED this 4th day of June, 2010. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-10-653 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Tate Aaron Presser, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Tate Aaron Presser to Tate Aaron Etches. The hearing will be on June 16, 2010 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: May 13, 2010 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court (SEAL) By: Bobbi Hainlline, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-70 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN CHRISTIAN SEIDENSTICKER, III, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jerry Dean Seidensticker, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of May, 2010. THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, Attorny for Personal Representative. /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-73 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN J. STENSRUD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED May 24th, 2010. /s/ Glen H. Stensrud, Personal Representative. WELLS & McKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-53 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWIN C. BUETTNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Richard J. Samson has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 20th day of May, 2010. CHRISTIAN, SAMSON & JONES, PLLC /s/ Liana J. Messer MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY. Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-10-649 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SCOTT GARNER MCDONALD, TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO SCOTT GARNER COONEY. Notice is hereby given that Petitioner, Scott Garner McDonald, has filed a petition with this Court for permission to change his name from Scott Garner McDonald to Scott Garner Cooney. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on the 22nd day of June, 2010 at 1:30 p.m., at which time objections to the petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the petition may do so

by filing said objection in writing with the clerk of said court no later than the time set for hearing. DATED this 13th day of May, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court (SEAL) By: Angela M. Phillips, Deputy Clerk NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Trustee will on AUGUST 12, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 o’clock A.M., at the front doors of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, the following described property: Two tracts of land located in Government Lot 6 of Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula, Montana, being more particularly described as Certificate of Survey Numbers 247 and 248. The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad rights of way and adjunct properties for the abandoned line of the railroad in, over and across the NW1/4SW1/4 of Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, conveyed by Quitclaim Deed recorded December 13, 1996 in Book 493 of Micro Records at Page 660. ALSO KNOWN AS Tracts 1-A and 1-B, Certificate of Survey No. 05813, located in Government Lot 6 within Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Said property is subject to a Montana Trust Indenture recorded May 6, 2005, Document No. 200510567, Book 751, Page 1498, records of Missoula County, Montana, where JEAN M. HAND AND GARY L. HAND, as joint tenants with right of survivorship, are GRANTORS, STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY is TRUSTEE, and ED ENGEL, an undivided 11% interest, GUENZLER FAMILY TRUST, an undivided 9.75% interest, TIM L. GUENZLER, an undivided 12.5% interest, KARL L. ROESCH, an undivided 25.5% interest, CAROLE S. ROMEY, an undivided 8.25% interest, MAX M. JOHNSON AND MARIANNE M. JOHNSON, an undivided 3% interest, STEWART D. FRASER, an undivided 10% interest, JACK C. DOWNES AND GAIL L. DOWNES, an undivided 5% interest, RANDALL S. OGLE, TRUSTEE OF THE OGLE AND WORM, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, PROFIT SHARING PLAN, an undivided 5% interest, SHIRLEY UNRUH, an undivided 5% interest, and RONAN TELEPHONE COMPANY EMPLOYEE PROFIT SHARING PLAN, an undivided 5% interest are BENEFICIARY. Beneficiary’s interest was assigned by the Estate of Stewart D. Fraser to Corey and Kathy Richwine, Kathleen Richwine, Susan J. Piedalue, Linda L. Roberts and Stewart Gregory Fraser, by Assignment of Promissory Note recorded March 26, 2010, Document No. 201005855, Book 857, Page 540, Missoula County, Montana, and assigned by all fractional interest holders to BLACKFOOT RIVERBEND, LLP, by Assignment recorded March 16, 2010, under Document No. 201005133, Book 856 Page 1217, Missoula County, Montana. Christy L. Brandon is the Successor Trustee pursuant to an Appointment of Successor Trustee recorded March 26, 2010, Document No. 201005856, Book 857, Page 541, records of Missoula County, Montana. Grantor’s default consists of failure to make payments when due beginning with the monthly payments from and after November 6, 2007 in the amount of $9,658.54 each. The total sum owing on this obligation is $895,000.00 principal balance plus accruing interest at the rate of 12.95% per year ($321.951388 per day) totaling $284,283.07 as of March 19, 2010, $27,550.00 late fees, $1,201.00 escrow fees, and $1,851.00 other fees and costs. Beneficiary may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, they will be added to the obligation secured by the Montana Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale. Beneficiary elects to declare all amounts under said Note and Trust Indenture to be immediately due and payable in consequence of the Grantor’s default. Beneficiary directs that Trustee sell the real property above described for the satisfaction of the obligation. This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed and will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances. The sale purchaser is entitled to possession of the property on the tenth day following the sale. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff, reinstatement or any other circumstance that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damage. The Grantor or any person having a subordinate lien upon the subject property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due under the trust indenture and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. This sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED this 26th day of March, 2010. /s/ Christy L. Brandon, Successor Trustee, P.O. Box 1544, Bigfork, MT 59911, (406) 837-5445. THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/23/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200600274, Book 767, Page 104, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Dale S. Martell, Susan L. Martell, as husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Brokers Conduit

was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17H of the Amended plat of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes, Lot 17, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200901265, Bk 832, Pg 296, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-4. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 5, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $188,679.34. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $167,397.17, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28803) 1002.109468-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/11/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200727357, Bk 807, Pg 717, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Rebecca Holman, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17 in Block 1 of a correction plat of Hillview Heights Numbers No. 3 and 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due there-

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 208. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting June 21, 2010 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to June 24, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

after. As of April 6, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $197,617.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $192,599.18, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72824) 1002.153549-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/19/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200815226, Bk 822, Pg 6, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John Henry Fisher and Judy K. Fisher, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 211 of 44 Ranch, Phases 3 and 4, a platted subdivision

in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 8, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $274,818.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $268,338.53, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 18, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.73022) 1002.153723-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust

PUBLIC NOTICE Knife River – Missoula, 4800 Wilkie Road, Missoula, MT 59808 has submitted an Application for Amendment of Opencut Mining Permit for the Fort Missoula Site (Target Range Site), located at 2800 40th Street, Opencut Permit No. 1402.The purpose of this amendment is to update the Plan of Operations to revise permitted acreage and reclamation bond, change haul road locations and to update the weed control plan to comply with 82-4-431 MCA of the Opencut Mining Act. The legal description for access roads and pit area is: Tract 1 COS 3744 in S2, NW4 & N2, SW4, Section 36, T13N, R20W, PMM CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 88.9 ACRES. This area includes 13.9 acres of future mining, 3.2 acres of access roads, 6.5 acres for concrete plants and facilities, 4.4 acres for equipment and storage, 16.5 acres for stockpiles and processing and 26.6 acres of pond area. The future gravel mining area is 13.9 acres with a not to exceed quantity of mine material to be excavated of 450,000 cubic yards thru the 2012 calendar year in preparation to turn the property over to the City of Missoula Park Department. Please send e-mails to dave.orbe@knifrriver.com or call 5325208. You can also contact our office at 532-5250.

indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/21/08, recorded as Instrument No. Book 825; Page 550; 200819967, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joshua D. Bryant and Rebekah J. Bryant was Grantor, Provident Financial, Inc. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Guaranty Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Guaranty Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 60 of Avalon Meadows, Phase 2 and 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to satisfy the loan upon maturity, and pay the remaining unpaid principal balance plus interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) was due in full on 02/21/2010. As of April 15, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $226,175.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,859.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the

Missoula County Government

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on June 21, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., at the Target Range School Library, 4095 South Avenue West, Missoula, Montana, for the following item: consideration of the proposed Target Range Neighborhood Plan as an amendment to the 2005 Missoula County Growth P o l i c y. 1. T h e Ta r g e t R a n g e Neighborhood Plan The Board of County Commissioners is initiating an amendment to the Missoula County Growth Policy. The amendment is the Target Range Neighborhood Plan. The Target Range Neighborhood Planning Committee in consultation with the Office of Planning and Grants created by the plan. The Neighborhood Plan

addresses key resources and assets in the neighborhood. The plan contains strategies and implementation tools that manage change and growth within the Target Range neighborhood. The current plan incorporates the Planning Board recommendations with proposed amended neighborhood language. See Map G for the Target Range Study Area (the area affected by this amendment). Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged at the County public hearing. All persons interested may appear to be heard or may file written comments at the County Commissioner’s Office prior to the date of the hearing. Mail comments to: Board of County Commissioners, Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. The draft plan is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, or online at ftp://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgftp/ Urban/TROH/TargetRange/TargetRang eNeighborPlan041210.pdf. Call 2584657 if you need assistance accessing a copy. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 2584657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 June 10–June 17, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 23, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 8034.20083) 1002.153643-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/02/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200421823, Bk 737, Pg 257, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John P. McDonald was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Home Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract D of Thibodeau and Poitras Tract Amending Block 1, a platted subdivision located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 2009006025, Bk 835, Pg 859, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 16, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $301,593.24. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $256,368.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 30, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.18626) 1002.125082-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 2, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana:N1/2 SW1/4 NW1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA.TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DISCLOSED IN BOOK 107 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 69 ALSO TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DISCLOSED IN BOOK 661 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1388 Lyle L Brown and Anita Brown, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 24, 2007 and recorded on September 28, 2007 at 4:11 o’clock P.M., in Book 806, Page 847, under Document No 200725694. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for

the holders of the Certificates, First Horizon Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series FHASI 2007-6, by First Horizon Home Loans, a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association, Master Servicer, in its capacity as agent for the Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $5,002.52, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 5, 2010 is $647,733.78 principal, interest at the rate of 7.8750% now totaling $102,437.12, late charges in the amount of $2,120.85, escrow advances of $17,240.63 and other fees and expenses advanced of $6,215.92, plus accruing interest at the rate of $139.75 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 23, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark ) On March 23, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Firsthorizon/brown 41305.710 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 3, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2 of East Rattlesnake Addition No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof, recorded in Book 11 of Plats, page 2, Records of Missoula County, Montana. A.P.N.: 1290405 Jacquelyn S. Rundle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mann Mortgage, LLC, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated April 17, 2007 and Recorded April 23, 2007 in Book 795, Page 1224, under Document No. 200709529. The beneficial interest is currently held by National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,203.15, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 16, 2010 is $279,814.59 principal, interest at the rate of 7.00% now totaling $15,495.20, late charges in the amount of $489.66, escrow advances of $2,598.96, and other fees and expenses advanced of $108.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $53.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.

The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 26, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark On March 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same.Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Pnc V. Rundle 41716.990 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 6, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 AND 7 IN BLOCK 47 OF SUNRISE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF DANA R NICHOLS AND TABITHA NICHOLS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2006 and recorded on June 28, 2006 at 4:27 o’clock P.M., in Book 777, Page 1193, under Document No. 200615820. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-7, by Washington Mutual Bank as successor in interst to Long Beach Mortgage Company. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,444.59, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 12, 2010 is $171,198.03 principal, interest at the rate of 9.350% now totaling $20,535.06, late charges in the amount of $86.68, escrow advances of $2,420.68, suspense balance of $-397.61 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,158.71, plus accruing interest at the rate of $43.85 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced.The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 29, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 June 10–June 17, 2010

Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark On March 29, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Wamu V Nichols 41816.853 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 6, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 1 in Block 7 of the corrected plat of Hillview Heights No 3. and 4 in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the corrected plat thereof recorded in Book 11 of Plats at Page 57, Records of Missoula County, Montana. Victoria Clark, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated Septemeber 27, 2005 and Recorded on September 30, 2005 in Book 761, Page 802, as Document No. 200525832. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2005-A15, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-O under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated December 1, 2005. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,093.13, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 16, 2010 is $160,600.30 principal, interest at the rate of 6.875% now totaling $15,175.51, late charges in the amount of $1,221.16, escrow advances of $3,341.98, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,280.03, plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.25 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 26, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark) On March 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Indymac/clark 41482.985 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 6, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3, Block 5 of Lake View Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. James L Allen and Kathy F Allen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First Merit Settlement Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Ameriquest Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated May 27, 2005 and Recorded June 9, 2005 in Book 754, Page 189 under Document Number 200513884. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 2005-R6. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded

in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1571.98, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 09, 2010 is $180,276.32 principal, interest at the rate of 7.00% now totaling $4,517.60, late charges in the amount of $227.19, and other fees and expenses advanced of $50.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.57 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 26, 2010. Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler. Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 American Home Mortgage V Allen 41537.466 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 19, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 15 in Block 23, South Missoula, A Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Leslie A Largay, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated December 20, 2006 and Recorded December 21, 2006 under Document Number 200632601. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, N.A. as successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1983.33, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 5, 2010 is $340000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.00% now totaling $16,127.46, late charges in the amount of $694.19, escrow advances of $1722.98, and other fees and expenses advanced of $108.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $65.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing con-

ditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 11, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On March 11, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3572179 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 19-A of Certificate of Survey No. 2784, a tract of land located in the NE1/4 of Section 1, Township 16 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. ROBERT W JENKINS AND ELIZABETH A JENKINS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 10, 2002 and Recorded April 12, 2002 in Book 680, Page 342 under Document No. 200210212. The beneficial interest is currently held by Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $912.12, beginning November 15, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 26, 2010 is $118,643.53 principal, interest at the rate of 9.280% now totaling $5,389.28, and other fees , plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.16 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Hsbc V Jenkins 41472.434 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described

real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Huntington Place, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 27 of Plats at Page 35 Max M. Sherry, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated March 26, 2007 and Recorded March 26, 2007 in Book 794, Page 325, under Document No. 200707028. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1322.61, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2010 is $203,723.38 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $5,396.57, late charges in the amount of $264.34, escrow advances of $183.34, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $1286.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010. Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOT )) ss.County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013. Gmac v Sherry 41207.922 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 10 OF THE FELLOWSHIP HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David F. Elmore and Staci Elmore, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 11, 2006 and Recorded on January 19, 2006 under Document # 200601342. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank, na. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,356.91, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2010 is $169,692.22 principal, interest at the rate of 6.875% now totaling $15,541.88, late charges in the amount of $575.50, escrow advances of $2,311.93, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,869.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.96 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other


expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 17, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097. STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark) On March 17, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Us Bank V. Elmore 41810.211 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH 58 FEET 8 INCHES (58’ 8”) OF LOTS 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 AND 10, BLOCK 72 OF SCHOOL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF NOW ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY OF AND EASEMENT TO ENTER UPON THE NORTH 71 FEET 4 INCHES (71’ 4”) OF LOTS 5, 6, 7, 8, ,9 AND 10, BLOCK 72 OF SCHOOL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING, MAINTAINING AND REPAIRING AN UNDERGROUND PIPELINE FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONVEYING WATER THROUGH AND UNDER THESE LANDS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO EXCAVATE AND REFILL DITCHES AND TRENCHES FOR THE LOCATION OF SAID PIPELINE. APN:2200-16-3-11-13-0000 JIM L BROWN AND BONNIE L MEYERBROWN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 26, 2007 and recorded December 10, 2007 in Book 810, Page 170 as Document No. 200731842. The beneficial interest is currently held by Household Finance Corp II. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,387.20, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 5, 2010 is $229,307.52 principal, interest at the rate of 12.15% now totaling $56,031.33, late charges in the amount of $2,621.64, escrow advances of $2,867.50, suspense balance of $-1,740.45 and other fees and expenses advanced of $6,425.42, plus accruing interest at the rate of $76.33 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale.

The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010. Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark)On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Hsbc V Brown 41472.223 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2A of Huson Lots, Lots 2A and 3A, a Recorded Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 30 of Plats at Page 17 DALE HESS AND SHERRY HESS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 2, 2007 and Recorded October 12, 2007 in Book 807, Page 406 under Document No. 200727046. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, N.A. as successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,262.08, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 24, 2010 is $180,489.95 principal, interest at the rate of 7.305% now totaling $6,324.47, late charges in the amount of $315.50, escrow advances of $107.57, and other fees and expenses advanced of $191.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010. Charles J. Peterson Successor TrusteeMACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRMP.O. Box 1097Dickinson, ND 586021097STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier. Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Pnc V Hess 41230.510 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 27, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described

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PUBLIC NOTICES real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 13 of Leischner Tracts, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. GLEN BROWNLEE AND RHONDA BROWNLEE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 18, 2007 and Recorded June 25, 2007 in Book 800, Page 312 under Document No. 200716107. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,044.73, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 16, 2010 is $114,449.90 principal, interest at the rate of 7.5000% now totaling $3,214.00, late charges in the amount of $177.12, escrow advances of $-212.48, and other fees and expenses advanced of $35.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.52 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of

taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any.Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any

RENTALS reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 19, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM, P.O. Box 1097, Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss.County of Stark)On March 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler. Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Citimortgage V Brownlee 41926.829

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SERVICES ACROSS 1 "Little Women" sister 5 His famous role is being reprised in 2010 8 List with activities for kids 12 ___ con pollo 14 Wyatt of the Old West 16 Apple pesticide banned in the 1980s 17 Play ___ in (affect) 18 It may stick out of one's pants 20 General Colin's nickname in the dynamite business? 22 Old synthesizer brand 23 Albuquerque coll. 24 Kind of dye 25 Helper, for short 27 Goddess of the dawn 29 "Humble" homes 34 "The Office" actor Steve made up of many parts? 37 Snoring cause 40 Its chairman was Yasser Arafat 41 Long-limbed 42 Thurston of "Gilligan's Island" moving to Missouri? 45 "The Worst Comedian of All Time," according to Maxim 46 Betty White recently hosted it 47 Tater 51 Fashion line? 53 Madness's musical genre 55 ___-Locka, Florida 56 Soundgarden frontman Chris crushed by the other team? 61 Polynesian capital 62 Its ads compare cereal bowl quantities 63 Falls behind 64 Dirty 65 Simmons competitor 66 Major event for a law student 67 Abbr. in many Canadian city names 68 Caustic substances

DOWN 1 Shearing sound 2 Baseball stats 3 They get deployed 4 Ian of "Ratatouille" 5 Body type somewhere in the middle 6 Obama Chief of Staff Emanuel 7 "I could ___ referee" (line from JayZ's "Empire State of Mind") 8 Down Under pal 9 Airline with a hub at Ben Gurion 10 Finger part 11 Online address 13 Asian mammal also called a "humped cattle" 15 Elizabeth Wurtzel autobio drug 19 Blue solid on a pool table 21 Lower-level apartment number 26 Network that merged with UPN 28 Missile storage buildings 30 Some tests 31 Cub Scout group 32 Antlered beast 33 The Family Stone leader 35 Some motorcycles 36 On the cheap end 37 It may get in gear 38 Greek consonant 39 "Smoking" alternative 43 Tissue swellings 44 Nevada county 48 "The Writer's Almanac" subject 49 Burning the midnight oil 50 Cowboys' home 52 Office notes 54 Part of NEA 56 Busy workers during April 57 Latvian capital 58 Right on the map? 59 "Get going!" 60 Playwright Coward 61 The whole kit and caboodle

Vic’s Concrete. Foundations, walls, flat work, coloring & stamping. Right every time. Free estimates. Quality work. 459-5546

MISCELLANEOUS Tweet Dreams Childcare in East Missoula is now accepting enrollment. FT/PT, 5am-5:30pm, Monday-Friday. State pay accepted. 549-5727

$50,000 to $250,000 go to...youtube.com Financial reality / Stock Market success.

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CORNERSTONE

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PAINTING

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

APARTMENTS 118 West Alder- Historic Park Place Hotel at the heart of down town Studio and 1 bdrm coin-ops and gas heat. $525-$575. Rent $750 7218990 1801 Howell #3 2bd/1ba $700 Hkups, off-street parking, pets? Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Contact us to find out how you can save 30% on your Replacement windows.

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406-829-0506 Randy Singleton• 10yrs NCTMB Cert

0-6 year-old openings Encourages Nature, Adventure & Arts!

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1B -329 E. Front. $525-W/S/G paid. Gas Heat, parking, coin-op laundry. NO SMOKING/PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333 2B -3000 Washburn- Newly Remodeled Condo. $825-$875W/S/G paid. D/W, Micro, W/D hkups, gas fireplace, carport. NO SMOKING. GATEWEST 728-7333 3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$545 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 825 SW Higgins B5 $705 2bd/1ba, garage, hk-ups, Heat Paid!, & lots of room. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Beautiful Daylight Base-ment Beautiful 2 bd daylight bsmt apartment. Westside. $600/ mo+deposit. No smoking/pets. 543-4053 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com 2 Bedroom Basement Apartment. $725/mo. $700/dep. Fenced yard, pets ok, W/D hookups, water & garbage paid. 360-3089

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2005 Hardly Davidson DWG. 9,514 miles. Stage 1 vance and hinze pipes. Asking $13,500 obo. Many extras. Dave 381-3827

SCOOTERS SCOOTERVILLE Springtime in the Rockies means fun, fun, fun on Scooterville Scooters. For the latest in FASHIONABLE RIDING GEAR,

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 June 10–June 17, 2010

1918 S 5th Street 2bd/2ba main

1021 5th: studio, small yard, central, full kitchen & bath, small pet, $510, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com 1102 S 3rd St W 3bd/1ba house, w/d hkups, yard, gas heat, pets poss., close to bike trail & McCormick Park. $1265. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com Available June 1st. Lolo Creek up HWY 12. 1+ acre on creek. 1 bedroom house W/D hookups. Small studio on property. Garage. $850/month +$850-desposit. Horses? Pets? Call Jessica 406-2733816. Ninemile 3-bedroom, fenced, 2-bathrooms, den, wood floors, pet ok, $875, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com

COMMERCIAL Commercial-Stephens Center 2100 Stephens-Retail/service or office. 950-3150 sqft. GATEWEST 7287333 Downtown Studio office storage warehouse space available, various sizes & prices. Contact 239-2206.

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listing with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse. Visit: http://www.roommates.com

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN ALBERTON Petty Creek Exit. Older 2 bedroom 1.5 bath single wide on 1/2 acre. 1010 Lucinda Lane. $625/month, $625 deposit. Call Rob 602-499-4640

MOPEDS AND SCOOTERS, visit us at 1700 Stephens, online at www.scootmt.com, or call us at 721ZOOM (9666). SCOOTERVILLE: 100 miles per gallon, 30 miles per hour, NO drivers license required, MOPEDS ARE HERE!! Scooterville Montana. 1700 Stephens, www.scootmt.com and 406-721-ZOOM.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Spacious, Newer

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

3BD/2 BA Home

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

• W/D Hookups • 2 Car Garage

AUTOMOTIVE MOTORCYCLES

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HOUSES

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©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0472 Last week’s solution

CONCRETE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

level duplex, microwave, dishwasher, common laundry area, shared yard, pets poss. $895. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

• Pets on Approval

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

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• $1250/month

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RENTALS Professional Property Management

Jane's Place

Hot Springs, MT • $45 & up Vacation Rental/Night/Week/Month

406-546-0404

pets welcome

www.rentangle.com/16406

Lost your grandmother's diamond ring?

330 N. 1st St. W. 2 BR apartment, $650/mo. $650 deposit, All utilities paid 307 Woody • 2 BR apartment, $585 mo. $600 deposit 149 W. Broadway 1 & 2 BR available now $450-$600 mo. + deposit Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at 549-4113

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

Call PPM for all your rental needs

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent! Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

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Expect the best from

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MISSOULA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500

422 Madison • 549-6106

251- 4707 1 BD 107 N. Johnson $425/mo.

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2 BD Duplex 1023 Cooley $575/mo. -- $100 off first mo. rent 1 BD w/ Storage 2026 9th St. #1 $565/mo.

For available rentals:

Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

www.gcpm-mt.com

10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson president

(406) 250-0729 www.mlaonline.org

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

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Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

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Join the Montana Landlord's Association

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

FATHER’S DAY COMPLETE PEST SERVICES, INC. Dan “The Bug Man” Your Hometown Exterminators Since 1981 www.completepest.net 406-721-4866 • Missoula 800-323-3284 • Montana/Idaho

Papa likes RECLAIMED WOOD Timbers • Lumber • Flooring • Metal • Trim • Siding 830-3966 • www.HeritageTimberMT.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 June 10–June 17, 2010


REAL ESTATE Lara Dorman Realtor GRI Our Mission at Portico is to honor diversity, build community and create a lifestyle that promotes the health and well-being of our planet.

406.531.5582 laradorman@aol.com

HOMES FOR SALE

10002488. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

150 ft Flathead Lake Ftg 3B/2B Home. Boat Dock, level grass-to-lake 1.46 acres: www.MTwaterviews.com $495K / Realtor 239-7588 3 acres fenced & ready for horses. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, modular home on a permanent foundation. 24x18 outbuilding, beautiful views. 499 Grandview, Stevensville. $179,000. MLS#

9132 SnowFlake Court $599,900

>>Garnet Mountain Property 16x40 Cabin, 2 tracks 24.49 acres, spring water, turn key $120,000.

5 acres & a 4 bedroom home on a branch of the Clark Fork on Third Street minutes from downtown! . House sits towards water. Your own private retreat beckons across the water. Enjoy quiet while you watch the wildlife and fish for trout. Private showings only. 3720 S. 3rd W. $679,999, MLS#906926. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811

Joy Earls STATELY HOME ON RARE 5 ACRES Just west of the Ranch Club. 4 Bed, Office and 3 3/4 bath, UG sprinklers and more....Relax on the stamped concrete patio and look 360 degrees at beauty all around. Come for a private showing today. MLS# 10004165

3 contiguous tracks<< 34.81 acres, creek frontage, flowing spring, off the grid, deer, elk & bear. $82,500.

>>10 acre track, $27,500.

SELF SUFFICIENCY IN SEELEY Wonderful cord log 3 bed cabin and two bed guest cabin w/ outbuildings, hot tub and more. Self contained including: 2 generators, three wells, seasonal spring and trails right from this home on 2 State Leases. MLS # 10002415

Family Family Retreat! Retreat!

Morrell Creek Road $167,000

Joy Earls • 531-9811 Call me to HELP YOU SHOP FOR HOMES OR to HELP YOU SELL YOUR HOME TODAY!!!

Flathead Lake Views $169,000 Nice 2+acre property between Elmo and Dayton with views of Flathead Lake and Chief Cliff. Property has shared well and septic approval.

joyearls.mywindermere.com RICE TEAM

140 Arrowhead Dr. • $220,000

Great opportunity for sweat equity. Large home on a large lot in the Wapikiya area. 3/2 baths, living room AND family room on main floor.

1527 S. 4th St. W. • $225,000 Quintessential Missoula! Recycled maple floors, antique bath fixtures, kitchen made for company. Dining room opens onto extensive decking and a gardener's fantasy yard with outbuildings, perrenials, privacy. Lots of unique touches; Art Deco Vibe.

Downtown Sweetheart

514 W. Spruce St. • $269,000 1920’s era house has been revamped while retaining all of its original charm. Updated electrical, plumbing, handicapped accessible bath, security alarm, offstreet parking, underground sprinklers, and air conditioning in harmony with original bullseye woodwork, mahogany flooring, high ceilings, and all right downtown on West Spruce. Zoned B2-2 for a variety of commercial or residential uses. MLS#10001940

5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS#906641. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

scaped 4 Bdr/2 Bath home on 1.2 acres on the Blackfoot River just 1015 minutes from Missoula. Open floor plan, great deck with hot tub overlooking the river and much more. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit..

Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Great 3bdr house with hardwood floors, fireplace, nice sized kitchen and big backyard with garden space, fruit trees and garage with shop area. 933 Woodford 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Beautiful 3B/2.5b home, upgraded/remodeled, level corner lot with sm shop & garden shed. Take a drive…2319 Garland $125K / Realtor 239-7588 Beautiful 3br/3ba home in a beautiful setting in desirable Lincoln Woods neighborhood close to walking trails, parks, wilderness area, Rattlesnake creek. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 10,000 Sq Ft Lot, open floor plan, double attached garage, lots of storage, living room & family room, close to Good Food Store, and more. $223,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit....

www.mindypalmer.com CUTE ROSE PARK/SLANT STREETS NEIGHBORHOOD BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2+ ,bonus rooms, hardwood floors, arched doorways, builtins, single garage, fenced yard, mostly finished basement, and much more. $239,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy17 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Home and guest house on 2 leased lots. Guest house is 1050 sq. ft., 2 bed, 1 bath. Borders state land. Snow mobile, cross crounty ski, hunt or hike right from your door. 1.5 miles from Seeley Lake for boating and fishing. 6 miles from Cottonwood Lakes. Hot tub included and carport. 0 Morrell Ck Rd. $167,000. MLS#10002415. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 Immaculate home in great neighborhood. 2 bdrms, 2 bth, family room, sauna, nice yard, Vintage touches, hardwood floors, everything’s in fantastic condition! 135 Kensington 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Log cabin with no close neighbors. Includes generator, well, and 2 snow mobiles. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 10003618. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates —all on one level with nearly 2000sf on a large corner lot . 30+ acres of easements to enjoy Grant Creek and Clark Fork tributaries. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 Nice, 2bdrm, 2 bonus rooms, fireplace, family room, walkout-daylight basement, spacious home in South Hills close to Chief Charlo, updated kitchen, backyard oasis, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com NORTHSIDE BUNGALOW WITH A GARAGE/SHOP. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, great location close to Downtown, large fenced back yard, and much more. $180,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit....

www.mindypalmer.com Older Home with Vintage charm in wildly sought after Missoula neighborhood. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, beautiful floors. This charmer has incredible possibilities. 321 Tremont 327-8787 porticorealestate.com One of a Kind Listing, Nine Mile Schoolhouse with all the charm, romance and history one would expect. Unlimited possiblities an outstanding property. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Really cute craftsman style, 3Bdr, 1Ba home priced to sell. This home has all the charm of the 20s & original floors. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

www.mindypalmer.com

riceteam@bigsky.net

Robin Rice Janet Rice 240-3932 missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 • 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • 15 acres with pond • Great horse property • Garage has apartment / rent $525 • $319,900 • MLS#10004041 • 3 bdrm/2 bath/10 Acres • Covered deck / fenced acreage • 28 x32 garage / 40x49 Quonset shop • RV hookups behind garage • $259,900 • MLS#10002960

• Custom built 3 bed, 2 bath home • Hardwood floors, radiant heat • Private setting with great views • 30 minutes from Missoula • $314,900 • MLS#10003067 • 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home • Addition for possible den or office • Shop & extra space in dbl garage • Zoned for multifamily or commercial • $124,900 • MLS#906610

912 Defoe • $179,000 3 bedroom two full bath home with GIGANTIC shop/garage. Brand new carpet just installed. Come take a look!

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1.03 ACRES IN THE LOLO CREEK VALLEY. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Main floor master suite, great room, family room & rec room, formal and casual dining rooms, great mountain and valley views. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12, 3278787 porticorealestate.com FISH THE BLACKFOOT RIVER FROM YOUR BACK YARD. Beautifully land-

12958 Kimwood Dr., Lolo • $189,900 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 6/12 12-2PM! Well cared-for 4 bed, 2 bath home located on cul-de-sac. Many new updates. Large garden area w/fruit trees. Yard is fully fenced in back. MLS# 10002632 Seller’s will look at all offers!

Buyer Must Income Qualify

Grant Creek Log home 26+ private acres $469,900 Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula! The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! mls#10001348 www.11815benchroad.com

1401 Cedar St. #17 Msla $127,100 2 Bed, 1.5 Bath, garage. Attractive townhome on Clark Fork River, close to trails. Newly painted interior, new flooring, end unit! MLS# 10001861

Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.marysellsmissoula.com

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 June 10–June 17, 2010


REAL ESTATE

SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great room, open floor plan, double garage, unobstructed views of the Bitterroot Mountains, great yard. $219,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit...

Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath Stevensville area home on 10 acres. High ceilings, beautiful hardwood floors, fireplace, spacious master bedroom, deck with hot tub, and much more. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy19 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

www.mindypalmer.com

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walkin closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $184,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit....

Stately 4 bedroom, 3.75 bath home on 5+ acres in an area of beautiful homes on Snowdrift Lane. Radiant floor heat with 8 zones including garage & hot water. Build a barn & bring your horses. Enjoy the patio, barbecue and gaze at mountains or 360’ views! 9132 Snowflake Court. $599,900. MLS#10004165. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

www.mindypalmer.com Spacious, light-filled Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2 Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms & 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths, a really nice big backyard with patio. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com SPECTACULAR BITTERROOT VIEWS.

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

View or list properties for sale By Owner atwww.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Well cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home w/ hot tub, A/C, & UG sprinklers. Near parks and trails. $319,900. 5501 Bonanza. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com Wonderful 5 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom home on large lot with fruit trees and garden area. Meticulously landscaped with retractable awning over back patio. $233,900. MLS# 10003652. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES .80 Acres close to Turah, level parcel with a Creek. Shop, Power, Septic, Well. Set up for a manufactured home, or build! $125K / Realtor 239-7588

25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

Featured Listing

NEW MONTANA LAND BARGAIN. 160 Acres / $189,900, Near Billings. Beautifully treed property. Call 888-3613006 or visit www.WesternSkiesLand.com for pictures

• Upper Rattlesnake home • Quite established neighborhood • Private yard with pine trees

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $159,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @2396696, Text Mindy4 to 74362, or visit...

3624 Creekwood Missoula

$279,900 MLS# 10003714

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

pat@properties2000.com www.properties2000.com

www.mindypalmer.com

LAND FOR SALE 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy0 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $179,900. MLS#906774. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A;

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 June 10–June 17, 2010


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Missoula Independent