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Scope: Patricia Thornton summons her personal demons Soundcheck: Emerging local star Kira Means says Hello Flash in the Pan: Ari LeVaux salivates over summer spinach


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Scope: Patricia Thornton summons her personal demons Soundcheck: Emerging local star Kira Means says Hello Flash in the Pan: Ari LeVaux salivates over summer spinach


Missoula Independent

Page 2 June 3–June 10, 2010


nside Cover Story Outdoor festivals, warmer weather (we think, eventually), 10 p.m. sunsets, even longer lines at the Big Dipper—and primary elections! That’s right, dutiful local electorate, it must be June in Missoula, and we’ve come prepared with an obnoxiously long, mildly informative, occasionally quippy guide to the 2010 primary races that actually matter.......................................................14

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News Letters Crowley, Crowley and McDonald .................................................................4 The Week in Review Mavs win, MisCon and hunting permit snafu.........................6 Briefs Pipestone, police boundaries and Fort Missoula ............................................6 Etc. Putting the brakes on wild runners ....................................................................7 Up Front Marty Cobenais talks big rigs, big picture..................................................8 Ochenski U.S. needs to take a hard look at its role in atrocities............................10 Writers on the Range First clean up, then we can talk more mining....................11 Agenda Environmental Justice in Montana..............................................................12

Tom Catmull and the Clerics Saturday, 6/5 @ 10pm

Top of the Mic Winner: MONDAY 10PM

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Green blood .................................................................................17 Happiest Hour Stone of Accord ..............................................................................18 Ask Ari Vegetarian chickens......................................................................................19 8 Days a Week Get out the vote ..............................................................................20 Mountain High Wings Across the Big Sky...............................................................29 Scope Artist Patricia Thornton summons her personal monsters ...........................30 Noise The Mountain Goats, Arrington de Dionyso, The Moondoggies and The Mynabirds....................................................................................................31 Soundcheck Rising star Kira Means releases debut album.....................................32 Film More isn’t necessarily better in Greek..............................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films.................................................34

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-12 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny ADMIN & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Marie Noland FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

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Missoula Independent

Page 3 June 3–June 10, 2010


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning on the corner of Ryman and Broadway

Q:

This week the Indy sizes up the candidates in the key June 8 primary races. Which race are you following the closest? Follow-up: What issue do you feel is the most important heading into this election season?

Matt Thiel: Probably the Gernant-Rehberg race. It’s exciting to get somebody new in politics, like Tyler. He’s working hard and seems so interested in working on the issues. Still sick: We have to keep our eye on real health reform and not be complacent with the one that was passed. It’s dangerous to think it’s solved, and to move on to something else.

Nancy R. Paige: The Rehberg race. Jobs, jobs, jobs: I think that unemployment right now is the biggest issue facing a lot of folks.

Colleen Tripp: I like Bryce Bennett. I like his views. He’s young, a go-getter and up on everything, and that really appeals to me. Blowin’ in the wind: Statewide, we need to address clean energy. I’m not for coal, and I want them to do something clean that supports local jobs. It’s about time—just look at the oil spill!

I would like to add my voice to the growing number of voters who are endorsing Lou Ann Crowley. Lou Ann is running as a candidate for the Montana Legislature House of Representatives to represent House District 94. I urge those voters who live in that district to consider her favorably in the June 8 primary election. Lou Ann has been a resident of Missoula for 30 years and has served the community well. She has been a teacher and for 10 years was a member of the Missoula City Council (from 1996 to 2006). Currently she is a member of the board of directors for the Farmers’ Market and also of the Missoula-Grant Creek Kiwanis Club. She served as director of the Missoula Urban Development Project after she retired from the City Council. Her compassion and attention to the needs of people caused her to cofound the first hospice in Missoula and she continues that work in Kiwanis, especially with children in need. Lou Ann lives in the heart of House District 94 and would be available to its residents as she was while on the Missoula City Council. Her opponent, Ellie Hill, lives elsewhere in Missoula, which is rather like a U.S. congressperson representing Montana but living in Gillette, Wyo. Lou Ann is experienced as an elective officer, aware of the needs and strengths of Missoula and its citizens, and she is calm and mature. She is well educated and has used her education as it should be used—to help her society make progress. I recommend her highly for the Montana House of Representatives. She will be most successful there and will serve House District 94, Missoula and the state of Montana well. James Eversole Missoula

More for Crowley Oscar Wilde said that experience is the one thing you can’t get for nothing. We are pleased that Lou Ann Crowley is willing to share her years of experience with the voters of House District 94. In this political climate, it is important to vote for people who have their hearts and lives in the process, and Lou Ann certainly has done that. She has lived in our district Dave Webb: The race in House Disctrict 94 between Ellie Hill and Lou Ann Crowley. Pinching the poor: I’m into social programs and hope we don’t under-fund families during these tough times.

Missoula Independent

Fan of Lou Ann

Page 4 June 3–June 10, 2010

for 30 years and represented us on City Council for 10 years. During that time she has always been responsive to the questions and concerns of her constituents by listening carefully and knowing our families and the needs of the neighborhood. Her community involvement has spanned years of tireless hard work and we look forward to the results she can produce with that same hard work in Helena. Winton and Catherine Kemmis Lori and Thomas Webster Julie Brown Missoula

The real deal Montana Conservative Alliance promotes conservative values and liberty through limited government. We

Their goal is to “silence the conservative voice and pave the way for Obama-style government here in Montana.

work with dozens of like-minded organizations throughout the state, actively supporting legislative candidates who, through their voting records and candidate surveys, have proven themselves to be friends of the taxpayer and friends of freedom. Our transparency contrasts with that of left-wing front groups like “Main Street Advocacy,” that hide their identity behind an innocuoussounding name, and cloak their big government agenda in disingenuous conservative rhetoric. Unlike Main Street, we do not unite with professional operatives from organized labor, and do not get our funding from wealthy Democrats bent on taking over the Republican Party. We proudly proclaim our conservative philosophy, and the principles of family, freedom and free enterprise.

Massive amounts of out-of-state money are being dumped into Republican primaries by Main Street to defeat conservatives and hijack the Republican Party. Their goal is to silence the conservative voice and pave the way for Obama-style government here in Montana. If, through their slick mailings and radio ads, they succeed in getting their liberal candidates nominated, voters will have few conservative choices in the fall elections, and state government will continue to balloon out of control, threatening our jobs, our families and our freedom. With the outrageous amount of tainted money Main Street is spending, it is easy for voters to get conflicted over who the true conservatives really are. Montana Conservative Alliance is able to offer a trustworthy guide to conservative voters. We enthusiastically endorse the following local candidates in contested GOP primaries: Art Baker in SD 44, Jeff Burrows in HD 87 and Richard Stamey in HD 89. Please give these true statesmen your support and your vote—for freedom’s sake. Scott Orr Montana Conservative Alliance Belgrade

Mr. Wise Guy In public, attorney Dennis McDonald, who is running for U.S. Congress in Montana, paints an altruistic picture of his relationship with admitted killer and mobster Jimmy “The Weasel” Fratiano. He agreed to represent Fratiano on condition, says McDonald, that Fratiano turn states evidence on his fellow mobsters. But two books published about Fratiano indicate that McDonald and the mobster enjoyed a long, friendly relationship. In fact, McDonald even helped broker one of those book deals on Fratiano’s behalf and profited from it himself. And, in more recent years, McDonald even talked to a film director about adapting that book into a movie. Do you really want a mob attorney making decisions for Montanans in Washington? Please educate yourself. Do not vote for Dennis McDonald for U.S. Congress. Jennifer Olsen Billings

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 June 3–June 10, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, May 26

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

The Missoula Board of County Commissioners unanimously adopts a special zoning district in North Lolo, effectively making permanent the “emergency” interim zoning implemented two years ago that prevents the construction of gravel and asphalt operations along Highway 93.

• Thursday, May 27 U.S. Geological Survey Director Marcia McNutt says the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is officially the largest in U.S. history, easily eclipsing the Exxon Valdez, the tanker that spilled 257,000 barrels into Alaska’s Prince William Sound in 1989. McNutt estimates BP’s blown-out well has gushed about 450,000 barrels, or at least 12,000 barrels per day since April 20.

• Friday, May 28 Hundreds of geeked out science fiction fans with swords, shields and face paint converge at Ruby’s Inn in Missoula to celebrate MisCon. The annual sci-fi convention draws fantasy fans from all over the country. They gather to share in role-playing games, mock battles and ideas for far-out storylines.

• Saturday, May 29 University of Montana sophomore Katrina Drennen runs a 4:19.36 in the 1,500 meters at the NCAA West Region preliminary round in Austin, Texas. The time is fast enough to qualify her for the NCAA championship meet to be held June 9–12 in Eugene, Ore.

• Sunday, May 30 The Missoula Mavericks trounce the Glacier Twins, 12–0, at Lindborg-Cregg Field. Led by pitcher Shawn McArthur, who throws a complete-game three-hitter, the win marks the 16th consecutive win for the Mavs, improving the team’s record to 25–1.

• Monday, May 31 Despite periodic rain showers, locals flock to the Missoula Municipal Cemetery on Memorial Day to commemorate loved ones lost. Approximately 5,000 people wind through the historic graveyard’s stone gates, according to Director Doug Waters. “It’s a big day,” he says.

• Tuesday, June 1 Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ online licensing system crashes on the last day to apply for special hunting permits. The permits are required to hunt in limited-access areas, or for individuals aiming to conduct special doe, antelope and cow hunts.

Honor guards from VFW Post 209 prepare to fire a 21-gun salute honoring veterans at the Montana State Veterans Memorial Park on Memorial Day. Eleven-year-old Boy Scout Jake Smith played “Taps” for those in attendance, including U.S. Sen. Jon Tester.

Law enforcement

City debates police domain Police Chief Mark Muir says he didn’t anticipate the level of opposition generated by his effort to expand the Missoula Police Department’s authority five miles beyond city limits. “I’m totally shocked that it has had the type of resistance that it has,” Muir says. City law enforcement finds it challenging to police jurisdictional gray areas. As it stands, Missoula officers must travel through pockets of county land—overseen by the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department—to arrive at annexed city territory. Muir proposed the ordinance in April to help municipal law enforcement do its job more efficiently, while freeing officers from potential civil lawsuits stemming from jurisdictional confusion. City Council initially vetted the ordinance in May. Unable to gain consensus, it was sent back to committee for further tweaking. Last week,

the Public Health and Safety Committee again split on the issue. Muir feels strongly enough about the ordinance to keep pushing. In fact, he told the council in a recent e-mail that he appreciates the governing body’s desire to refine the ordinance, but law enforcement experts are best equipped to guide the discussion. “If you don’t trust me to direct the police department and its activities, then I am going to be ineffective as your police chief,” he wrote. But Missoula City Councilman Bob Jaffe says he worries Muir’s proposal will leave city taxpayers footing the bill for police work that extends well beyond municipal responsibilities. “I’m very concerned about the idea that our office will start being the county’s police force,” Jaffe says. In turn, Jaffe says he will offer an amendment that would abbreviate Muir’s proposal, giving police full arrest authority 250 feet outside city limits, while allowing Missoula police officers to track down individuals suspected of committing crimes

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 June 3–June 10, 2010

within the city up to five miles outside municipal boundaries. Jaffe also suggests providing authority to respond to offenses personally observed while en route to annexed city areas. “It seems like that’s reasonable that they should respond to those,” he says. Muir’s proposal again goes before the public and council June 7. Jessica Mayrer

Parks

A small step for Fort Missoula The approval of a 50-year lease of University of Montana-owned land by the Montana Board of Regents May 27 brought Missoula one step closer to the long-planned and little publicized Fort Missoula Regional Park, a 246-acre recreation hub west of town. It’s the first tangible news from the project since the Missoula City Council unveiled the first stage of the master site plan in 2008, says Parks and Recreation Director Donna Gaukler. The step forward may be small—the lease covers a mere


Inside

Letters

Briefs

10.63 acres of the entire project—but shows the city hasn’t given up on the plan. “Until the thing with UM, the primary story has been we’re kinda lining up the ducks, paper wise or wherever we can, so when the time is right we’ve got that done,” Gaukler says. The regional park has been in the works since 1995, when the city and county adopted the Missoula Urban Area Open Space Plan. The city purchased a chunk of the land from UM in 1998 with the intent of establishing a large-scale recreation area, and city officials adopted the Fort Missoula Regional Park Plan in 2002. The plan calls for—among other attractions—nine multi-use sports fields, an all-seasons pavilion and three miles of trails with human-made ponds. Total cost is estimated at $6 million. Once the infrastructure is in place the park will take between three and 10 years to complete. “We can broach it in any number of phases,” Gaukler says. “We left it so, after we get infrastructure and that, we can go a lot of different directions depending on who the partners are and what the funding source might be.” The city now has 72 months to build a 300space parking lot on the newly rented property, Gaukler says, or it will have to renegotiate the lease with the regents. According to Hugh Jesse, director of facility services at UM, the lease agreement states Missoula will share the lot with UM’s College of Technology and install a bus shelter for UM’s Park N Ride system. Initial estimates put the cost of the lot, with amenities, at $554,861. Gaukler says the city will likely use credits from Knife River Corp. to cover a majority of the expenses. Alex Sakariassen

Oil spill

A foul welcome Montana’s population of American white pelicans might want to change its winter migration destination. The large birds with black-tipped wings, classified by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks as a “species of concern,” typically point their footlong orange bills toward the Gulf Coast come fall. But the largest oil spill in U.S. history in the Gulf of Mexico has scientists and bird lovers worried that some of the pelicans might not make it back next year.

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

“It just depends on how long this mess lasts,” says Paul Hendricks, a zoologist with the Montana Natural Heritage Program. “It seems like even if they get the well capped here relatively soon, the oil’s going to be circulating around for a while.” Montana is home to four breeding colonies of American white pelicans. Two are in eastern Montana, at the Medicine Lake and Bowdoin national wildlife refuges. Two more are along the Rocky Mountain Front, at Canyon Ferry and Arod lakes. The eastern colonies have long been established, while the central Montana colonies were initiated largely by volunteer efforts in the early 1990s.

In addition to white pelicans, Hendricks says Montana’s population of cormorants could be affected by the spill, which began April 20 when a BP oil rig exploded and has since gushed about a half-million barrels of oil into the Gulf. Amy Cilimburg, Montana Audubon’s director of bird conservation and global warming outreach, worries Montana’s population of black terns could be harmed as well. Fortunately, she says, most of Montana’s waterfowl and songbirds head to locations west of the Gulf of Mexico, if scientists know where they go at all. No matter the degree to which Montana’s migrating bird populations are affected, Cilimburg says the spill should serve as a reminder of the interconnectedness of things—and of the real threats to birds. “It sure is a further indication of why we should move away from fossil fuels and address climate change,” she says. “A couple birds getting whacked by a windmill is just way less impactful than what’s going on down there.” Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

Retail Pipestone snowed under Only about three weeks after Missoula’s expanded REI opened its doors, Pipestone Mountaineering, a downtown mainstay since the mid-’90s, announced it’s closing its own. It’s more cause-and-effect than coincidence, says Jay Allen, owner of Bozeman-based Northern Lights Trading Co., which bought Pipestone last May. “The economy hasn’t been kind to us,” Allen says. “It seems to just keep impacting us. And then on top of it, we’ve got to contend with a big-box retailer doubling in size. So I think those two things combined caused us to make a fairly painful decision, which is that we need to close Pipestone… “Maybe there’s not room for three outdoor retailers,” he adds. The closure lengthens the already long list of Missoula businesses that have succumbed to the recession. Most notably, Macy’s and Moose Creek Mercantile closed downtown locations earlier this year. Brady’s Sportsman’s Surplus, another local outdoor recreation store, closed in March. Pipestone, located at 129 W. Front Street, will begin liquidating its inventory of outdoor equipment and apparel on Thursday, June 3, Allen says, and will remain open during its regular hours until everything’s gone. Five employees will lose their jobs. Northern Lights bought Pipestone about a year ago in hopes of reinvigorating the business that had been owned by Jim Wilson since it opened. But new management and a wider product selection weren’t enough to overcome the economic hardships that, Allen says, “just kind of all hit at once.” “It’s a hard decision to make,” Allen says. “It’s unfortunate that we have to make this decision. We certainly appreciate all the customers that have shopped at Pipestone over the years. And I hope that the customers that have shopped at Pipestone will continue to shop at other local merchants that are here. I think that will probably do more to help Missoula than anything else.” Allen would probably send the same message to residents of Bozeman, where Northern Lights operates its two remaining stores. Another new REI opened there two weeks ago. Matthew Frank

BY THE NUMBERS

40

Applicants for the position of University of Montana president received by the state’s Presidential Search Advisory Committee. The deadline for applicants seeking to replace George Dennison was May 19.

etc.

Imperial Oil has been the subject of considerable pooh-poohing around Missoula this spring. Just this week, Northern Rockies Rising Tide—that growing voice of opposition to climate injustice—scheduled a string of events culminating in a Thursday rally outside the Montana Department of Transportation’s West Broadway office. Approving the proposal will establish, they say, a hazardous high-and-wide corridor through our state. But Highway 200 isn’t the only trail in the state attracting activists with the promise of an environmental standoff. The Swan View Coalition, a grassroots conservation group out of Kalispell, threatened last week to sue the U.S. Forest Service if the agency doesn’t put a stop to a 100mile, 50-runner footrace along the Swan Mountain Range planned for late July. At the very least, the group wants an Environmental Assessment before anyone says, “On your mark.” Apparently Adidas and Lycra short-shorts are as much a cause for ecological concern as high-and-wide loads near the Blackfoot, even if they aren’t worn by Richard Simmons. Keith Hammer, chair of the Swan View Coalition, says the concerns are simple: By allowing the organizers of the Swan Crest Run a special use permit for backcountry trails in the Flathead National Forest, the Forest Service is opening up a precedent for commercial use of the Swan Range. That use could manifest itself in intrusive, even destructive, ways—mountain bike races, motorcycle competitions, a fly-over sequence on CBS’s “The Amazing Race.” Think of the grizzlies, Hammer says, and think of the lynx. Run organizer Brad Lamson isn’t buying it. The group behind the Swan Crest Run has been operating small-scale endurance events in the area for nearly a decade. The Forest Service has seemingly never had a problem, granting special use permits for each race. This is the longest and most crowded run so far, Lamson admits, but 50 runners staggered over 100 miles hardly constitutes a major threat to local wildlife habitat—and certainly not enough to warrant an all-out assault on an event that raises money partly for backcountry trail work. The critics droning on about precedents—Imperial Oil and the Swan Crest Run alike—have a good point. Give one guy an inch and the next will strip-mine the shirt off your back. But does a grassroots endurance test really set a precedent for large-scale commercialization of the Swan? Unlike the threat of future high-and-wide projects—like that requested recently by ConocoPhilips—we feel the comparison is kind of apples and oranges or, more appropriately, Nikes and Goodyears.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 June 3–June 10, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Wide load Marty Cobenais talks big rigs, big picture by Jessica Mayrer

Veteran environmental watchdog and Ojibwe Indian Marty Cobenais is joining forces with a growing coalition of conservationists calling for Montana to block ExxonMobil’s proposed high-and-wide corridor through the state. An ExxonMobil subsidiary, Imperial Oil, asked the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) to approve a permit that would allow the company to transport massive oil processing “modules” over

Cobenais: They want to expand. Right now, they are building too many pipelines, so they can’t meet production. They’re having a hard time even filling up the pipelines that are just now coming online. Plus, they have another Keystone XL Pipeline that they want to create. They want to get more equipment up there. That’s why the Missoula corridor is being created, so they can get more equipment up to the tar sands to

Photo courtesy of MDT

Indigenous Environmental Network’s Marty Cobenais recently traveled to Missoula to join a growing coalition of conservationists hoping to block ExxonMobile’s proposed high-and-wide shipments, like the one above, through Montana.

Lolo Pass and through Missoula en route to the Port of Sweetgrass. The 300-mile Montana leg constitutes just one segment of a long journey that would take the equipment from South Korea to the Kearl Oil Sands project in Alberta. Accommodating the modules requires about $22 million worth of highway modifications. The company would raise or bury utility lines in 572 locations, modify or install 33 traffic structures, modify or build 75 highway turnouts, and trim dozens of trees in Bonner and Choteau. MDT is expected to decide this month on whether or not to approve the proposal. Cobenais, of the Minnesota-based Indigenous Environmental Network, says the project has the makings of an environmental catastrophe—and that’s before the equipment even gets to Alberta, where it will help extract oil from beneath pristine boreal forest. We caught up with Cobenais this week prior to his arrival for a speech about the proposal. Indy: What’s happening now at the Alberta tar sands mines?

Missoula Independent

Page 8 June 3–June 10, 2010

get more oil out. That’s what we’re trying to fight. We’re trying to stop the expansion. In the end, the tar sands will be equivalent to the size of Florida. Indy: Why is Missoula important in this discussion? Why is it important that Montanans are engaged? Cobenais: Right now Missoula is very important, because they’re expanding the highway along the river between Missoula and Lewiston to create more space for these vehicles…You’re going to build up the highways. You’re going to disturb the waters, the rivers and everything else along the way to create all of this. If there’s an environmental catastrophe waiting to happen, it’s one of those (trucks) falling into the river. Indy: Northern Rockies Rising Tide and others have accused Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer of encouraging production of dirty fuel by supporting the highand-wide corridor. Do you agree? Cobenais: I’d have to say yes. He’s also encouraging the Keystone XL Pipeline to go through eastern Montana…You look at the oil spill in the Gulf Coast…

These pipelines will break and they will end up having oil spills. Indy: Schweitzer has said that the project, if approved by MDT, will yield approximately $68 million in revenue for the state. That revenue, he says, provides a powerful economic incentive. Do you dispute the potential economic benefits of the proposal? Cobenais: Economic blackmail is what’s going on right now by these big companies. They can buy their way through and do whatever they want to do with no repercussions. The government will say, ���Yes, we can make this money. And we can also create these jobs.’ Those are the top two things any government official is going to look at right now. And, unfortunately, the environment loses that fight every time. Indy: I’ve read that the estimated carbon footprint resulting from oil extraction in the Alberta tar sands could be worse than any other oil extraction project in North America. Is that true? Cobenais: This is going to be the second largest oil area in the world. It’s also, unfortunately, the most damaging way of extracting oil. Right now they dig off the whole boreal forest and they dig down about 80 to 100 meters. And they claim to put things back the way they were afterward. But, looking at it, they’re not. So, yes, there’s a huge carbon footprint. Indy: MDT has said it must comply with state law when deciding whether to approve the shipments. And what we’re hearing from MDT is that its scope is limited to just looking at the immediate impacts of the actual corridor itself. The agency is not legally allowed to look any further than that—to look at, for instance, the broader environmental picture. What’s your take on this legal rationale? Cobenais: I think that government will find a way to allow it just because that’s the government. They know the rules, the ins and outs, just like the oil companies do. Indy: If Montanans don’t want to see the corridor constructed or the larger project continue, what can they do to stop it? Cobenais: I think people can still get up and voice their opinions and give strong reasoning for why the governor and the state departments and everyone else should not give these permits…Voices are still heard. If people are against it, they can get out and be active. They can do protests, nonviolently of course, get out and voice their opinions and say no. And if it does happen they can change the leadership. jmayrer@missoulanews.com


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

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We're STILL trying to find a home for Hoss! Isn't there someone out there who appreciates the challenge of instilling good manners in a dog who currently has none? Hoss has a wonderful, loving heart, but he does need training.

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ASPEN

Aspen is a Siamese X with muted colors, big blue eyes, and a true quiet beauty. She's quite shy, so her adopter will need to be patient with her while she's adjusting to a new home and letting her sweet personality blossom.

MILLIE

MILLIE

Nobody gives you a greeting like Millie! As soon as she sees you coming, her tail and butt begin to wiggle, then her tongue drops and her grin can't help but make you smile. She already thinks she's your best friend, so why not make it official!

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BOSS

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2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd Clark Fork River Market

Millie is a lynx point Siamese whose lovely striping adds lots of interesting markings to her coat. She's an older cat who isn't the least bit interested in kitten activities -- just give her someone to love!

Don't let his size fool you; even though Astro is only 25 pounds, he has enough personality to fill the room! He knows lots of tricks and he loves to show them off, like “roll over” and “dance!” He's ready to start having fun with you today!

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

L I LY

Lily's owner became pregnant and decided she couldn't have both a cat and a baby. We find that an odd decision to make, but we're sure we can find a home where this lovely lady will be both welcome and loved.

RILEY

If you ask any number of our regular volunteers who their favorite shelter dog is, Riley's name is always first to come up. She likes and trusts people indiscriminately, so naturally you can't help but love her back.

BLANCA

Blanca's beautiful and she knows a cage is just no place for her. She spends all day trying to convince everyone to let her out and take her with. She's a young Siamese, sometimes too smart for her own good.

Flowers for every bride. Affordable flowers with an artistic flair.

Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time

The Flower Bed 2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

SPIRIT

Spirit is part of our Seniors for Seniors program, meaning her adoption fee will be waived for anyone 60 and over! Spirit is an affectionate lady in need of some quiet conversation with you, if there's room on your lap?

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 517 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street

YA H T Z E E

No special occasion, Yahtzee always looks this lovely. She has big, bright eyes, and a soft, plush coat, plus she happens to be super sweet too! She likes to snuggle and is looking for her soul mate. Aren't we all?

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

237 Blaine • 542-0077

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 SASHA

My world was a scary place before I came to AniMeals. I hid a lot, trying hard not to incur the wrath of “the man.” He was angry all the time and everyone in the house was afraid of him. The police came and took him away and the children went to live with relatives.

MICKIE

Mickie’s whole world turned upside down the day her family left her. She has been trying to make the best of this extremely unfortunate turn of events which derailed her once very routine and orderly life. She is a quiet, sensible kitty who enjoys laps and loving caresses.

LOLLIPOP

Scheduled for a “Routine Disposal” because her owners didn’t want to pay for her annual shots anymore, Lollipop was saved by a guardian angel who thought there should be nothing “routine” about the end of her life.

BEVERLY

They threw her out of the car and sped off in a cloud of dust and gravel. Beverly was devastated that her family would do such a thing. She didn’t know what to do or where to go….and the kids in the neighborhood pelted her with rocks every time they saw her. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

Missoula Independent

Page 9 June 3–June 10, 2010


The Ultimate In Hygenic Pedicures

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

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Missoula Independent

Page 10 June 3–June 10, 2010

U.S. needs to take a hard look at its role in atrocities The concentration camp horrors of World War II justifiably shocked civilized societies across the globe. It also sparked an enormous outpouring of empathy for the Jewish people that led to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1947. For more than 60 years the United States has supported Israel, supplied the nation with armaments and outsized financial aid and defended the right of Israel to exist as a sovereign state. But now, in the wake of one of the most egregious and violent acts in its history, Israel has brazenly defied the laws of civilized nations in attacking a Palestinian relief mission that has shocked and angered the world. It may also bring about the long-overdue examination of the United States as the enabler of Israel’s increasingly belligerent stance in the Middle East. For those who may be unfamiliar with the area’s history, the Gaza Strip is a tiny parcel of land on the Mediterranean Sea, smaller than Flathead Lake, and mostly surrounded by Israel and bordered by Egypt. After Israel exceeded its original borders following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, it annexed formerly Palestinian lands as spoils of war. The Gaza Strip is inhabited primarily by Sunni Muslims, many of whom are refugees and who still harbor strong enmity toward the Israelis. The most recent incident, depending on who you hear it from, goes like this: A flotilla of ships carrying 700 civilians, including a Nobel peace laureate, and hundreds of tons of relief supplies left Turkey bound for the Gaza Strip. The relief convoy is in response to a two-yearold Israeli blockade of Gaza’s air, territorial waters and borders that followed a 22-day war in 2007 in which Israel, flying American-made F-16s, destroyed thousands of Palestinian homes, educational institutions, hospitals and government buildings, and killed an estimated 1,500 Palestinians while losing 13 Israelis in the decidedly one-sided conflict. The blockade has left the remnant Palestinian population of about 1.5 million people in dire conditions, with no way to rebuild what was destroyed in the war, a shortage of medical supplies and generalized suffering of the populace. The relief flotilla was intended to bring much-needed supplies of cement, prefabricated homes, medical supplies and what is generally considered “humanitarian aid.” So far, there is no indication that any automatic weapons, missiles or bombs were on board.

When the ships, including a very large Turkish-flagged ferry, were still in international waters about 70 miles off the Gaza coast, Israeli special forces troops attacked the flotilla. The smaller ships were almost immediately overcome, but when Israeli troops rappelled down from helicopters onto

She’d be

“spitting bullets, calling for heads to roll and threatening to take any actions necessary to stand by Israel.

the decks of the large ferry, things went terribly wrong. Israel says its troops were simply “defending themselves” from the metal bars and knives with which the passengers on the boat had armed themselves. Those on the ferry, including an al-Jazeera correspondent, say the Israelis opened fire before they even set foot on the boat. Who is telling the truth may never be fully determined, but the end result left at least 9 passengers dead and dozens more wounded. Adding insult to grievous injury, the Israelis then commandeered the ship to Israel, where they incarcerated hundreds of the passengers, including European foreign nationals. The response from most of the world has been immediate and forceful. Turkey, one of Israel’s only Muslim allies in the Mediterranean area, pulled its embassy staff and has launched a formal complaint to the United Nations. That’s no surprise, since it was, after all, a Turkish-flagged ship, pirated in international waters by the Israelis. European nations have likewise demanded a UN investigation into the affair and an end to the blockade.

And then there’s the United States, which voiced only the mildest of concern, primarily in regret for the loss of life, but not a hint of condemnation over what, in other circumstances, we would immediately call “state-sponsored terrorism.” Imagine, for a moment, what we would hear from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had Palestinians landed on a ship in international waters, full of humanitarian supplies headed for Israel, and killed and incarcerated its passengers prior to taking control of the vessel. She’d be spitting bullets, calling for heads to roll and threatening to take any actions necessary to stand by Israel. But so far, not a peep from Hillary the Hawk. And speaking of hawks, the Israelis that took over the ferry rappelled down from American-made Blackhawk helicopters. Did Israel buy those choppers? No, it did not. The sad truth is that Israel receives the most foreign aid from the United States, in the form of military and economic assistance, of any nation in the world. At about $3 billion a year, that comes to one-fifth the entire U.S. foreign aid budget and, in daily terms, amounts to about $7 million a day to this tiny country of 7.5 million people. Somehow, our relationship with Israel has come to resemble the mean little guy with his big buddy walking into a bar. The little guy picks the fights, counting on his big buddy to step in and save him—and pick up the tab, too. But given the current situation, seems like it’s time to consider the broken knuckles and scars being friends with this mean little guy is costing us. Of course there will be those who will say any such actions are “antiSemitic.” To them, I’d point out what many Canadians said to U.S. citizens during the Bush years: “We love Americans, but can’t stand your current government.” Likewise, we can love and respect our Jewish friends. But when it comes to the actions now being perpetrated by the current Israeli government, it’s long past time to take a hard look at our government’s role in enabling these atrocities, to lay our international hypocrisy aside, and to hold Israel to the same standards of law as other civilized nations of the world. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Building trust First clean up, then we can talk more mining by Jeff Welsch

Trust us, the industry giants keep saying, as they try to assure us they can mine the earth without harming it. Trust us, for we have the best technology now and have learned from our mistakes. Trust us, for we have every possible safeguard in place for every event that could go terribly wrong. Trust us, and when we’re done you’ll barely know we were here. And so we trust. We trusted Massey Energy when it insisted it was safely mining for coal in the hills of West Virginia. Now 29 miners are dead after an explosion April 5 at the company’s Upper Big Branch Mine. We trusted British Petroleum when it promised to conduct environmentally sensitive drilling for oil in the Gulf of Mexico and assured us that an accident imperiling the waters and beaches of the Gulf Coast was “virtually impossible.” Now 11 workers are dead and millions of gallons of oil are endangering shorelines, wildlife and livelihoods from Louisiana to North Carolina after an April 20 explosion. We are also asked to trust the extractive behemoths Simplot, Monsanto and Agrium when they tell us they can expand their mountaintop, phosphatemining footprints in southeast Idaho without harming the Greater Yellowstone environment, or us. Simplot wants to take the unprecedented step of purchasing more than 1,100 acres of U.S. Forest Service lands for a toxic-waste impoundment to accompany its new Dairy Syncline mine near Soda Springs. Monsanto is eager to build a mine almost literally on the banks of the Blackfoot River in Idaho, already fouled by deadly selenium runoff. Agrium, a Canadian company whose advertisement for a new mine manager ironically touts southeast Idaho’s “beautiful mountains” and “great” outdoor recreation opportunities, is set to level some of those beautiful mountains at a new mine site near the Blackfoot’s headwaters.

Of course, the mining companies might argue that this is different from the coal mining and oil drilling scenarios, and they’d be right: Unlike the phosphate folks, Massey Energy and British Petroleum are actually attempting to clean up their messes. Meanwhile, southeast Idaho’s giant phosphate scar is still fraught with 17 federal Superfund sites, reflecting the ongoing selenium contami-

Monsanto is “eager to build a mine almost literally on the banks of the Blackfoot River in Idaho, already fouled by deadly

selenium runoff.

nation responsible for killing at least six horses, 18 head of cattle, hundreds of sheep and untold wild game and fish. And just to the west, the Don ore-processing plant in Pocatello remains a Superfund site because of its mountain-sized slag pile not far from the Portneuf River. All have been awaiting cleanup, some for decades. Oh, and in case you missed it, Agrium wants We The People to pay for the cleanup at two of their Superfund sites. What of a potential catastrophic event similar to the tragedies in West Virginia and in the Gulf? While the loss of livestock, wildlife and outdoor recreation due to selenium pollution might seem catastrophic enough to some, it’s true that the phosphate min-

ing industry in southeast Idaho has never had a calamity on the level of Massey and BP. Trust us, they would say, that couldn’t happen here. Then again, that’s what agriculture officials near Los Banos, Calif., were saying in the early 1980s at California’s Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge. But the refuge made national headlines when thousands of migrating wildfowl were found dead, dying or grotesquely deformed by ingesting toxic levels of selenium from runoff. Today, the phosphate mining industry wants us to believe it can remove mountaintops and scar large swathes of Greater Yellowstone without harming its lands, waters, wildlife or people. Trust us, they say: We have the technology. We have learned from our mistakes. We are putting every conceivable safeguard in place to ensure environmentally sensitive mining. We have heard it all before, but still we want to believe. So, to Simplot, Monsanto and Agrium, I say: You want to build our trust? Use some of the tens of millions of dollars you’re spending on mine development to clean up your existing messes. Before expanding your footprint, demonstrate you can mine at your current sites without poisoning the lands, waters and wildlife. Then show us you can put these landscapes back together in some reasonable facsimile of the way you found them. If you don’t, it seems only a matter of time before a catastrophe on the order of Kesterson, Massey or British Petroleum befalls your industry. If you do undertake reclamation, then—and only then—will we begin to trust that you can mine new parts of the southeast Idaho earth without continuing to harm it. Jeff Welsch is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is the communications director for the Greater Yellowstone Coalition in Bozeman.

Beer Drinkers’ Profile "Future Leaders of America"

Jeff & Chip

Why did you guys come to the Iron Horse today? When we're out of class we're down here for lunch. What's next? When the tab gets bigger, probably Happy Hour at the bowling alley. Advice for our current leaders? Get on that oil spill business. Beer of Choice? Bud Light & Bud Light with Clamato.

Reserve space for your special event in the 501 Lounge. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 • 100% Smoke-Free

Missoula Independent

Page 11 June 3–June 10, 2010


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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

We all know fossil fuels are dirty sources of energy, but sometimes, all we need is a bit of regional context to really ram that point home. This week, you can get a grasp on the impacts of oil and coal development on American Indians and their communities during an environmental justice panel moderated by Winona LaDuke, the former vice presidential nominee on the Green Party ticket in 1996 and 2000. The roundtable includes Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, an activist and member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations of Alberta who plans to speak on the effects of the tar sands oil development on her homeland. Gail Small of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe will also be there, and will hash out her community’s struggle to stop coal development in southeastern Montana. Members of the

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes offer comments on sacred sites, as well as environmental concerns as they relate to the Flathead Indian Reservation. As a bonus—and likely a breather from such heavy subject matter—folk duo the Indigo Girls will play a short set during the panel. This issue is likely to smolder for years to come, so take this chance to understand why old-school methods of creating energy need to go. —Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY JUNE 3

8:30 AM–12 PM and 12:30–4 PM at homes on Deveraux Place and Hermione Lane. Space is limited, and registration is required, so RSVP by calling the Habitat for Humanity office at 549-8210.

You can let the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) know that the Exxon/Imperial Oil Kearl Module Transport Project isn’t such a good idea during a protest in opposition to the project, which begins at noon at Missoula’s MDT office, 2100 W. Broadway St. Free. Alternately, meet with others at 11:30 AM at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue. and bring your bike to ride to the MDT office. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.org. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict (and no mediation) by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.org.

The “Environmental Justice in Montana: Protecting the Land for Future Generations” panel is Saturday, June 5, at 1:30 PM at the Johnny Arlee/Victor Charlo Theatre at Salish Kootenai College, 58138 Hwy. 93 in Pablo. Free. Call Jodi Rave at 396-8537.

SATURDAY JUNE 5 Help out some local derby girls by snagging some wicked roller derby merch along with furniture, toys, books, clothing and whatever else you can think of during the Hellgate Rollergirls Big Garage Sale, which begins at 7 AM at the Hellgate Rollergirls Headquarters, 812 Toole St. Free to attend. Missoula’s IRS Taxpayer Assistance Center, 2681 Palmer St., hosts an open house from 9 AM–2 PM to assist taxpayers and small business owners with their unresolved tax issues. Free. Visit irs.gov/newsroom.

MONDAY JUNE 7

Help assist a youngster battling cancer during the Cash Michael Hyde Broadway Benefit, which features music by Chereal, as well as a silent auction and drawing from 6–11 PM at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway St. $5. To donate items for the auction call Stacy at 550-3794.

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Support the completion of Ewam’s Garden of 1000 Buddhas to prepare for a visit from the Dalai Lama during An Evening with Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche, a fundraiser that features a live auction, a talk by Ewam founder Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche, and food/drinks at 6:30 PM at the Governor’s Room in the Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. $60 per couple/$35 per person, with tickets available at Worden’s Market, Jeannette Rankin Peace Center and at the door. Call 726-0555.

Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

Missoula’s homeWORD presents a community design —the organizacharrette for Solstice and Confluence— tion’s new, mixed-use building project—from 6:30–9:30 PM in the conference center at the Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 532-HOME.

FRIDAY JUNE 4 Habitat for Humanity of Missoula is currently looking for volunteers ages 16 and up to participate in Habitat Home Building during its Youth Week, June 15–19, from

TUESDAY JUNE 8

Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

THURSDAY JUNE 10 Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict (and no mediation) by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/ social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 June 3–June 10, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN FBI investigators said Lois J. Harvey, 40, handed a hold-up note to a bank teller in Columbus, Ohio, who informed Harvey she couldn’t read it. While trying to explain the note, Harvey noticed an off-duty police officer in full uniform waiting in line behind her. She grabbed the note and hastily left. Informed by the teller what had happened, the officer went after Harvey, who, when caught, tried to eat the note. When the officer arrested her, she coughed it up. Authorities identified Joshua Tell Warner, 23, as the man who robbed three Oregon banks after receiving calls pointing out that the suspect was a deckhand on a crab boat who appeared on the television reality show “Deadliest Catch.” Following his arrest at a traffic stop in East Peoria, Ill., Warner pleaded guilty. TOO BIG TO PROSECUTE After investigators with Canada’s Bank of Montreal assembled more than 35,000 documents pertaining to what could be the biggest mortgage fraud in Canadian history, government authorities told the bank they weren’t interested in pursuing a criminal investigation against more than 300 Albertans, including mortgage brokers, real estate agents, lawyers and at least one member of parliament, whom the bank accused of generating $70 million worth of phony mortgages in one year. “There just aren’t enough police officers to investigate these crimes,” said Chris Mathers, a corporate crime consultant and former Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer. “If you double the number of investigators, you will just have double the number of crimes being investigated and still have a whole bunch stacked in a pile and waiting to go.” LITTLE THINGS MEAN A LOT Authorities arrested Rolando Negrin, 44, a federal security screener at Miami International Airport, who they said beat up a co-worker with an expandable police baton. According to the arrest report, Negrin explained that he endured repeated mocking about the size of his genitals after his Transportation Security Administration colleagues observed his private parts on one of the airport’s full-body imaging machines until “he could not take the jokes any more and lost his mind.” TOBACCO ROAD When researchers denounced R.J. Reynolds Tobacco for marketing Camel Orbs, mint- or cinnamon-flavored dissolvable tobacco pellets that they said too closely resemble Tic Tac breath mints and will appeal to children because they can be eaten like candy, Reynolds official David Howard noted, “Virtually every household has products that could be hazardous to children, like cleaning supplies, medicines, health and beauty products, and you compare that to 20 to 25 percent of households that use tobacco products.” The difference, insisted Dr. Jonathan P. Winickoff, chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Tobacco Consortium, “is that kids potentially will be watching grown-ups ingesting these products. The last time I checked, we don’t have adults drinking toilet bowl cleanser in front of their kids.” ABOVE AND BEYOND Two Japanese police officers spent six evenings in a row hiding in a closet before finally nabbing a 16-year-old boy suspected of stealing 862 yen ($9.72) in Wakayama Prefecture. Joseph M. Veladro, 28, spared the world another lawyer by telling police in Port St. Lucie, Fla., that he stole more than $300 in merchandise so he’d be charged with a felony that would keep him from going to law school. NO PEEKING After students at a Pennsylvania high school were charged with child pornography for circulating cell phone images of a sex act on school grounds, school officials found themselves being investigated for examining the video images. Parents complained that officials at Susquenita High School who confiscated pornographic images and videos from the students “passed around” and viewed the offensive material. “Of course, one or two people had to see the images to determine what they were, but if more than one or two top administrators saw them, there better be a good reason why,” Perry County District Attorney Charles Chenot said, adding that employees who showed the images to people not involved in the investigation could face the same charges as the seven students involved. IRONIES OF THE WEEK After Wisconsin state troopers needed tire spikes to stop a tractor-trailer whose driver refused to pull over, authorities said the 44-year-old driver appeared to be sleep deprived. His cargo: energy drinks. New York City fire investigators blamed a blaze that gutted five businesses and required 140 firefighters to extinguish on a worker installing a fire-safety door at a pizza shop. The worker, an employee of Ideal Fire Safety Systems, said his welding torch apparently set some grease on fire. WAY TO GO Investigators said a car traveling at 92 mph ran off the road in Willowick, Ohio, then hit an embankment and went airborne. The car flew 173 feet, crashed into the side of an apartment building between the third and fourth floors, bounced off and landed in a parking lot, where police found the driver, Carmen Ritacco, 26, dead. An out-of-control sport utility vehicle veered across a median strip and six lanes of traffic in Fairfax County, Va., before jumping the curb and hitting two bicyclists on a bike path. The Dodge Durango killed one cyclist, 18-year-old Abdel Ouahid Chadli, and injured another before crashing into a tree, killing driver Gary Anthony Thorne, 31. The incident occurred on National Bike to Work Day. When Randal Grubb, 63, leaned out of his SUV to pick up mail he dropped onto the road in front of his home in Spring Township, Pa., he fell out of the vehicle, which then dragged him down the street and pinned him against a concrete wall. Grubb’s wife, a passenger, wasn’t able to stop the vehicle from rolling forward and called authorities, who pronounced Grubb dead at the scene. RECIDIVIST OF THE WEEK Just one month after Douglas Gardner, 54, was released from a Vermont prison, where he spent nearly 20 years for a fatal drunk-driving crash, state police charged him with DUI when he drove a car down an embankment in Highgate.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 June 3–June 10, 2010


THE INDY SIZES UP THE CANDIDATES IN THE KEY JUNE 8 PRIMARY RACES. utdoor festivals, warmer weather (we think, eventually), 10 p.m. sunsets, even longer lines at the Big Dipper—and primary elections! That’s right, dutiful local electorate, it must be June in Missoula, and we’ve come prepared with an obnoxiously long, mildly informative, occasionally quippy guide to the 2010 primary races that actually matter. How did we determine which races actually matter? We focused on the four Missoula contests believed to be the most competitive—Senate District 48, House District 94, Missoula County Sheriff and, of course, the four-person Democratic race for U.S. House of Representatives. We didn’t cover the Republican primary for Congress here because we’ve already written about A.J. Otjen and Mark French, and their efforts to knock off incumbent Denny Rehberg, in the weeks leading up to the election (check out www.missoulanews.com for those stories). Lastly, and most importantly, make sure to vote on Tuesday, June 8. You can visit the Office of Elections website (www.co.missoula.mt.us/election) or call 406-258-4751 to find your polling place, check your voter registration status and find additional information.

O

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

Who wants to run against a millionaire? Why it matters: A cynic might say it matters because someone has to have the honor of getting trounced by well-funded Republican incumbent Denny Rehberg in November. A more optimistic Democrat would argue that Rehberg is just as vulnerable as any incumbent this year—especially considering his involvement with a latenight boat crash on Flathead Lake last summer—and that this race offers the most compelling Rehberg opponents in years. Either way, this race matters because Democrats are desperate to find a viable candidate to challenge the incumbent, and that never-ending search has produced this primary election’s most wideopen competition. Name: Tyler Gernant Age: 27 Home: Missoula Relevant experience: Worked for Sen. Max Baucus, U.S. Rep. Brian Baird and John Edwards’ presidential campaign. Also co-founder of the Rural Advocacy League. Occupation: Small-business attorney with Bjornson Law Offices. Why proponents back him: Fourth generation Montanan whose polished campaign and thorough grasp of the issues belie his young age.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Missoula Independent

Why skeptics balk: The age thing. If elected, Gernant would be the so-called “Baby of the House.” Current youngster Aaron Schock, R-Illinois, just turned 29. Website: www.tylergernant.com Gernant, in his own words: I had a lot of friends from here in Montana who lost their jobs and ended up having to leave the state to find work. A few of the businesses I’ve represented as a lawyer have had to close their doors and lay off their employees as a result of what I view as systemic failures within our government. I really felt there was a lot we had to be doing to foster small business development in Montana. Clean energ y is something that could bring a lot of high-paying jobs to Montana, and we weren’t doing enough about that at a federal level. Over the next 10 years, it could bring 13,000 highpaying jobs to the state and bring in over a half-a-billion dollars to our economy. I’ve talked about giving small businesses a tax credit for hiring new employees. The last time we did something like that in the late ’70s, it brought about a huge surge in job growth. That’d be a good start. When community banks are hurting, they’re not lending money to the small businesses in Montana that create jobs. That’s what I saw with some of my clients, where all of a sudden they couldn’t qualify for loans that they had no trouble qualifying for in the 10 years prior. We need to make sure that what we’re doing for the banks that are supposedly too big to fail doesn’t adversely affect the small banks here that are the lifeline to business in Montana. This is the job I want. I didn’t want to view something else as a stepping stone. This is what got me interested. This is where I think I can be most effective. I think fundamentally it’s a question about experience. Look at what experience has gotten you—a congressman who has voted for tax cuts for the wealthi-

Page 14 June 3–June 10, 2010

est, for putting two wars on our credit card, for this big boondoggle of a prescription drug plan and for our deficit. Denny talks about small business development, but it’s something I’ve actually done. I’ve actually worked with hundreds of small businesses across Montana to help them grow and prosper. Mike Mansfield is someone I think we should all model our lives on. I’m proud that his family has been a part of our campaign. Sen. Edwards had a real touch with common folks. It was something I always respected, but my opinion of him has definitely changed. One of the benefits of youth is that I don’t have any skeletons in my closet.

Name: Melinda Gopher Age: 45 Home: Missoula Relevant experience: Outreach coordinator for Council of Concerned Citizens, fair housing specialist for city of Great Falls and worked on Bill Yellowtail’s 1996 campaign for the U.S. House. Occupation: Student Why proponents back her: Refreshingly outspoken political outsider who isn’t afraid to go after Rehberg—or any of her Democratic opponents—with blunt criticisms. Why skeptics balk: While entertaining, her lack of political experience and fundraising leave her little chance of beating Rehberg. Gopher, for instance, raised less than $5,000 during the last reporting period. Website: www.melindaformontana. com

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Gopher, in her own words: I want to bring back the spirit of public service. I don’t see being a politician as a career path. There’s a difference between politics and good government. If we look at politics as the low end of the spectrum and good government as the achievable goal, I feel that cycle after cycle we’re setting the bar low. I’m not good at politics, but my objective is to be good at good government. I grew up on Hill 57 in a two-room house. I come from people—my roots lie in the Rocky Boys Band of Chippewa Indians—

who were systematically oppressed through several centuries to arrive at where we were at Hill 57. My whole life is predicated on how out of whack this government’s priorities are, and that’s what’s been the precursor to me being here now. Last spring at a round dance, we just decided we’re sick of this. We’re sick of being gaffed off by politicians. We’re sick of organizing around an issue and not being heard. We decided to project our story on a greater canvas. Right now, I can hear Dennis McDonald’s voice in my head, and it’s the same canned response—same with Tyler, too—as to how to fix the economy. I’m sorry, but that’s not good enough. There’s a lack of technolog y funding in the state. I don’t know how we’re going to transition to a high-tech economy here in Montana if the federal investment is not there. My spouse and I found that out first-hand trying to get an IT contracting company up and running. I have to be like this, coming from where I come from. It’s my nature. There’s been a little bit of a waitand-see attitude from the powers that be in the Democratic Party, and I’m comfortable with that. I’m going to give you a lesson in Indian Politics 101. Now, you think the party and the county chairs have power. Well, in Indian Country it’s the powwow announcer. You start with the powwow announcer and they get your message out there. Then it goes down to the clans and the families and the individuals, and calling Grandma Dorothy in Fort Belknap and making sure she’s got all her grandkids registered to vote. It’s very oral and very word-ofmouth. It’s a tried and true political model. That’s the secret to my victory on June 8.

Name: Dennis McDonald Age: 66 Home: Melville Relevant experience: Chairman of Montana Democratic Party, 2005–2009. Occupation: Rancher Why proponents back him: Established Democratic Party insider who has the connections to beat Rehberg in November. Why skeptics balk: One of three reasons: 1. It’s not exactly a good year to be considered a political insider. 2. The former California lawyer once represented—and allegedly developed close ties to—Jimmy “The Weasel” Fratianno, a high-profile West Coast Mafioso. 3. In a video that’s become viral (just Google “McDonald Mop Flop”), McDonald was caught awkwardly stumbling through seven minutes of questioning from Rehberg supporters outside the

congressman’s Missoula office. The last two are presumed to be easy-pickin’s for Rehberg in the general election. We b s i t e : w w w . m c d o n a l d f o r congress.com

Photo courtesy of Dennis McDonald

McDonald, in his own words: I’ve never seen the angst in Montanans’ eyes that I have over the last year. We need a fundamental change in our economic philosophy. Probably 30 years ago our country embarked upon the notion of trickle-down economics. If there’s one thing we’ve learned out of this downturn, trickle-down economics works fine for Wall Street, but doesn’t work for Main Street, and particularly not Main Street in Montana. We need to invest in education. Perhaps we can look toward building a med school in Montana…Secondly, let’s build a vet school at MSU in Bozeman. Right now, our students who want to go into veterinary medicine have to go out of state. Finally, let’s invest in making Montana Tech at Butte the citadel for green research—that is, renewable energy, research innovation and investment. There’s no reason Montana can’t be the leading state for renewable energy resources—in wind energy, biomass, geothermal and solar energy. Unlike some of my opponents, I believe we can develop our state’s natural resources in an environmentally prudent manner. I thought the state’s leasing of Otter Creek was probably premature. But once the Land Board made that decision, once the horse left the barn, then it seemed to me that it’s the responsibility of our elected leaders to move forward and make sure that it’s done correctly. I’ve been absolutely opposed to the construction of the Tongue River railroad, and I still am. I’m very proud of the work I did representing this career criminal. I took this high-ranking Mafia don and made him a government witness. I think at the end of the day we put, like, 26 high-ranking Mafiosos in jail. I think on that case I did more to assist law enforcement across the country than Rehberg has done in his entire life. I would say it was probably not my best hour. I would suggest to you that we’ll


see more and more [stunts like the “Mop Flop” interview]. Rehberg’s history has been, whenever he’s in a close race, he turns to character assassination. That’s all he has. I hope at the end of the day Montana voters will judge which one of us provides the best opportunity to send Rehberg back to the private sector. That’s the ultimate goal.

Name: Sam Rankin Age: 65 Home: Billings Relevant experience: Ran unsuccessful bid for state House in 1982 and filed but withdrew for U.S. Senate race in 1996 and 2000. Occupation: Real estate broker Why proponents back him: A moderate Democrat who rails against special interest money and preaches fiscal responsibility, and who backs it up by running a barebones campaign. Why skeptics balk: Entered the race late, ran a limited campaign and has had almost zero visibility. Website: srankin.qwestoffice.net

Photo courtesy of Sam Rankin

Rankin, in his own words: Like most Montanans, I believe excessive money has corrupted the political process on both sides of the aisle. The common man’s voice has been displaced by special interests. I believe special interests rule and I don’t like the way they rule. I was sitting back, watching the other candidates, and kept hoping that one of them would visit the issue of special interest money. They didn’t. With baby boomers aging and the benefits they’re due to receive, getting the deficit curve under control will alleviate a lot of other problems. You can’t change these things overnight, but they have to change. The entitlements—basically Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid—take roughly 43 cents out of every revenue dollar that we spend. There are hundreds of different ideas to consider, but entitlements have to be looked at over time. There should be no tax increases via the tax code—it’s too complex already. But we need something along the line of either a value added tax or a consumption tax. So people don’t get the wrong idea, it would go something like this: hamburger, no; steak, yes. Eggs, no; caviar, yes. We have to increase our revenue and decrease our spending, or else we’ll end up like Greece. Denny Rehberg and I go to the same church. I’m at a disadvantage, but hopefully we’ll tap into how angry Montanans are with what’s going on in Washington right now. If it’s not me this year, it will be someone like me next time.

HOUSE DISTRICT 94, DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

Winner takes all Why it matters: Perhaps the most closely watched local primary features two high-profile and accomplished women vying for Dave McAlpin’s former seat in the House. Ellie Hill, as an attorney and director of the Poverello Center, is one of Missoula’s most prominent activists. Lou Ann Crowley, a Missoula City Council member from 1996 to 2006 and one-time mayoral candidate, is widely known for her civil and non-profit service. Republican candidate Jay Stanford withdrew from the race, so either Crowley or Hill will run uncontested in November and head to Helena next year.

Rep. McAlpin cares a great deal about the well-being of the people of Montana based on the bills he introduced during his tenure. I would continue working in the areas of education, jobs, supporting those with mental health issues, promoting child nutrition and preventing domestic violence.

Why should residents of HD 94 vote for you? Because I unwaveringly support progressive values. I have been endorsed by Mayor Engen, former Mayor Kadas, six members of City Council, Montana Conservation Voters and Sen. Ron Erickson, who also represents HD 94.

Photo courtesy of Lou Ann Crowley

Name: Lou Ann Crowley Age: 63 Time in Missoula: 32 years Education: B.A. in elementary education from State Teachers College at Boston. Relevant experience: From 10 years of service on the Missoula City Council, I have direct legislative experience in budgeting, land use, transportation, economic development and serving those at risk; good listening skills, ability to work across the aisle, and a track record of building coalitions. Website: www.louanncrowley.com Why should residents of HD 94 vote for you? Ten years of legislative experience, a proven track record of social and legislative accomplishments and the only candidate on the ballot who lives in the district. If you’re elected to the state House, what would be your top legislative priority? Improving the economy through job creation in basic industries and new and green technologies, support for small businesses, and funding for UM and the College of Technology. How would you build on Dave McAlpin’s five-year tenure?

SENATE DISTRICT 48, DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

One of the most contentious issues heading into the 2011 legislative session is medical marijuana. Do you believe the law should be amended? How? The explosive growth of the medical marijuana industry has raised a host of questions not answered by the existing law. These need to be addressed and the law amended to make the system work better for everyone. There are no easy solutions. It’s possible Republicans will control both houses in 2011. What’s one item you think will have broad bipartisan support? With the current emphasis on addressing our drinking and driving culture, I believe DUI legislation will have broad bipartisan support. What adjective best describes Gov. Brian Schweitzer? Charismatic.

Name: Ellie Hill Age: 34 Time in Missoula: 5 years Education: B.S. in psychology from Boise State University; J.D. from University of Idaho.

Name: Tom Facey Nickname: Spacey Facey Age: 56 Relevant experience: Montana House of Representatives, 1999–2006; caucus leader of House Democrats in 2001.

If you’re elected to the state House, what would be your top legislative priority? I am already working with constituents to introduce legislation related to economic development, job creation, affordable housing and education. I also believe that we must work to immediately reduce the costs of airline travel to and from Montana.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

How would you build on Dave McAlpin’s five-year tenure? Dave, who last year was named director of the Montana State Crime Lab, has been supportive of my campaign. Building on his legacy, I will be one of few legislators who have actually prosecuted DUIs and I understand firsthand the impact DUI has on our community. The new DUI courts in Billings and Kalispell are showing great promise in

In three sentences or less, why should residents of SD 48 vote for you? Two reasons: I have the energy and ideas to move us forward. Second, I’ve worked hard on constituent issues during my four sessions, including introducing 51 bills with only three at the request of the governor or committee. That shows I listen to the concerns of my constituents.

[Missoula Police Sgt. Bob] Hinle was shot in Missoula [in 1988], the community raised about $100,000 to help his wife travel to Denver when he was recuperating. I saw the fact that if a logger or construction worker got hurt and had to go to Seattle for care, or a guy from Glasgow had to go to Billings for a workers’ comp case, all those travel expenses would not be paid by work comp. It took me three sessions to get a bill through, but I finally got a bill through that allowed for some of those travel and lodging costs to get paid for by workers’ comp.

What would you consider your greatest accomplishment from your extensive time serving in the state House of Representatives? I have two: I didn’t realize it at the time, but I started the process of televising the Legislature…The other is, when

If elected, what would be your top legislative priority in the Senate? We’ve got this huge hole in our budget, and part of that is from using stimulus money from last session for ongoing expenditures. I’ve heard figures of upwards of $400 million—I don’t remember the exact source, but

Profession: Science teacher, Sentinel High School Website: www.faceyforsenate48.com

More work to be done Why this race matters: Both Tom Facey and Teresa K. Henry served their district in the state House of Representatives, and are now vying for the Senate seat vacated by Democrat Carolyn Squires. Facey and Henry come cut from a similar cloth—in fact, Henry once worked as Facey’s campaign treasurer—but still present a clear difference to voters.

Re l e v a n t e x p e r i e n c e : Vo t e d Missoula’s “Best Activist” for the past three consecutive years, nearly perfect penmanship, never been beaten in “Trivial Pursuit,” walked down every street in House District 94, and does the world’s worst Marlon Brando impersonation. Website:: www.elliehillforhd94.org

Missoula Independent

reducing Montana’s steady increase in multiple-DUI offenders. I support expanding the program to Missoula and other communities. One of the most contentious issues heading into the 2011 legislative session is medical marijuana. Do you believe the law should be amended? How? Exploitation of the law’s physician recommendation requirement at circuslike “clinics” that process hundreds of people in a single day must come to an end. Financial relationships between caregivers and physicians should be outlawed, plain and simple. So should public use of cannabis, by anyone. The law is intended to honor the central Montana values of freedom and selfreliance, to grant worthy patients the liberty to use an ancient, proven natural plant for healing purposes. With consensus amendments at the 2011 Legislature, we can fulfill that goal and end the craziness. My campaign has been endorsed by John Masterson, the director of Montana NORML. It’s possible Republicans will control both houses in 2011. What’s one item you think will have broad bipartisan support? In January the U.S. Supreme Court made a landmark decision allowing corporations to spend an unlimited amount of money in political campaigns. I support a constitutional amendment clarifying that corporations are not people, money is not speech, and the Bill of Rights is a bill of human rights. Since the days of the Copper Kings in Butte, Montanans have stood unified in their opposition to the idea of special interests buying political power. A unified Montana Legislature should send a message to our congressional delegation that Congress must act to limit the damage of this radical decision that strikes at the heart of democracy. What adjective best describes Gov. Brian Schweitzer? Ballsy. the next sentence was something to the effect of, “and no one’s really talking about this.” That’s a good chunk of change. During the special session in 2002, we filled a $500 million deficit. I know it’s possible. I know we’re not going to fall off a cliff. But I also appreciate that it’s going to take a lot of maneuvering. One item already being discussed in Helena is how the state can better address DUIs. What do you think is the best approach to the issue? One guy, when I knocked on his door, he said, “You know, the first one, everyone makes a mistake. Let’s focus on the treatment aspect with a DUI court or something like that. Let’s not throw the book at the person. After that, well, you’ve made more than one mistake.” I agree with that philosophy.

Page 15 June 3–June 10, 2010


I’m not a constitutional lawyer, but I think if you agree to a driver’s license, you agree to take the appropriate test if you’re suspected of being under the influence. I think that passes constitutional muster. Driving is not a right; it’s a responsibility. The offender should also have to pay for his treatment, and the monetary loss for getting a DUI should be higher. Another contentious issue heading into the 2011 legislative session is medical marijuana. Do you believe the law should be amended? How? I do believe the law should be amended. I don’t want to take a politician’s view on this, but I know Rep. Diane Sands, D-Missoula, has been heading up a committee that’s been looking at this. I trust that committee will come out with some great ideas. I hope those ideas include allowing cities and counties to zone where those businesses go. As a high school teacher, I’m just not going to move forward with any legalization…I also don’t think you should smoke marijuana in public.

Let me add that, I’m fairly sure that no matter what we do, some constituents will not be happy. As I’ve knocked on doors, opinions on this issue have covered the whole spectrum. What adjective best describes Gov. Brian Schweitzer? It’s not an adjective, but I’ll say that he sucks the air out of the room when he comes in. What’s your campaign song? If you don’t have one, what do you wish it would have been? I don’t have one, but I’d say most anything by Steely Dan. Name: Teresa K. Henry Nickname: Tracy Age: 57 Relevant experience: Montana House of Representatives, 2005–2009. Profession: Registered nurse and assistant professor of nursing at the Montana State University College of Nursing on the University of Montana campus

Wide-open shot

Name: Bob Parcell Age: 60 Background: Retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel and former Forest Service smokejumper Current position in Sheriff ’s Office: Senior Deputy Sheriff II Wi t h t h e M i s s o u l a C o u n t y Sheriff ’s Office: 28 years Website: www.parcellforsheriff.org The sheriff ’s office has been the focus of some public criticism during McMeekin’s tenure. If elected, how do you plan to right the ship, so to speak? You have to have openness, you have to have access for the public. It’s there now, but maybe it’s not as good as it should be. It can always be improved…You can have a good method of bringing [the public] in. We can have various classes, they can come in and see what’s going on. We need more reserves, and we need cadets. We can work with the city to do ridealongs. The more people know, the more they trust you.

Missoula Independent

In three sentences or less, why should residents of Senate District 48 vote for you? I’m experienced in the legislative process. I’m also good at problem solving and being able to look at multiple points of view and come to a solution. What would you consider your greatest accomplishment from your extensive time serving in the state House of Representatives? The one that gave me the most positive feeling was being co-signer on the bill that expanded CHIP coverage by changing the poverty level. We basically ended up covering more kids. The other thing, during my first session, I introduced and carried a bill to include more labeling and monitoring for mercury that’s used in dental offices. The bill didn’t pass, but I ended up working with the hospital association and the dental association and a variety of other groups to come up with some internal answer man, and I don’t want any yesmen around me. I want guys that question everything and are willing to tell me, “Sir, I think you’re doing this wrong,” or “Why don’t we try this?”…All you got to do is get off their backs, take their saddles off, give them the reins and let them fly. They’ll take it and run with it. I guarantee you they’ll find the answers if you give them the right to do so. Don’t think you’re the only guy that has the answers.

MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF, DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

Why this race matters: Controversial Missoula County Sheriff Mike McMeekin dropped an election year bombshell this January when he announced his retirement from law enforcement effective December 2010. Now the race for county sheriff is wide open for the first time in decades, and Democratic candidates Bob Parcell and Brad Giffin are talking serious change. The winner will face Republican Nick Lisi—running unopposed in the primary—and Independent Carl Ibsen in the general election this November. Though it’s just one step toward office, Missoula has elected Democratic sheriffs since at least 1998.

Website: www.tkhenry.com

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

What do you think will be the deciding factor in winning voter support in the primary? It’s basically leadership. If you have a moral problem anywhere, where does that come from? It doesn’t come from the lower positions. Everything comes down from the top, the general atmosphere of the department is set from the top down. Leadership is the biggest issue in this race. The City of Missoula is currently discussing expanding police authority beyond the city limits. How do you plan to address that possible overlap? It’s very important to keep the cooperation and the coordination between the city and the county. These problems just outside the city limits come about because of this hop, skip and jump thing with annexation. If I think there’s a problem as sheriff, I’m going to go to [Police Chief Mark Muir] and work it out…We understand and give the city their due and we let them enforce the law where they can. We’re spread thinner, and they have more people because they operate in densely populated areas. Missoula County continues to grow, which raises specific issues for the sheriff ’s department. How ready are you to tackle those issues? I think I’m ready because I have the wherewithal. I don’t plan on being the

Page 16 June 3–June 10, 2010

How many guns do you own? I’m a big hunter, I’m a military man. They multiply too, you know? Put two of them together and if the wife isn’t looking pretty soon there’s another one. [Final count: 24 rifles, 16 pistols and one shotgun]. Lastly, McMeekin’s been rocking a pretty gnarly mustache all these years. If elected, will you be carrying on that facial hair tradition? I can’t grow a mustache to beat the band. I look stupid in a mustache only. If I’m going to do it, I’m going with a beard. As a smokejumper, I had a real nice reddish, blondish beard. Beards I like. Mustaches? I did that one time, looked at myself, and it was the stupidest thing I’ve ever seen in my life.

Name: Brad Giffin Age: 49 Background: U.S. Marine Corps veteran and 2006 candidate for Missoula County Sheriff Current position in Sheriff ’s Office: Assistant Patrol Commander Wi t h t h e M i s s o u l a C o u n t y Sheriff ’s Office: 20 years Website: www.giffin4sheriff.org The sheriff ’s office has been the focus of some public criticism during McMeekin’s tenure. If elected,

commitments and regulations to decrease mercury use and exposure.

and corrective facilities are so full that we can’t put people into jail or into treatment.

If elected, what would be your top legislative priority in the Senate? Health care is my background, so one of the more important things will be implementation at the state level of any of the changes from the federal health care reform bill. I think that will be tied considerably to our budget issues because we’ll have a number of newer unemployed people who will lose benefits, and we’re going to have to look at the Medicaid rolls and how we balance those costs. I have the expertise to help us get the most bang for our buck, so to speak, so we can support prevention and early intervention programs.

Another contentious issue heading into the 2011 legislative session is medical marijuana. Do you believe the law should be amended? How? I think we need to look at some of the administrative rules about how it’s implemented. But I don’t know that the law needs to be amended. It’s a people’s initiative, and I think we’ve gotten a really strong message that access to medical marijuana for symptom management is important to the people of Montana.

One issue already being discussed in Helena is how the state can improve its DUI laws. What do you think is the best approach to the issue? My short answer is DUI courts…I don’t know that changing the felony level is going to make any difference if our jails how do you plan to right the ship, so to speak? I don’t really think the ship is listing, to tell you the truth. I think the level of professionalism of the sheriff ’s deputies that currently work there is second to none, and that applies equally to the detention officers. They’re all highly competent, ethical people. You can look at any department and find 2 or 3 percent of people who are going to make mistakes, whether they do it intentionally or accidentally.

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

What do you think will be the deciding factor in winning voter support in the primary? Obviously the budget’s a big challenge. You have revenues that are drying up and services from the sheriff ’s office are already at a premium. We just don’t have any extra people. After the layoffs in the mid-’70s, none of those positions were ever refilled and Missoula County hasn’t gotten any smaller. Unfortunately, dealing with an electorate is a lot like dealing with a jury. You just never really know for sure what appeals to people. The people I’ve spoken to extensively over this campaign want a more open and accessible sheriff ’s office, and that’s part of my platform…It should be as simple as going to a website and being directed to the prop-

What adjective best describes Gov. Brian Schweitzer? The word is indefatigable. The guy never tires. I just don’t know when he sleeps. What’s your campaign song? If you don’t have one, what do you wish it would have been? I haven’t technically thought of one, but it would be something by Bruce Springsteen, and probably “Into the Fire” from The Rising. er place to get in contact with someone who can arrange the service [you need]. The City of Missoula is currently discussing expanding police authority beyond the city limits. How do you plan to address that possible overlap? My understanding of what [Muir] wants to do is simply provide his people the ability to drive from an area in the city through the county to another island of city, and if they see a breach of peace they can act as a peace officer instead of just a citizen…For us as a sheriff ’s office, to bring on additional people is going to require more taxes and that’s just not a popular option. We’re as thin as we can be right now. We’re living within our budget means, and to increase the public safety fund is the only way you could get more sheriff ’s deputies on the street. Missoula County continues to grow, which raises specific issues for the sheriff ’s department. How ready are you to tackle those issues? From the time I started working there I was instantly attracted to moving up the chain to try to make change in the department. And I’ve made a significant amount of change from the bottom…You can sit back in the department and do as little or as much as you want. I think it’s incumbent on the guy who actually runs the ship to have as much exposure to all the different aspects of the department as possible How many guns do you own? Personally owned guns? Five or six. Lastly, McMeekin’s been rocking a pretty gnarly mustache all these years. Will you be carrying on that facial hair tradition? I’m not going to be wearing one myself. I’m perfectly comfortable cleanshaven…That’s just my style.


dish

the

Hungry?

Green blood

Put a Fork in it

FLASHINTHEPAN Good spinach is the beef of plants. It has a meaty vibe and can get you a little high, the way sushi can. I think this green fleshy feeling is related to the extreme chlorophyll density in spinach, and because the plant’s tender, watery build makes this chlorophyll unusually accessible. Chlorophyll is thought to be a “blood building” nutrient because it’s freakishly similar in structure to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying molecule in blood. Other healthful properties attributed to chlorophyll include enhanced healing of wounds (and suppression of foul odors coming from wounds), cancer-fighting qualities, protection from radiation, and speeding of bone healing and tissue regeneration. Small baby spinach leaves are the rage, but they don’t pack the same wallop as a big leaf of savoy spinach, also known as crinkled or curly leaf, like Tyee or Bloomsdale. The leaves are bigger, thicker, and make a bold and juicy mouthful. Unfortunately, most of what’s available in stores are the flat, smooth-leaf varieties that lend themselves to mass cultivation. The whole plant is harvested, bunched with other plants, packed into crates and delivered to your store. Savoy is generally sold loose-leaf, or picked as needed if it’s growing outside. In keeping with the sushi-like feeling that raw spinach imparts, I like to dress my spinach leaves in a mixture of soy sauce, wasabi, rice vinegar and a few drops each of lime juice and sesame oil. Or, for a fun appetizer, dip the leaves into the dressing like chips into salsa; the crinkly folds grip the sauce. If you have a lot of spinach, saag paneer is a great option. This classic Indian dish is made with homemade cheese, though some people make it with tofu instead of cheese, which is totally weak—if you don’t want cheese, fine, but don’t bother searching for some other chunky white protein.

Other spring greens can be used in addition to or instead of spinach, including turnip greens, kale, wild nettles, overwintering mustard greens, dandelion, lambs quarter and other edible weeds. Some aficionados swear that saag paneer isn’t right if it doesn’t contain mustard greens as well as spinach. The dish needs tomatoes in order to taste right. You can use fresh tomatoes, and I’ll do so when I make saag paneer with fall spinach, but I think homemade ketchup is the best. It has a sweet, clove

flavor that goes beautifully with the spices, and its perfect smoothness gives body to the green mush. The process begins with the making of the cheese, aka paneer. Heat half a gallon of whole milk on med/high in a thick-bottomed pan, stirring often with a rubber spatula or similar implement to prevent scalding the milk. You have to be vigilant, because mere seconds will pass between when the milk is almost boiling and when it’s boiling over into a frothy, foamy mess. As soon as it begins to boil, turn off the heat and add four tablespoons of lemon juice, stirring steadily. The milk should separate into watery whey with thick curds floating on top. If the whey still appears creamy, add another tablespoon of lemon juice. Lay at least four layers of cheesecloth into a colander set inside a big bowl and pour the curdled milk through

by ARI LeVAUX

the cheesecloth. The whey can be used for other cooking purposes or fed to animals. Tie the corners of the cheesecloth together and hang over the whey bowl so it continues draining and the curds settle into a hard cheese. Squeeze the curds to get more whey out. Now wash your spinach and/or other greens. While spinach stems are tender enough to leave in, tougher stems like from kale, nettles or mustard greens should be removed. For each half-pound of greens, chop one or two serrano or jalapeno peppers and a teaspoon of ginger. Cook the peppers and ginger for a few minutes in a quarter-inch of water. Add a half-teaspoon of salt, then add the greens. Put a lid on and cook for five minutes, stirring occasionally and being careful not to let the water evaporate. Let the greens cool, then puree in a blender. Cut your cheese into cubes and lightly brown them in a hot pan with oil or ghee. The browning brings out a nutty flavor. Set aside the browned cheese. In a pan with oil or Photo by Ari LeVaux ghee (or mustard oil) on medium heat, add a pinch of fenugreek seeds, a pinch of cumin powder, and a pinch or more of coriander, and cook for 30 seconds. Add an onion, chopped, and your tomato product: either a fresh tomato, minced, or a quarter cup ketchup or half a cup canned tomatoes, and one or two chopped garlic cloves. Cook until it’s integrated and soupy. Then add the cheese and stir-fry until the cheese heats up. Then add the pureed greens. Let it cook together for a few minutes, and it’s done. Saag paneer is typically served with aromatic rice, like basmati or jasmine. And the green, chlorophyll cream can also be made in bulk, when spinach is plentiful, and frozen in meal-sized portions for later use. It ages nicely. Which is more than you can say about sushi.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Bernice’s: a Missoula’s staple; serving strong coffee and baked goods in the heart of the Hip Strip since 1978. Stop by and see us at the Clark Fork River Market. We’ll be there bright and early on Saturdays beginning May 8th from 8AM to 1PM. If you miss the market, we’re open every day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest

produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm-11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours Monday-Saturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery...Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza.

Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

at Food For Thought.

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 3pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

2010 SUMMER MOVIE MAKING CAMPS MCAT is sponsoring two summer video camps for kids age 9 to 13+. Camps cost $100 each and include a year-long membership in Missoula Community Access Television, a $40 value.

Camps meet afternoons from 1:15 to 5:45.

Check them out at www.mcat.org or call 542-6228

Page 17 June 3–June 10, 2010


the

dish

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross • 549-5595 Bright was my face when quickening steps followed my desire for a ColdStone creation; and enjoyed, a dipped waffle bowl, upon whose top shone glorious chocolate and sprinkles, as from a rampart's edge, I overlooked the shakes, the smoothies, the cookies and, above all, the ice cream cakes, decorated exactly how I wanted them–a vast milky river, stretching in the sun. It was then I realized: It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$ Doc's Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. Open Mon-Thurs 7am-3pm, Fri & Sat 8am-3pm, Sun 8am-3pm. $-$$ Front Street Pasta & Wraps 247 W. Front Street • 728-6655 Can't decide? Front Street Pasta and Wraps has something to satisfy every craving. We have everything from giant wraps to wok tossed dishes. Spicy peanut sauce goes great with just about everything. Vegetarian friendly menu is great for the non-meat eater. And now you can enjoy a cold beer or a glass of wine with your meal. So step off the beaten path of Higgins and ride into Front Street Pasta and Wraps. Just next to the Carousel on West Front Street. Open M-F, 10am-8pm. $ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Harry Davids 2700 Paxson Street, Suite H • 830-3277 Kicking off in February is LIVE BAND KARAOKE and LADIES NIGHT at Harry David’s every Thursday night at 9:30pm. Drink specials for the Ladies! Part Karaoke / Part Dance

night with the band Party Trained, this is your opportunity to sing like a rockstar with a live band backing you up – and it will be every Thursday! If Karaoke is not your thing – no problem the band will be playing in between karaoke songs to keep you on the dance floor! Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave. • 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch 11:302PM and dinner 5PM-close. LIVE JAZZ Thursdays FREE $-$$

COOL

June

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Bolivia Fair Trade

COFFEE ICE CREAMS

"One of our favorite roasts."

$10.50/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

Missoula Independent

Page 18 June 3–June 10, 2010

HAPPIESTHOUR Stone of Accord Claim to fame: The North Reserve relative of popular downtown Irish pub Sean Kelly’s. This place is a bit more restaurant than bar, but still drinker-friendly.

appropriately slow. Plenty of local brews are also on tap.

Biggest difference from Sean Kelly’s: The illustrious Chef Dan Zachary. The former Sean Kelly’s chef—co-winner of our 2008 Best of Missoula poll for Best Chef—moved to the new location when it opened in May 2009. Stone of Accord offers the same menu as Sean Kelly’s, but the specials are all Chef Dan’s.

Who y o u ’ r e d r i n k i n g with: Mostly travelers, since it’s located near I-90 and a cluster of hotels, but Stone of Accord also attracts a good number of Grant Creek locals. The latenight crowd includes service industry workers on account of the 10 percent “SIN” discount.

Okay, impress us with a Chef Dan special: The night we were there, we saw baked tilapia topped with baked crab meat and a pineapple salsa, served with rice pilaf, veggies and soda bread. When the tilapia ran out, Chef Dan featured a 12-ounce Kobe steak with chive horseradish. This is a drinking column, so talk about the bar: You’re ordering Guinness, of course. Will MacKenzie, the sort of affable bartender who knows his customers by name, pours it

Happy Hour specials: None.

Atmosphere: Typical Irish pub vibe, with plenty of Guinness signage and a replica Stone of Accord near the entrance. Much like Sean Kelly’s, the staff is disarmingly friendly. How to find it: 4951 N. Reserve Street, just south of I-90. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.


Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on all-natural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$

$…Under $5

SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 5497979. $$–$$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 • www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana. Certified Organic Wines, No Added Sulfites. Tasting Room Hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Before you visit, consider: "Come on, drink up, Lewis. We have thinking to do." Chief Inspector Morse, Cambridge, UK $$ $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

Missoula’s

FREE Summer Concert Series!

Thursdays Q 5:30-8:30 pm Q Caras Park Live Music, Food & Beer Garden Free Chair Massages and Family Activities! June 3

June 10

Joan Zen

Bad Neighbor

Family Activity:

Family Activity:

soul, funk, r&b, reggae

Bitterroot Gymnastics Obstacle Course

pop, rock

spectrUM & Child Care Resources

Wednesdays Q 11 am-2 pm Q Caras Park June 9

June 16

Bad Neighbor

Strange Brew

pop, rock

rock

Kids Activity:

Missoula Public Library

Kids Activity:

Intl Wildlife Film Festival

For more information, call the Missoula Downtown Association at 543.4238 www.missouladowntown.com

$$–$$$…$15 and over

ASKARI Vegetarian chickens Dear Flash, Cleaning out the freezer, I’m finding things like deer kidneys and elk livers that seemed like a good idea at the time, but I don’t think I’ll be getting to. Is it okay to feed meat scraps to my chickens? I’ve got turkeys and guinea fowl this year too, and they’re supposed to be getting more protein than the layers. Will meat taint the eggs and meat? Will the taste of blood make the kids go postal? —Postal Hen Patrol

Q

Chickens are naturally bug eating, carcass pecking, turd-gobbling foragers. Interestingly, both eggs and chicken meat is commercially available that’s advertised as from vegetarian birds, a claim that is most certainly false, and worse if it’s true. Chickens have the sharp eyes and quick reflexes to snap flies out of the air, and chickens will go after any bug they can. The only way to ensure they’re truly vegetarian is to keep them in a completely regulated environment, aka a sterile box.

A

Before anyone runs out to boycott vegetarian chicken products, what these claims often mean is that animal byproducts—such as the stuff they scrape off the meat-packing plant floor—were not added to the chicken feed. Some scrutiny of the packaging is in order. But in a home scenario, the short answer to your question is “yes.” Home-generated animal byproducts are fine for chickens. Just don’t feed them chicken or other bird meat, because cannibalism has been linked to Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) in some species. And even though mad chicken disease has yet to be discovered, feeding chicken meat to chicken just seems wrong. Doesn’t it? Something else to keep in mind is that putting meat in your chicken yard could attract unwanted animals like raccoons, bears, coyotes, skunks, etc. I would put out your meat a little at a time, cut into chicken bite-sized portions. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net.

Missoula Independent

Page 19 June 3–June 10, 2010


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings June 3–June 10, 2010

THURSDAY October

29

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit It’s all about the tattoos, man. The exhibit Big Air features photos like the one above by Richard Cornelius and others by Rita Pignato during a First Friday opening reception Fri., June 4, from 5–8 PM at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

We're proud THURSDAY June to be part of a team that is committed to earning nightlife your trust. Patrick Marsolek

03

You can let the Montana Department of Transportation know that the Exxon/ Imperial Oil Kearl Module Transport Project isn’t such a good idea during a protest in opposition to the project, which begins at noon at Missoula’s MDT office, 2100 W. Broadway St. Free. Alternately, meet with others at 11:30 AM at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue and bring your bike to ride to the MDT office. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.org. John Schiever cross-examines your suds

Presentation & Signing

A JOYFUL INTUITION Wednesday, June 9th 7:00 pm

Missoula Independent

Page 20 June 3–June 10, 2010

for some very important details when he plays acoustic “brewglass” music at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Help assist a youngster battling cancer during the Cash Michael Hyde Broadway Benefit, which features music by Chereal, as well as a silent auction and drawing from 6–11 PM at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway St. $5. To donate items for the auction call Stacy at 550-3794. The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. in Whitefish, presents Artistic Visions, an exhibit of works on paper, photography and oils by Victor Daniel with a First Thursday Gallery Night reception from 6–9 PM at the gallery. Free. Call 863-ARTS.

Jazz makes the pad thai go down smooth when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents free live jazz from local musicians at 6:15 PM this and every Thu. at the restaurant. This week: Keaton Wilson and Steve Kalling perform. Call 830-3237. Less is truly more when permaculture guru Paul Wheaton leads the talk “Permaculture Gardening in Missoula–Getting Started,” which covers things you can do in your plot to raise more food with less water, fertilizer and work, starting at 6:30 PM in the large meeting room of the Missoula end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 4, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com. Support the completion of Ewam’s Garden of 1000 Buddhas to prepare for a visit from the Dalai Lama during An Evening with Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche, a fundraiser that features a live auction, a talk by Ewam founder Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche, and food/drinks at 6:30 PM at the Governor’s Room in the Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. $60 per couple/$35 per person, with tickets available at Worden’s Market, Jeannette Rankin Peace Center and at the door. Call 726-0555. Missoula’s homeWORD presents a community design charrette for Solstice and —the organization’s new, mixedConfluence— use building project—from 6:30–9:30 PM in the conference center at the Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 532-HOME. Just make sure you don’t have blues intolerance: Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W., keeps the bread flowing and puts blues on tap during Blues and Bread IV, a first Thursday event from 8–10 PM featuring blues music by MudSlide Charley, as well as filled sourdough hard rolls for $1. Free to attend. The Missoula Food Bank receives 25 cents from every hard roll sold. Call Marco Littig at 728-1358. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Feast your eyes on a film about American boulder climbing during a screening of The Disciples of Gill, a film by Pat Ament about legendary climber Pat Gill, with a screening at 7:30 PM in the basement of The Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. $10. Call 543-6966. Seattle’s The Moondoggies probably won’t let you rub Sriracha sauce on their fangs when they play rock and folk rock with Portland, Ore. indie folk band Blitzen Trapper at 9 PM at the Palace. $13/$11 advance at Ear Candy. (See Noise in this issue.)

He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY June

04

It’s all about a meal and a deal when the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., presents its lunch with a full meal and dessert from 11:30 AM–12:30 PM each day at the center. $5. The menu changes daily. Call 543-7154. Nature gets artistically nurtured during Ecology Project International’s wildlife art exhibit, which features work by Sven Lindauer, Jennifer Bardsley and Jim Main during a First Friday opening reception from 4–7 PM at the Swift Building, 315 S. Fourth St. E. Free.

nightlife Get oily when artist Jennifer Bardsley presents a series of abstract landscape paintings that utilize non-toxic livestock markers—aka oil paint sticks—during a First Friday opening reception starting at 5 PM at House Design Studio, 133 N. Higgins Ave. Free. He’s got an eye for abstraction: Yellowstone Photo, 321 N. Higgins Ave., presents a series of photos by John Lester featuring closeups and abstracts in nature during a First Friday opening from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 728-7637. The mundane gets a strong aesthetic injection during Diamonds & Rust, an exhibit featuring ink and watercolor works by Lorna Gabel, by Jeffrey Olson, with an opening reception from 5–8 PM at Hamilton’s Art City, 407 W. Main St. Free. Call 363-4764. Make sure you’re gnawing on something fungal when editors Renee Roehl and Kelly Chadwick read from Decomposition: Fungi-Inspired Poems, an anthology of poems written by the likes of Gary Snyder, Sherman Alexie, Margaret Atwood and others, from 5–7:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220

SPOTLIGHT f u n g a l m e te r I don’t know about you, but I love the taste of mushrooms chopped up in a salad, or sprinkled in a Thai curry dish. But as far as my relationship with this fleshy fungus goes, I’ll admit that it’s always been a one-way street. It’s something I consume, and nothing more. But for 72 writers—who include Gary Snyder, Sylvia Plath and Margaret Atwood—the mushroom, along with its fungal relatives like lichen and mold, has become the subject of poetic adoration and dissection in Decomposition: An Anthology of FungiInspired Poems—a collection of work that WHAT: Reading and Signing of Decomposition: An Anthology of Fungi-Inspired Poems WHO: Editors Renee Roehl and Kelly Chadwick WHEN: Fri., June 4, 5–7:30 PM WHERE: Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave.

celebrates the essence of this far reaching, fertile organism. Authors like Sherman Alexie bring dark humor to the phenomenon of fungi with “The Anatomy Of Mushrooms,” a poem that features lines like: “Now, after all these years, I remember the woman, whom/I loved,/who casually mentioned that mushrooms reminded her of penises/though I cannot recall for sure if the comparison fascinated or repelled her./Soon after that conversation, she left me for another woman.” The late D.H. Lawrence, on the other hand, gets soap-boxy when he compares mushrooms to bourgeoisie Englishmen in “How Beastly The Bourgeoisie Is.” Other scribes, like Alison Hawthorne Deming, offer vivid descriptions of fungi sprawling on the forest floor with her piece “This Ground Made of Trees.” These literary spores spread to town this week when Renee Roehn and Kelly Chadwick, the anthology’s editors, swing by for a reading and signing. So even if you hate the taste of mushrooms, or can’t stand the sight of slimy mold, I think you ought to find something in this fungal jungle of stanzas to appreciate.

HOW MUCH: Free

N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Spotlight above.) They’re only clowning around, that’s all. Claws Salon, 101 S. Higgins Ave., presents a walking art exhibit featuring a ringleader, clowns, music and popcorn as well as clothing designs by Meghan Manzer, photography by Green Door Photography starting at 5 PM. Free.

—Ira Sather-Olson

Look out for a childlike monster on the canvas when artist Patricia Thornton presents Misfits, Monsters and Pretty Things, Part V: the Rocky Mountains, an exhibit featuring her mixed media pieces that opens during a First Friday reception from 5–8 PM at The Brink Gallery, 111 W. Front St. Free. (See Scope in this issue.)

Showcasing nine Missoula residences demonstrating innovative sustainable living practices!

All tours begin at Home Resource, 1515 Wyoming

Guided bio-bus tour $25/person Guided scooter tour $20/person Guided bike tour $10/person (kids 12 and under free) Guided walking tour $10/person (kids 12 and under free)

Tickets on sale at

www.homeword.org Contact Liz at 532-4663 x16 or liz@homeword.org for more info! Missoula Independent

Page 21 June 3–June 10, 2010


Montana Comprehensive Epilepsy Program Most people with epilepsy should be seizure free on a single drug. Are you still having seizures? Are you on more than one drug? Do you know what type of epilepsy you have? Are you a surgical or VNS candidate? Do you have side effects of your anti-seizure drugs? Are you paying too much for your anti-epilepsy drugs? Is your insurance demanding you take generics? Can the epilepsy diet help you? Are you one of millions of people who have depression and epilepsy? Are you a candidate for an experimental drug? We can answer these questions, make an accurate epilepsy diagnosis and help you choose the anti-epilepsy therapy that best suits your individual needs. Thomas Swanson, M.D. is our medical director and a nationally recognized expert in epilepsy, epilepsy research, and EEG. As a faculty of the University of Montana and member of the University of Washington Regional Epilepsy Center he brings valuable experience in epilepsy research and patient care to Western Montana. We treat adult, childhood, and neonatal epilepsy with clinic locations in Missoula, the Community Hospital Pediatric Specialty Clinics, and Great Falls.

“seizure free, no side effects”

Call 327-3895 mtepilepsy.com

EOS 7D Body: $1,750 - $100 INSTANT SAVINGS = $1,650 EOS 5D Mark II Body: $2,600 - $100 INSTANT SAVINGS = $2,500 Rebel T1i & EF-S 18-55 IS Lens: $825 - $50 INSTANT SAVINGS = $775 Rebel XS, EF-S 18-55 IS & EF-S 55-250 IS Lens: $950 - $200 INSTANT SAVINGS = $750

Missoula Independent

Page 22 June 3–June 10, 2010

Photographer Joshua Meier keeps dreamlike surrealism on tap when he presents The Parables (and other impossible events), an exhibit of his photos presented during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. A gallery talk with Meier follows at 7 PM. Call 7280447. (See Spotlight in this issue.) These ladies know what’s up: The Catalyst, 111 N. Higgins Ave., presents The Pattee Canyon Ladies’ Salon, an exhibit running from 5–7 PM that features paintings, ceramics and encaustic works by the likes of Nancy Erickson, Stephanie Frostad, Kristi Hager, Becki Johnson, Beth Lo, Leslie Van Stavern Millar, Shari Montana, Linda Tawney and Janet Whaley. Free. Surrealism mixes with beauty during Big Air, a series of photos by Richard Cornelius and Rita Pignato that features images of western skies and people like skateboarders catching air, with a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-0171. Go for the art, stay for the Olde Bongwater beer: Montana Caregivers Network, 345 W. Front St., hosts a First Friday exhibit of paintings by Elise Jordan from 5–8 PM. Free. Also includes a set by the band When Copper Was King, and refreshments like Olde Bongwater Porter beer and munchies. The Montana Autism Community presents Missoula’s “Exceptional Kids,” a First Friday art opening featuring work by children with special needs with a reception from 5–8 PM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St. Free.

The Emerald Isle gets adored through imagery when DeAndria Gutzmer presents Coming Out Into the Heart of Ireland, a series of images inspired by the people, land and cultural beauty of Ireland with a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at the Western Montana Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 202. Free. Don’t expect the ancient when John Ryan presents recent paintings during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Keep your gaze fixed on those right angles when artist Sasha Nikole Smith presents architecturally inspired paintings on display during a First Friday reception at 5 PM at The Mandolin restaurant, inside the Union Club, 208 E. Main St. Free. Soak up something exotic during Foreign Landscapes, an exhibit of medium format photography by Jackson Goodell featured during a First Friday opening reception starting at 5 PM at Computer Central, 136 E. Broadway St. Free. Local artist Susan Carlson presents Wood Drawings & Woodfire Ceramics, an exhibit featuring 20 drawings using Sharpie markers, along with woodfire ceramics, during a First Friday opening at 5 PM at A&E Architects, 222 N. Higgins Ave. Free. The Montana Wilderness Association presents its Wilderness Walks kickoff event, which includes local brews, barbecue kabobs, music by The Lil’ Smokies, as well as the chance to pick up a free copy of the 2010 Wilderness Walks Guide Book, from 5–8 PM at The Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. Free, with the music running from 5–7 PM. Call

Gabriel at 541-8615 and visit wildmontana.org. He’ll kick your aesthetic ball: Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave., presents Viva El Futbol!!!, an exhibit of soccer-inspired art by L. Alexander Wolfe with a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Includes vino and cookies. It’s all about landscapes and more landscapes when Montana Art & Framing, 709 Ronan St., hosts a First Friday opening reception featuring western Montana landscape art from 5–9 PM. Free. Includes work by Elloie Jeter, Te r e s a G a r l a n d Wa r n e r , Elizabeth Hughes Bass, Elene Weege, Stephanie Frostad and Don Mundt. Call 541-7100 and visit montanaart.com. The Monte Dolack Gallery, 139 W. Front St., presents In Retrospect, a series of paintings and prints by Monte Dolack and Mary Beth Percival with a First Friday opening reception starting at 5 PM at the gallery. Free. Bust another move with Missoula’s gang of improvisational movers during “Seeds in the Streets,” a First Friday performance with Turning the Wheel of Missoula which starts with interested participants meeting at 5:15 PM at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue Free to participate. You’ll warm up for 20 minutes with facilitators, and then move through the streets until 7 PM. Wearing solid spring colors is encouraged. Call 830-3285. Colors will not bleed off the canvas when artist Kim Shirley presents rural western Montana images during a First Friday opening reception from 5:30–8 PM at Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W. Free. An artistic shake of textural proportions goes down your art appreciation gullet when Lisa Crews and Brock Elam present their fiber and paint work, respectively, from 6–9 PM at Stevensville’s River’s Mist Gallery of Fine Art, 317 Main St. Free. Also features acrylic and scratch board work from Tasha Sorenson. Call 777-0520. It’s all about the choo choo and then some when photog Samantha Woodard presents On Track, a series of photographic perspectives of the Montana rail system with a First Friday opening reception from 6–8 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Free. Includes drinks and snacks. Photographer Rick Landry shows the impermanence of her manmade objects during his exhibit Car Heart Collection HDR metal prints of vintage vehicles at Art Focus, 215 W Main St. on the First Friday Art Walk in Hamilton, June 4, from 6–8 PM. Call 406-363-4112.


SPOTLIGHT

surreal snapshots

In one photo a couple sits at a table, pill bottles strewn about, looking strung out and like they had one too many chugs from a bottle of liquor the night before. In another, a woman faces a blurry city, suitcases in hand, about to take the plunge into a world that seems unfamiliar, yet vastly appealing. These are just a few of the images snapped by Joshua Meier, whose exhibit The Parables (and other impossible events) opens this week at the Missoula Art Museum and tells of his personal stories of frustration, doubt, sadness and success, with the use of models and objects in spaces that are usually vast and remote. He creates these works through large format photography—think big equipment, and large-scale photos—and then processes these black and white images in such a way that they look vintage. The results are definitely surreal, and at WHAT: First Friday opening of The Parables (and other impossible events) WHO: Joshua Meier WHEN: Fri., June 4, 5–8 PM, with a gallery talk at 7 PM WHERE: Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: Visit missoulaartmuseum.org

Hamilton’s Frame Shop & Gallery, 325 Main St., presents pastel landscapes and florals by Florence artist Elloie Jeter with a First Friday opening reception from 6–8 PM at the shop. Free. Call 363-6684. Just say wow: Local 15-year-old singer/songwriter Kira Means keeps you in awe when she plays a CD release concer t f r o m 6 : 30 – 9 P M a t B r e a k Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Includes special guests Eden Atwood, Tom Catmull, and others. (See Soundcheck in this issue.) This is gonna be tha bomb: The FayRay Artist Collective presents F-BOMB, a performance that occurs throughout the heart of downtown Missoula during First Friday featuring avant-garde fashion designs made by models, and a narrative you won’t forget, beginning at 6:30 PM. Free. Get absorbed in a haunted verbal landscape when poet Rob Schlegel reads and signs copies of The Lesser Fields at 7 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-9010. Witness the creations of an assemblage master when Michael DeMeng hosts a book signing and art show for his new book Dusty

times, completely shrouded in mystery. Take, for instance, “Perhaps This Time,” above, which looks like it was shot on the surface of Mars, and lacks any clear-cut narrative. Meier, who’s from Oklahoma and currently resides in his home state, visits Missoula this week to present his exhibit, and to talk about his creative methods. But he’s no stranger to town. In fact, he graduated from the Rocky Mountain School of Photography in 1999, went on to teach at the school from 2000 to 2007, and started Parables when he was living here. And, if you’re a fan of local folk musician David Boone, you’ll instantly recognize Meier’s work since he’s the photographer behind the shots taken for Boone’s most recent studio albums.

Diablos: Folklore, Iconography, Assemblage, Ole!, from 7–10 PM at Studio/Gallery, 1001 S. Fourth St. W. Free. Andrea Harsell makes the wine go down just fine when she plays a solo set at The Keep Restaurant, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, from 7–10 PM. Free. Call 728-5132.

—Ira Sather-Olson

She’s definitely not on the run: Karen Buley reads and signs copies of Nurses on the Run: Why They Come, Why They Stay, at 7 PM at Chapter One Book Store in Hamilton, 252 W. Main St. Free. Ten percent of proceeds will be donated to nurse educator scholarships. Call Karen at 251-2507.

Missoula Independent

Page 23 June 3–June 10, 2010


Orchard Lane, at 8 PM. Free. Call The Elenita Brown Dancers shake it 837-2836. like a salt shaker to hip-hop, Vivaldi, Strauss and Spanish/Flamenco music The Lifers will not be giving out free during a dance performance at 7 PM nose jobs when they play the Eagles at the Stevensville Senior Center, 100 Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Mission St. Free. Call 777-3546. Free. Watch those bellybuttons with your best Locals Hologram Pants bludgeon artistic gaze when Cat’s Eye, 137 E. your khakis when they bring synth, Main St., presents live belly dancing rock, dance and hip-hop tunes along by local dancers for First Friday from with psychedelic visuals to the 7–8 PM at the shop. Free. Vino will also Badlander at 9 PM. $5. be served. Seattle’s Your Divine Tragedy keeps Wartime Blues breaks you free from the cataclysmic drama to a minimum the chains of depression when they when they pour you a rock elixir at the woo you with Americana and folk outPalace at 9 PM. $5. Locals Eliptikys side the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at and High Voltage open. 7:30 PM. Free. The Wild Coyotes pinch penny A child struggles to navigate the confuspinchers when they play country and ing, humorous and frightening experirock at the White Front Bar in ences she undergoes in the McCarthy Phillipsburg, 110 E. Broadway St., at 9 era during a performance of How I PM. Free. Lost My Voice, a one-woman play County Line keeps drawing that line by Arlee’s Raso Hultgren with a Rust takes its toll on curmudgeonly souls. Jeffrey in the sand when they play country performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Olson presents his found object metal sculptures, during the grand opening of the Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit during Diamonds & Rust—an exhibit that includes Sunrise Saloon (formerly The Other howilostmyvoice.com. watercolor works by Lorna Gabel—at a First Friday Side), 1110 Strand Ave., at 9 PM. Free. opening reception Fri., June 4, from 5–8 PM at Two sisters, the laundromat they inheritCall 728-1559. Hamilton’s Art City, 407 W. Main St. Free. ed, and a whole lot of singing is bound Russ Nasset and The Revelators to go down when Stevensville’s Beth just want to tickle your pickled okra Schreiber and Cara Ayres present their musi- Los Angeles’ Edward Sharpe & The cal theater Suds ‘n Suds, with a perform- Magnetic Zeros bust your psychedelic gut when they play Rockabilly and country at ance at 8 PM at the Stevensville Playhouse, they play psych folk pop at the Wilma at 8 Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 319 Main St. $20, with tickets available by PM. $18/$17.50 advance at Rockin Rudy’s 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. calling 239-1218 or by visiting Valley Drug and ticketfly.com. Zeppo wonders if you’re too sexy for your and Variety in Stevensville. Proceeds benefit It’s Jay, not Clay: Jay Aiken plays a solo set shirt when they play blues and R & B at the Stevensville’s “Save our Swimming Pool” at the Raven Restaurant and Bar in Woods Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. fund. Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork on 39 Tom Catmull and The Clerics take your

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Page 24 June 3–June 10, 2010

fortune cookies hostage when they play Americana at Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Seattle’s Visqueen let’s you get blasted in a blast furnace when they play rock at the Top Hat at 10 PM. $5. Locals Victory Smokes and Velcro Kicks open.

SATURDAY June

05

Help out some local derby girls by snagging some wicked roller derby merch along with furniture, toys, books, clothing and whatever else you can think of during the Hellgate Rollergirls Big Garage Sale, which begins at 7 AM at the Hellgate Rollergirls Headquarters, 812 Toole St. Free to attend. Missoula’s IRS Taxpayer Assistance Center, 2681 Palmer St., hosts an open house from 9 AM–2 PM to assist taxpayers and small business owners with their unresolved tax issues. Free. Visit irs.gov/ newsroom. Find out the ins and outs of being el presidente of a university when Lawrence Pettit signs copies of If You Live by the Sword: Politics in the Making and Unmaking of a University President, from 10:30 AM–noon at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881.


BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 "Viva El Futbol!!" Betty's Divine celebrates the World Game with original artwork by L. Alexander Wolfe. Bring in the world's biggest sporting event in style. Vino, cookies, and good times. 5-8pm. BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Join us at Butterfly Herbs for our June First Friday celebration where artist John Ryan presents many of his recent paintings. From 5–8 PM at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave.

ETERNAL SPRINGS HEALING 180 S. 3rd West Grand Opening 5-9 p.m., Eternal Springs Healing Center, 2nd floor, 180 So. 3rd West. Meet instructors, sip chai, learn about classes, free gifts. See First Friday exhibit Cherry by Jessica Russell. Register to win classes. Paint The Tree of Life mural with Elise Jordan, 1-3 p.m. in the garden below.

HIGHLAND WINDS 1520 S. 7th St. W., 541-7577 This First Friday, Highland Winds Gallery is featuring Peggy Miller's giclee "A Hot Montana Day". Whether looking for a Father's Day gift or just browsing, come check out our collection. We are just west of Russell at 1520 S. 7th St. W. Summer: Art Studio open First Fridays 3-8 p.m.

MISS ZULA'S 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 Featuring the art of Deana Mattos Diefenbach. "Woman, mother, advocate for my daughter on the Autistic Spectrum. Teacher, student, community volunteer. My art is inspired by color, nature, life and love. It is a passion, emotion, self expression, release, & part of who I am." NOTEWORTHY PAPER & PRESS 101 S. Higgins, 541-6683 Stop in and see our new card lines from Sycamore Street Press and Dude + Chick! And we always have GREAT new merchandise arriving daily! Handmade papers, art supplies and so much more.

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Missoula Independent

Page 25 June 3–June 10, 2010


Get a taste of the aesthetic fruits of artists in the Bitterroot during the Artists Along the Bitterroot Studio Tour, which covers over 20 artists’ studios and five galleries and runs from 10:30 AM–6 PM throughout the Bitterroot. Free. Call 777-2954 and visit artistsalongthebitterroot.com for a tour map. Honor the Earth and Women Donors Network present the panel

“Environmental Justice in Montana: Protecting the Land for Future Generations,” which features moderator Winona LaDuke, comments from Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, Gail Small and others, plus a short performance by the Indigo Girls, starting at 1:30 PM at the Salish Kootenai College, 58138 Hwy. 93 in Pablo. Free. Call Jodi Rave at 396-8537.(See Agenda in this issue.)

nightlife MudSlide Charley opens the floodgates to shower you in shades of royal blue when they play gutbucket blues the Blacksmith Brewing Co, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. El 3-Oh, featuring members of Cash for Junkers, lets the gypsy jazz slide into your suds when they

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play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Help him write original tune number 501: Sacramento, Calif.’s JD Valerio brings the folk—with over 500 original songs under his belt— when the singer/songwriter plays Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway St., at 7 PM. $3. Local Michael Boise opens. Walking Corpse Syndrome brings on the darkness in support of the band’s most recent album, Narcissist, when they play an all ages show with Kancerus and Eliptikys at the Union Hall at 7 PM. $5. A child struggles to navigate the confusing, humorous and frightening experiences she undergoes in the McCarthy era during a performance of How I Lost My Voice, a one-woman play by Arlee’s Raso Hultgren with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit howilostmyvoice.com. The Lifers will not be giving out free nose jobs when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. County Line keeps drawing that line in the sand when they play country during the grand opening of the Sunrise Saloon (formerly The Other Side), 1110 Strand Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 728-1559.

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Missoula Independent

Page 26 June 3–June 10, 2010

Slowly but Shirley, Airstream Safari and Greenstar keep your cold cuts ultra chilled when they play Sean Kelly’s at 9 PM. Cost TBA. Durham, N.C.’s The Mountain Goats want you to wander through the roughage when they play indie rock/folk at the Palace at 9 PM. $12/$10 advance at Ear Candy. New York’s The Beets open. (See Noise in this issue.) Andre Floyd and Mood Iguana lets you fondle that stack of mood crystals when they play blues and rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Locals Ebola Syndrome, Kid Traxiom and ir8prim8 let their bass tones cleanse your insides when they play dubstep, glitch-hop and other styles at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY June

06

Just when you thought there weren’t enough farmers’ markets, along comes the Target Range Community Farmers’ Market, 10 AM–1 PM this and every Sun. until Oct. 10 at the parking lot of Target Range School, 4095 South Ave. W. Free. Interested vendors should call Todd at 531-0877.

nightlife Scott Moore just asks you for a tad more lovin’ when he plays the Raven Restaurant and Bar in


Woods Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork on 39 Orchard Lane, at 5 PM. Free. Call 837-2836. Enjoy a night of dinner and theater during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s “Dinner A la Commedia,” a dinner theater featuring Commedia dell’arte, mime, and clowning with food from Italy, France and Germany starting at 6 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $65. Visit mtactors.com for tickets or call 241-8209. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Men always get to belt out a slick tune or two during Man Night featuring Karaoke, which occurs this and every Sun. starting at 9 PM at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 251-5402. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 9:30 PM. Free.

MONDAY June

07

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every

Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

nightlife Enjoy a night of dinner and theater during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s “Dinner A la Commedia,” a dinner theater featuring Commedia dell’arte, mime, and clowning with food from Italy, France and Germany starting at 6 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $65. Call 241-8209.or visit mtactors.com for tickets. You’re getting sleepy, very, very sleepy. Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents a performance by hypnotist Terrance B, at 8:30 PM at the bar. $12 day-of/$10 advance/$15 reserved seats. Call 830-3277. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9 PM. Free. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlander’s Service Industry Nigh starting at 9 PM. Free. Also, if you’ve got an iPod, bring it in and they’ll play it.

and signs copies of The Right Velocity, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? This one is for all you prog heads: Robert Fripp founded which prog rock group? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) He just wants to be your buddy: Nashville’s Buddy Mondlock picks at your heartstrings when he plays country and folk at the Johnny Arlee/Victor Charlo Theatre at Salish Kootenai College, 58138 Hwy. 93, at 8 PM. $14/$12 advance at Shannon Nunlist Physical Therapy in Polson or True Value Hardware in Ronan. Call 800-823-4386. You’ll wish he was your preacher. Olympia, Wash.’s Arrington de Dionyso (of the band Old Time Relijun) lets his throat do the talking when he plays improvised experimental music at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Kansas punks Rooftop Vigilantes and locals Streetlight People open. (See Noise in this issue.)

TUESDAY June

08

A private eye, crime, and a plethora of weed wherever he turns ought to make for an interesting night when Brian McDonnell reads

Missoula Independent

Page 27 June 3–June 10, 2010


WEDNESDAY June

09

Your weekly lunch date with almost everyone comes at 11 AM at Caras Park during Out to Lunch, which features food vendors, kids’ activities and music this week by the Bad Neighbor. Free. Call 543-4238 and visit missouladowntown.com.

nightlife Saxophonist Donny McCaslin saxes up the stage while Boris Kozlov and Johnathan Blake provide pitch perfect accompaniment when they play jazz as the Donny McCaslin Trio during another installment of DalyJazz, which starts at 7 PM at 240 Daly Ave. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Get perceptual when Patrick Marsolek hosts a presentation and signs copies of A Joyful Intuition–How to Access Your Inner Knowing for Insight, Healing and Happiness, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Knoxville, Tenn.’s Madeline Ava lets her ukulele command the night when she plays with tour mate Max Weiss at 8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $5, all ages. Locals The Scribblers and A Memory of Elephants open. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the

Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Robert Fripp founded King Crimson, a band considered to be gods of the prog rock genre. He also collaborated with Brian Eno too, just so you know. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Freya” by The Sword (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. The Palace presents a DJ set of reggae, dancehall and hip-hop by Jamaican native Supa J, aka the Badlander/Palace’s bouncer Jimmy, starting at 9 PM. Free. California’s Sarah McCoy and the Zippidy Yeahs lets the jam slip out of your jellyroll when they play jam, progressive and psychedelic blues/folk with Michigan’s Ultraviolet Hippopotamus, at 10 PM at the Top Hat.

THURSDAY June

10

The Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. in Hamilton, presents workshops on how to be a successful artist with Douglas E. Taylor, from 4–6 PM at the museum. $29.

nightlife

the biting humor flowing when they play the Palace at 9 PM with Missoula native DJ Pony P and DJ Pozibelle. $5. Locals Tonsofun, Linkletter and Traffic open.

It’s time for dinner and a summer show with hundreds of your fellow friends during Downtown ToNight, which features food, kids’ activities and music from Bad Neighbor starting at 5:30 PM at Caras Park. Free. Call 543-4238 or visit missouladowntown.com.

Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free.

Boulder, Colo.’s Salem tickles your toes and massages your brain when they play jazz and funk with spoken word and Afro-Cuban beats at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

California’s Trevor Green prefers his greens funky fresh when he plays folk, bluegrass and jazz with String Band Theory, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA.

Reg ister by calling 363-3338. Visit brvhsmuseum.org.

Get those benjamins by going permie: Paul Wheaton, local permaculture guru, presents the talk “Make the Big Bucks with Permaculture Farming,” which covers around two dozen ways to make money from the diversity of permaculture farming with the discussion beginning at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. They’ll singe you with their dirty rhymes: San Francisco female hip-hop duo TOAST keeps

Those folks with the FayRay Artist Collective are at it again. This time, they be droppin’ an aesthetic bomb on downtown known as F-BOMB during First Friday at 6:30 PM. While details seem to still be in the works, the collective plans to hit the heart of Missoula (I hear they’re planning to perform at some point in the parking lot behind Butterfly Herbs) with an avant-garde fashion show of sorts, plus some out of sight performances. So keep your eyes out for these artistic cats, but before you do that, please do me a favor by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., June 4, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Recycling in the Schools SCHOOL RECYCLING SPONSORS FOR THE 2009-2010 SCHOOL YEARS



These companies and individuals have funded school recycling in Missoula schools. Missoula Valley Recycling provides bins, regular curbside pickups, and in-school presentations. Home ReSource acts as the 501-c3 not for profit sponsor. We wish to recognize and appreciate these entities that have helped improve our schools and environment.

School Sponsors:

Also thanks to:

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If the sight of warblers or thrushes in flight electrifies your senses, you’re in for an epic avian treat this week. At 3 PM Fri., June 4, any and all Montana birders should descend to the Holiday InnDowntown at the Park in Missoula, 200 S. Pattee St., for the Montana Audubon Society’s annual festival known as “Wings Across the Big Sky.” As I mentioned last week, this fest—which runs from June 4 through Sun., June 6— is basically the Lollapalooza of birding, and features a host of speakers like raptor master Kate Davis, and includes over 30 bird watching trips to various locales around Missoula. Prices vary to attend, from $75 for the weekend to $55 for Sat. only. Visit mtaudubon.org for a complete schedule and to register, or just go to the convention at 3 PM to sign up in-person. Call 443-3949. If for some reason you’re a bird hater, take a hike Fri., June 4, during a Lake Missoula Hike from 4–7 PM, starting with a meet up at the Pattee Canyon Gravel Pit at 4. From there, you’ll ascend up Mount Sentinel to the Lake Missoula high water mark, where local experts with the Ice Age Floods Institute will pour heady knowledge into your noggin about the Ice Age and surrounding rock formations. Afterwards, you’ll get refreshed with a no host beer and pizza party at the Kettlehouse. Free to attend. E-mail Jim at james.shelden.@bresnan.net. Or you could gear up for your upcoming jaunts in the wild with a shindig on Fri., June 4, during The Montana Wilderness Association’s 48th annual Wilderness Walks kickoff party, which occurs from 5—8 PM at The Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. Free. The soiree celebrates the organization’s walking series—which offers participants the chance to hit the trails with125 free guided hikes across the state—and offers you the chance to sip on local beer, munch on barbecued kabobs, as well as a check out a performance by local bluegrass faves The Lil’ Smokies. You’ll also be able to grab a copy of the 2010 Wilderness Walks Guide Book, as well as snag some sick info on sweet local hikes. Call Gabriel at 541-8615. Later on Fri., June 4, take your lover to the stars when you gaze at planets and distant galaxies during Blue Mountain

Observatory’s first public observation of the year, which begins at 10:30 PM. Free. Visit physics.umt.edu/bluemountain for a map and call 243-5179 for updates. Then, on Sat., June 5, you best head north to Glacier National Park, since the park is offering free admission all day Sat., June 5, and Sun., June 6. Of course, camping, concessions and the like will cost you. Visit nps.gov/glac/index.htm. Or better yet, pedal like a supa freak for a good cause on Sat., June 5, during the American Lung Association’s “Breathe Ride,” a 100-mile or 35-mile ride (depending on your preference) along the stunning Rocky Mountain Front that begins with day-of registration at 6 AM at the Sun River Methodist Church in Sun River, which sits north on Hwy. 200 near Great Falls.

cold beer (just kidding). Contact Hannah at hannah.riedl@umconnect.umt.edu. The second project begins at the Van Buren pedestrian bridge and Kim Williams Trail junction at 8:30 AM and is slim on details, but it looks like you’ll do your part to protect natural spaces. Free, with lunch served at 11:45 AM. Bring gloves, water, sunscreen and dress appropriately (that means leave the bling at home). Registration required, so go to rei.com/stores/72 to RSVP. Little runts get their birding on Sat., June 5, during the Montana Natural History Center/Montana Audubon Society’s Kids’ Bird Fest, which begins at 8 AM at the Montana Audubon Society table at the Clark Fork River Market, just below the north Higgins Ave. bridge. An array of bird scoping follows, including a bluebird hike at 9 AM, and naturalist walks at 10 and 11 AM. Free. Open to kids ages 5 and up. Call 327-0405 and visit montananaturalist.org. If you’re in the Flathead on Sat., June 5, enjoy a stroll among a range of flora when the Flathead Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society hosts a hike up the Johnson Mountain Terraces. Free. Meet at 9 AM at the soccer fields across from the Grouse Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 2 Fairway Drive, and bring lunch and water. Call Betty at 892-0129 to RSVP. On Mon., June 7, runners get an edge on the competition during a talk with Courtney Babcock titled “Formulating Your Race Strategy for the Missoula Marathon,” which begins at 7 PM at the Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St. W. Free. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Bow out from the week on a vegetative note when the Clark Fork Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society hosts two plant-a-riffic events. The first is the John Toole Photo by Chad Harder Park weed pull, which occurs Tue., June 8, at 6:30 PM with a meet up at the park, just east of the Missoulian building and Registration is $60, and you also need to raise $50 in donations, near the Kim Williams Trail. Free. Call John at 542-2640. The second outing is a flower scoping expedition that but know that these proceeds benefit Montana’s American Lung takes you to the Nine Mile Prairie up the Blackfoot, and Association. Visit montanabreatheride.org and call 442-6556. If you’re in the mood to give in different way, hook nature up begins at 5:30 PM Wed., June 9, by meeting at the northwest corwith your mad service skills Sat., June 5, during two National ner of UM’s Adams Center’s parking lot to carpool. Free. Call Kelly Trails Day services projects. The first is at 8 AM at the Rock at 258-5439. Now let the bird ogling commence!. Creek Trailhead, where you’ll use your nimble hands to reconstruct a turnpike on the trail. $10. Be sure to bring essential outcalendar@missoulanews.com doors gear like hiking shoes, appropriate clothing, lunch and a

Missoula Independent

Page 29 June 3–June 10, 2010


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Creature features

Missoula Independent

Artist Patricia Thornton summons her personal monsters by Erika Fredrickson

Patricia Thornton’s monsters have a disarming and live off pennies for a few years—which is what ties for other characters—to represent her working self. Other times she draws the neckties as quality even with all their sharp teeth. The local artist’s we’re doing.” mixed media pieces emit a childlike quality—someThornton got a studio at the Ceretana on Railroad autonomous entities of artistic liberation. thing akin to shadow puppets with eyes made of dots Street and within a year became the manager and curaAnother one of her most central monsters is the and stars, and bodies colored with candy-like pastels tor of the space. In January of this year, she moved to gender-ambiguous character Manny Rose. That characamong outlines of chalky whites and blacks. But her the second floor of the Brunswick. During that time, ter was born when someone asked Thornton to draw a work proves to be deceivingly layered, both in concept her work has changed quite a bit. When she first picture of the monster from the mythical Black Lagoon. and style. In her upcoming exhibit, Misfits, Monsters arrived she did oil painting parodies of pop culture Instead of drawing something scary, she ended up with and Pretty Things, Part V: The Rocky Mountains, icons like Oprah and Dr. Phil. But after a while she a goofy, dreamy-eyed monster whose rib cage is in the Thornton includes a piece inspired by the recent oil started making colorful sketches of monsters that shape of a tree. spill, for instance, and another that deals with the con- resembled the creatures of her childhood but repre“I like to draw like a kid and it made me think of cept of fractured selves: the worker versus the artist. sented aspects of her personality. when I was kid my mom would always say I had this And though the ideas she portrays appear to be represented by simply rendered shapes, the composition made by the combinations of the shapes and the combination of artistic mediums—printmaking, graphite, colored pencil, acrylic, oil pastel and sewing—are more complex. “I’m around little kids all the time,” Thornton says. “And I do like to draw at their level. But what I do isn’t easy. People think, you know, ‘Oh, it looks like my second grader’s work.’ I have heard that. But I work with second graders and they don’t do this kind of thing.” Thornton grew up in an artistic family in a nomadic lifestyle that carried her from the East Coast to California, living in towns for no longer than a few years at a time, if that. “We sometimes stayed in apartments, but we lived out of vans and tents, too,” Thornton says. “When I tell people that they say, ‘Oh, hippies!’ But my parents were very conservative—my mom did portraits of Oliver North. They just thought that was a great way to live.” Growing up in the 1960s, Thornton was mesmerized by the monsters she saw on television and the big screen. Whenever she had a chance, she says, Patricia Thornton’s “Stars in My Eyes” is part of her upcoming exhibit at The Brink Gallery titled Misfits, she’d watch the vampire soap opera “Dark Monsters and Pretty Things, Part V: The Rocky Mountains. Shadows,” and monster comedies like “The Munsters” and the “Addams Family.” She loved silver screen monsters from sharks and “It was fun to do things about other people but I exhibitionist quality and that I would stand in the windinosaurs to legends like Godzilla and King Kong. always had this gnawing feeling about it,” Thornton dow naked,” she laughs. “I don’t remember any of that. “I liked the monsters that were scary but where says. “How can I judge anybody else? And so I just try But Manny reminds me of that optimistic, young, childsomething had happened to them to make them go to keep it personal, to take apart myself more than like innocence.” mad,” she says. “I could identify with that. Like Them!, other people.” Thornton says that even though the monsters are where there was some kind of nuclear disaster and the At first, Thornton says, her personal monsters personal, she hopes they speak to a universal truth. ants all grew huge.” were darker and more vicious looking. In one early The creatures of Misfits, Monsters and Pretty Things Thornton moved to Missoula after working for painting, for instance, a creature with a blood red body may be cute and pink, but they also bare teeth. years in California, New York and Las Vegas, piecing and bulging eyes bares its shark-like teeth. “I like having that angst show up in there,” she says. together various jobs—including teaching art—to make “I was going through the feelings that come from not “You can live in this world that’s pink and the flowers are a living. (She earned her B.A. in art at Sonoma getting accepted into grad school, the whole pretty, but then you listen to the news—it can be devasUniversity in California.) Five years ago, she moved to ‘Rawwwwrrr,’ feeling,” she says, giving a monster-like roar. tating. I try to be open-minded. I draw the line at Hannity Missoula with her artist husband Tim to see if the lower But after a while, Thornton’s monsters started to and Rush Limbaugh. I never thought it would get to cost of living would give them more studio time, and become a little less harsh. They began to represent where it is now with those people. Talk about monsters. so Thornton could pursue her graduate studies. parts of her personality that fit more into a content- Way scarier than anything I could create.” Misfits, Monsters and Pretty Things, Part V: The “I had been through Missoula a few times and ed sense of how she sees herself. One character, I decided to apply for grad school here,” she says. “The Piggybacker,” always carries a child (Thornton’s Rocky Mountains opens at The Brink Gallery Friday, “I wasn’t accepted, and it was a bummer. But I also a nanny) or other people’s things on its back June 4, with a reception from 5 to 8 PM. Free. decided I was just going to do a self-imposed grad representing her nurturing side. She has bowling school for myself, rent a studio, get an apartment pin-shaped creatures that sometimes look like neckefredrickson@missoulanews.com

Page 30 June 3–June 10, 2010


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The Mountain Goats The Life of the World to Come 4AD

If you’re not one for being preached at, you might quickly skip over an album with songs named after passages of the Bible. And why wouldn’t you? We get enough sermons, already. Plus, this sort of writing trick has the potential of becoming heavy-handed. On The Mountain Goats’ latest, The Life of the World to Come, frontman John Darnielle tells stories of characters dealing with cancer, imprisonment and drug addiction. The songs are titled “Hebrews 11:40” or “Romans 10:91,” which automatically gives it a spiritual framework. Fortunately, none of it is too literal. In the

Arrington de Dionyso

Malaikat dan Singa K Records

On his third solo album, Arrington de Dionyso leaves no doubt that he has a singular calling as a mad architect and curator of human-made noise. As frontman of Old Time Relijun, Dionyso honed American folk and revival music to the hardest, darkest, noisiest extremes. Now he tunes his ears to the east, weaving American blues together with some of Asia’s strangest musical traditions to produce fabulous noise sculptures. Rhythms of Indonesian gamelan are run through Buddhist chants or Tuvan throat

The Moondoggies

You’ll Find No Answers Here Hardly Art

In only a few years, The Moondoggies have captured their hometown music scene’s heart. No big feat, if they were from some backwater but given that they’re based in Seattle, it’s quite a coup. After a listen to their new EP, it’s clear why they’ve caused such a stir. There are no gimmicks or pretenses to be found; it’s honest, subtle and timeless music reminiscent of the 1960s and 1970s (think Neil Young sans the nasal quality). “It’s Hard to Love Someone” is a boisterous barroom sing-along, while “Just Makes Sense to Me” is resigned lonesomeness incarnate. And there’s also a faint hint of something decidedly modern. It’s boogie-

The Mynabirds

What We Lost In The Fire We Gained In The Flood Saddle Creek

I can’t get enough of The Mynabirds in the same way I got utterly addicted several years ago to the old stylings of R&B garage band The Detroit Cobras. But while The Detroit Cobras cover obscure songs from the 1950s and 1960s, The Mynabirds make originals that just sound like they could be classics.

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Movie Shorts

piano-entwined “Deuteronomy 2:10” Darnielle sings about someone stuck behind chain links and concrete, saying, “Look hard at my stripes, there will be no more after me.” And if you look up Deuteronomy 2:10 you’ll notice it references the Emims, an extinct group of giants who were eventually conquered. Well, fine. I can warm up to the idea of looking up passages and making connections with Darnielle’s strong imagery. The motif ’s okay, but the organ-like chords and dramatic sentimentalism still gives it an over-serious piety. And that’s all a bit much. (Erika Fredrickson) The Mountain Goats play the Palace Saturday, June 5, at 9 PM with The Beets. $12/$10 advance at Ear Candy. singing or are bombarded with saxophones last heard playing in U.S. noise bands like Pussy Galore. Dionyso sings in Indonesian, which I can’t understand, so I am inclined to listen to the tone of his voice. He obliges me by singing, speaking or growling the unknown words with an excess of diabolical emotion. A few tracks are genuine songs, some are jazzy soundscapes, but most I can only call performances: strange and compelling mixtures of eerie music and mysterious monologues. Listening to Malaikat dan Singa is like stepping into the middle of a wild and exotic but not unfamiliar festival being celebrated halfway across the world from wherever you are now. If you can stand the noise, enjoy the madness. (Ali Gadbow) Arrington de Dionyso plays the Palace Tuesday, June 8, at 9 PM with Rooftop Vigilantes and Streetlight People. $5. blues meets cosmic-cowboy two-step, blended with a fair helping of Pacific Northwest-rainy season melancholy. Bolstered by unembellished guitar, Rhodes organ and drums, the vocal harmonies are what really sparkle. In the lament “Down the River,” The Moondoggies mention a girl who “chases off the liar in me,” and this line speaks to the character of the whole album. Filled with romances and loss, the lyrics and music throughout are both poignant and no-nonsense. (Melissa Mylchreest) The Moondoggies play the Palace Thursday, June 3, at 9 PM with Blitzen Trapper. $13/$11 advance at Ear Candy. Singer Laura Burhenn has the vocals of Dusty Springfield or Linda Rondstadt, and the music itself blends country, R&B and 1970s rock. What We Lost In The Fire We Gained In The Flood offers something a little less wild than The Detroit Cobras’ albums, more crafted and nuanced in so many ways. For instance, the sweaty dance number “Let the Record Go” sounds like 1990s rockers The Breeders if they covered a Carole King song. “Wash It Out” might be a blander track if not for the claps smartly dispersed throughout like little firecrackers. The horn-filled “We Built a Mountain” could make for obvious irony if Burhenn sang, “I hope you’re happy today,” with even a slight tinge of contempt. Instead, her unabashed sincerity makes the song about love lost even more tragically beautiful. (Erika Fredrickson)

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Missoula Independent

Page 32 June 3–June 10, 2010

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Hello, indeed Rising star Kira Means releases debut album by Erika Fredrickson

Last year on New Year’s Eve, Kira Means played Means played around with melodies and guitar to a packed room at the Wilma Theatre for the teen strumming. She wrote “Hello” in summer 2008 after talent contest “First Night Idol.” It was an over- she saw a news report about a man in San Diego whelming experience. Not just because Means was whose wife and kids were killed when a plane singing and playing guitar to a full audience inside crashed into their house. Missoula’s historic theater, or even that she was set “That stuck in my head,” she says. “I wrote the to play yet another gig later that evening at song from the guy’s point of view, talking to his Break Espresso, but also because she’d just come wife. The bridge part of the song, where it slows from playing at a funeral down, that’s her talking for two fellow Hellgate back to him.” High School classmates In the song, Means killed in a drunk sings with a clear, full driving accident. voice, “I just want to hold up my hands and Standing on the sing to you, just sing to Wilma stage, Means told you. And every day I hear the audience, “This song your tears on my roof, is about overcoming and I miss you.” tragedy,” before launchThe song is a perfect ing into her trademark example of Means’ abilitune, “Hello,” and bety to write simple and coming the first freshcatchy tunes without man ever to win the being overly simplistic. contest. It was a bitter“She avoids cliché in sweet day, emotionally an instinctive way,” says and physically. jazz singer Eden Atwood, “That was hard,” who teaches Means voice Means recalls. “That lessons. “Sometimes whole day was insane. Photo by Cathrine L. Walters lyrics from young There have definitely been days like that.” Kira Means, 15, releases her debut album at women like herself can be maudlin. But she At 15 years old, Break Espresso this week. doesn’t do that. She’s Means’ talents have been sophisticated. She’s getting a buzz in the local music scene. The singer/guitarist has been in high already written a song [“Hello”] that, fully prodemand for benefits, block parties and coffee shop duced, could be a Lennon/McCartney song.” On her upcoming album, Means offers other gigs. She’s played Sean Kelly’s on numerous occasions, farmers’ markets and local festivals like the original tunes inspired by her young life. “Beauty” is recent Garden City Localfest. And, this week, as Means about the snowy landscape near a town in Northern celebrates the release of her debut album, Hello, her Alberta where Means and her mother, Laval, visited a friend two winters ago. “Dear Someone” is visibility seems ever more likely to be on the rise. “All the adults around her are getting fired up inspired by the piano stylings of Coldplay, with about her talent,” says popular local Americana musi- lyrics stemming from ideas she got after watching cian Tom Catmull, who teaches Means guitar. “I can’t the film 500 Days of Summer. imagine what’s going through her head, being her age Means takes all the hype surrounding her and having the notoriety she’s getting already.” music in stride. She’s not pushing herself to In person, Means comes off as a humble but make another album anytime soon, she says, and confident person. She candidly recalls how when she’s trying not to plan too far ahead. But these she was in elementary school she wanted to be on days she has become more picky about the songs “American Idol,” the television talent show that’s she writes; if they’re not as good as the last one, she trashes them. And she’s finding that every made some unknown talents instant pop stars. “I just liked Top 40 music then,” Means says. “I new gig makes her more comfortable seeing herwasn’t that musically educated. I watched ‘American self as a musician in a community of alreadyIdol’ and I wanted to be on the show as soon as I established musicians. “It’s been overwhelming at times, but it’s turned 16.” But as she started immersing herself in classical been good,” she says. “I feel welcome in the musiguitar and piano lessons, things changed. She dis- cian community. And even though I’m a 15 year covered indie rock musicians like Feist, Dr. Dog and old and sometimes people don’t really know if Animal Collective, and she became drawn to music that makes me serious or not, I’m happy they do take me seriously.” in a more complex, personal way. “I started taking more lessons and developing my Kira Means plays a CD release party at Break musical tastes, listening to indie rock or jazz and clas- Espresso Friday, June 4, at 6:30 PM with guests sic rock,” she says. “I’ve tried to mature my music. And Tom Catmull and Eden Atwood. Free. ‘American Idol’ isn’t really my goal anymore.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Spun off

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

More isn’t necessarily better in Greek by Scott Renshaw

I get why the concept of a “spin-off ” movie like Get Him to the Greek seems like a no-brainer—in theory. If you look at television, there’s a history of taking supporting characters from successful comedies and launching them into equally successful starring vehicles like “The Jeffersons” from “All in the Family,” “Rhoda” from “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Frasier” from “Cheers.” ( We ’ l l c o n v e n i e n t l y ignore “AfterMASH” and “Joey.”) Over time, those supporting characters develop their own particular identities within the original show, and taking those identities to a bigger showcase isn’t a huge leap of logic. But it’s not the same with movies. A scene-stealing supporting comedic character often works precisely because there isn’t any attempt to give him or her more depth or context. The character exists to steal a few scenes with Band on the run. superficial laughs, and nothing more. That’s why there was no reason for Bronson Pichot to star in Serge: The Motion Picture after Beverly Hills Cop, and that’s why taking Steve Carrell’s blundering anchorman from Bruce Almighty and making him the hero of Evan Almighty resulted in an almighty stink-pile. Yet here we have a showcase vehicle for Aldous Snow (Russell Brand), the vain, addlebrained British rock star who became the new boyfriend to Jason Segel’s TV-star ex-girlfriend in 2008’s Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Here, he’s licking his wounds after his most recent record—an earnest-yet-offensive piece of social commentary called African Child—has become a critical and commercial flop. But a low-level music industry functionary named Aaron ( Jonah Hill) has a notion that Snow can mount a comeback through a concert at Los Angeles’ legendary Greek Theater commemorating the 10th anniversary of a landmark live album by Snow’s band, Infant Sorrow. All Aaron needs to do is squire Snow from London, to a “Today” show appearance in New York, and then to the concert in L.A., all in 72 hours—a far-from-easy task given Snow’s fondness for altering his consciousness. Please try to forget that Hill was also in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, playing a completely different character even though it would have made perfect sense to give his Hawaiian maitre’d with a huge Aldous Snow man-crush a new job. Aaron’s a thinly drawn character as it is, a guy who has a big fight with his live-in girlfriend, Daphne (Elizabeth Moss of “Mad Men”), just before launching a weekend of probable debauchery. Hill, fortunately, is about as innately funny as any movie comedian cur-

Times Run 6/04 - 6/10

rently working, brilliant both when he’s freaking out in a Vegas hotel room on a multi-drug cocktail, or trying to maintain his dignity in a sports coat covered in his own vomit. But writer/director Nicholas Stoller (also returning from Sarah Marshall), just like his mentor Judd Apatow, wants to make sure there’s an emotionally resonant subtext to all the craziness.

That’s frustrating enough when it’s just Aaron’s possible reconciliation with Daphne sucking up screen time; it’s borderline inexcusable when it’s also part of an attempt to “humanize” Aldous Snow. Brand is terrifically entertaining when he’s simply wallowing in Snow’s oblivious swagger, like an even more diva-fied member of Spinal Tap— which is exactly what made him funny in Sarah Marshall. Turning his intoxicated excesses into a reaction to his break-up with a long-time girlfriend (Rose Byrne), and having him question the emptiness of his lifestyle, seems to miss the point of Snow’s appeal entirely. He’s supposed to be a shallow mess of a human being, not a wounded and multi-faceted sad clown. Complexity can only make the character less entertaining. Unfortunately, that’s what has to happen when you take the guy who was the unapologetic comic relief and try to wrap an entire narrative around him. In Get Him to the Greek, there’s a surprisingly hilarious part for Sean “Whatever the Hell Nickname He’s Using These Days” Combs as Aaron’s tough-minded boss Sergio—who also, in a hallucination sequence, gets to eat a tiny version of his own head. In small doses, it’s a great character—but that doesn’t mean I want to be staring at a Sergio feature in 2012. Get Him to the Greek is a package of sometimes satisfying gags built on a completely faulty premise: that everything that was good in small quantities must be better in larger quantities Get Him to the Greek opens at the Village 6 Friday, June 4. .

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Scope OPENING THIS WEEK DINOSAUR TRAIN Kids can satiate their interest in dinosaurs with this toon that follows a Tyrannosaurus Rex named Buddy and his train-bound adventures through jungles, oceans, and other ancient ecosystems. Village 6: 1 only on Sat.–Sun. GET HIM TO THE GREEK No baklava was harmed in this latest offering from Nicholas Stoller about sexed up English rocker Russel Brand, who gets courted by record label intern Jonah Hill to play a gig in the City of Angels. As is par for the course, Hill has a hard time keeping Brand away from sex, absinthe and

Noise

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Wilson learns to get down with fellow canines like Kiefer Sutherland and, um, Fergie. Carmike 10: 12:30, 2:45, 4:55, 7:05 and 9:15. Village 6: 4:55, 7:05 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 12:30 and 2:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:40, 4:55, 7:10 and 9:20 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:35, 6:50 and 9. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM Ben Stiller’s career plans are in the pits, as is his son's faith in him. That’s until he snags a job as a security guard at a museum, where he learns

Film

Movie Shorts

same name follows a middle-aged journalist and a tatted up hacker who forge an unlikely alliance as snoops trying to shed light on the 40-year-old disappearance of a teen. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 9, with no show on Fri., and a Sun. matinee at 3. HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON This 3-D animated flick follows Hiccup, a scrawny Viking teen who was brought up to mercilessly slay dragons. But things change when he befriends a “different” dragon that makes him realize they aren’t so evil after all. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:30, 3:55, 6:35 and 8:55 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:55, 6:35 and 8:55.

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME Jake Gyllenhaal’s the rugged, sword-wielding sidekick to dazzling princess Gemma Arterton as they set their sights on swiping up a dagger—that has the power to turn back time— from Gyllenhaal’s not-so-noble uncle Sir Ben Kingsley. Carmike 10: 12:45, 1:30, 3:30, 4:20, 6:10, 7:15, 8:45 and 9:55. Village 6: 4:20, 7 and 9:40 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1, 2:45, 3:45, 5:30, 7, 8 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:30 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 1:45, 3:45, 4:25, 7, 7:45 and 9:40. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15. ROBIN HOOD Arrows soar and a despotic sheriff gets his just deserts in this adaptation of the classic tale that features Russell Crowe as Robin Hood, and Matthew MacFadyen as the oh so corrupt Sheriff of Nottingham. Carmike 10: 12:30, 3:40, 7 and 10:05. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 3:30, 6:30 and 9:25 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 2:30, 6:30 and 9:25. SEX AND THE CITY 2 Your favorite sexually empowered home girls— who are now mostly married—escape from the Big Apple for a trip to Abu Dhabi where cultures clash, motherhood gets hashed out over cocktails, and old flames get a slight spark. Carmike 10 noon, 12:45, 3:10, 3:55, 6:20, 7:05, 9:30 and 10:15. Village 6: 3:55, 7:05 and 10:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 12:45, 3:15, 3:50, 6:15, 7:05 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:15 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 1:30, 4:05, 4:30, 7:30 and 8. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15.

“Nobody—and I mean nobody—touches my towels without asking!” Killers opens Friday at the Wilma Theatre.

candy coated drugs. Village 6: 4:35, 7:20 and 10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:25, 4:30, 7:15 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. KILLERS Katherine Heigl gets punked by Ashton Kutcher—well, in a way—when the duo ties the knot and Heigl realizes that Kutcher’s line of work means bullets will blaze, and rude dudes will come crashing through their living room windows. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9 nightly with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. Pharoahplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:30, 5 and 7:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:50, 7 and 9:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. MARMADUKE Round up your dawgs for yet another movie w i t h a t a l k i n g d o g . Th i s o n e f o l l o w s Marmaduke, voiced by Owen Wilson, who moves with his family to Orange County to live the California dream. What follows could be considered a lesson in canine adaptability, as

Missoula Independent

he’s not the only creature that goes bump in the night. Carmike 10: Tue. only at 10 AM. SPLICE Adrien Brody and Sarah Polley think their lofty science experiments with DNA are a good thing, but boy are they wrong, especially when they concoct an alien-looking humanoid. Village 6: 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:35, 5:05 and 7:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:05 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:20, 7:05 and 9:40.

NOW PLAYING CITY ISLAND A family that lies to each other just might manage to stay together in this dark comedy that follows a Bronx-area family and their array of secrets that start to bubble to the surface— including a dad who hides his acting ambitions, and a daughter in college who strips for extra cash. Wilma Theatre: Nightly at 7, with no show on Fri., and a Sun. matinee at 1. THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO This adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s book of the

Page 34 June 3–June 10, 2010

IRON MAN 2 Robert Downey Jr. returns as Iron Man, the well liked industrialist with a few metallic tricks up his sleeve. This time around, however, Downey Jr.’s got the government pleading for his technological secrets, and dudes like Mickey Rourke after his head. Carmike 10: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:45 and 9:15 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:15 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. LETTERS TO JULIET Amanda Seyfried tours the Italian town where Romeo and Juliet is set, and happens to stumble across a group of people who answer love letters left on a wall for Juliet. For some reason, she decides to join in on the action—and in the process, Seyfried helps Vanessa Redgrave hook up with her long lost Italian stallion, and ignites her own flame with Christopher Egan. Carmike 10: 1:45, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:50. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:20, 6:40 and 9:15 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:10, 6:40 and 9:15.

SHREK: THE FINAL CHAPTER Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz and Eddie Murphy get CGI and 3-D treatment as voiceovers in the final installment of this series that finds Shrek navigating a puzzling world after making a bum deal with Rumpelstiltskin. Carmike 10: 1:45, 2:10, 4:30, 4:45, 6:50, 7:30, 9:15 and 9:55. Village 6 in 2-D: 4:50, 7:15 and 9:40 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at noon and 2:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 12:35, 2:35, 3:05, 5:10, 5;40, 7:35, 8:05 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:15 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 2, 3:30, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 8:45 and 9:15. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., June 4. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


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Page 35 June 3–June 10, 2010


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Missoula County Fairgrounds June 18, 19 & 20, 2010 Fri 10-7 Sat 10-6 Sun 10-4 Free Admission & Parking All 3 Days

80 Juried Artists and Crafters Name: __________________________________ Phone:_____________________________________________________________ Drop off Registration Form at Festival

PET OF THE WEEK Chinook is the more shy of our two fabulous Husky friends. She likes to let her brother meet people first. Once he approves she's in your lap! Chinook is housetrained and has all her indoor manners mastered. Most importantly, she just can't be left outside alone. She gets bored and chooses to get out to find something more fun to do! With an experienced owner, Chinook will be a great addition to the family. Canine-Ality-(green) I'm a free spirit! Visit her at the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Fri.1-6p.m. and Sat.11a.m.-4p.m. or call us at 549-HSWM!


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

Benefit car wash and bake sale for Travis Johnsen June 12, 11-? @ Diamond Jim’s Eastgate Casino.

WUSSY GALORE Ohh! I finally get what you’re saying! For the longest time, I was resenting you for telling women they shouldn’t ask men out. I had this impression of you wanting ladies to just sit in a corner waiting for a strong, burly man to come to our rescue. I reread some of your columns, and it seems you’re saying it’s okay for us to approach guys, strike up a conversation and show we’re interested, but not to do the actual asking out. Or, am I wrong, and are you saying we should literally wait around for them? If so, I’m just going to go buy 23 cats right now and get it over with. —Don’t Wanna Be The Crazy Cat Lady Too many women tell themselves they’re expressing their equality with men by taking a “Raid on Entebbe” approach to getting a date. (You’re supposed to be seducing a man, not rushing him into your cargo plane before he gets shot by the Ugandans.) Women who go all “Me Tarzan, you Tarzan” on men confuse “equal” with “the same” and what a woman can do with what actually works. (Pssst! Somebody has to be Jane.) You might be as “liberated” as all get out, but your genes are ready to party like it’s 1.8 million years ago, when women evolved to be the harder-to-get sex and men coevolved to expect to smooth-talk a woman into the bushes. Anthropologist Heather Trexler Remoff writes in Sexual Choice that an unambiguous advance on a man—asking him out—is fine if your goal is getting him to attend one specific function with you. If you’d like more than a single-serving-size encounter, “you’d do well to take (your) time and not push against the built-in rhythms of human courtship.” Guys these days don’t make this easy. Masculinity, especially in young guys, appears to have gone the way of the rotary dial phone, the Betamax, and the spotted owl. It’s gotten so bad that there are even Barbies for adult males— the action figures guys stay home moping to about how they can’t get dates. (Of course, the first step would be actually asking a girl out, not staying home praying to date her.) If the current downturn in manliness continues, fathers will soon start telling their sons, “Son, someday you’ll grow up and be a large boy who needs to shave.” The answer for you and the rest of the ladies isn’t taking over the man’s job—doing the asking—but signaling to

him that it would go very, very well for him if he did it. You do that by flirting. You’ll have to experiment, but you can probably flirt far beyond what seems reasonable—especially when a guy seems to have all the sexual aggression of a lost baby duck. Ultimately, flirting is a form of information-gathering: Is there a man cowering in there somewhere? If so, is he man enough and interested enough to squeak out, “Doing anything Friday night?” If he can’t or won’t, he’s telling you something important: “Go flirt with the next guy.” You may do a whole lot of flirting with a whole lot of next guys, but it beats dating somebody who’s not that interested in you or sitting in a corner waiting for some burly man to come to your rescue. (One may—an archeologist in the year 2110, musing, “Hmm, looks like she died waiting for a guy to grow a pair.”)

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer If you want to drink that’s up to you. If you want to stop call Alcoholics Anonymous. 1-888607-2000

LET’S MEEK LOVE! How come many women on online dating sites expressly state in their profile that they don’t want “winks” from men, only e-mails? Isn’t a wink just an invitation to look at a profile—which is what an introductory e-mail is, right? —Online Daterguy You never get a second chance to make a really crappy first impression. Next time you’re in a bar, and you spot a girl who strikes your fancy, don’t bother talking to her or buying her a drink. Just tap her on the shoulder and run. That’s basically what you’re doing by “winking” online. Never mind coming up with some clever little form e-mail that you personalize for each girl you hit on. Just send that little winkieface symbol, telling a girl you’re too lazy, dull, wimpy, or cheap to write her a message (cheap because you can “wink” on a lot of dating sites without paying to join). Sending a wink is also a really girly thing to do—the online version of wearing a really short skirt and crossing and recrossing your legs. That does send a provocative message—something along the lines of “Hey, ladies—guess whether I’m wearing any panties!”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 June 3 – June 10, 2010

PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

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EMPLOYMENT

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

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Alpine Artisans is seeking part time director for performing arts series in Seeley Swan Valleys. Full job description at www.alpineartisans.org. To apply, contact Jenny Rohrer at 754-0034 or rohrervid@aol.com. Application deadline June 9, 2010. ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE. Public Works Department advanced administrative support. #2977686 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 BOOKKEEPER. Part-time for retail business. 50% bookkeeper,50 % retail sales. Rate of pay to start for bookkeeper is $10/hour or higher depending on experience. Position is available ASAP! #2977690 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

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CNA/PCA staff needed at local assisted living facility for night shift. Experience with elderly required; experience with Alzheimer’s and dementia patients is preferred. Must be a CNA or have strong PCA experience. Will be completing documentation on residents; transferring and discharging; medication assistance; personal care; maintaining a safe and sanitary environment; preparing and serving food; clean-up of food and food areas; housekeeping and laundry; and assist residents with activities. Must be able to work in a team environment and have considerable patience, along with desire to work with elderly residents. Required to be on time and reliable. Full background check will be conducted. Shift is 11 pm to 7 am; 32 to 40 hours per week. Pay is depending on experience, $8.16-$8.40 for PCA & $9.69$9.98 for CNA with a $0.75 night shift differential, plus benefits: Flex plan, 401K, health and dental insurance. #2977684 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 JEWELRY CONSULTANTS. Both part time and full time available. Previous retail experience preferred. Must be self-motivated, hardworking, and have excel-

lent customer service skills. Will set goals and analyze monthly plans. Professional demeanor required. Store hours are 9am 9:30 pm, Sunday through Saturday. Pay is depending on experience, must be at least 18 years old. #2977689 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 L AW N M A I N T E N A N C E WORKER / SNOW REMOVAL. At least 3 months experience is required. Summer duties: Mow lawns, operate weed eater and perform other lawn maintenance tasks. Winter duties: Snow removal from commercial and residential properties; shoveling, snow blowers, de-icer. **REQUIRES VALID MONTANA DRIVER’S LICENSE—NO EXCEPTIONS** Pay starts at $8/hr. **HIRING IMMEDIATELY * * # 2 9 7 7 6 8 5 M i s s o u l a Workforce Center 728-6970 LIBRARY PAGE. Part-time to perform routine clerical work for the circulation department and/or technical services department to include maintaining the organization and accurate arrangement of materials in the library and assisting with various stages of processing materials. Requires six months clerical experience. Library experience as user or volunteer desired. #2977691 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Office Asst/Receptionist The international law firm of Dorsey & Whitney LLP has a position available immediately for a PT Office Assistant/Receptionist. Responsibilities include: general office duites & limited revisions of legal documents & correspondence. We are looking for someone with good typing, proofreading & org. skills; ability to work well under pressure; and good oral & writen communication skills. MS Word experience is required. Hours: 12-5 p.m. M-F. This position is eligible for benefits. Visit our website at www.dorsey.com for more information. Please include a resume & cover letter, with salary requirements, when applying. P / T C O O R D I N AT O R F O R EXCHANGE STUDENTS Recruit hosts, provide support and activities. Must love teens. Make friends worldwide! www.aspectfoundation.org POLICE RECORDS SPECIALIST. Codes & enters police records into computer systems, compiles statistics, maintain records for the Missoula Police Department. Requires a high school education and a year of full-time clerical experience including data entry, OR high school education and completion of a post high school course in office practices or related areas. Must be able to pass a Police background investigation. Applications must accompany a certified typing test reflecting at least 40 WPM. #2977692 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL FULL-TIME SOCIAL WORKER for the Mental Health Nursing Care Center in Lewistown, MT. $27,071 to $32,614 annually DOE, plus benefits. For information call (406)538-7451. Closes 06/11/10 EOE

SKILLED LABOR MECHANICS. Two full-time positions with Missoula County to repair and rebuild trucks and heavy construction equipment for the Public Works Department. Requires five years auto mechanic experience which includes experience working on diesel engines. Five years auto mechanic experience with heavy equipment preferred. Welding experience preferred. Any applicable training helpful. Requires Class A, Type 2 commercial driver’s license with air brake endorsement. Must provide own tools. #2977688 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified s t u d e n t s . S A G E Te c h n i c a l Ser vices, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher 6/10 & 6/19. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT. Night shift in a NON-SLEEPING POSITION in residential setting. Need at least 6 months experience with home health care, aide work in facility or caring for disabled family member. Must be a self-starter and have the capability to work independently without supervision; common sense needed. Requires physical ability to turn patient and stay awake during entire shift. Duties include taking vital signs, turning patient, Range of Motion exercises, dressing patient, responding to patient calls, tending to feeding tube & trachea tubes, and other duties as assigned. Must be empathetic and respectful of patient’s needs. Background check will be conducted. Need to be dependable, willing to work fill in shifts in addition to regularly scheduled shifts. Not on a bus route. Located off of Big Flat Road. Must have dependable transportation. Will work 8:30pm to 6:00am, with fill-in as needed. MUST BE available to work nights and weekends. Shifts to be discussed at interview. Wage is $9.00 per hour or more depending on experience, raises upon performance & proven ability. #2977687 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RN Clinical Coordinator The Missoula Indian Center has an opening for a full-time Health Clinical Coordinator in the Health Department. Applicant

must possess contract/grant writing, program management/development and supervisory experience. Applicant will provide direct service to clients and must possess the organizational/multi-tasking skills to function effectively in a fast paced environment. Applicant must possess a bachelor’s level degree in Nursing, licensed to practice in Montana. A Master’s Degree or advanced degree in Health Care administration, Nursing or Business with 5 years experience in super vising desired. Wage is DOE. Benefit package offered. Applications and a detailed job description are available at the Missoula Indian Center, Bldg. #33 Fort Missoula Rd. Missoula, MT 59804. No phone calls please. Application, resume, three professional letters of reference, a copy of current Nursing licensure/credentials and college transcripts are required for submission. Include verification of tribal enrollment, if applicable. Native preference will apply. Position open until filled.

SALES SALES COUNTER SUPERVISOR for building-related products and service company. Will be generating sales and supervising sales staff, including hiring and training staff. Must be able to work effectively with customers and contractors to build and retain customer base. Requires a minimum of 5 years experience supervising sales staff and selling related products and services, education and/or training/knowledge equivalent to a high school diploma, strong math skills, and construction knowledge. Valid Montana Driver’s License required. Knowledge of paint and glass is beneficial. Pre-employment drug test will be conducted. Will work days, Monday-Friday or Tuesday-Saturday. #2977683 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part-time to $7,500/month full-time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-800-330-8446 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com LOOMIX(r) FEED supplements is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800-870-0356/kboen @loomix.com to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area. RYEGATE BAR AND CAFE perfect hometown business, $159,900. Includes liquor license and extra land and building. Nice home $94,900. Call 800-748-2299 or w w w. b i l l i n g s r e a l e s t a t e professionals.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 June 3 – June 10, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you’d like to be in supreme alignment with cosmic rhythms this week, I suggest that you completely avoid using the f-word. Likewise, you’ll maximize your chances for taking advantage of fate’s currents if you refrain from ever using the s-word, the c-word, the m-word, and the b-word. As a general rule, the more precise and the less lazy you are in using language, the more willpower you’ll have and the better able you’ll be to attract the experiences you want. It’s always invigorating to choose your words creatively and kindly, of course, but especially now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you grow a mere acre of peanuts, in a good year you’ll harvest a big enough crop to make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. That might be more than you need. If you just plant enough peanuts to fill a basketball court, you’ll still have enough to make over 3,200 sandwiches, which would provide you with more than eight every day for a year. This is a good phase of your astrological cycle to be thinking thoughts like these, Taurus. You will have more insight and motivation than usual if you formulate long-term plans to create abundance for yourself. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As they orbit the planet, astronauts witness as many as 15 sunrises and sunsets each day. Time isn’t really sped up for them, but it seems like it. I expect you to experience a similar feeling in the coming weeks, Gemini. You may have the fantasy that you’re living the equivalent of four days every 24 hours. The light will be brighter, the emotions richer, and the teachings more highly concentrated. If you give yourself to the surge with relaxed enthusiasm and focused receptivity, your evolution will be expedited.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How skilled are you at getting things done and making things happen? This is different from just being busy; it’s not the same as scrambling around attending to whatever tasks are at the forefront of your attention. I’m talking about actually cranking out excellent results that manifest a comprehensive vision of your intentions. I’m talking about working hard and smart to serve the big picture, not working frenetically and mechanically to rid yourself of nervous mental energy. You’re in a phase when these themes are especially important, Virgo. Be a master of the details; don’t let the details master you.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s how author Leo Buscaglia described the rigorous requirements for being a great lover. You must “continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the philosopher, the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar, and the fortitude of the certain.” I’m sorry to report that no one I’ve ever known has met those high standards! In the coming weeks, however, you Aquarians will have the potential to get halfway there. Life will conspire to boost every effort you make to be a great lover.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Recently I was remembering the names of streets near the house where I grew up in Allen Park, Michigan. Although I didn’t register it at the time, they were lyrical, euphonious, and evocative: Philomene, Shenandoah, Osage, Luana, Cleophus, Gahona. As I walked and played on them day after day for years, my imagination breathed in the magic of their exotic sounds, unobtrusively nurturing my poetic sensibilities. I bring this up, Pisces, in the hope of inspiring a comparable rumination in you. Think back on the riches of the past whose importance to your development you may have underestimated. It’s a good time to re-connect with the power and glory of influences that brought out the best in you almost without your knowledge. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 June 3 – June 10, 2010

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV comedy series “Community” takes place on the sleepy campus of a community college. It features the hijinks of seven misfits who are older and weirder than their fellow students. In one episode, an inept female security guard chases the lead character, Jeff, hoping to catch and cite him for a farcical misdemeanor. As she races along, shouting for him to stop, she takes out her can of pepper spray and shoots several streams in his direction. The cloud of noxious stuff doesn’t reach him, but she runs face-first into it as she continues her pursuit. It irritates her eyes and forces her to halt. Later, in telling her associate what happened, she says she was the victim of “self-inflicted friendly fire.” I worry that you’ll soon be tempted to carry out a metaphorical version of that, Capricorn. Please don’t.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There are very few people who can lick their own elbows, and up until now you have probably not been one of them. Judging from the current astrological configurations, however, I’m guessing that a lot of you Sagittarians are about to be more flexible, limber, and acrobatic than usual—not just in your mental attitudes but possibly even in your physical abilities. At least metaphorically speaking, you’ll be able to bend over backwards without damaging your dignity. You could also stretch and twist yourself into poses that have previously been impossible. So who knows? Maybe you’ll find a way to plant a kiss on your own elbow.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In a Rolling Stone interview, musician John Mayer suggested that Tiger Woods could have avoided his terrible troubles if he had just chosen to masturbate more. Rather than literally acting out his obsessive sexual urges with a jillion women who weren’t his wife, why not contain them in the fantasy realm? I suggest you consider applying this principle as you make your decisions in the coming weeks, Scorpio — not just in regards to your sexual life, but in other areas as well. There may be times when you could prevent an influx of unnecessary chaos simply by conducting a conversation in your imagination rather than by having it with the actual person who seems to be agitating or enthralling you.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In her essay “Write Till You Drop,” author Annie Dillard offers advice to aspiring writers. I’m going to quote a certain passage that happens to be apropos for you Libras right now. “Spend it all, shoot it, play it, lose it, all, right away, every time. Do not hoard what seems good for later…give it, give it all, give it now. The impulse to save something good for a better place later is the signal to spend it now. Something more will arise for later, something better. These things fill from behind, from beneath, like well water. Similarly, the impulse to keep to yourself what you have learned is not only shameful, it is destructive. Anything you do not give freely and abundantly becomes lost to you.”

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If I were writing the story of your life as a fairy tale, the current chapter would be filled with enchanted events. You’d hear animals’ thoughts in your head and you’d remember your past lives. You’d be able to find accurate oracles in the shapes of clouds, the ringing of distant bells, and the patterns of shadows on the sidewalk. You would see the help that’s invisible to everyone else and know what to do in order to get the love you want. Take advantage of the available mojo, Leo. Use it to set people free, including yourself.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): I think you’re ready to stand up and reclaim your power from the soul-sucking influences that have been swindling you. But you don’t have to turn this showdown into a melodramatic epic that brings down the house or blows up the world. In fact, I think it’s better if you stay low-key as you transform the dynamics that have been grinding you down. The adjustments may be nowhere near as major as you imagine. Why? Because most of what you need to do is make shifts in your own attitude. The necessary changes in outer circumstances will arise naturally once you’ve done that.

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MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT BITTERROOT VALLEY BANK d/b/a CLARK FORK VALLEY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BLAIR A. GUEST and CLINT CALDWELL, Defendants, And BLAIR A. GUEST, Counterclaimant, vs. BITTERROOT VALLEY BANK d/b/a CLARK FORK VALLEY BANK, Counter–Defendant. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. On the 10th day of June A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 5156 located in the Southwest one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. TOGETHER WITH Ingress and Egress over the existing private road and utility easement as found in Memorandum of Private Utility and Road Easements recorded in Book 627 Micro Records, Page 1948. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 20th day of May A.D., 2010. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN, Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF HEARING MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on June 16, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., M.T., in Room 201, Second Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Dodge Holdings, LLC (the “Borrower”) in order to finance a

portion of the costs of construction of a 3,500 square foot, 1.5 story building to house two separate businesses, consisting of Alpine Physical Therapy (a business that provides evaluation and treatment of orthopedic physical therapy patients) and The Studio (a health club that provides fitness services) and furnishing and equipping the building (the “Project”), to pay certain costs of issuance of the Bonds and to pay other eligible costs, if any. The Project is expected to cost approximately $667,875. The Project will be owned by the Borrower. The Bonds shall be payable solely from loan repayments to be made to the County by the Borrower. The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bond issuance is $450,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrower and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County and shall not constitute or give rise to a pecuniary liability of the County or a charge against its general credit or taxing powers, and the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrower pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County, except money payable by the Borrower to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution or Bonds, contact Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, Missoula County, or Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, Missoula County, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 or by calling 406-721-5700. Dated: May 18, 2010 B Y


PUBLIC NOTICES ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE MISSOULA COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROPOSAL The MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will be conducting a PUBLIC HEARING on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010, at 1:30 P.M. in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway. The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments and questions concerning an application for funding to be submitted to the Montana Department of Commerce (MTDOC) for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. If awarded funds, the County will loan $220,000 to Kelly

Logging for working capital. Additional information concerning the proposal will be presented at the public hearing. If you are unable to attend and would like additional information, or wish to comment in writing or by phone, please contact: Cindy Wulfekuhle, Principal Grants Administrator, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802, or email cwulfeku@co.missoula.mt.us, or phone (406) 258-3795. Comments concerning the proposal must be received by Wednesday, June 9, 2010. Persons needing special accommodations to participate fully in the meeting should contact Cindy Wulfekuhle no later than June 8, 2010, to allow adequate time to make needed arrangements. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

MISSOULA COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROPOSAL The MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will be conducting a PUBLIC HEARING on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010, at 1:30 P.M. in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway. The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments and questions concerning an application for funding to be submitted to the Montana Department of Commerce (MTDOC) for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds not to exceed $225,000. If awarded funds, the County will loan $207,000 to Northwest Paint, Inc. for working capital. Additional information concerning the proposal will be presented at the public hearing. If you are unable to attend and would like additional information, or wish to comment in writing

or by phone, please contact: Cindy Wulfekuhle, Principal Grants Administrator, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802, or email cwulfeku@co.missoula.mt.us, or phone (406) 258-3795. Comments concerning the proposal must be received by Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Persons needing special accommodations to participate fully in the meeting should contact Cindy Wulfekuhle no later than June 15, 2010, to allow adequate time to make needed arrangements. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE Citifinancial, Inc., Plaintiff vs. Shana R. Phillips a/k/a Shana Phillips a/k/a Shana Drake; Defendant. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale:TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. On the 17th day of June A.D., 2010,

at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: STATE LEASE NO. L-3062187, LOT 50 IN SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 27th day of May A.D., 2010. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN, Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DA-10-28 NOTICE OF HEARING TO TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS AND

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, 2009 Sunset West Water System/RSID 8925 PWSID#MT0001857 We’re very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from one well. We have completed a source water protection plan that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination to our drinking water supply. This plan can be found online at http://nris.state.mt.us/wis/swap/swapquery.asp. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. We’re pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Tami Quinn. She is a certified operator with years of experience and can be reached at 370-1838. At the present time the Sunset West water system is owned by a Rural Special Improvement District and is managed by Missoula County. No regular meetings are held. Sunset West water system monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows the results of any detects in our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2009. For constituents that are not monitored yearly, we have reviewed our records back the last 5 years. We have monitored for lead and copper, and all of our samples are in compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

In the tables above and below you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions: Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - (mandatory language) A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Contaminant Level - (mandatory language) The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - (mandatory language) The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)-picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

AWARD OF TEMPORARY CUSTODY IN RE THE ADOPTION OF E.J.G., a Minor Child. NOTICE is hereby given that Petitioners, Steven and Nicole Mott, have filed a petition with this Court to terminate the parental rights of Katie Irene Garding, a U.S. citizen and Gonzalez Garcia, a citizen of Mexico, to the minor child, E.J.G. born on May 9, 2010, at Community Medical Center in Missoula, Montana and award temporary custody to the Petitioners. NOW, therefore, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on June 10, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. in the abovenamed Court at which time objections to said Petition will be heard. DATED this 17th day of May, 2010. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Linda Osorio St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-10-67 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN G. BACKER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James E. Florin, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 12th day of May, 2010. /s/ James E. Florin, Personal Reprsentative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-10-653 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Tate Aaron Presser, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Tate Aaron Presser to Tate Aaron Etches. The hearing will be on June 16, 2010 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: May 13, 2010 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court (SEAL) By: Bobbi Hainlline, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-70 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN CHRISTIAN SEIDENSTICKER, III, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jerry Dean Seidensticker, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of May, 2010. THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, Attorny for Personal Representative. /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-73 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN J. STENSRUD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED May 24th, 2010. /s/ Glen H. Stensrud, Personal Representative. WELLS & McKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-53 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWIN C. BUETTNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Richard J. Samson

has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 20th day of May, 2010. CHRISTIAN, SAMSON & JONES, PLLC /s/ Liana J. Messer MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-10-49 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ADA M. STEVENS, a/k/a Ada Mae Stevens, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Robin L. Poire has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent, Ada M. Stevens, are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Robin L. Poire, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o John Spangler Law Offices, P.O. Box 567, Superior, Montana, 59872, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 30th day of April, 2010. /s/ Robin L. Poire, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY. Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-10-649 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SCOTT GARNER MCDONALD, TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO SCOTT GARNER COONEY. Notice is hereby given that Petitioner, Scott Garner McDonald, has filed a petition with this Court for permission to change his name from Scott Garner McDonald to Scott Garner Cooney. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on the 22nd day of June, 2010 at 1:30 p.m., at which time objections to the petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the petition may do so by filing said objection in writing with the clerk of said court no later than the time set for hearing. DATED this 13th day of May, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Cour (SEAL) By: Angela M. Phillips, Deputy Clerk NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 19-A of Certificate of Survey No. 2784, a tract of land located in the NE1/4 of Section 1, Township 16 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana ROBERT W JENKINS AND ELIZABETH A JENKINS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 10, 2002 and Recorded April 12, 2002 in Book 680, Page 342 under Document No. 200210212. The beneficial interest is currently held by Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $912.12, beginning November 15, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 26, 2010 is $118,643.53 principal, interest at the rate of 9.280% now totaling $5,389.28, and other fees , plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.16 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 June 3 – June 10, 2010


MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Notice of Polling Place Locations, Accessibility Designations, Voting System Exhibition, Diagrams and Voting Instructions

Statement of the Location of Precinct Polling Places and Accessibility Designations for the June 8, 2010, Federal Primary Election: All polling places will be open for voting from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Notice of Voting System Exhibition, Diagram and Voting Instructions: Please note that the county’s voting systems are on public exhibition at Missoula County Fairground’s Election Center. Please see diagrams of the voting system(s) and ballot arrangement and instructions on voting below.

SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE ON AN AUTOMARK VOTING SYSTEM The AutoMARK is a ballot-marking system that will be in use during the upcoming election. Its main purpose is to allow voters with disabilities and other special needs to mark a ballot privately and independently. If you wish to vote on the AutoMARK, please inform the election judge at your polling place that you would like to do so. The election judge will give you a ballot (with the stub removed) that will go in the machine. After the system accepts the ballot, the system will provide instructions on how to vote the ballot. In order to make the ballot easier to read, you can change the contrast and font size. You can mark your choices by touching the screen or by using the keypad, which features written and Braille markings. The AutoMARK system will confirm your selections on the screen and by audio. After you verify that your selections are correct, the system will fill in your choices on the ballot and print the ballot. The ballot will then go to an election judge for depositing in the ballot box. If you need assistance at any time during the process, simply request it.

SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE ON AN M-100 PRECINCT COUNTER VOTING SYSTEM The following is a diagram for the M100 Precinct Ballot Counter that will be at each polling place.

TO VOTE: 1. To vote, you must blacken the oval completely. SAMPLE SECRETARY OF STATE (Vote for One) John Doe Thomas Jefferson Jane Q Public

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 June 3 – June 10, 2010


MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

VOTE BOTH SIDES – CHECK BALLOT TO SEE IF THERE ARE ISSUES PRINTED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT TO BE VOTED ON. 2. USE A #2 PENCIL OR BLACK INK TO MARK YOUR BALLOT. An Optical Scanner will count your ballot. If you use any other type of pen, it may not be counted correctly by the Scanner. OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR BALLOT: When marking your ballot you should NOT make an X or a check mark. You should NOT cross out, erase, or use correction fluid on the ballot and if you make an error, you should request a new ballot. READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY! If you mark more candidates than you are allowed to mark for that position, it is considered an overvote. You may request a new ballot if you overvote in any race. If you do not correct your ballot, that race will not count because of the overvote; however, the remainder of your ballot will be counted. After you mark the ballot, you will be directed to place the ballot in the M-100 precinct counter, which will alert you to errors, if any, tabulate your choices and then deposit the ballot in the ballot box.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 June 3 – June 10, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the

sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and

Missoula County Government

Missoula County Government

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on June 21, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., at the Target Range School Library, 4095 South Avenue West, Missoula, Montana, for the following item: consideration of the proposed Target Range Neighborhood Plan as an amendment to the 2005 Missoula County Growth P o l i c y. 1. T h e Ta r g e t R a n g e Neighborhood Plan The Board of County Commissioners is initiating an amendment to the Missoula County Growth Policy. The amendment is the Target Range Neighborhood Plan. The Target Range Neighborhood Planning Committee in consultation with the Office of Planning and Grants created by the plan. The Neighborhood Plan

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, June 15, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request – 3580 Highway 200 E Rezone A request from Ken Jenkins of Montana Northwest Company to rezone property located at 3580 Highway 200 E from C-C2 (General Commercial) to CR3 (Residential, 36 dwellings per acre). The property is legally described as Lots A, B1, C, & D1 of Block 21 of East Missoula Addition, located in Section 24 of Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., in Missoula County (See Map U). The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this subdi-

for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Hsbc V Jenkins 41472.434 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Huntington Place, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 27 of Plats at Page 35 Max M. Sherry, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary,

by Deed of Trust Dated March 26, 2007 and Recorded March 26, 2007 in Book 794, Page 325, under Document No. 200707028. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1322.61, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2010 is $203,723.38 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $5,396.57, late charges in the amount of $264.34, escrow advances of $183.34, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $1286.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The

Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being

made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010 Successor Trustee MACKOFF

KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Gmac v Sherry 41207.922 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 10 OF THE FELLOWSHIP HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF.

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, 2009 Lewis and Clark Subdivision, RSID 8918 PWSID#MT0000370 We’re very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from two wells. We have completed a source water protection plan that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination to our drinking water supply. This plan can be found online at http://nris.state.mt.us/wis/swap/swapquery.asp. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. We’re pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Tami Quinn. She is a certified operator with years of experience and can be reached at 370-1838. Lewis and Clark Subdivision monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows the results of any detects in our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2009. For constituents that are not monitored yearly, we have reviewed our records back the last 5 years. Lewis and Clark has been issued a waiver for certain inorganic contaminants. This waiver allows our water system to sample only once every 9 years for these regulated contaminants: barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, selenium. Past sampling for these contaminants has shown that they are not present in our water supply, or occur in such small amounts that they are not considered a health hazard. This waiver is in effect from 2002 through 2011. We have monitored for lead and copper, and all of our samples are in compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. We have a waiver for lead and copper. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

addresses key resources and assets in the neighborhood. The plan contains strategies and implementation tools that manage change and growth within the Target Range neighborhood. The current plan incorporates the Planning Board recommendations with proposed amended neighborhood language. See Map G for the Target Range Study Area (the area affected by this amendment). Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged at the County public hearing. All persons interested may appear to be heard or may file written comments at the County Commissioner’s Office prior to the date of the hearing. Mail comments to: Board of County Commissioners, Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. The draft plan is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, or online at ftp://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgftp/ Urban/TROH/TargetRange/TargetRang eNeighborPlan041210.pdf. Call 2584657 if you need assistance accessing a copy. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 2584657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

vision at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 30, 2010, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 2584657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

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In the tables above and below you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions: Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - (mandatory language) A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Contaminant Level - (mandatory language) The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - (mandatory language) The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)-picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Total Coliform - Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems. Our system had one violation. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 May 20 – May 27, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES David F. Elmore and Staci Elmore, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 11, 2006 and Recorded on January 19, 2006 under Document # 200601342. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank, na. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,356.91, beginning January 1, 2009,

and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2010 is $169,692.22 principal, interest at the rate of 6.875% now totaling $15,541.88, late charges in the amount of $575.50, escrow advances of $2,311.93, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,869.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.96 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due

or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or

cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation

secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 17, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, 2009 El Mar Estates/New Meadows Water System, RSID 8916 PWSID#MT0000517 We’re very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from seven wells. We have completed a source water protection plan that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination to our drinking water supply. This plan can be found online at http://nris.state.mt.us/wis/swap/swapquery.asp. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. We’re pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Tami Quinn. She is a certified operator with years of experience and can be reached at 370-1838. At the present time the El Mar Estates/New Meadows water system is owned by a Rural Special Improvement District and is managed by Missoula County. No regular meetings are held. El Mar Estates/New Meadows water system monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows the results of any detects in our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2009. For constituents that are not monitored yearly, we have reviewed our records back the last 5 years. El Mar Estates/New Meadows has been issued a waiver for certain inorganic contaminants. This waiver allows our water system to sample only once every 9 years for these regulated contaminants: barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, selenium. Past sampling for these contaminants has shown that they are not present in our water supply, or occur in such small amounts that they are not considered a health hazard. This waiver is in effect from 2002 through 2011. We also have applied for and received an Organic Chemical Use Waiver from the Department of Environmental Quality. The organic chemicals listed on the last page of this report are excluded from monitoring requirements. We have monitored for lead and copper, and all of our samples are in compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. We now have a waiver for lead and copper. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

In the tables above and below you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions: Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - (mandatory language) A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Contaminant Level - (mandatory language) The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - (mandatory language) The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)-picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water

Our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future. Organic Chemicals excluded from Public Water Supply monitoring requirements by an Organic Chemical Use Waiver CARBAMATE PESTICIDES - METHOD 531.1 Carbofuran Oxamyl

PESTICIDES - METHOD 525.2 Alachlor Heptachlor Epoxide Hexachlorobenzene Atrazine Hexachlorocyclopentadiene Benzo(a)pyrene

Lindane Methoxychlor Chlordane Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate Simazine Endrin

Toxaphene Heptachlor .

58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 17, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Us Bank V. Elmore 41810.211 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH 58 FEET 8 INCHES (58’ 8”) OF LOTS 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 AND 10, BLOCK 72 OF SCHOOL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF NOW ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY OF AND EASEMENT TO ENTER UPON THE NORTH 71 FEET 4 INCHES (71’ 4”) OF LOTS 5, 6, 7, 8, ,9 AND 10, BLOCK 72 OF SCHOOL ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING, MAINTAINING AND REPAIRING AN UNDERGROUND PIPELINE FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONVEYING WATER THROUGH AND UNDER THESE LANDS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO EXCAVATE AND REFILL DITCHES AND TRENCHES FOR THE LOCATION OF SAID PIPELINE. APN:2200-16-3-11-13-0000 JIM L BROWN AND BONNIE L MEYERBROWN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 26, 2007 and recorded December 10, 2007 in Book 810, Page 170 as Document No. 200731842. The beneficial interest is currently held by Household Finance Corp II. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana.The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,387.20, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 5, 2010 is $229,307.52 principal, interest at the rate of 12.15% now totaling $56,031.33, late charges in the amount of $2,621.64, escrow advances of $2,867.50, suspense balance of $-1,740.45 and other fees and expenses advanced of $6,425.42, plus accruing interest at the rate of $76.33 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an

interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Hsbc V Brown 41472.223 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2A of Huson Lots, Lots 2A and 3A, a Recorded Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 30 of Plats at Page 17 DALE HESS AND SHERRY HESS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 2, 2007 and Recorded October 12, 2007 in Book 807, Page 406 under Document No. 200727046. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, N.A. as successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,262.08, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 24, 2010 is $180,489.95 principal, interest at the rate of 7.305% now totaling $6,324.47, late charges in the amount of $315.50, escrow advances of $107.57, and other fees and expenses advanced of $191.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor,

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 June 3 – June 10, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 18, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On March 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Pnc V Hess 41230.510 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 27, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 13 of Leischner Tracts, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. GLEN BROWNLEE AND RHONDA BROWNLEE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 18, 2007 and Recorded June 25, 2007 in Book 800, Page 312 under Document No. 200716107. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,044.73, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 16, 2010 is $114,449.90 principal, interest at the rate of 7.5000% now totaling $3,214.00, late charges in the amount of $177.12, escrow advances of $-212.48, and other fees and expenses advanced of $35.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.52 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior

to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 19, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On March 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same.Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 Citimortgage V Brownlee 41926.829 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/14/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200724009, Bk 805, Pg 1015, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael C. Coulter, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 in Block 1 of Linda Vista Ninth Supplement, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 20 of Plats at Page 56. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 1, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $330,547.70. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $315,316.69, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 10, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at

www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71878) 1002.152790-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/14/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200309749, Bk. 701, Pg. 1527, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Debra A. Gesel and Martin A. Gesel, wife and husband was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Webster Bank was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Co. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Co. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13-A in Parcel ‘D’ of Hillside Homes No. 1, Supplemental Plat ‘A’, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $128,632.49. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $123,069.39, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 11, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.05511) 1002.152904-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/15/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200803721, Bk 813, pg 816, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Camson N. Adenuga, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit E-4 of Grandvue Village, according to the Declaration under the Unit Ownership Act recorded as Document No. 443148 on March 27, 1979, located on Lots 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, Block 2, Hillside Homes No. 1, according to the official plat thereof as

filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office, Missoula County, Montana. Together with an undivided 1/20 interest in the common elements appertaining to the above described unit and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto as set forth in the Declaration. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 30, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $143,015.83. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $139,268.44, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 9, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72609) 1002.152802-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/08/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200613760, Book 776, Page 568, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lindsey Doe, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 44A of Cook’s Addition, Block 1, Lots 40 through 45, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 5, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $153,448.28. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,231.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 June 3 – June 10, 2010

Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01566) 1002.114050-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/23/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200600274, Book 767, Page 104, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Dale S. Martell, Susan L. Martell, as husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Brokers Conduit was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17H of the Amended plat of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes, Lot 17, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200901265, Bk 832, Pg 296, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-4. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 5, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $188,679.34. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $167,397.17, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s

and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28803) 1002.109468-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/11/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200727357, Bk 807, Pg 717, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Rebecca Holman, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17 in Block 1 of a correction plat of Hillview Heights Numbers No. 3 and 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 6, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $197,617.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $192,599.18, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72824) 1002.153549-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/04/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200526489, Bk 761, Pg 1259, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Justin Kelly, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 28 of Wallace Creek Estates, a platted

subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 6, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $224,270.84. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $217,909.19, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72908) 1002.153589-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/19/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200815226, Bk 822, Pg 6, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John Henry Fisher and Judy K. Fisher, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 211 of 44 Ranch, Phases 3 and 4, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 8, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $274,818.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $268,338.53, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to com-


PUBLIC NOTICES mence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 18, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.73022) 1002.153723-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/21/08, recorded as Instrument No. Book 825; Page 550; 200819967, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joshua D. Bryant and Rebekah J. Bryant was Grantor, Provident Financial, Inc. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Guaranty Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Guaranty Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 60 of Avalon Meadows, Phase 2 and 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to satisfy the loan upon maturity, and pay the remaining unpaid principal balance plus interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) was due in full on 02/21/2010. As of April 15, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $226,175.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,859.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 23, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be

accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 8034.20083) 1002.153643-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/02/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200421823, Bk 737, Pg 257, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John P. McDonald was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Home Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract D of Thibodeau and Poitras Tract Amending Block 1, a platted subdivision located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 2009006025, Bk 835, Pg 859, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 16, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $301,593.24. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $256,368.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 30, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.18626) 1002.125082-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 19, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 22 of Williams Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. GLEN BAUER, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to David R Chisholm, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to U. S. Bank N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated March 14, 2003 and Recorded March 19, 2003 under Document # 200309251 Bk-701, Pg1029. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank, NA. Charles J.

Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $710.03, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 22, 2010 is $87,015.01 principal, interest at the rate of 5.95% now totaling $2,886.58, late charges in the amount of $171.72, escrow advances of $434.08, and other fees and expenses advanced of $119.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $14.18 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 10, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On March 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3572308 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 19, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 15 in Block 23, South Missoula, A Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Leslie A Largay, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated December 20, 2006 and Recorded December 21, 2006 under Document Number 200632601. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, N.A. as successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded

in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1983.33, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 5, 2010 is $340000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.00% now totaling $16,127.46, late charges in the amount of $694.19, escrow advances of $1722.98, and other fees and expenses advanced of $108.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $65.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 11, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On March 11, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3572179 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010, 06/10/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 7 in Block 6 of Spring Hills Addition No. 6, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof KAREL A MORALES, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 8, 2007 and Recorded in Book 799, Page 329 under Document No. 200714796. The beneficial interest is currently held by MetLife Home Loans, a division of MetLife Bank, N.A.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the

monthly payments due in the amount of $1,636.58, beginning August 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 01, 2010 is $232,944.24 principal, interest at the rate of 6.8750% now totaling $10,676.64, late charges in the amount of $520.42, escrow advances of $1,015.06, and other fees and expenses advanced of $262.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $44.49 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale, is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in “interest to the grantor .or any other person having’ an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AIM ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 12, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3572196 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 11 OF RAVENWOOD HILLS NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jon G. Kearns and Marlies P. Borchers, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 04, 2008 and Recorded on September 10, 2008 under Document # 200821009, in Bk-826, Pg-193. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of

$2,318.00, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2010 is $291,578.88 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $8,723.95, late charges in the amount of $741.76 and other fees and expenses advanced of $520.24, plus accruing interest at the rate of $47.93 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 12, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On March 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3572205 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 1 OF SUNSET WEST, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MOUNTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. ROBERT E ERBAUGH, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to

Community Bank-Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 21, 2005 and recorded on March 25, 2005 in BK-749 pg-1020, document # 200506666. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc., successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $837.91, beginning November 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 9, 2010 is $100,271.02 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $2,583.67, late charges in the amount of $126.56, escrow advances of $298.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $20.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.14 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid, money orders, certified” checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. IN INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE Dated March 12, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3572218 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010

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CONCRETE V i c ’s C o n c r e t e . Foundations, walls, flat work, coloring & stamping. Right every time. Free estimates. Quality work. 459-5546

$50,000 to $250,000 go to...youtube.com Financial reality / Stock Market success.

Adrian 543-2503

MISCELLANEOUS Experienced Heath Care Provider available for assistance with seniors for personal care, doctor’s appt, running errands, light cleaning and cooking. Resume Qualifications and local references available. Joy 493-0956

DUPLEXES 0-6 year-old openings Encourages Nature, Adventure & Arts!

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

FREE LAUNDRY SOAP

APARTMENTS

CORNERSTONE

PAINTING

35 Years Experience Interior & Exterior Free Estimates 546-5541

ACROSS 1 Wild guy? 6 Lather 10 Candy that comes in twos 14 Be harmonious 15 Latvian capital 16 "Ars longa, ___ brevis" 17 Band whose "No Rain" video had the "Bee Girl" 19 Mouth rinse brand 20 His, to Henri 21 It's rolled by roleplayers 22 Like 2011, but not 2012 24 551, in old Rome 25 Deck component 26 Total nightmares 28 Song about an animal "measuring the marigolds" 32 Not captivating 33 Lindsay wearing an alcohol monitoring bracelet 34 2007 Will Smith survival flick 38 ___'wester 39 How some sandwiches are served 40 French street 41 Some of the Habsburgs 44 Rakes in 46 Mario ___ 64 (1996 racing game) 47 Actress Barbara of "The Big Valley" 49 1996 nominee parodied as referring to himself in third-person 52 Persian's place 53 It equals itself to the 100th power 54 Digital camera contents, for short 55 It's called on the street 56 Author's kiss of death 59 Christmas tree varieties 61 "To the Extreme" rapper 64 "Watch your head!" on the course 65 Yale students, familiarly 66 Word before horizon or coordinator 67 Mineral that's often black 68 Champagne flute part 69 "Remove" marks, to a proofreader Last week’s solution

DOWN 1 Boxing moves 2 Stare too long 3 ___ Kringle 4 Hallow ending 5 1984 Patrick Swayze movie remade for 2010 6 Bar coupon, perhaps 7 "There Will Be Blood" subject 8 "The Heart of ___" (P.G. Wodehouse book) 9 Jawbone 10 Vegan meat substitute, for short 11 Funk band with "Play That Funky Music" 12 Author Calvino 13 Graph basis 18 Spanish painter Joan 23 Chip's pal 25 Half a dance step 27 Screen stars' org. 28 "Casablanca" character 29 Queen of Jordan 30 He sang "Johnny B. Goode" 31 Some palominos 35 Magical practice 36 Now, in Latin 37 Office piece 39 Makes it longer than 42 Ate 43 Do (acid) 44 Turned on, like a computer security setting 45 Bristle on barley or rye 48 Rapidly shrinking Asian sea 49 Great, in "Variety" headlines 50 Funny paper? 51 Raise high 56 Actress Jessica 57 Unwanted spots 58 New Jersey team 60 Word before worker or symbol 62 Never, in Nuremberg 63 Many a Monopoly sq. ©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0471

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Improving Your Contact us to find out how you can save 30% on your Replacement windows.

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118 West Alder- Historic Park Place Hotel at the heart of down town -Studio and 1 bdrm coinops and gas heat. $525-$575. Rent $750 721-8990 1323 Grant St “A” $1450 4bd/3.5ba Brand NEW! 2 car garage, w/d, dw, microwave, fireplace, & hardwood floors. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1B -329 E. Front. $525-W/S/G paid. Gas Heat, parking, coin-op laundry. NO SMOKING/PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333 2339 Mary #4 2bd/1ba $695 Heat Paid! Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2B -3000 Washburn- Newly Remodeled Condo. $825-$875W/S/G paid. D/W, Micro, W/D hkups, gas fireplace, carport. NO SMOKING. GATEWEST 728-7333

Find the perfect fit in our print or online employment ads

3320 Great Northern Apartments-Rent $495-$545 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990

missoulanews.com

AUTOMOTIVE IMPORTS

Scooters Mopeds

2008 Honda Fit Sport $14,900~Excellent Condition~ CD; MP3 plug in; Alloy wheels; Keyless Entry; Fog lights; cargo tray & cargo tray cover; nose mask; Wheel locks; Color: Blackberry Pearl~ 10K miles 406370-8859~~ Moving need to sell!

SCOOTERS Tomos 150 cc Scooters: at Scooterville starting at $1999. 721-ZOOM. www.scootmt.com. 1700 Stephens.

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I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

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327-0300

1918 S 5th Street 2bd/2ba main level duplex, microwave, dishwasher, common laundry area, shared yard, pets poss. $895. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 721 Hendrickson: 1-bedroom, breakfast bar, carport, big yard, pet ok, $595, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

HOUSES 1102 S 3rd St W 3bd/1ba house, w/d hkups, yard, gas heat, pets poss., close to bike trail & McCormick Park. $1265 Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 1961 9th: 2-bedroom, new carpet, on alley, yard, gas range, pet OK, $550, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

COMMERCIAL Commercial-Stephens Center 2100 Stephens-Retail/service or office. 950-3150 sqft. GATEWEST 728-7333 Downtown Studio office storage warehouse space available, various sizes & prices. Contact 239-2206.

ROOMMATES

3714 W. Central #2 2bd/1ba $700 hk-ups, carport, upper unit. Grizzly Property Management. 542-2060.

ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listing with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse. Visit: http://www.roommates.com

825 SW Higgins B5 $705 2bd/1ba, garage, hk-ups, Heat Paid!, & lots of room. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

Beautiful Daylight Basement Beautiful 2 bd daylight bsmt apartment. Westside. $600/mo+deposit. No smoking/pets. 543-4053

ALBERTON Petty Creek Exit. Older 2 bedroom single wide on 1/2 acre. 1010 Lucinda Lane. $625/month, $625 deposit. Call Rob 602-499-4640

RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

ALBERTON Petty Creek exit. Older 3 bedroom, 1 bath house on 1/2 acre. 1025 North Runyon. Great location. Available now. $695/month. $695 deposit. Call Rob 602499-4640

1&2

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SCOOTERVILLE Springtime in the Rockies means fun, fun, fun on Scooterville Scooters. For the latest in FASHIONABLE RIDING GEAR, MOPEDS AND SCOOTERS, visit us at 1700 Stephens, online at www.scootmt.com, or call us at 721-ZOOM (9666). SCOOTERVILLE: 100 miles per gallon, 30 miles per hour, NO drivers license required, MOPEDS ARE HERE!! Scooterville Montana. 1700 Stephens, www.scootmt.com and 406-721-ZOOM.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 June 3 – June 10, 2010

Spacious, Newer 3BD/2 BA Home • W/D Hookups • 2 Car Garage

$79

95

4 Wheel Alignment 1414 Montana St. 406-728-3144

• Pets on Approval • $1250/month

Plum Property Management

406.493.1349

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com


RENTALS Professional Property Management

Jane's Place

Hot Springs, MT • $45 & up Vacation Rental/Night/Week/Month

406-546-0404

pets welcome

www.rentangle.com/16406

330 N. 1st St. W. 2 BR apartment, $650/mo. $650 deposit, All utilities paid

Lost your grandmother's diamond ring?

307 Woody • 2 BR apartment, $575 mo. $575 deposit 149 W. Broadway 1 & 2 BR available now $450-$600 mo. + deposit 101 Pullman Ct. Large 2 BD apartment $575 mo. + deposit Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at 549-4113

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

Post a lost & found notice for

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MISSOULA

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Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $620/mo.

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Expect the best from

1 BD 107 N. Johnson $425/mo.

2 BD Duplex 111 N. Johnson $595/mo.

Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

Join the Montana Landlord's Association

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

251- 4707

2 BD Duplex 1023 Cooley $595/mo. -- $200 off first mo. rent

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent!

Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson president

(406) 250-0729 www.mlaonline.org

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

FATHER’S DAY

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 10250 Valley Grove Dr., Lolo MLS#902264 - $289,000 Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath, artsy log home on 1.84 acres 5 minutes from Missoula - Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate 546-5816

2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $129,900. MLS#906610. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. Montana Preferred Properties. 2663 Stratford, Target Range MLS#907889 - $212,000 Well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath ranch with fenced yard. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

3 3 2 2 B C o n n e r y Wa y MLS#908163 - $191,000 Unique 3 level condo. 2 bedrooms, plus loft & 3 bath. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

4322 Capy Ln. - MLS#904419 $435,000 Wonderful executive style 4 bed, 4 bath home on 1 acre lot. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate 546-5816

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. Montana Preferred Properties.

Affordable, nice, like-new single family home in central Missoula with 3brm, all aplliances, awesome open floorplan and only $169,900, 1947 12St 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 10,000 Sq Ft Lot, open floor plan, double attached garage, lots of storage, living room & family room, close to Good Food Store, and more. $223,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com

BUYERS WANTED: Research is what I do. Email me your wish list, we’ll look high and low for your new place. Celia Grohmann, Broker, Banana Belt Realty, celia@montana.com. C U T E R O S E PA R K / S L A N T STREETS NEIGHBORHOOD BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2+ bonus rooms, hardwood floors, arched doorways, built-ins, single garage, fenced yard, mostly finished basement, and much more. $239,500.

Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy17 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Development potential, almost 2 acres, vintage farmhouse & duplex, additional undeveloped ground. Preliminary Plat City Council Approval in place, contact agent for details, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C13 June 3 – June 10, 2010


REAL ESTATE 1500 W Broadway, suite A Missoula

On the corner of Broadway and Russell

100%

Shelly Evans 544-8570

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION. For the past 4 years. Give us a Try!

EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1.03 ACRES IN THE LOLO CREEK VALLEY. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Main floor master suite, great room, family room & rec room, formal and casual dining rooms, great mountain and valley views. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12 porticorealestate.com Fantastic, like-new, 4Bdrm, 2Bth, open floorplan, affordable at $229K, Next to Fantastic Community Garden and close to Good Food Store and bike trail. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Jodie Hooker 239-7588 Jerry Hogan 546-7270

RICE TEAM

Kevin Plumage 240-2009

>>Garnet Mountain Property 16x40 Cabin, 2 tracks 24.49 acres, spring water, turn key $120,00.

Janet Rice • 240-3932

Robin Rice • 240-6503

3 contiguous tracks<< 34.81 acres, creek frontage, flowing spring, off the grid, deer, elk & bear. $82,500.

>>10 acre track, $27,500.

Lara Dorman Realtor GRI

Flathead Lake Views $169,000

Our Mission at Portico is to honor diversity, build community and create a lifestyle that promotes the health and well-being of our planet.

Nice 2+acre property between Elmo and Dayton with views of Flathead Lake and Chief Cliff. Property has shared well and septic approval.

406.531.5582 laradorman@aol.com

140 Arrowhead Dr. • $220,000 Great opportunity for sweat equity. Large home on a large lot in the Wapikiya area. 3/2 baths, living room AND family room on main floor.

6605 Kiki Court MLS# 903596 Starting at $299,970

Downtown Sweetheart

514 W. Spruce St. • $269,000 1920’s era house has been revamped while retaining all of its original charm. Updated electrical, plumbing, handicapped accessible bath, security alarm, offstreet parking, underground sprinklers, and air conditioning in harmony with original bullseye woodwork, mahogany flooring, high ceilings, and all right downtown on West Spruce. Zoned B2-2 for a variety of commercial or residential uses. MLS#10001940

912 Defoe • $179,000 3 bedroom two full bath home with GIGANTIC shop/garage. Brand new carpet just installed. Come take a look!

Joy Earls Are you looking for a NEW Home that is all on one level with no steps... wide hallways... and nearly 2000 sf?? Do you like open space to walk your dog or relax or bird watch with shared access on Grant Creek and a tributary of the Clark Fork? Would you like to hop on the new bike/ped path right past this subdivision??

Call me today to look at the plans for this beautiful new home in Riverwalk Estates brought to you by Earls Construction, Inc.

Joy Earls, Broker • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com

FISH THE BLACKFOOT RIVER F R O M Y O U R B A C K YA R D . Beautifully landscaped 4 Bdr/2 Bath home on 1.2 acres on the Blackfoot River just 10-15 minutes from Missoula. Open floor plan, great deck with hot tub overlooking the river and much more. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit.. www.mindypalmer.com Great 3bdr house with hardwood floors, fireplace, nice sized kitchen and big backyard with garden space, fruit trees and garage with shop area. 9 3 3 Wo o d f o r d 3 2 7 - 8 7 8 7 porticorealestate.com Hillview Acres - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Acreage in Helena area. Zoned for cemetery. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 car garage. Great horse property on 15 acres. Large kitchen and dinning area overlooking meadow and pond. Double garage has apartment with separate door on back side that rents for $525 per month. $319,900, MLS#10004041. 19655 Mullan Rd. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. Montana Preferred Properties. Huge Price Reduction Lot 1 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905530 - $85,000 or two lots totaling 5.12 acres for $160,000 2.87 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate 546-5816 Huge Price Reduction Lot 2 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905531 - $85,000 or two lots totaling 5.12 acres for $160,000 2.25 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 5465816 Immaculate home in great neighborhood. 2 bdrms, 2 bth, familyroom, sauna, nice yard, Vintage touches, hardwood floors, everything’s in fantastic condition! 135 Kensington 3278787 porticorealestate.com OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 6/6/10 1-3 PM. 3 acres fenced & ready for horses. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, modular home on a permanent foundation. 24x18 outbuilding, beautiful v i e w s . 4 9 9 G r a n d v i e w, Stevensville. $179,000. MLS#

321 N. Higgins - MLS#10003360 - $875,000 Downtown commercial building with land (business not included). Prime location with over 4000 sq. ft. of retail space plus basement.

Mary Mar ry

10002488. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@wind e r m e r e . c o m . Te x t : 4 4 1 3 3 Message:128888 for pics

over back patio. $233,900. MLS#10003652. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

NHN Applegate & Prarie Rd., Helena - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Great investment to get in at the very beginning of a cemetery development. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

Wonderful single level home in quiet neighborhood near Rattlesnake Creek. 2 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 3624 Creekwood, Missoula. $279,900. MLS#10003714. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

NORTHSIDE BUNGALOW WITH A GARAGE/SHOP. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, great location close to Downtown, large fenced back yard, and much more. $180,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com Older Home with Vintage charm in wildly sought after Missoula neighborhood. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, beautiful floors. This charmer has incredible possibilities. 321 Tremont 327-8787 porticorealestate.com One of a Kind Listing, Nine Mile Schoolhouse with all the charm, romance and history one would expect. Unlimited possiblities an outstanding property. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Really cute craftsman style, 3Bdr, 1Ba home priced to sell. This home has all the charm of the 20s and original floors. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great room, open floor plan, double garage, unobstructed views of the Bitterroot Mountains, great yard. $219,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, l a u n d r y, a n d m u c h m o r e . $184,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit.... www.mindypalmer.com Spacious, light-filled Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2 Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms & 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths, a really nice big backyard with patio. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C14 June 3 – June 10, 2010

Desirable Elk Hills condo. New listing priced to sell $169,500. Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753, 543-4412 or Fidelity Real Estate 721-1840.

LAND FOR SALE 19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping. $89,999. MLS# 10003279. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. Montana Preferred Properties. 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696,Text Mindy0 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $159,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN

SPECTACULAR BITTERROOT VIEWS. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath Stevensville area home on 10 acres. High ceilings, beautiful hardwood floors, fireplace, spacious master bedroom, deck with hot tub, and much more. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy19 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

H AWA I ’ I R E A L E S TAT E ~ BUYER’S MARKET homes-condos-land. Average temperature in the 70’s. Susie Spielman, RS, Windermere C&H Properties. Cell: 808-640-3100 or E-mail: susie.spielman@hawaiiantel.net 20 years experience. FREE INFO~NO PRESSURE~NO OBLIGATION

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Well cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home w/ hot tub, A/C, & UG sprinklers. Near parks and trails. $319,900. 5501 Bonanza. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Wo n d e r f u l 5 B e d r o o m , 2 Bathroom home on large lot with fruit trees and garden area. Meticulously landscaped with retractable awning

REAL ESTATE LENDING WITH A CONSCIENCE. Private funding for secured legitimate “NonBankable” Loans with substantial equity. Cash for “Seller Held” contracts and mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC, 619 SW Higgins, Ste 0, Missoula, MT. 59803. 800-9994809 MT. Lic #000203


REAL ESTATE

FEATURED LISTING

Craftsman built home

• Private, Luxury Retreat on 10 Acres (10 min. to town) • 4 Bedrooms with Bath, +2 other bathrooms • Incredibly designed for Entertaining and Family Living • Custom details throughout the home-A Must See!

$1,275,000 MLS# 900412

3552 No Mail Trail Missoula

joni@reexecs.com • www.jzmtrealty.com

• 5 Bed, 2 Bath home w/ gas fireplace • Beautiful fenced & landscaped yard • Garden area, fruit trees, patio, storage • All Appliances and A/C

• Large wood working shop • 5 bed, 3 bath + 3 car garage • Beautiful, high quality interior finishes • Large garden area & great mountain views from deck

$299,000 MLS # 10002301

8205 Phillpot Ct. Clinton, MT

Joseph Cooke

Joni Zinkovich (406) 531-6038

FEATURED LISTING

406-531-3715 jc.mt.realty@gmail.com • mullantrailrealty.com

$233,900 MLS# 10003652

3 Kasota Missoula

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Proper ties

Did you know? Posting a classified ad is FREE!  www.missoulanews.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C15 June 3 – June 10, 2010


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$2.29

USDA Organic Green Seedless Grapes

99¢

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Hutterite Colony Large Eggs

$1.19

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Missoula Independent