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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 21 • May 21–May 28, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Missoula police officers take to the virtual streets Scope: Andy Smetanka stalks his way into a Guy Maddin film Comedy: Chris Fairbanks digs for Todd Barry’s funny bone


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 21 • May 21–May 28, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Missoula police officers take to the virtual streets Scope: Andy Smetanka stalks his way into a Guy Maddin film Comedy: Chris Fairbanks digs for Todd Barry’s funny bone


Missoula Independent

Page 2 May 21–May 28, 2009


nside Cover Story A stunned silence hit the state of Montana at lunch time on Friday, May 8, as news filtered out from federal district Judge Donald Molloy’s Missoula courtroom that W.R. Grace & Co. and three of its former executives had been acquitted Cover illustration by Kou Moua of all crimes in connection with the asbestos poisoning of Libby, Montana. Court watchers, however, were less surprised. From the nature of the charges themselves to the statute of limitations, from the rulings prohibiting evidence Molloy deemed prejudicial to the final jury instructions, Grace’s lawyers prevailed on nearly every point that gave them an edge, making it all but impossible for the 12 jurors to come to any other conclusion...............................15

News

Friday 5/22 • 9pm

S al s a

Loca

Thursday 5/28 • 9pm

Hillbilly Hellcats From Denver, Colorado Friday 5/29 • 9pm

Letters Health care, health care, health care ...............................................................4 The Week in Review Missoula loses a music scene stalwart ......................................6 Briefs Pipestone sells, Blixseth swaps and Dems grow younger.................................6 Etc. Calling out John Hendrickson...............................................................................7 Up Front Missoula police take to the virtual streets....................................................8 Up Front EKO Compost repurposes Missoula’s poop ................................................9 Ochenski The trail of broken promises.....................................................................10 Writers on the Range The real story of vampires in Washington ............................11 Agenda Trauma and the Mind-Body Connection .....................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Slow boat cooking..........................................................................21 8 Days a Week Thinking twice about our veggie garden ........................................22 Mountain High Join CASA’s park-to-park ride...........................................................33 Scope Andy Smetanka parlays an obsession into feature film work .........................34 Noise Bird’s Mile Home, The Racquet, Black Dice and Blind Pilot...........................35 Comedy Comedian Chris Fairbanks grills Todd Barry, sort of..................................36 Film Angels & Demons thrills where Da Vinci didn’t ................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films....................................................38

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Exclusives Street Talk ....................................................................................................................4 In Other News............................................................................................................13 Independent Personals.............................................................................................39 The Advice Goddess..................................................................................................39 Free Will Astrolog y ...................................................................................................40 Classifieds...................................................................................................................41 Crossword Puzzle......................................................................................................45 This Modern World ...................................................................................................50

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PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen PHOTO INTERN Ashley Sears COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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with Purchase of Beverage Page 3 May 21–May 28, 2009


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Asked Tuesday afternoon on Higgins Ave. in downtown Missoula

Q:

by Chad Harder

This week the Indy looks into how EKO Compost turns Missoula sewage into soil amendments. How do you feel about your solid waste being converted into compost? Follow-up: What’s the oddest item you’ve ever put into your toilet?

Shandor Badaruddin: That’s great. I’m glad they are. It’s a dirty job and somebody’s got to do it. Royal flush: Well, I guess I’m pretty conventional in that regard because I don’t think I’ve put anything out of the ordinary in there. Just the usual, and paper products.

Joe Godburn: Anything they can do to keep it moving, you know the circle of life and all that. Crocodile hunter: I really haven’t put anything weird in there, but when I was about eight years old I had a dream that an alligator came out and tried to eat me. That’s the first dream I can remember.

Kate Vanderscoff: Anytime we can reuse waste it’s a good thing, and this is turning it into something good. Poop’s good. I’m serious, and compost is good too. Brushed off: I once dropped a toothbrush in a toilet, but it wasn’t intentional. There wasn’t any poop in there, but I think I still threw it away. At least I hope I did.

I’m the first one to support reducing our country’s consumption of fossil fuels. In fact, I look around Montana and see an enormous potential to be a national energy leader if we can continue to expand our renewable energy capacities. However, I cannot support proposals like the cap and trade legislation being debated in Congress. The question isn’t whether cap and trade will have a negative impact on our economy, jobs and personal income— the question is by how much. Supporters of cap and trade have studies that suggest modest declines in job growth and GDP, and the opponents have studies that show massive negative impacts. I don’t know who is correct, but both sides agree that the effect will be negative. The hardest hit will be low income Americans, and more importantly, low income Montanans. A greater share of their income already goes to energy costs. Cap and trade will just force an even greater share of their paycheck to go to energy, as any costs added by cap and trade policies will be passed on to the end user. And direct energy costs aren’t the extent of it—because transportation and manufacturing costs also go up under a cap and trade system, the cost of all household goods will increase. Add to that the projected job losses due to cap and trade and we are considering a serious situation for low income people. I’m not suggesting we do nothing to reduce fossil fuel emissions; frankly, that is not an option. I’ve seen what American ingenuity can do and I have every confidence we can make a difference without forcing the least fortunate among us to sacrifice even more. Let’s find another way to solve this issue without introducing new problems in an already weak economic environment. I believe the solution lies more in innovation, both in the energy sector and in legislative efforts, than it does in old ideas gaining new favor. Tim Ondrak Missoula

Same care for all

Louie Bond: If its not dangerous, or polluting or anything like that, it seems like we might as well put it to some kind of use. Close the door: I can’t even imagine, but probably some old stuff out of the refrigerator. You gotta get rid of it somehow.

Missoula Independent

Find another way

Page 4 May 21–May 28, 2009

Sen. Max Baucus wants a national health law similar to the one in Massachusetts (see “Single-payer push,” May 14, 3009). There are subsidized plans based on gross income. The state decides how much you can afford. Many in these plans can’t afford the co-pays or find a primary care doctor due to the low reimbursement rate—and forget choice or keeping their primary or specialist.

There are discount plans for higher incomes. The cheapest is expensive, and many can’t afford care because of high deductibles and co-pays. An uninsured resident must pay a penalty enforced as tax evasion. Many couldn’t afford a plan and paid a penalty up to $912 for 2008. For subsidized insurance, a Medicaid form with a federally required estate recovery clause must be signed— at age 55 and up, assets are taken upon death to pay for care. This is not an insurance policy; it’s a loan. The state has tried to cover this up, but some won’t sign and paid penalties for being uninsured. Others were auto-enrolled.

It hit me “ about two weeks ago that graduation also means I’ll be dropped from my parents’ health

break a leg or even come down with a flu that requires a trip to see the doctor. And in my search for a job, health benefits will be a significant consideration. But rising health care costs combined and health insurance premiums have hit employers as hard as they’ve hit families and individuals, so many potential employers are not able to offer such “luxuries.” Health care premiums that have grown almost three times faster than wages since 2000 have had a significant impact not only on employers and individuals, but also on the economy and must be fixed now. I want to acknowledge Sen. Baucus’ hard work on health care reform and thank him for his continuing advocacy on this issue. As chair of the Senate Finance Committee, Baucus has been a leader for the people of Montana and the entire country when it comes to fixing our broken health care system. I am hopeful that in working together, our elected representatives in Washington and the health care industry can reach agreement on an ambitious, effective and workable solution. Our families, businesses, and our economy are depending on it. Siri Smillie Missoula

insurance, which I’ve been so fortunate to have for the past

22 years.

If a law mandates that all citizens have health insurance, it must be equitable for all. Does Baucus’ plan have estate recovery? Tell him you want single-payer and the same care for all. Dianne Bridges Lenox, Mass.

Now what? As a member of the Class of 2009, my college graduation has been a muchanticipated event, one that I have worked 16 years to achieve. However, it hit me about two weeks ago that graduation also means I’ll be dropped from my parents’ health insurance, which I’ve been so fortunate to have for the past 22 years. As of my graduation date, I’ll be floating along, praying that I do not

Health care dictatorship Sen. Max Baucus wishes to do to Montanans and our country what Massachusetts did to us. He’ll soon try to sell you the “Massachusetts Plan” for health insurance. A victim of this fraud, I learned you’ll become a criminal if you don’t buy from his suppliers—the insurance companies. You’ll be charged with tax evasion and fined thousands yearly for not buying. Your intelligence and patriotism will be questioned when he says, “We need a uniquely American solution.” How American is a health care dictatorship? One-third of extorted premiums fund insurance bureaucracy, profits and wasteful duplicate staffing of thousands of companies. Max will prey on human sentiments to insure the needy. He won’t reveal you’re subsidizing the poor via massive monthly premiums to cover costs, insurers’ profit margins and bloated bureaucracies feeding at your trough. Don’t be buffaloed, Montana. Learn about single-payer at medicareforall.org. Scott Carlo Pittsfield, Mass.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

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Missoula Independent

Page 5 May 21–May 28, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, May 13

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

Missoula’s Public Safety and Health Committee unanimously approves a plan to cut the city’s energy consumption by 10 percent, and the full council passes the plan on Monday. The city will pay Johnson Controls about $51,000 to conduct an energy audit, which the city hopes will lead to far greater savings on its energy bills. The city paid $1.6 million for energy last fiscal year.

• Thursday, May 14 Gov. Brian Schweitzer announces a $500,000 cut in Montana Meth Project funding, part of the $4.5 million he struck from the budget with line-item vetoes. In a subsequent statement he writes that despite $1 million in seed money allocated in 2007, “The Meth Project has not become self-sustaining.” The project did receive a half million from the state’s general budget.

• Friday, May 15 Bozeman High School’s softball team ends its threeyear, 65-game losing streak with a 7-4 win over Missoula Hellgate in Great Falls in the second game of a triple-header. “We celebrated like we won the World Series,” coach Sam Vidal told the Bozeman Chronicle. Later in the day, Missoula Big Sky put the Hawks back in their place, whipping them 12-5.

• Saturday, May 16 Localfest, sponsored by the Missoula Sustainable Business Council, begins a week-long effort to get Missoulians to connect with local, sustainable businesses. The festival itself takes over Caras Park and incorporates live music, art, tables for local business and the “Best in the West” kayaking competition on Brennan’s Wave.

• Sunday, May 17 Pearl Jam bassist and Big Sandy native Jeff Ament reconnects with Deranged Diction, his hardcore band from 25 years ago, for an early morning set at Missoula’s Palace Lounge. The music is not the only throwback, as the Palace erupts with the most gnarly mosh pit this side of the ’90s.

• Monday, May 18 Tom Reed, the longtime owner of The Other Side and Buck’s Club, dies of an apparent heart attack at Missoula Community Medical Center. He was 55. The two clubs are closed until further notice, leaving Missoula without one of its most popular music venues. Services are scheduled for Friday at Garden City Funeral Home and Crematory.

• Tuesday, May 19 A judge in St. Paul, Minn., overturns the conviction of 33-year-old Sean McCoy of Missoula. McCoy was arrested during the Republican National Convention on Sept. 1 last year and convicted of public assembly without a permit. A faulty jury instruction led to the case’s dismissal.

More than 8 feet of snow still blanketing the top of Kellogg Peak lured nearly 2,000 skiers to the sunny slopes of Silver Mountain for a day of free skiing on May 17. Traditionally the last resort in the region to close, Silver will reopen again Memorial Day weekend with $25 tickets.

Forest Service

Blixseth trades out About 40,000 acres of land in Idaho, along the Montana-Idaho border near Lolo Pass, is in the process of being conveyed to the U.S. Forest Service as part of a land swap with Western Pacific Timber, LLC ( WPT). WPT, partially owned by timber baron and former Yellowstone Club owner Tim Blixseth, purchased the land from Plum Creek Timber Co. in late 2005 with the intent to broker an exchange, a maneuver used in the past by Blixseth to add value to his holdings. The company entered into an agreement with the Forest Service last September to initiate the exchange and an environmental impact statement is currently underway. The land is composed of about 60 squaremile checkerboard blocks intermingled with Clearwater National Forest land, encompassing the headwaters of the Lochsa River and home to threatened and endangered species. The historic Lolo Trail, used by migrating Nez Perce Indians and later by Lewis and Clark, runs through it. The swap would effectively extend the

reach of the Montana Legacy Project into Idaho, according to Teresa Trulock, project manager with the Clearwater. “We’re right over the border from that,” Trulock says. “If you just look over the state line, that imaginary boundary, this is the checkerboard that continues on the Idaho side. “Checkerboard lands are hard to manage,” she continues, “because it’s hard to do a holistic approach to resource management when you only own and manage every other square mile…This opportunity came to us, and it makes it easier to manage fire on the landscape. It makes it easier to manage fish and wildlife.” In exchange for its 39,371 acres in the upper Lochsa River drainage, WPT would receive 28,212 acres of Forest Service land in small parcels in seven counties in central and northern Idaho. WPT’s Brian Disney describes them as “fingers and toes—scattered parcels that affect the public the least amount.” Asked if the land is attractive for real estate development—like other Blixseth transactions— Disney said, “There’s always that chance down the line, but if you look at these properties, they’re timber properties. This is a timber deal.”

Commissioners in northern Idaho’s Latah County voted May 6 to oppose the land swap for its potential to affect the county’s character and public access, but they hold no authority. Matthew Frank

Business

Pipestone goes to the Lights Missoula outdoor retailer Pipestone Mountaineering changed hands last week when owner Jim Wilson sold the business to Bozemanbased Northern Lights Trading Company. Wilson put Pipestone up for sale last fall, and says about four individuals have expressed interest. Northern Lights, which currently runs two stores, looked like the best fit. “I really like the folks there,” Wilson says. “They’re really genuine people, and they have the same philosophy as far as customer service.” Northern Lights owner Jay Allen says the transition is going smoothly, largely thanks to Wilson’s cooperation. Managers from Northern Lights visited Pipestone last Friday to meet with staff and check the store’s inventory.

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 May 21–May 28, 2009

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

Pipestone won’t change much for now, aside from wider product selection. Both the store name and staff will remain. “We don’t want to come in there and change everything,” says Northern Lights manager Matt Parsons. “We have a great customer base there, we have a great staff, we have good lines, great inventory. We’re just going to try to get more of it in there.” Over time, some aspects of the Pipestone operation will improve. One retail avenue Allen hopes to expand is the store’s web presence. Northern Lights has experienced considerable success in online sales. “I think it’s going to be a better store overall than when I had it,” Wilson says. As for Wilson’s post-Pipestone life, he says he’s excited to focus on his real estate work. Wilson founded Pipestone in Butte in 1990 and moved the store to Missoula in the mid-’90s. At the time the Trail Head had a monopoly in outdoor retail, and Wilson says he sought to increase customer options. Always underfinanced and overworked, it’s been an upstream paddle. “I wanted a change,” Wilson says. “I’ve been in retail probably 25 years, and I just needed a break…a change of life.” Alex Sakariassen

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Forward Montana’s campaign to drum up voters during the last presidential election. Houseman, also 28, was elected as the new alternate state committeeman. The president of the local steel workers’ union, Houseman is currently laid off from his job at Smurfit-Stone Container Corp. Wiener says a large portion of the committee’s agenda will revolve around galvanizing support. “I think one of the things that the new leadership brings is based on our experience with movement politics and not just electoral politics,” he says. “That includes the importance of working between elections to craft a message and deliver it, and to organize peo-

Politics

Dems grow younger On May 12, The Missoula County Democrats held their annual county convention to elect a new executive board. Three of the five new faces—Jason Wiener, Emily Brock and Roy Houseman—may not represent a new direction for the organization, but they certainly represent a change: the oldest is just 32. “We were really excited about the infusion of youthful energy that came into the party in the past year,” says John Torma, 61, a member of the nominating committee. “And I know I personally—and I think I can speak for the executive board—really wanted to capitalize on that and cement the involvement of some of these younger folks within the local Democratic Party.” None of the three is a stranger to politics. Wiener, 32, represents Ward 1 on the Missoula City Council. He was voted the committee’s new chairman. Brock, 28, a graduate student at the University of Montana, serves as the coordinator of Hellgate High School’s Flagship program. The new vice chair was heavily involved with

ple when elections come. Parties are still about winning elections, and we’ll have the infrastructure in place to do it.” Torma, a former alternate state committeeman, says he’s delighted to see the new generation take the reins. “I was happy to serve on [the executive board] when I did,” he says. “But I’m overjoyed to pass the baton to somebody younger than myself who has the energy to do more of this than I do.” Jesse Froehling

Cell Phones

Emergency calls questioned The ongoing discussion of Missoula’s potential cell phone ban for drivers took a left turn last week when Ward 6 Councilmember Ed Childers raised a question with no clear answer: Are police officers able to drive more safely than the rest of us while talking on their cell phones?

Agenda

News Quirks

He asked because the potential ban being batted around by the city’s Public Safety and Health Committee includes an exemption for emergency personnel. And while their job would seem to require the need to talk and drive at the same time, Childers wondered if there was an evidence to suggest they wouldn’t cause a similar danger. Turns out, mountains of studies exist underscoring the correlation between unsafe driving and cell phone use—the National Safety Council cites 50 such studies—but officials from two traffic safety organizations say nobody has studied whether police officers are better able to talk and drive than the rest of us. “[Cell phone use by emergency personnel] is not something we have research on,” says Karen Aldana, spokesperson for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “I wouldn’t be able to speak anecdotally at all.” Meredith Morris of the National Safety Council agreed, but added, “What concerns us for any driver is the level of cognitive distraction caused by cell phone use while driving.” Childers posed the question to Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir during the May 11 meeting, but didn’t press the issue. Muir didn’t know of any studies, but did point out that officers receive many hours of defensive driving training, a benefit the majority of drivers don’t experience. “They say they need to use a cell phone as part of their regular driving duties,” Childers says. “And I can’t assume they don’t need it. I have to assume that these guys are hired to do a job and they get a whole lot of training on a whole lot of different levels.” Ward 1 Councilmember Dave Strohmaier, who drafted the cell phone ban, says regardless of the research, an emergency worker’s need to perform his or her job outweighs any safety issue. “Some situations—regardless of the increased risk—warrant use of electronic communication devices,” wrote Strohmaier in an e-mail. “The same logic applies to any private citizen dialing 911 to report an emergency (something that is also exempted from the ordinance).” The committee will continue to discuss the ordinance before referring it to the full council. Jesse Froehling

BY THE NUMBERS

4

Montana automotive dealerships Chrysler plans to sever ties to, including Flanagan’s in Missoula. Owner Larry Flanagan says the move—affecting 789 dealerships nationwide—won’t be final until Chrysler exits bankruptcy court. He plans to contest the decision.

etc. Normally, we wouldn’t bother with the minutiae of Missoula’s City Council meetings, but we figure it’s time to address the recent yellowbellied rants of Ward 2 Councilmember John Hendrickson. We’d call Hendrickson chicken or say he’s flown the coop, but we’ve moved beyond those issues. Instead, we’ll just point out that he’s acting like a ninny. Twice in the last three weeks Hendrickson has decided to dump on the Independent during council’s comment period. First, he took exception with our April 24 story that quoted his colleague, Dick Haines, as saying the two of them were part of an anonymous zoning petition making its rounds through the city. Hendrickson has so far refused to talk with us about the petition. Haines, however, was very specific, mentioning twice that Hendrickson was involved, then specifying that additional council members—beyond he and Hendrickson—“didn’t want to be identified at this point.” Haines stood by his account, so it would appear Hendrickson’s issue lies with Haines, not us. But he nevertheless pilloried the Indy during a public meeting on the people’s time. Hendrickson reviled the Indy again at the council’s May 16 meeting, objecting to an article exploring how wedge issues—including zoning—might play in the next election. We identified city spending as another one of those issues, since Hendrickson himself made it a point of contention during last year’s belt tightening. During Monday’s public hearing, Hendrickson called the story “inaccurate” because, best we can tell, we used the words “proposed budget cuts” instead of his preferred “budget talking points.” Then he simply asked that we “stop making things up.” Not to gloss over the issue, but if we wanted to start making up stories, don’t you think we’d choose something a little sexier than budget fights? Anyway, Hendrickson never asked for a correction, or even bothered to contact us, and we stand by the story. We can only assume—since Hendrickson has studiously avoided earnest dialogue with us—that he’s trying to discredit our reporting for exactly the reasons we wrote about them in the first place: He’s keen on exploiting budget challenges and zoning as wedge issues in his reelection campaign. Bashing the paper is easier than, say, hashing out the finer points of either debate. While we’re thrilled Hendrickson’s given us a little grist, we have trouble respecting someone who won’t look us in the eye when he calls us liars. When and if he decides to direct his petty sideshow our way, we’re all ears.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 May 21–May 28, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Grand theft automated Missoula police aim high with new virtual training by Jesse Froehling

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A gunman holes up in a local high school and starts popping students. Stacked four deep, officers move in two-by-two, and I’m on the left flank. A kid jumps out of a doorway, screams and runs away. We pass a classroom where a trio of students tends to another kid laying in a pool of blood. “He went that way,” one of the students says as he points down the hallway. “He shot my friend.”

“I knew it was going to be some of the most realistic training we could employ without people getting hurt,” says Capt. Chris Odlin. “It’s very hard for us to recreate the realism of somebody actually being defiant with you and pushing you all the way to the point where you use lethal force. We end up using cops for actors a lot—and cops aren’t great actors.” Missoula managed to get an appropriation for the simulator through U.S.

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Photo by Chad Harder

The Missoula Police Department recently purchased the $85,000 MILO Range Pro, an interactive simulator that trains officers on more than 250 criminal scenarios.

A shot rings out and the officer in front of me drops to the ground, clutching his leg. “I’m all right,” he says. “Keep going.” We turn a corner and the shooter, a student, holds another student in a headlock with a gun pressed against his temple. I hesitate, then fire off a couple of rounds and kill the shooter, but not before he offs the poor kid in his arms. The screen goes blank. “You engaged. That’s good,” says Lt. Mike Colyer of the Missoula Police Department (MPD). “But you hesitated. You have a right to protect yourself, but an obligation to protect everyone else. If he’s putting someone’s life in danger, you shoot him.” Colyer is the instructor for an $85,000 simulator the police department purchased in February from IES Interactive Training in Ann Arbor, Mich. With the purchase, Missoula became the first police department in the world to own the newest version of the MILO Range Pro, an interactive simulator that incorporates more than 250 professionally acted scenarios.

Missoula Independent

Page 8 May 21–May 28, 2009

Rep. Denny Rehberg, but the process took a while. Odlin, the officer who submitted the request, says he’s been working on acquiring the system since January 2007. The simulator can handle up to 16 different users simultaneously, a new feature that allows entire units to train together. Another feature allows the instructor to reward an officer for strong verbal commands by deescalating a situation, or to raise the intensity if a cop makes a poor decision. ( When I pulled over a car, Colyer had the passenger cooperate, rather than pull a gun on me, after I screamed at him to put his hands up.) In fact, Colyer emphasizes that it’s a “use of force system, not a shooting system,” despite the flashier violent scenarios. Since the simulator is so new, Colyer says he doesn’t have any statistics to prove how the training translates to the streets; he hopes to evaluate use of force statistics in a year. Anecdotally, however, he says it’s helped new officers who struggled with the correct level of assertiveness and veteran officers refine their training.

Colyer says MPD used or threatened to use physical force approximately 221 times last year, including the Dec. 21 shooting of a homeless man named Greg Baumann. After police tried to arrest him on two outstanding warrants, Baumann fired on the three officers. The officers returned fire, killing Baumann. A coroner’s jury found that the shooting was justified. Robert McCue, general manager of IES, says the simulator is designed to help officers prepare for and sometimes avoid specific scenarios that have often ended in shootings. “It’s training for the future,” McCue says. “In one afternoon, we can put an officer into a domestic dispute, we can put him into a situation where there’s a shooter on campus, we can have him deal with an emotionally disturbed person. Basically, we can compress the years and years of experience an officer normally needs to see all those types of situations into a single afternoon. The idea is that it gives them a frame of reference and a level of experience so at least they have a starting point when confronted with a new situation.” The MPD uses a full complement of weapons equipped with lasers to interact with the simulator—two handguns, a rifle, a Taser, chemical spray and a baton. Part of the exercise forces the officer to choose the appropriate tool for the particular situation. In the name of authenticity, the simulator also shoots back. After I dropped a bank robber who pulled his gun on me, I turned, smirking, to Colyer. The bank robber’s partner, whom I didn’t see, let loose a barrage of plastic BBs in my direction. They hurt, Colyer says, but because he’s nice, Colyer, who controls the direction of the projectiles, shot the BBs at the plastic table I was standing behind instead of my head. Colyer ran me through a half dozen other scenarios, most of which I botched. Finally, at the end of the session, I managed to shoot a drug dealer before he shot my partner, but Colyer says he usually ends with a more innocuous scenario. “You don’t want people walking out of here thinking, ‘Everybody’s trying to kill me,’” he says. “You don’t want the officer pulling his gun on the next guy who pulls his wallet out.” jfroehling@missoulanews.com


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ENJOY LOOSE CABOOSE COFFEE AT THE CLARK FORK RIVER MARKET

Waste not

We’ve moved our cart

EKO Compost repurposes Missoula’s poop by Matthew Frank

A conveyer belt extends from Missoula’s wastewater treatment plant near Mullan Road, reaches over the fence to EKO Compost and continually drops its load into a big brown pile. “As you can see right here, this is where the biosolids come from the sewer plant,” says plant manager Terry Munnerlyn. “That’s digested sludge, so you can see it’s kind of in a cake form.” Follow that fecal cake over months, through closely monitored aerobic decomposition with Missoula’s discard-

sorted and sifted. The mix then comes out the other end—to specifications set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Montana’s Department of Environmental Quality—as a marketable product perfect for enriching soil, Munnerlyn explains. “It’s safe for the environment, it’s safe for people, it’s safe for gardens,” he says. “It’s just totally safe.” Missoula’s EKO Compost, employing 14 people full-time, sells about 50,000 yards of compost each year in

Photo by Chad Harder

Terry Munnerlyn of EKO Compost holds the earthy end product of a months-long decomposition process. One of its main ingredients? Missoula’s decomposed sewage sludge.

ed leaves and limbs, and it ultimately ends up in many a backyard garden. But as Missoulians get their hands dirty during spring planting season, few seem to know the origins of their compost soil. “I think we’re overlooked a lot of the time,” says Munnerlyn, “because we’ve been here for so long that nobody’s done without us to find out where it would (otherwise) go.” Since 1977, this conveyer belt has delivered almost all of Missoula’s dewatered sewer sludge to EKO Compost for recycling. About 120 cubic yards of human waste arrive here each day, six days a week, totaling more than 2,000 dry tons per year. And more gets trucked in from Idaho cities Post Falls and Hayden Lake. “It gives me a form of nitrogen to start the composting process, and it keeps it away from the landfill and land applications, too,” Munnerlyn says. “We’re a full-cycle recycle operation here. What we do is take this from the city, and we take for free leaves, limbs, lawn clipping and brush from the city and the public” (including about 10,000 Christmas trees last year). After the concoction is “cooked” for 90 days by the 155-degree-plus heat produced by microorganisms, it’s aged,

bulk or in bags. Its biggest buyer is Home Depot, which sells it in stores as far away as Utah. EKO Compost varieties are also available at Marchie’s, Pink Grizzly and Caras nurseries, as well as at Ace Hardware in Tremper’s Shopping Center. Of the country’s roughly 7.2 million dry tons of biosolids produced each year, about 55 percent is reused. The majority is applied to agriculture lands as fertilizer—as was done with Missoula’s biosolids prior to 1977. About a quarter is broken down into higher-grade products like compost and heat-dried pellet fertilizer. In 2007, there were an estimated 200 sewage sludge composting sites around the country, together producing about 417,000 tons of compost, according to a North East Biosolids and Residuals Association report. Five biosolids composting facilities currently operate in Montana. The reuse of sewage sludge has its critics. Some say human illnesses and livestock deaths can be attributed to pathogens found in the millions of tons of sludge applied to farm fields. Fewer question the potential health hazards of composting the waste. And there are those—including some Missoula residents living near EKO

Compost and the wastewater plant— who complain of odors. But Eugene DeMichele of the National Biosolids Partnership thinks most concerns are unfounded, the product of some instinctive poop aversion. “There’s this whole human reaction to anything that looks or sounds like the use of human waste and toilet waste for anything that might be beneficial,” he says. “There are probably 10 or 15 people in the U.S. who have taken it upon themselves to be active opponents to the use of municipal solids for anything at all. They would prefer having it shipped to some other country, or maybe put someplace where no one had to see it or look at it or mention it again. We’re not in that kind of an environment. You have to deal with things the way they are.” Recently, though, the prevalence of chemicals in sewage sludge has become a growing concern. A January 2009 EPA report summarized the findings of its recent national sewage sludge survey. Samples from 74 wastewater treatments facilities found 145 chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, steroids, hormones, metals and flame retardants. Three pharmaceuticals and three steroids were found in every sample taken. It’s findings like these that led the Sierra Club to recommend not using sewage sludge products on home vegetable gardens. In Missoula, the wastewater plant tests its sludge for metals (the levels are well below the limits set by the EPA), says pretreatment supervisor Sherri Kenyon, but not for pharmaceuticals. She explains that the composting process’s ability to break down such chemicals remains unclear and the subject of ongoing research. “To me, it seems there’s a high probability that if there are any [chemicals] coming from our dewatered sludge, that they could be further removed from the composting process at EKO Compost.” In any case, Missoulians will keep pooping, and EKO Compost, as it has for 32 years, will keep turning it into something many of us, as we tend to our gardens, will actually pay money for. “It’s been a hard journey,” Munnerlyn says, standing amid mounds of warm, earthy compost. “But now people are understanding it more, and we’re accepted as being the biosolids compost.” mfrank@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

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Broken promises How did Social Security and Medicare come to this?

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Anyone who knows history will recall how treaties with America’s Indian tribes were conveniently discarded whenever settlers or corporate profiteers needed land, water or a variety of natural resources. It came to be called the “trail of broken promises.” Nowadays, modern Americans are getting similar treatment from our leaders in Washington as collapsing Social Security and Medicare programs threaten to leave current and future generations with much less than we were promised. The big story last week was how Social Security and Medicare would be facing insolvency in the near future because they are paying out more than they are taking in. Medicare is predicted to be insolvent by 2017, while Social Security is expected to be “depleted” by 2037, which is four years ahead of recent predictions. The cause, say the spokesmen for the Obama administration, is a higher-than-expected demand on the funds and lower-than-expected revenues because of the economic collapse. What’s hard to figure out is why all of this is so unexpected. The demographics of the baby boom generation have been studied and known for a very long time. We know there are 78 million boomers who have already retired or will soon retire. The effect is likewise predictable. When the boomers quit working—or even cut back to part-time because of their age—they produce less tax revenue. When 78 million people are in that status, the reduction in revenue from income taxes suddenly becomes a very big and continuously growing number. Moreover, while those same 78 million boomers quit producing revenue, they begin to consume considerably more revenue due to the increased medical needs of the aged. This, too, is no mystery and should have been totally foreseeable, especially by the “experts” whom are highly paid with tax dollars to stay on top of such issues as demographics and supply (of revenue) vs. demand. Yet, we are led to believe that somehow Congress, the White House and all the king’s men are now suddenly surprised by a demographic that has been at least half a century in the making. What you don’t hear getting discussed much is what happened to the money that has been taken from the boomers for all those years by the federal government for our guaranteed Social Security and Medicare payments. And why aren’t they talking about it? Because what happened is

that Congress, in collusion with a succession of both Democrat and Republican presidents, has pilfered those funds and spent them on completely unrelated areas—waging futile wars of aggression, feeding the bottomless maw of the military-industrial complex, funding pet pork projects in abundance (Alaska’s “Road to Nowhere” comes to mind), and basically squandering a resource that had been promised to the future. Instead of fat and healthy Social Security and Medicare trust funds that are able to withstand the foreseeable and unforeseeable vagaries of economics, we

“Since there’s no real money or assets, the only way the federal government can honor those bonds is to— you guessed it— borrow more

money.

have a file cabinet full of paper bonds backed by the “full faith and credit” of the federal government. Unfortunately, since there’s no real money or assets, the only way the federal government can honor those bonds is to—you guessed it—borrow more money, load an even greater debt on future generations, and kick up the amount of interest payments on the enormous federal debt to stratospheric levels. Needless to say, this isn’t how the system was supposed to work. But now that they’re in this conundrum of their own making, Congress and the White House are tossing out proposals that break the promises of the past and leave the future with a bleak outlook. Social Security Commissioner Michael Astrue, for instance, had this to say: “The sooner we get on with the task

of reforming the system, the easier it will be to make the tough choices.” Really? What part of the Social Security system needs or deserves reforming? Nothing, it works just fine. Only problem is, they spent the money already, so here come the so-called “tough choices.” And what are they? Well, if you believe any number of senators, representatives or White House operatives, the only thing we can do now is to break our promises to those who have funded the system faithfully over the years. Bumping the retirement age to 67 for those born after 1960 is already on the books, but there’s talk of raising it even higher. What’s next, retire when you die? Or how about cutting benefits? Already Social Security trustees are saying there will be no cost-of-living increases for those on Social Security in 2010 or 2011. Flat-lining checks for retirees despite increased costs for everything from medicine to everyday necessities like food and utilities doesn’t sound like that great of an idea, especially when the federal government is on an unprecedented spending spree for everything from bankrupt financial institutions to a bloated $2 billion a day military budget. Or hey, maybe we can raise taxes on those still in the work force. How’s that sound to all you post-boomers out there? Your demographically smaller generation gets to pay higher taxes to support the larger boomer generation because the government squandered the revenue from the taxes boomers have been paying for their entire lives. Plus, you also get to pay down, somehow, the $11 trillion in national debt that, in the end, will likely climb higher when all the trillions in financial bailouts are added in. That comes to $36,801 for every man, woman and child in the U.S. and the debt load has been increasing by $3.81 billion per day since September 28, 2007! Criminal, not clever, is the word that comes to mind as these horrid options are being floated around as if the past and its promises never existed, as if loading these terrible burdens on our children and their children’s futures is acceptable. America’s “trail of broken promises” has gone on for a century and half. Isn’t it time this particular trail came to an end? Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Out for blood The real story of vampires in Washington state by Juan Jose Bocanegra and Joe Campe

Vampires are taking the West by storm, descending on rural communities like Forks, Wash. Is this a reference to Twilight, the now cult-classic book and movie? No, in this case, the malevolent outsiders are agents of ICE, which stands for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the U.S. Border Patrol. There is a strong parallel here to the vampires in Twilight: Federal immigration officials are sucking the life out of entire communities and preying on the most vulnerable among us. The parallels between Stephanie Meyer’s fairytale and the real world don’t end with the similarities between federal immigration agents and the “bad” vampires in Twilight. The setting is still Forks, Wash., a small, quiet town of 3,000 people near the picturesque Hoh rainforest. As readers learned in Twilight, the Olympic Peninsula is filled with majestic forests and plentiful rain. In real life, these forests supply coveted forest products to people around the world, thanks to the labor of hundreds of people who ask little of us. Some work at “block cutting,” which entails cutting huge cedar stumps into blocks that are hoisted up by helicopter from the middle of the forests, and then carted by semi-trucks to mills to be cut into shakes and shingles. Another forest product is the ornamental leaves of salal. Harvesters pluck the spear-like leaves from salal plants deep in the forest and sell their bundles to packing sheds that ship across the globe. The two industries constitute a major part of what’s left of Forks’ economy, one that’s suffered greatly since the timber wars of the 1990s. Not surprisingly, these forest workers are extremely poor, though they perform the most dangerous and labor-intensive jobs in the industry. Block-cutters use chainsaws with the skill of a chef filleting a fish, and many have the scars to show for their years of labor. Salal harvesters walk miles into areas without roads in order to harvest and carry back salal branches. Both groups work long hours maneu-

vering slippery terrain peppered with large rocks and fallen trees. Dangerous slips and falls are routine. Twisted ankles, broken legs and sprained backs are disturbingly common. So, you might ask, what do Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Border Patrol have to do with block cutting and salal harvesting? Here’s a hint: The job titles are bloqueros and saladeros. And the workers are mainly immigrants from Mexico and Guatemala. Because many are undocumented, the biggest danger they face is neither their risky job nor their abject

Immigration “officials have descended on Forks like tourists scrambling to see the moss-draped trees described

in Twilight.

poverty. The saws, the slippery terrain and the economic exploitation don’t equal the fear and humiliation generated by an encounter with a customs or Border Patrol agent. Immigration officials have descended on Forks like tourists scrambling to see the moss-draped trees described in Twilight. They are stopping any and all Latino-looking people on their way to the store or while dropping kids off at school. They wait outside the courthouse to target immigrants who are there to simply pay a parking ticket.

Stories abound—of the trauma children endure in encounters with customs agents; terrifying details about early-morning house raids; even reports of immigration officials sending dogs after workers who choose to run into the woods. When caught, these hard-working immigrants who supply weatherproof shingles for our houses and floral arrangements for our weddings are sent to the Tacoma, Wash., detention facility, which was documented by Seattle University in 2008 as a site of human rights violations. Much like the fictional world of Twilight, the outsiders—federal immigration officials—show no sympathy for the workers and their families. Their aim is to locate and dispose of the vulnerable. Hunting is their job. The end result of their pursuit is the suffering of their targets, who suddenly disappear from a community—perhaps even a family—that had been home. In an ironic social twist only possible in today’s world, Meyer’s simple story about vampires, with its many parallels to the real-life town, has put Forks on the national map. So we think this is the time for a real-life response to the inhumane immigration crackdown—a response on the scale of the national infatuation with vampires. We urge Washington state Gov. Chris Gregoire to take the lead on progressive immigration reform: It’s time for the governor to tell customs officials and the Border Patrol to stop the raids, roadblocks and detentions in Forks and elsewhere in Washington. Doing this would put Washington in the national spotlight for something of which its people can be proud. The writers are contributors to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). Joe Campe is a graduate student in public health at the University of Washington in Seattle. Juan Jose Bocanegra is a staff organizer for Washington state’s Jobs with Justice, a national campaign for workers’ rights.

ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON PER EVENT Missoula Independent

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If your definition of “trauma” involves Phish not playing the Wilma this summer, consider yourself lucky. Around the globe, humans have experienced trauma as a sudden and brutal shock to the system, with physical, emotional, financial and mental repercussions. For these people, the holy grail of healing remains elusive, a hidden pathway through the pain and fear holding them in place. Since 2006, the Exploratory & Beyond Trauma Committee (EBTG), a conglomeration of local health services providers, has met to parse the connections between the traumatized individual’s mind, body and spirit. Now, through collaboration with various city, state and private organizations, EBTG hosts a two-day conference on the latest discoveries in the field. The event is headlined by Bessel van

Thu. 21 May The Sustainable Business Council unveils the winners of their fifth annual Sustainability Awards at 6 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W., after the 5:30 social hour gets everyone primed to accept runner-up status. And stick around for the 6:15 panel of winners. Free. Fight global warming as you submit comments in real time when the Sierra Club hosts a live stream from Seattle of the EPA Hearing on the Danger of Greenhouse Gases at 7 PM at the Elk’s Lodge. Steer the feds toward taking action, but first RSVP 549-1142.

Sat. 23 May 221 East Front St. 543-6966 trailheadmontana.net

Thru May 24th

Now that we’ve got an administration less interested in messing with states’ rights, let’s organize the weed: Patients with valid medical marijuana cards—don’t forget that card!—and their caregivers are invited to an open-space meeting with Montana NORML from noon–5 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. The agenda will be determined by those in attendance. $5 suggested donation, light lunch provided. Call 493-0425. Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

Mon. 25 May Spend some time honoring those who placed themselves in harm’s way for our benefit during a full platter of Memorial Day Services, which begins with a 9:15 AM meetup at the VFW Hall, 245 Main St., for a free bus tour of the five arranged ceremonies. Or meet at the Caras Park fish statues at 9:45. Or at the Courthouse at 10:45. Or call 251-5116, or e-mail bluemountain@montana.com.

der Kolk, left, medical director at the Trauma Center in Brookline, Mass., and features breakout sessions on acupuncture, art t h e r a p y , B o d y Ta l k , E y e Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), multicultural living, veterans and trauma, qi-gong and yoga. Also, a lesspricey opening lecture grants the public a taste of the weekend’s offerings. Heal on. —Jonas Ehudin The two-day conference “Trauma and the Mind-Body Connection” begins at 8:30 AM on Fri., May 22, in the UM University Center Ballroom. The event features a public lecture titled “The Body Keeps the Score” at 7 PM, and continues at 8:30 AM on Sat. Conference (includes pub. lecture): $150; public lecture: $15. RSVP at www.ebtg.org.

The 89th annual Corvallis Memorial Day Parade, dubbed “Celebrate the Heart of the Valley,” begins at 10 AM, which is three hours after the breakfast at the Community Event Center, two hours after parade participants can pick up their numbers and one hour after registration closes. Free, but please register at corvallispost91.com, or call 546-4244.

Tue. 26 May Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Wrapping up Mental Health Awareness Month, the Bitterroot Public Library presents the panel “Living Well with a Mental Health Diagnosis” at 7 PM. Free. Call 3634463 or 531-5699.

Wed. 27 May Please, please, just get your cat(s) fixed, all right? The Humane Society of Western Montana hosts the all-day low-income event Spay Your Mama!, where you can end an entire feline line for just $10. RSVP 549-3934. Who watches the watchmen? You do, should you choose to attend this quarter’s Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) Citizen Advisor Meeting, which begins at 6:30 PM at FWP’s secret hideout, 3201 Spurgin Road. Free. Call 542-5500.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 May 21–May 28, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Police arrested forgery suspect Alfonso Rizzuto, 47, after he entered a post office in Kingston, Pa., and a postal worker recognized him from a wanted poster posted in the office. The Times Leader reported that when police stopped Rizzuto outside the post office, he identified himself using a New York driver’s license and claimed the man on the poster was his brother. After a fingerprint scan revealed his true identity, Rizzuto admitted he was the person on the wanted poster and that the driver’s license belonged to his brother. New York City police looking for a man who tried to rob a bank but left with no cash spotted a man fitting the suspect’s description waiting in line at another bank. Just as the man was handing the teller a hold-up note, Officers Michael Gonzalez and George Billaverde walked up and arrested Mark Mcnulty, 55. “He was surprised,” Gonzalez told the Daily News. “He was so focused on what he was doing.” When a man in a liquor store in Trenton, N.J., grabbed a bottle of cognac and ran for the door, owner Jeff Wadkins, 76, activated a switch that locked the door. Police said the trapped thief pulled a handgun and demanded to be let out of the store, but Wadkins recognized the gun was a fake, kept the door locked and called the police. The Times of Trenton reported the suspect ran to the back of the store looking for another way out. Finding none, he sat down and began crying. Officers arrived to find Edwin Calix, 19, still sobbing when they arrested him. FLU FEVER – Afghanistan’s only known pig was removed from view at Kabul Zoo to avoid worrying the public. “Most people don’t have much knowledge about swine influenza, and seeing a pig, they panic that they will be infected,” zoo director Aziz Gul Saqib told Agence France-Presse. He explained the animal, a gift from China in 2002, has been quarantined in its winter house until the worldwide pig panic subsides. SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – Police called to break up a fight between a married couple in Surrey, British Columbia, attributed the altercation to the evening news broadcast. “The violence on the news was disconcerting to the woman,” Royal Canadian Mounted Police Sgt. Roger Morrow told the Vancouver Sun, explaining the husband slapped his wife twice across the back of her head, and she replied by smashing him over the head with a jar. EXPERT WITNESS – District Attorney Al Moustakis of Vilas County, Wis., said he planned to recruit 5-foot-8, 140-pound women willing to stick their head in a toilet to help him make his case that a woman was drowned by her husband and didn’t commit suicide as he claims. Appleton’s Post-Crescent said the experiments involve positioning women the size of the late Genell Plude, 28, around a toilet to determine whether the version of events told by her husband, Douglas Plude, 42, is plausible. HOT-SMELLING TEENS – Authorities in Lakewood, Colo., asked schoolteachers, principals and parents to discourage youngsters from viewing more than 200 YouTube videos showing Axe Body Spray being used as a flamethrower. “Nearly a dozen young people are facing a range of charges after using the popular teenage cologne to set things on fire, including themselves,” a news release from West Metro Fire Rescue stated. “Recently, several young people have been investigated by fire officials after lighting classmates’ clothing on fire and using it as a flamethrower to ignite other items. In one instance, bushes next to an apartment caught fire and spread to the building.” JOY-RIDING FOLLIES – Kile Wygle, 28, was hospitalized in Newark, Ohio, after crashing his vehicle—a motorized barstool powered by a dismantled lawn mower. The Newark Advocate reported that Wygle, who was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated after admitting he had consumed 15 beers, told investigating officers the barstool had a top speed of 38 mph. Authorities in Sun City Center, Fla., reported a rash of souped-up golf carts speeding on public roads. About 25 percent of area residents own golf carts, which are street legal so long as they don’t go faster than 19 mph. But sheriff’s Deputy Rob Thornton told the St. Petersburg Times he gets calls every week about speeding golf carts, mostly from other golf-cart drivers. Sun City Golf & Cars accommodates requests for more powerful motors but makes customers sign a waiver promising they won’t use the golf carts on public roads. “You have to take their word for it,” storeowner Barry Klawans said. Ray’s Golf Carts also installs faster motors but only to customers who swear they’ll get a license plate, which is required for carts that go faster than 20 mph. SPELLING COUNTS – Two-thirds of Americans think that spelling among adults is on the decline, with about a quarter admitting that they are bad spellers themselves, according to a study by the London-based Spelling Society. The most troublesome word for men, misspelled by 78 percent on occasion, is “friend;” for women, more than half couldn’t spell “liaison” correctly. The society, founded in 1908 to raise awareness of problems caused by irregularities in English spelling, advocates a regular spelling system for the United States and Britain, a move favored by 40 percent of those surveyed. Ten percent said it’s government’s responsibility to help Americans improve their spelling. Birmingham, England’s second-largest city, decided to drop apostrophes from all its street signs, declaring they’re confusing and old-fashioned. “Apostrophes denote possessions that are no longer accurate and are not needed,” Councilor Martin Mullaney, who heads the city’s transport scrutiny committee, said. “More importantly, they confuse people,” as well as GPS units, including those used by emergency services. Jenny Hodge, an official with satellite navigation equipment maker TomTom, disputed Mullaney’s claim, explaining that GPS units accommodate addresses with and without apostrophes. A test by the Associated Press backed her up. Officials in Webster, Mass., discovered that signs directing visitors to a local lake have spelled its Indian name wrong for years. It isn’t Lake Chargoggagoggmanchaoggagoggchaubunaguhgamaugg, but Lake Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg (with a U at letter 20 instead of an O and an N at letter 38, not an H). Locals simply refer to it as Lake Webster.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 May 21–May 28, 2009


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 WA L LY

Wally may look a little goofy, but that's just because he is a little goofy. But in a very nice way! He needs someone to love, someone to put him on a diet, and someone to take him for long, pleasant walks. That would make him very happy, and probably less goofy.

549-3934 ANNA

ZIGGY

Move over, Martin and Ackroyd: our Ziggy is the real wild and crazy guy! He's full of energy, can bounce better than anyone else we've ever seen, and wants to share his happy nature with a real family. Hopefully, that family will get him some training to help him curb his enthusiasm.

Although you can't necessarily tell by looking at her, Anna is a true cattle dog cross. She is smart, and she loves to please people. But if that doesn't convince you, then her adorable, extra wiggly butt-shakin' should be proof enough! Anna deserves someone who appreciates what a great catch she is.

ELLIE

Not only is Ellie a beautiful young Shepherd cross, but she really is quite sweet as well. She loves people, especially children, even lying patiently still while they fuss and climb all over her. Outside, though, she loves to play and go for walks. Ellie is just the dog your kids have been bugging you for.

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BUDDY

Buddy is very happy and very smart. He doesn't even have to be leashed at the shelter; he knows which kennel is his, and he goes right into it. He could use some training in other areas, but he's so eager to please that learning good manners will be a snap.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

www.petnannymt.com • (406) 529 5115

SHELBY

MONK

Monk is a friendly young fellow with a sad expression on his face and lots of extra toes. We think the extra toes are pretty neat, but we'd like to see a happy look in his eye. Getting a real family would probably take care of that right away!

At just 35 pounds this (mini) Rottweiler X is the perfect size. She has the enthusiasm and spirit of a big dog yet she still fits comfortably in a small space, such as your lap! Shelby is young, already has had a bit of training, and loves to play and go on adventures!

BUFFET

Buffet is a cat very close to my heart here at the Humane Society. You see when he first arrived he was covered in wounds and very scared. But I could see a sweet boy inside, just wanting to come out. Now you would never know he’s the same cat.

2420 W Broadway 2810 Brooks Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time

3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

SARAH

What a beauty Sarah is! Not only does she have a lovely silver coat, but her ear tufts are to die for. She's quiet and ladylike in our cat room, but it's easy to see that she has a sweet personality that would truly blossom in a real home.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

We make the world a better smelling place! 837 S. Higgins • 370-5078

BOSWELL

Boswell is quite a small rabbit now, but that's because he's a youngster. Shelter visitors have told us he's a Harlequin and will grow up to be a big guy. Just think -- then there'd be even more of this handsome fellow to love! He's so friendly that we hope someone will make him a real family pet.

MAGGIE

Maggie currently has a job, so to speak, at HSWM. She is the official test cat for dog behavior assessments. She loves dogs so much; as soon as we know it's safe, she's out of the cage and rubbing all over the dog! No matter their size or breed, she snuggles them all.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com 5174 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 728-2275

BUTTERS

Butters is a classic representative of all those great orange boys you hear so much about. He is quite a handsome tiger with unique glowing orange eyes that match his coat perfectly. He is mellow, and secure enough with himself to require just the right amount of attention. Loubelle Wissler 240-0753 KC Hart 240-9332 fidelitykc@montana.com

721-1840 www.missoulahomes.com “A Team of Professionals Making It Easy for You!” Please Support our Humane Society

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals

721-4710 BART

My name is Bart. I have been at the shelter for months now. I am not invisible. I am not hidden in the back. I am right in plain sight in the kennel next to the cute cats and kittens. People walk by me every day but no one sees me.

MEEKA

It's a story we hear all too often: an owner moves, liquidates, gets rid of the cat along with all of the other unwanted things, and a sweet girl like Meeka ends up at AniMeals. She is a quiet kitty who enjoys laps and loving caresses while purring her little heart out and giving gentle kitty kisses, hoping all the while that these are the hands that will finally take her home.

MR. PUDDY

He fought for life as long as he could. Mr. Puddy kept vigil by his side and gave all the comfort he could to his very sick guardian. He was put in a hospital, never to return, and the kitty worried about where his friend had gone. Unable to find a home for his faithful companion, the family turned to AniMeals for help.

FA N C Y

She was dumped high up on a mountain in the dead of winter. Fancy made her way back to civilization through waist deep snow. How she did it will forever remain a mystery. When the manager of a ski resort found her she was skin and bones. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609 Missoula Independent

Page 14 May 21–May 28, 2009

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.


No Justice for Libby Andrea Peacock analyzes the W.R. Grace not guilty verdicts, and finds there’s plenty of blame to go around.

A collective stunned silence hit the state of Montana at lunch time on Friday, May 8, as news filtered out from U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy’s Missoula courtroom that W.R. Grace & Co. and three of its former executives had been acquitted of all crimes in connection with the asbestos poisoning of Libby, Montana. Then the e-mails, phone calls and Facebook messages started: “We are sick to our stomachs…” “What an injustice, tell me who I can write to…” “Not guilty?? Pardon me, but WTF?? This is shocking.” “Surely 2,000 cases of illness and about 225 deaths in the Libby area are not their fault. B*tards.” Court watchers were less surprised. From the nature of the charges themselves to the statute of limitations, from the rulings prohibiting evidence Molloy deemed prejudicial to the final jury instructions, Grace’s lawyers prevailed on nearly every point that gave them an edge, making it all but impossible for the 12 jurors to come to any other conclusion. At issue were criminal charges for environmental crimes against the U.S. government and people of Libby, Montana: namely, that Grace and these men knowingly exposed generations of a small Montana town to lethal doses of a particularly virulent form of asbestos from its vermiculite mine there, violating the Clean Air Act in a conspiracy to defraud the federal government, and obstructing the subsequent investigation. More than 270 people from Libby lie in their graves due to asbestos from the mine, and another 1,800 (from a community of about 12,000) walk around with the likely death sentence of an asbestos-related diagnosis. The government’s case walked a razor’s edge of dates and crimes. The Clean Air Act provisions Grace was accused of violating didn’t exist until 1990, the year the mine closed. Furthermore, the five-year statute of limitations began running at the end of 1999, when a newspaper series brought the tragedy in Libby to light. Since charges weren’t filed until 2004, that left a very thin sliver of time in which to find evidence of wrongdoing. So while prosecutors were permitted to introduce evidence of the conspiracy dating back to 1976, they also had to prove that this conspiracy continued through the Clean Air enactments of 1990, and into the relevant time period after 1999. This was particularly problematic as it related to the human defendants: Robert Bettacchi, Henry Eschenbach, William McCaig, Robert Walsh and Jack Wolter. McCaig, for instance, retired before the 1990 Clean Air Act provisions came into existence. Wolter was fired in 1994, and

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Eschenbach retired in 1996. (There were originally seven defendants along with Grace: Alan Stringer died before having his day in court; O. Mario Favorito’s case was severed due to his unique status as Grace counsel. Charges against Walsh and McCaig were dismissed at the tail end of the trial, when the government realized the court’s restrictions on evidence made it impossible to prove the charges against them.) The government’s theory was elegant despite these challenges: each charge complemented and necessitated the others. Grace knew the specific and unique toxicity of its tremolite asbestos fiber, prosecutors asserted, yet withheld crucial pieces of evidence from regulatory agencies in order to keep turning profits and avoid liability. Company memos discuss these goals in detail through the 1970s, as executives debated what to do about Libby product lines while federal regulations regarding asbestos were in flux. This, prosecutors said, was the conspiracy. The deception took on some urgency in 1990, the theory continued, when federal law made it a crime to release a hazardous substance into the ambient air, knowing that it created the risk of imminent death or serious injury. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kris McLean accurately likened the vermiculite left around town to land mines set for Libby’s citizens to step on. When W.R. Grace executives closed the Libby mine in 1990, sold off their properties, then split town, they did so knowing that the high school and middle school running tracks had been paved with mine tailings; that the Plummer Elementary School ice skating rink was constructed with its ore; that the former screening plant sold to a local family, the Parkers, for their nursery and storage businesses was blanketed with asbestos-contaminated vermiculite; that the export plant it donated to the town— which was leased for a family-run retail lumber and planing business—was also chock full of the stuff. Grace was sloppy with a product it knew to be lethal, allowing it to be spread around the Little League baseball fields, to be used by a local sand and gravel company, to be loaded by pickup trucks and carried to gardens and yards throughout town, and to “sand” the dirt road running up

Rainy Creek to the mine, frequented by locals to access hunting and by kids to get to a popular party meadow. In the prosecution’s narrative, the citizens of Libby became unwitting agents of Grace, indirectly causing the hazardous releases while going about their day-to-day lives. These were the Clean Air Act violations. When people became sick, when people died, their families took Grace to court and won: sometimes settlements, sometimes guilty verdicts—all amounting to modest sums of money. To the company, it was the cost of doing business. Grace had profited from Libby, unloaded its contaminated properties, and gotten out of town more or less unscathed. This was the conspiracy in action. Then in 1999, reporter Andrew Schneider

dants’ motions to acquit. “They need to continue hiding the ball, otherwise the endangerment is going to be discovered. If Grace were to tell the EPA, ‘We knew the workers were going home with dust on their clothes,’ given the sickness that existed in the population, they would be responsible for that. It’s not the kind of statement they could make to the government and not let the cat out of the bag. “This is the company line, this is what they had to say. They cannot tell the truth about this or they will suffer substantial liabilities and possible criminal prosecution.” ••• The prosecution’s case proceeded without incident until March 23. On that day, a former

“Grace’s lawyers prevailed on nearly every point that gave them an edge, making it all but impossible for the 12 jurors to come to any other conclusion.”

published a series on Libby in the Seattle PostIntelligencer. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent a team to town to find out what was really going on. As the EPA agents talked with Grace, the company stalled, banned the EPA from the mine site, misled and outright lied to government investigators, both in person and in writing, causing delay in the cleanup and yet more exposures to the deadly fibers. These were the obstructions. “They tell a little bit of the story, they tell the wrong story, they deflect, they delay…” attorney McLean argued to Judge Molloy against the defen-

Grace vice president and unindicted co-conspirator named Robert Locke took the stand. The government’s theory of conspiracy relied heavily on decades’ worth of internal Grace documents. Human memory is frail, and few people who had personal knowledge of Grace’s machinations were talking. Locke was the exception. He was, as lead Grace attorney David Bernick put it, to be “the voice of the documents.” Locke’s career with Grace is noteworthy in large part for a memo he wrote in 1980, laying out the company’s options for dealing with an impending federal investigation of Libby’s vermiculite and its toxicity.

“Obstruct and block,” Locke wrote. “Be slow, review things extensively and contribute to delay.” Locke was perfectly positioned to help the prosecution team. A Harvard business school grad, he spent 25 years with Grace mostly in the Construction Products Division that ran the Libby mine. He also suffers from disabling depression, anxiety and attention deficit disorder, and was fired from the company in 1998. Locke clearly had an ax to grind–he had a discrimination lawsuit pending against Grace, and so proved receptive to the government’s overtures. And for four days of direct and cross-examination, he delivered. Locke kept meticulous notes going back decades and could recall vividly the details of Grace’s decision-making process. He nearly single-handedly made the government’s conspiracy case. But on day three, Locke recalled a conversation that changed everything. He testified that during a meeting about the sale of the former Grace screening plant to the Parker family for their nursery business, he voiced concerns about the deal. He said that his boss, defendant and former senior vice president Robert Bettacchi, waved off Locke’s unease in a particularly callous manner. Locke: I was told that we were—someone was going to buy the site of the former screening plant and the tunnel and grow mushrooms there or flowers or something or other. … I had real bad vibes about the site… I just said that it was a real bad idea to do that, we ought to just put loam over it and plant grass and keep people the hell out of it. McLean: Did you say those things to Mr. Bettacchi? Locke: Not those exact words, I imagine, but that’s what I said. I just thought it was a bad idea. McLean: Did he make any response to your point? Locke: Yeah, and that’s the only reason I remember that. He said caveat emptor. McLean: What did that mean to you? Locke: Well, it’s Latin and it means buyer beware… Taken at face value, this was the nail in Bettacchi’s coffin. However, when Bettacchi attor-

Photo by Chad Harder

With the court-imposed gag order lifted, W.R. Grace attorney and courtroom showman David Bernick takes questions from the press corps. Billed as the largest environmental crimes trial in U.S. history (for the potential fines and jail time involved), the case against Grace attracted media from across the country. At different times, reporters from Bloomberg, the L.A. Times and New York Times rubbed elbows in the courtroom with local journalists .

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Page 16 May 21–May 28, 2009


Photo by Chad Harder

Former W.R. Grace executive Jack Wolter had planned to retire in Libby and build a home on a piece of land that once belonged to Grace. His attorney, Los Angeles-based lawyer Carolyn Kubota, made much of this fact in her defense of Wolter: “Nobody builds a house in a town on a property that they believe is contaminated with a deadly substance. Period.”

ney Thomas Frongillo got his shot at Locke, he confronted the former Grace vice president with a statement Locke had made to prosecutors in 2004 to the effect that he had not been involved in any conversations regarding the sale of the screening plant property. Frongillo accused Locke of perjury. “You came up with a fabricated story, an outright lie…because you wanted to stick it to the guy who you sued and couldn’t get any money from,” Frongillo insisted. Judge Molloy reacted immediately, halting the proceedings and sending the jury off on spring break with Frongillo’s accusation left hanging. As court resumed the following week without the jury present, defense attorneys wasted no time accusing prosecutors of having colluded with Locke in cooking up his testimony, and asserted that the entire case was too tainted to continue. The prosecutors steadfastly maintained their innocence and Locke’s credibility. The basis of accusations against Locke was circumstantial. First, Locke had been offered immunity from prosecution in exchange for his cooperation, but turned down the deal. Defense lawyers claimed this decision was made with a wink and a nod from the government, that they had no intention of going after Locke but wanted him to look neutral, independent and vulnerable to the jurors. Furthermore, it turned out EPA investigator Bert Marsden failed to turn over all his e-mail correspondence with Locke—notes showing Locke had a clear bias against Grace and Bettacchi in particular. Locke was therefore anything but the independent or vulnerable man presented to the jury, Grace attorney Bernick reasoned. “His message to the jury was unmistakable: He was his own man, by saying he was willing to experience the threat of prosecution,” Bernick said. “That was a false impression, right? Designed to mislead the jury.” With the jury gone, Bernick was given free reign to question Marsden one Friday morning.

From the start, Bernick endeavored to pressure Marsden into saying that Locke was an integral part of the prosecution team—not a mere witness. He spent four hours picking apart e-mails spanning more than four years of communication between the two men, asking about books that Marsden had recommended to Locke, a meal they shared, and Locke’s apparent need to help out way beyond the scope of a normal witness. “Mr. Locke got all these things he wanted,” Bernick insisted. “His own special [immunity] let-

implicate prosecutors in the alleged perjury. But Marsden steadfastly refused to bend: Locke was unique, he was mostly cooperative, but he was not part of the team. Before Locke had taken the stand, Judge Molloy was already signaling his impatience with prosecutors, whom he said were not providing any evidence of a conspiracy. Afterwards, Molloy pegged Locke as a liar, pronouncing the testimony “as close as I would ever want to see to perjury.” Though Molloy never seemed to buy the

Photo by Chad Harder

The prosecution team heads into court to hear the verdicts, including, from right to left, Department of Justice attorneys Kris McLean and Kevin Cassidy, EPA investigator Bert Marsden and EPA lawyer Eric Nelson. The prosecution was vastly outnumbered by the defense, which brought at times an average of five lawyers per defendant to court.

ter, special treatment, special input. Special, special, special! He had a special relationship with prosecution.” Bernick never once let up on this theme. Partly the implication was the jury could not judge Locke’s veracity as a witness without knowing this context, but it was also an attempt to

defense assertions that the entire Bettacchi-Locke exchange had been invented by prosecutors, he came awfully close to dismissing the whole case for prosecutorial misconduct, based on the hidden e-mail issue. “From the get go, I trusted Mr. McLean. My trust probably kept me from doing what I should

have done earlier,” Molloy said. “I have no confidence at all in anything the government says.” As it turned out, the 2004 transcript Frongillo waved in front of Locke as evidence of his dishonesty revealed the situation to be more complex than Frongillo had let on. Locke testified he had not been involved directly in negotiations, but had been at many meetings where the screening plant sale was discussed. Prosecutors emphasized it was at one of these meetings that Bettacchi made the disputed comment to Locke. According to attorney McLean’s notes, Locke told the prosecution about the now infamous conversation nearly two months before the trial began. With no evidence of perjury, and prosecutors’ insistence that Locke was credible and the e-mail fiasco was an honest mistake (pointing out that if they had meant to conjure up testimony, they would have done a better job at it), Molloy decided to let the trial continue. He admonished the jury to ignore Locke’s testimony as it related to Bettacchi (citing Locke’s obvious animosity toward his former boss), and castigated the government in front of jurors for failing in their duty to provide the defense with all required documents. With the star witness for the prosecution turned into a perfect distraction for the defense, the chastened government team rested its case. ••• By my count, there were about a dozen different arguments put forward by Grace and the other defendants upon which the jury could legitimately have hung its not guilty verdicts. These included assertions that bordered on the absurd—like the notions that Libby’s fiber is not actually a regulated form of asbestos, and the sick folks up there are not really ailing, but misdiagnosed—but which might have found traction among the 12 people who haven’t spent the last 10 years researching the subject.

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Other theories were designed to create confusion. Grace pounded away at the government’s science. Toxicology, geology, epidemiology and risk assessment are not easy subjects, and absent Grace’s specific knowledge about the asbestos in Libby, the rest of us have always been playing catch up. So when Grace attorneys put on experts who claimed the government got it wrong, how were the jurors to say, beyond a reasonable doubt, who had it right? Grace attorney Bernick zeroed in on the unusual idea that Grace used innocent third parties to cause the release of asbestos. He likened it to having a bucket full of a hazardous substance. If he were to tell someone to kick the bucket, he reasoned, he’d be liable. But to set the bucket down on the ground and walk away, then be held liable 10 years later when someone kicked it, would be unfair, and not the intent of the law. Grace argued that its internal debates on what to do about Libby were legitimate business discussions, not evidence of conspiracy. Attorneys, knowing full well that property rights play well in Montana, claimed Grace had every

It was a pretty slick argument, allowing the jury to have sympathy for Libby, empathy for the prosecutors, all the while voting for the defense. Most convincing was evidence that matched my research and that of anyone else who’s taken a look at the historical record in Libby: The State of Montana and EPA knew enough of what was happening, and they should have been all over that town 30 years ago. There is blame to share, and while that does not release Grace and these men from their responsibilities, it is utterly true. If 11 weeks of such confusing, conflicted testimony weren’t enough to raise reasonable doubts, the defense planted a couple ringers within the jury instructions, the court-approved guidelines sent with the jurors into their deliberations. One defined “imminent danger” as a command that the prosecutors must prove it was “more likely than not to cause death or serious bodily injury.” Defense attorneys construed this to mean that at least half the people exposed in Libby needed to be dying (instead of just the 20 percent of the community members showing evidence of asbestos-related lung disease). Another instruction specified that the releases of hazardous material placing people in such imminent danger must have happened “for the first time” after November 1999. By that logic, Bernick’s bucket metaphor applied—people had been kicking it for nearly a decade. There were no first times after November 1999. Prosecutor Kevin Cassidy ended his closing statement to the jury with an aerial photo of Libby illustrating the EPA’s sampling efforts over the years. Green dots marked clean samples, red dots signified those than came back positive for asbestos. “Ladies and gentlemen, Photo by Chad Harder this is Libby when the EPA Following the verdicts, Chicago attorney David Bernick arrived there. The town is full stated he believes the jury exonerated W.R. Grace morally of asbestos contaminated as well as legally, adding that from the time Grace bought the mine in 1963, the company was able to lower fiber lev- vermiculite.” It brought to mind the day els in the air dramatically: “Just because there’s been a tragedy doesn’t necessarily spell a moral problem.” early in the case when Grace lawyers superimposed the green right to deny access to the mine to EPA investiga- dots on top of the red, implying that the prosetors, given concerns about liability and its misgiv- cution had done something wrong by showing ings over the EPA’s cleanup plans. They claimed the red dots at all. In the Grace version, all was EPA questionnaires were intended as “gotchas,” green. There was no asbestos. It aptly illustrated an attempt to trick Grace into offering answers the prosecution’s point, Grace’s company line for that would provide a basis for prosecution. They decades: “There is nothing to see here, it all made full use of the stereotype that Montanans comes out in the process, it’s less than one perdistrust the power of government, turning EPA cent, there is no problem,” Cassidy said. “There’s team leader Paul Peronard into a megalomaniac nothing to see here. There is no risk.” who could do whatever he wanted. (“One word,” Bernick posited to Peronard on the last day of tes••• timony. “King. K-I-N-G. Didn’t you describe your Gayla Benefield and Norita Skramstad were role as King of Libby?” Peronard responded the five minutes away from getting in the car to make statement was taken out of context: There were the four-hour drive to Missoula when they got too many supervisors in Libby so no one could be word the jury had a verdict. So the two women, effective. His authority, Peronard said, sparring long-time Libby residents and advocates for the with Bernick, “was not the War Powers Act.”) asbestos victims, both carrying the scars of And, of course, the defense played up Locke’s Grace’s tremolite in their lungs, were not sitting testimony as proof of their misconduct in the front row to see justice done in person, as allegations. Norita’s late husband Les had hoped for. “What did [the prosecutors] show by their And certainly neither of them would say jusconduct?” Bernick asked in closing. “They care a tice was done at all. “They got away with murder,” lot about Libby, they had an allegiance to Libby; Norita told me on the phone. “Molloy was their the somber tones of [government attorney] Mr. best defense. He won it for them.” Cassidy talking about the toll of Libby. Their alleShe had a point. Judge Molloy kept out as giance was to Libby, not to the law… best he could any evidence that humanized the “They’ve taken a political story and criminalized victims in Libby: there was to be little talk of chilit, want to bring it home to you and make it stick.” dren’s exposure, no description of how it is to die

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Page 18 May 21–May 28, 2009


from the slow suffocation of asbestosis, nothing that brought to life the cases of “occupational exposures,” the workers and their family members who were killed. This was his job—to a point. Nearly any time Molloy had room for interpretation, his rulings came in for the defense: which witnesses could testify, the things they could testify to, the sorts of evidence that could be introduced. Many internal Grace documents that would otherwise have been relevant—memos, for instance, that debated things like the cost of showers and uniforms for its workers—were redacted or omitted all together because of their inflammatory nature. In one order, Molloy disallowed the use of 47 out of 54 of the government’s proposed exhibits, mostly on the grounds that they would be prejudicial—that is, their potential emotional impact outweighed their evidentiary value. The lesson seemed to be, if you’re going to conspire to break the law, make sure your documentation is too provocative to be seen by a jury. It’s important to keep in mind that this was not a case about lives shortened or stolen. These were environmental crimes charged here. The defense attorneys referred often to the incidence of sickness and death among workers and their families—when they acknowledged it at all— as though it was a legitimate bargain for those men to hand over their lives (and those of their wives and children) in exchange for the privilege of earning a livelihood. Furthermore, Molloy allowed the tenor of the case to be debased. Defense attorneys mocked their opponents outright, and called the government’s attorneys and witnesses alike liars (including a particularly merciless attack by Bettacchi attorney Frongillo on the character of nursery owner Mel Parker, who if defense lawyers were to be believed,

cared more about having waterfront Montana law allows that, “A person property than his family’s health). commits the offense of negligent Molloy called the prosecutors “bullhomicide if the person negligently headed,” and berated them for putcauses the death of another human ting Locke on the stand, parroting being.” the defense’s accusations against As of early 2007, there were 274 their witnesses and tactics. people on Libby’s self-kept scorecard of To their credit, prosecutors asbestos casualties—this includes 33 McLean and Cassidy kept their comcases of mesothelioma identified by the posure throughout. Under a barAgency for Toxic Substances and rage of accusations, the pair defendDisease Registry (mesothelioma is a ed themselves while maintaining an rare lung cancer associated exclusively air of civility that had been abanwith asbestos exposure), as well as mindoned by both the court and their ers, miners’ wives, miners’ children and opponents. scores of people who had no connec“The defendants have called me a tion to the mine at all—they simply Photo by Chad Harder liar today, they have said I suborned lived in Libby. Given the latency period perjury. They have said I constructed of asbestos related diseases—which can a case that was misleading. They have Two of Norita Skramstad’s five children have been diagnosed stretch for as long as 40 years—the with asbestosis, and she has contracted the disease as well. Her said many things about my character husband Les Skramstad worked at the mine for two years and community will likely be burying peoas an attorney, about my character as died in 2007 of mesothelioma after struggling for nearly two ple whose lives were shortened by a prosecutor that simply are not decades with asbestosis. the contamination Grace left lying true,” McLean said in his defense. around town well into the middle of During the trial, an occasional posse of jour- this century. “It’s not how the U.S. Attorney’s Office works, it’s nalists gathered for lunch at the Union Club to not how I work.” Just because the rest of us are tired of the The pair of prosecutors kept their focus on swap impressions. At one point when Gayla and tragedy is no excuse. There are an awful lot of the real story at all times. When Grace lawyers in Norita joined us, Andrew Schneider commented people still waiting for judgment day. their closing arguments talked of how the compa- he was tired of writing about Libby, and I fully ny “followed up” with its industrial clients out of understood how he felt. But I also had a pretty Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock can concern for asbestos levels those workers were good idea what Gayla’s response would be: “I’m be reached at the Department of Justice, P.O. Box exposed to, McLean posed a simple question tired of living with it, but I’ve got five friends 201401, Helena, MT 59620, or via e-mail at drawing a chorus of objections (that were, of dying right now. There were six, but one passed contactdoj@mt.gov course, sustained): “Who followed up with the away on Sunday.” It never was Gayla Benefield’s or Norita’s or Libby residents?” Andrea Peacock is a former editor of the Les Skramstad’s job to get justice for Libby. It was Independent, and the author of Libby, Montana: Norita asks if the verdicts can be appealed. I tell her that while they can’t, there’s still the pos- the job of the EPA and Department of Justice. It Asbestos and the Deadly Silence of an American sibility of state charges on homicide. But she has was the duty of Montana’s media. And it remains Corporation ( Johnson Books, 2003). no appetite for this. “I think we’ll just go on with the responsibility of the Montana Attorney General. our lives,” she says. “Let it all go behind us.” editor@missoulanews.com

the $$–$$$...$15 and over The Keep Restaurant 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 728-5132 Steak - Seafood - Fine Wines and Spirits. Serving dinner 5pm-10pm seven days a week. Cocktail hour Mon-Thur 5pm-6pm in our fireside lounge. The ideal setting for weddings, receptions, and rehearsal dinners. Dates still available in 2009, call today. For dinner reservations call 728-5132. www.thekeeprestaurant.com $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Enjoy the warm ambience of our cozy neighborhood bistro with an urban feel. Our chefs transport flavors from Europe and the

Mediterranean offering a creative New American twist on classic fare. Featuring the freshest ingredients from local growers. Serving lunch Tuesday through Sat. 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tuesday through Sun. 5:00close. Beer and wine available. $$–$$$. Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone-deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, “Pizza by the Slice.” Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups,

salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

dish

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$. Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. MF 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Getting ready for outside seating? So are we. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Page 19 May 21–May 28, 2009


COOL

May

COFFEE

COFFEE SPECIAL

ICE CREAMS

Guatemala Antiqua Italian Roast $9.75 lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

Need a date for dinner?

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Check out the personals on page 39.

dish

the

SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Open for Lunch and Dinner! Check out our new menu: Sesame House Salad, Soba Vegetable Pasta, Warm Brie Salad, the Dubliner, Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich, and Great Italian Pastas. Irish favorites, too: Pasties, Fish and Chips & Shepherd’s Pie. “where the Gaelic and the Garlic mix!!” $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Vietnam Noodle 2100 Stephens 542-8299 A true Vietnamese dining experience! Enjoy our authentic beef noodle soup, spring rolls, pad thai, Vietnamese style hot & sour soup, noodle soup bowls & daily lunch/soup combo specials. We suggest that you also try our new stuffed hot peppers. For your cooking pleasure at home, we have an Asian grocery next to our restaurant! Get a free meal on your birthday when you bring 5 or more friends. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Bucks Club 1805 Regent • 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

CLOSED

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Page 20 May 21–May 28, 2009

eMpanadas 728-2030 www.empanadalady.com eMpanadas are back! Indulge in your favorites at the Clark Fork River Market this Saturday, 8am to 1pm and at Downtown Tonight, Caras Park, Thursdays, June-August 5:30-8:30pm. Baked to perfection with fresh, local ingredients,10 exquisite varieties of Argentine-style empanadas await you: Carne de búfalo, lamb, pollo, humita, and more.$ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. Lunch Board: Tuesday through Friday 11:30 to 2pm. Dinner A La Carte: Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 9pm. Reservations Accepted. For special events (business meetings, birthdays, baby showers, etc.) please call Chef Jason Tenesch.

Whitefish Café Kandahar 406-862-6247 A George’s Distributing fine wine tasting, a Café Kandahar 7 course wine dinner, Kandahar Lodge luxurious accommodations and an Andy Blanton champagne brunch come together May 14-15 for a “Not To Be Missed” event. Meet & greet with the winemakers. Full package $299 for two. Call 406-862-6247 for limited tickets.

French American Cuisine 363-4567 • Upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton, MT 59840 Lunch Board • T - F 11:30 - 2pm Dinner a la carte • T - Sat 5 - 9pm


by Ari LeVaux

Slow boat cooking If you were shipwrecked on a desert island with only one food, what would you choose? Think survival. Only unprocessed, raw ingredients are allowed in this exercise—no energy bars or hamburgers. Call it coincidence, call it cosmic, call it luck, but if you really were trapped on a desert island, one of the best foods you could hope to find is a food you’d actually be likely to find. Packed with energy, protein, fiber, vitamins and many other nutrients, coconut is a complete and proven survival food. The coconut inhabits innumerable deserted islands thanks to a dispersal method by which it slowly floats around the ocean and occasionally makes landfall on suitable shores, where it sprouts and colonizes. This is one reason why coconut is the poster child for my personal culinary style: The Slow Boat School of Cooking. Slow boat cooking is a regional cuisine focused on local ingredients, but not to the point of dogma. Slow boating allows the strategic application of select ingredients from faraway places—like coconuts—providing they adhere to two basic rules: 1. The faraway food in question cannot be grown at home, ever. This rules out imported fruits like strawberries and apples from the southern hemisphere in winter, when they’re out of season at home. Slow boat principles dictate that you preserve local foods in season and use the storage forms all year long, rather than buying the imported version out of season. Ingredients like coconuts, chocolate and black pepper cannot be grown at home. 2. Imported ingredients are allowed if they can be transported slowly, unrefrigerated—like the spice and pasta Marco Polo brought home in his slow boat from China. While realistically it’s hard to know by what mode your food arrived, if, in the evolution of our cuisine, we stick to foods that could be transported by slow boat, then we hold open the possibility that they will be. And

Ask Ari:

Q

we’ll create cuisines that could someday be close to carbon neutral, if some shipping companies would go back to using sailboats. In fact, Languedoc vineyards in France has begun shipping its wine this way. Coconut brings a flavor and richness to the table that is as close to magical as food can get. It mixes harmoniously with many local ingredients, and today I’m going to focus on how it can be applied to elk and green chile. The first step is to thaw your meat, which doesn’t have to be elk. It could be anything, even

fish. If you have frozen green chile, thaw that too. If not, hang in there. Many cooks, even in tropical countries where the coconuts drop from the trees, balk at making their own coconut milk. And while canned coconut milk qualifies as slow boat friendly, I prefer to make it fresh. Picking a good coconut can be a crapshoot, but you can improve your odds by choosing coconuts that feel heavy for their size, don’t have cracks or mold on the outside, and have audible water sloshing inside. Consider bringing a bowl to the store. Smash your new coconut on the parking lot, drain the water into the bowl, and taste it. If it tastes rotten, exchange the coconut for another and try again. Alternatively, you can keep a can of coconut milk as a backup in case of a bad coconut.

Pull apart your smashed coconut and bake the broken shards at 350 degrees for 30 minutes, or until the edges start to turn golden. Remove from heat and let cool. Chop the flesh, which should pull away from the shell easily with a butter knife or spoon, and put it in a food processor or blender. Grind for about three minutes, and then slowly add 2 cups of water. Blend/process for three more minutes. Let steep for 15 minutes, and then pour the whole business through a filter. A tea strainer or paint strainer works well. Squeeze all the liquid into a bowl. Set aside the leftover coconut flesh to add to your next stir-fry. Cut your meat into 1-inch chunks and squeeze a few slow boat limes over the chunks. Marinate 15 minutes, and then brown the meat in a pan with hot oil. When brown, add a sliced onion, a few chopped garlic cloves and some lime leaves (I get mine from a local greenhouse). I buy green chiles by the bushel in August, when they’re in season, and roast and freeze them for year-round use. If you didn’t do this, you have permission to go buy fresh Anaheim or New Mexico chile peppers from the store, and roast them yourself to make this dish. While the meat is browning, peel and clean 7 to 10 chiles under running water, removing seeds if you wish, and chop them. After you add the onions and garlic to the pan, let them cook until they start to sweat, then add your coconut milk. Stir, add soy sauce to taste, and squeeze in a few more limes. Simmer five minutes, add the green chile, simmer two more minutes and turn off the heat. Serve with rice, and garnish with cilantro if you have any on board. Bending or breaking a rule here or there won’t capsize the slow boat. The course you sail is a balance between choosing your ingredients thoughtfully and steering clear of self-deprivation. The world offers fabulous fruits; indulge responsibly.

We're the Perfect Place to Sit, Sip, Meet and Eat. Sun thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com Across from the U of M campus.

Grass be gone

Hi Ari, I’m a fan of your column. I hope you are enjoying New Mexico! I saw last week or so that you suggested people get rid of their lawns by solarizing it for a few months. It surprised me that you suggested this as an alternative to digging up the sod. I have never seen solarizing work well, not as well as you describe, for sure. I always discourage people from doing that. People really need to dig out the lawn and then take it away to get it ready for any kind of garden or re-planting. Those Kentucky bluegrass rhizomes are just tenacious and just when you think that they must surely be dead…they come back to life.

The easiest thing is to just rent a sod cutter, and stack the sod pieces on the street or in the alley. Then follow up by posting a “Free Sod” ad in the newspaper or Craigslist. Someone will be happy to take it off your hands. Marilyn Marler University of Montana natural areas specialist

A

Thanks for your side of the story, Marilyn. The solarizing (i.e., covering the lawn with a black tarp for six weeks) can definitely backfire if you remove the tarp too early. But the downside of digging up the sod is you remove a ton of good organic matter and dirt

from your future garden spot. Also, sod cutters only work if you have a picture-perfect lawn, and not mixtures of Kentucky bluegrass, quack grass, dandelions and whatever else has blown in. But the black plastic works on anything. And six weeks of summer Montana sun on a black tarp, in my experience, kills everything. On other fronts, I’ll be returning to the homeland for a week, starting this Sunday and culminating at the farmers’ markets on May 30. Hope to see some of you then! Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

Missoula Independent

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Page 21 May 21–May 28, 2009


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings May 21–May 28, 2009

If your toddler’s movement seems kind o f, w e l l , s t a l e , b r i n g t h e m t o Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:15 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Kids aged 5–13 can teach the man a thing or two during Movin’ with the Mayor, a health promotion event at 3:30 PM at Westside Park. Free. Call 721-PARK. Having trouble deciding what to do with all that junk inside your trunk? Commiserate with The Green Light, 128 W. Alder, as they host their first trunk show from 4–8 PM for the fashion-forward organic line “Stewart & Brown,” which was designed by a former Missoulian. Free. Call 541-8623. Even those without a bun in the oven will benefit when the Happy Mama Prenatal Center, 736 S. First St. W., presents a low-impact Community Yoga Class every Thu. at 4:15 PM. $5 suggested donation.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

The Decemberists play the Wilma Theatre with Blind Pilot at 8 PM on Sun., May 24, and if you don’t already have tickets, you’re probably going to have to sit this one out.

THURSDAY

21

May

School’s out early, which means it’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures

of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. Give your youngsters something to strive for—or to avoid—when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., serves up a Playdate with an Artist at 3 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY.

Times Run 5/22- 5/28

Handcrafted Artisanal Truffles Made with Single Origin 100% Ecuadorian Chocolate Come join us for lunch. Featuring freshly made sweet & savory crepes

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Is Anybody There? (PG13) Nightly at 7 & 9 Sun. matinee at 1 & 3:20 Fri. (5/22), Sun. (5/24) at 7 ONLY

FULL BAR AVAILABLE

Paris 36

119 S. Higgins Ave, Missoula 543.2566 Next to the historic Wilma Theatre.

poshchocolat.com Missoula Independent

Page 22 May 21–May 28, 2009

(PG13) Nightly at 7 & 9:10 Sun. matinee at 1 & 3:20 Fri. (5/22), Sun. (5/24) at 9 ONLY

www.thewilma.com

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Be the blender for a fruit smoothie of movement traditions every Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, where Shake, Rattle and Pose: Yoga Dance Fusion carries you through the motions and delivers you at Oneness’ door. Call 541-7240 for pricing. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 22, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


Missoula Independent

Page 23 May 21–May 28, 2009


nightlife The Sustainable Business Council unveils the winners of their fifth annual Sustainability Awards at 6 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W., after the 5:30 social hour gets everyone primed to accept runner-up status. And stick around for the 6:15 panel of winners. Free. It’s an all-inclusive art party when the Missoula Art Museum hosts Artini: Cultural Souvenirs at 5:30 PM, where UM art history professor Valerie Hedquist explains the age-old quandary of why “A Snowman Cares for Our Memory of Water,” exhibiting artist M.A. Papanek-Miller signs her books and bluegrass from Iron Lasso helps wash down the delightful noshes and smooth beverages. Free. Call 728-0447. All genres are encouraged— excepting, perhaps, death metal— every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Expectant parents can get a leg up on the competition as The Nursing Nook, 1900 S. Reserve St., presents the 2.5-hour class Breastfeeding Prep for Success at 6 PM. $60 includes 10 percent off breastfeeding supplies. Call 721-5440. It’s pretty much the opposite of dancing on Ecstacy: Ecstatic dance sweeps you up at 6 PM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $5 suggested donation. E-mail ecstaticdancers @gmail.com. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. If you’re sick and tired of outdated Horton techniques, you’re in luck every Thu. at 6:30 PM, when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Modern Horton Technique Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Learn how to support your child’s transition into kindergarten with WORD’s five-week series “The ABC’s of Kindergarten Readiness,” which begins at 6:30 PM every Thu. through June 11. Free., and childcare is available. RSVP 543-3550, ext. 255. Fight global warming as you submit comments in real time when the Sierra Club hosts a live

Missoula Independent

stream from Seattle of the EPA Hearing on the Danger of Greenhouse Gases at 7 PM at the Elk’s Lodge. Steer the feds toward taking action, but first RSVP 549-1142. Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase at 7 PM, where dropins are always welcome. Free. Call 541-8463. In honor of the extremely posthumous publication of the book Who is Mark Twain?, Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Store hosts an authentic Mark Twain impersonator to tell stories and describe the writer’s life and times at 7 PM. Free. Call 363-5220. The YMCA of Missoula features John Sporman, sound designer for the Missoula Children’s Theatre, whose 7 PM YMusic Class: Intro to Live Sound will have you ready to safely land the soundboard in case of an in-show emergency. $25/20 members. Call 721-9622 or visit ymca missoula.org. Come to The Cottage Inn in Kila for a 7 PM Irish jam session and stay for the weekly cribbage tournament at the world famous home of “Turbo Crib.” Free. Call 755-4572. If your normal swing spot’s become jam-packed with losers, head to the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., where swing lessons begin every Thu. at 7 PM and the dance party gets going in earnest at 8. $5. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. Bring your axe—or banjer for you backwoods types—and reminisce about music’s goodle days at the weekly Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 726-3765 or 880-6834. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Hate Mail, a play written by Kira Obolensky and Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Bill Corbett, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre,

Page 24 May 21–May 28, 2009

515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush. Call 945-2904. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Tue. at 8 PM during Hip Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Got a little extra cash? Great, do you think you could get me a ticket to witness an acoustic evening with the Lyle Lovett Trio at 8 PM in the Wilma Theatre? C’mon, it’s only $59.50! Hook a brother up and go fetch it at Rockin Rudy’s. Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096. Bowling and karaoke go together like going in the out door during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Grab a sheet of refrigerator cardboard and show off your breakinest moves—or simply watch our local pool of b-boys and b-girls—when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts the dance jam Top Rock Thursdays every Thu. at 8:30 PM. $2. Call 541-7240. The underground couches fill with laughing throngs when hometown hilarity arrives in the form of funnyman Chris Fairbanks, who brings New York comedian and bud Todd Barry along to incite mass laughter at 9 PM in the Palace Lounge. $10. (See Comedy in this issue.) Help kick off their pending tour as Bird’s Mile Home plays the Elk’s Lodge at 9 PM with serious warming-o’-the-stage by El Zombi Gato, Vera and Hangover Saints. $5/$7 under 21. (See Noise in this issue.) Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Missoula’s most ballady balladeer,

Russ Nasset, graciously picks up a gig at the Old Post Pub, playing every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Landslide hosts open mic night at the Bandit Saloon in Columbia Falls every Thu. and Tue. night, starting at 9 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

FRIDAY May

22

Learn to “use your natural intuition with the love of Creator to repattern your DNA, thoughts, feelings and beliefs” during a three-day Theta Healing Basic DNA Class with Kay Linda Walker, who begins the transformation this morning at the Whitefish BodyTalk Center. Admission TBA. Call 261-9031 or e-mail thetabykw@yahoo.com.

Th e C h i l d r e n ’ s M u s e u m o f Missoula, 225 W. Front St., has five upcoming options for your kids, so register for a session or two of their Passport to the World Summer Camps, which begin June 15. $75/$65 members per weekly session. RSVP 541-PLAY. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3 to 6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, God Says No by James Hannaham. Just kidding (did I need to tell you that?). Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Get your fill of life in a parallel universe as Montana’s longest running family-friendly science-fiction conference, the four-day MisCon 23, kicks off at 1 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. $30. Visit miscon.org. The wild west comes into focus for the cheering audience as the 10th annual Townsend Ranch Grand American Shoot, a threeday showcase of cowboy mounted shooting, begins at 2 PM at Darby’s Townsend Ranch, 3278 Standing Bear Road. Free. Call 821-3749 or visit townsendranch.com. Every weekday, kids aged 6–13 flock to the ZACC, 235 N. First St., where the Young Artists Afterschool Program provides

experiences with ceramics, painting, construction, wire, robots and more. $12 per day. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com If high school English class isn’t exactly nurturing your inner poet, bring all that angsty verbiage to the Missoula Public Library every Fri. when the Teen Writing Group meets at 4:30 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Looking for a varied buzz? Try a weekly wine tasting at the Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., where the sweet juice of divinity begins flowing at 5:15 PM every Fri. $10. The Can’t Hardly Playboys pick ‘em old and new—as long as it’s acoustic folk and rock—every Fri. from 6 to 8 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The fine dining is boosted up a couple of notches when Andrea Harsell plays at 6:30 PM at The Keep. Free. The Gravely Mountain Boys offer an evening of bluegrass at the Hangin Art Gallery and Coffee House in Arlee at 7 PM. Free. Call 726-5005. Humorist, award-winning screenplay author and musician Jonathan Richard Cring presents the program SpiriTed at 7 PM at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., which has left audiences across the planet breathless and energized. Free. Call 5444141 or visit janethan.com. Celebrate the life and accomplishments of one of America’s greatest artists and naturalists when Brian “Fox” Ellis delivers the evening lecture “John James Audubon” at 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $4 suggested donation. Call 327-0405. Main Street gets even sexier as Patrick Marsolek and Grace Hodges present an evening of tango classes, with beginners welcome at 7 PM, intermediates at 8 and Milonga going down at 9 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5 per class/$10 for all/$3 Milonga only. Call 541-7240. Get wild on the dance floor, or just bring your instrument and jam with the band, when an all-ages Friday Night Dance Party thumps into the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $3. Call 543-7154. The guitar, harmonica and voice of the skilled Isaac M. soothe those wine-addled nerves at 7:30 PM at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 541-8463.


SPOTLIGHT d u s te d Th e C r o p D u s t e r s have the sort of Montucky rally call that induces whiskey drinkin’, bonfires, gun shootin,’ swing-yer-partner dancin’, sing-alongs and whiskey drinkin’. In fact, they list their influences as Jim Beam, Jack Daniels, M. Mark and Mr. Crown. So you get where these guys are coming from, right? This week Bozeman gives us a giant shot of what could be described as Drive By Truckers with all the influences of Waylon, Willie and David Allan Coe. And, perhaps, the dramatics of John Mellencamp.

WHEN: Fri., May 22, 9 PM WHERE: Badlander HOW MUCH: $5 I think there’s a chance alt-country (which, by the way, is real country) has had its heyday, especially as magazines like No Depression go under. But may I suggest a revival? Or, if you didn’t get

Arrive early for the 8 PM sign-up— and to down a few jitter-killing drinks—as Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson hosts the weekly Friday Night Open Jam with Jimmy Falcon and Sam Massa at 9. Free. Live music of an unspecified nature shakes things up at 8 PM at The Raven in Big fork, 39 Orchard Lane, which should add some spice to the Walleye Fish Fry as well. Visit sleep eatdrink.com. Power poppers Secret Powers diversify the evening as they play the Badlander with Montucky altcounty from the CropDusters and the poppy stylings of the Racquet at 9 PM. $5. It’s a special Fri. night treat as the Missoula Metal Militia, led by Oregonian death metal bands Necryptic, Nocturnal Slaughter and Truculence, who benefit from local support from Undun,

Just outside Southgate Mall, Paxson St. Entrance, Off Brooks • 542-SEED

You know how you always have that dream where you’re wearing an original T-shirt that says “White Lion,” your jeans are perfectly skinny and you have the best tattoo sleeves in town? Forget about it. Here’s your new Montana, CropDuster future:

WHAT: The CropDusters

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Hate Mail, a play written by Kira Obolensky and Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Bill Corbett, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush. Call 945-2904.

on the alt-country truck in the first place, perhaps it’s time to get out of your indie rock, shoe-gazer haze, and take a moment to put on your steeltoed boots and experience some Montana heritage of the cowboy rebellion variety.

“From the age of 13 I’ve been driven by the dream of drivin’ my own diesel rig. Twenty million miles later I’m a long haul operator livin’ the life I want to live. I’m a truck-drivin’ son-of-abitch.”

marches into the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Something freaky washes up on the shores of Reserve Street as Dark Dreams: Bloody Lips— which features a special tie-in with MisCon, the sci-fi convention— sports DJs Erastaroth, Critical Bill, ir8prim8 and HAuLi spinning all your favorite EBM, synthpop, industrial, fetish, powernoise and goth hits and bondage performances by Mistress Leona and her slave at 9 PM at the Joker’s Wild, 4829 N. Reserve St. $5/Free for MisCon attendees. The Wilma Theatre’s your secret tweaker pad at 9 PM, as LBC (A Tribute to Sublime), considered “one of the hottest shows in the tribute industry,” gets to the “Date Rape” once they “Smoke Two Joints,” chug a “40 Oz. to Freedom” and listen to an opening set by Junior and Transportation. $17/$15 advance at Rockin Rudy’s. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free.

–Erika Fredrickson

Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Paint your eardrums with a palette of hip hop, funk, house, techno and more when Friday Night Delights delights the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Free. Get your freak on at AmVets Club, where DJ DC rocks dance music at 9 PM. Free. Release your inner Kool Moe Dee when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to shake it like a Polaroid picture when DJ Sanchez cranks

Missoula Independent

Page 25 May 21–May 28, 2009


out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Your opportunity to showcase the capabilities of your new bionic hips comes as Sean Kelly’s hosts a Latin throwdown with Salsa Loca at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. If you’ve become sick to death of Missoula’s abundance of measly little shrimpazoids, the Full Grown Men satisfy your every dream—and at least two orifices— as they play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Bask in the sounds of spinning discs as Mobile Beat’s DJs scratch it up tonight and tomorrow starting at 10 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Cover TBA. Call 755-9463.

SATURDAY May

23

Here’s one for the early risers: The Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., hosts John James Audubon impersonator

Brian “Fox” Ellis, who offers up an Early Morning Bird Walk beginning at 8 AM. Free, but registration required, so RSVP 327-0405. Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM-noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org) which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. You are invited to bring your family’s brain injury survivors and others to the Puzzle Club Support Group every Sat. at 9 AM at Jokers Wild, 4829 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 728-9117. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 541-7240.

If you’re south of Missoula, your weekly dose of freshness awaits at the Hamilton Farmers’ Market, which opens at 9 AM every Sat. through Oct. 3 on Bedford Street near the Ravalli County Museum. Free. Call 961-0004.

Sylvia Robert’s your host for a series of Kundalini Yoga classes, which begins at 10:30 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $80 for eight classes/$60 for six classes/$12 drop-in. Call 541-7240.

Alpine Artisans cordially invites you to attend the two-day 17th annual Loon and Fish Festival, a community celebration of art and wildlife, which begins at 10 AM at the Community Hall in Seeley Lake, features wildlife and children’s programs, book readings, food and more through Sun., May 24. Free. Visit alpineartisans.org.

It is Saturday again, so it must be about time for a festival in Caras Park: This week, the Montana Freestyle Jam begins at 11 AM (and lasts until 11 PM) with a collaborative display of alternative arts focused on human movement. Breakdancing, fire-spinning, juggling, footbagging, slacklining, extreme rickshaws and more are yours for the taking. Free.

Rockhounds from all over Terra converge on the Bitterrroot River Inn, where the two-day Bitterroot Gem and Mineral State Show begins at 10 AM both days. Free. Call 363-2632. In this case, it’s considered polite to stare at the sex organs: The Missoula Iris Society hosts their annual Median Iris Show from 10 AM–6:30 PM at Southgate Mall. Free. Call 529-6683. Adult Beginner Bellydance/ World Fusion meets every Sat. at 10 AM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where no prior dance experience is necessary. $7. Call 531-3000.

Congrats to this year's Commuter Challenge winners: 1-10 Employees: (Co-Winners) The Biomimicry Institute, Clark Fork Coalition, homeWORD, Montana Campus Compact, Morales Law Office, Sunburst Sensors, Wild Rockies Field Institute and Women's Voices for the Earth 11-25 Employees: (Co-Winners) Ecology Project International and MMW Architects

100+ Employees: The Good Food Store Thanks to REI and the Big Dipper for sponsoring this year's contest! Missoula Independent

Page 26 May 21–May 28, 2009

Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Alison Laundrie gets you in shape and provides a few moments away from your spawn every Sat. at 11 AM during a Pilates class at Sunflower Montessori School, 1703 S. Fifth St. W. $10 includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247. Now that we’ve got an administration less interested in messing with states’ rights, let’s organize the weed: Patients with valid medical marijuana cards—don’t forget that card!—and their caregivers are invited to an open-

OVERALL COMMUTER CHALLENGE TOTALS

1 Week 68 Participating Workplaces 765 Employees

26-50 Employees: REI Missoula 51-100 Employees: Garlington, Lohn and Robinson

Join M.R. Mazurski for a discussion on waterwise plants during the class Native Landscapes, which begins with a tour of Missoula’s Waterwise Garden—between South Fourth Street and the Clark Fork River—at 11 AM. Free. Call 329-1346.

with Perfect 575 Employees Participation for the week

Roundtrip Sustainable 2,918 Commutes Logged

618 Prizes Won

space meeting with Montana NORML from noon–5 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. The agenda is to be determined by those who attend. $5 suggested donation, light lunch provided. Watch the brownies. Call 493-0425. Memorial Day’s about to get a whole lot wetter, as Splash Montana Waterpark opens at noon, with special hours (noon–6 PM) all weekend. Admission prices vary, so visit missoula parks.org. Tour the exhibit A Snowman Cares for our Memory of Water with exhibiting artist M.A. Papanek-Miller at noon at the Missoula Art Museum, after which she’ll be signing the exhibition catalog. $20. Call 728-0447. Bitterroot author Cookie Grimes reads from and signs her book, Jake the Cow Horse, from noon–2 PM at Waldenbooks #1621 in Southgate Mall. Free. Visit cookiegrimes.com. Add your mark to a huge group art piece when a “Hands On” Sewing Circle, which runs from 12:30–2:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, invites you to stitch a bit of hand-shaped wool onto Marie Watt’s exhibition Heirloom. Free. Call 721-0447. The Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., presents John James Audubon impersonator Brian “Fox” Ellis, who shows the assembled mass how to offer science education through stories with the workshop “Breathing Life Into Dry Bones,” for which the start time has yet to be nailed down. $35/$30 members. RSVP 327-0405.


nightlife

The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com.

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Hate Mail, a play written by Kira Obolensky and Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Bill Corbett, at 6 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush. Call 945-2904.

Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834. Learn about organic agriculture and take a farm tour while chowing on hors d’oeuvres and picking out your free plants as Whitefish’s Terrapin Farm hosts an Open House from 3–7 PM. Free. Call 862-6362 for directions.

nightlife Stevensville’s newest brewery— Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St.—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Tom Catmull at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323. Our Lady of Musical Positivity, Joan Zen, plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. As part of the Loon and Fish Festival, author Judy Blunt reads from and signs her book, Breaking Clean, at 7 PM at Seeley Lake’s Grizzly Claw Trading Company, where refreshments will be served. Free. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Hate Mail, a play written by Kira Obolensky and Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Bill Corbett, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush. Call 945-2904. Everyone’s welcome to tear up the dance floor when Lockwood’s Versatiles provide the booty-shaking tunes from 8–11 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5, and bring some treats, but not the Stensrud brownies, please. Call 543-7154. Arrive early for the 8 PM sign-up— and to down a few jitter-killing drinks—as Frenchtown’s Alcan Bar and Cafe hosts the weekly Saturday Night Open Jam with Jimmy Falcon and Sam Massa at 9. Free.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 7 PM, live jazz by Donna Smith at 7:30 and a rotating cast of bands thereafter. Free.

Photo courtesy of Rober Gil

Get your share of face-melting estrogenated guitar when Anita and Kevin Robinson—aka Portland, Ore.’s, Viva Voce—celebrate the release of their album, Rose City, with a 9 PM show at The Badlander on Tue., May 26, with Cut Off Your Hands. $12.

Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

The Full Moon cast a sweeping musk enveloping as they play the 9:30 PM. Free.

They give and they give, and they ask for nothing in return (save for a pile of warm panties): DJs Kris Moon and Monte Carlo do what they do best at 9 PM at the Badlander. Free.

DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Your mind melts slowly into your shoes as it washes over you in waves: Black Dice, Wolf Eyes and Rammer/Dunn—a Bryan Ramirez joint—rock the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $8. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to perform “I Don’t Wanna Hear Your Band” by The Wicked Celtics during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if a pounding on the wall comes from next door. Free. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. You can expect just about anything—except smoke—when the Palace Lounge, 147 W. Broadway, presents CUE with DJ Hickey at 9 PM every Sat. Free. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. You’re a diva on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJ DC and his dance music at 9 PM. Free.

Prophets forecloud of lovethe dance floor Union Club at

SUNDAY May

24

You’re hereby invited to Hamilton’s Carriage House, 310 N. Fourth St., every Sun. at 9 AM, in order that you might bear witness to Rev. Kathianne Lewis’ message from the Center for Spiritual Living in Seattle. Free. Call 375-9996. If economic strain’s got you worrying about your home—or lack thereof—contact the Human Resource Council, 1801 S. Higgins Ave., which offers home repair and homebuyer assistance programs. Call Brendan at 728-3710, but do it tomorrow, when they’re open. You’ve but one short week to respond to a call for photographs, sent out by the Bigfork Museum of Art and the Swan View Coalition, for consideration for inclusion in the upcoming exhibit Celebrating the Swan Range, so visit swanview.org/ photo_contest.html. Learn about organic agriculture and take a farm tour while chowing on hors d’oeuvres and picking out your free plants as Whitefish’s Terrapin Farm hosts an Open House from 10 AM–5 PM. Free. Call 862-6362 for directions.

In honor of the fallen, we’ll not read today: The Missoula Public Library helps fulfill that vow as they remain closed all day long. Free. Don’t call 721-2665, you’ll only get their answering machine. Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Free. You’re invited to wrestle with the claims of Jesus in an open and accepting environment every Sun. at 10 AM, when All Souls Missoula meets on the third floor of the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Free. Visit allsoulsmissoula.org. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “Quesadillas are my medicine!” Free. Call 543-7154. Clubbing takes practice, so launch your wee ones on the right foot when Blackbird Kid Shop presents another Tiny Dancers Kids’ Dance Party from 3–6 PM at the Palace Lounge, where healthy food and great tunes are supplemented by contests, a bubble machine and more. $5/$3 advance at Blackbird, 525 S. Higgins Ave. Non-walkers free. Call 543-2899. The Montana A Capella Society pulls out all the stops as they present the concert 500 Years of Love Songs at 3 PM at the Corvallis United Methodist Church. Free. Call 375-9069. If jazz dancing is a little too city for you, then hit the Kalispell Country Clogger classes at the downtown Kalispell Eagles Hall at 5:30 PM. Call 250-6965 or 885-2262.

Missoula Independent

No matter how short my shopping list, I always lock my bike at the Orange Street Food Farm, thanks in part to the Decemberists, who play the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM with special kick-ass guests Blind Pilot. This show was sold out before tickets even went on sale, so fuggedaboudit. The weekend isn’t over until you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, where Landslide hosts at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Euchre is a game I’ve never, ever played. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat—and no smoke: Head underground when The Palace Lounge, 147 W. Broadway, features a rotating cast of Random Rock DJs at 9 PM every Sun. Free.

MONDAY May

25

As idle hands are indeed the Devil’s playthings, keep the kiddos busy for one week this summer (June 15–19) when the Missoula Alliance Church offers Summer Adventure Week Vacation Bible School—this year’s theme is “Jesus, Believe in Miracles”—with crafts, snacks, dramas and the like. Free. Call 251-3983 or visit macmissoula.com.

Spend some time honoring those who placed themselves in harm’s way for our benefit during a full platter of Memorial Day Services, which begins with a 9:15 AM meet-up at the VFW Hall, 245 Main St., for a free bus tour

Page 27 May 21–May 28, 2009


of the five arranged ceremonies. Or meet at the Caras Park fish statues at 9:45. Or at the courthouse at 10:45. Or e-mail bluemountain@montana.com or call 251-5116. The 89 th annual Corvallis Memorial Day Parade, dubbed “Celebrate the Heart of the Valley,” begins at 10 AM, which is three hours after the 7 AM breakfast at the Community Event Center, two hours after parade participants can pick up their numbers—8—and one hour after registration closes at 9. Free, but please register at corvallispost91.com, or call 546-4244. You’ve but a few short weeks before the registration deadline for Y Music Summer Camps, so unless you want to continue to raise that brood of tonally impeded offspring, get in touch with the good folks at the Y. Prices vary, so call 721-YMCA or visit ymcamissoula.org. In honor of the fallen, we’ll not read today either: The Missoula Public Library helps us fulfill that vow as they remain closed all day long. Free. Don’t call 7212665, you’ll only get an answering machine.

Sunflower Montessori School

Now Enrolling for Themed Summer Program 3 - 6 years Mention this ad & get $25 off first month's tuition. •Serving seasonal, whole organic food purchased locally.

Call to schedule a tour.

830-3025 1703 S. 5th St. W. Missoula sunflowermontessori@hotmail.com Missoula Independent

Page 28 May 21–May 28, 2009

Take relaxation to the next level from 1–3 PM, as Splash Montana hosts their annual Memorial Day Ice Cream Social, with frozen ‘n’ flavored bovine secretions provided by Cold Stone Creamery. Admission prices vary, so visit missoula parks.org.

There’s a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. For once in your life, leave the bar with a slightly thicker wallet with DJ Hickey’s Rawk and Roll Bingo Night every Mon. from 8:30 PM until midnight at the Badlander. $1 per card, and the opening round’s always free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The Milkcrate Mechanic keeps the groove fine tuned when he presents random music for random people, featuring rotating DJs and acts, free pool and mad krunk every Mon. at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge. Free. Bring your music appreciation glands to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and you’ll soon find yourself surrounded by the finest musical acts on the planet. Free.

Two sessions of the popular World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class take place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon.: At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5:15. $30 per month/drum rental: $15 per month. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

TUESDAY

Gothic Fusion Bellydance takes place every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Beginners are more than welcome. $7. Call 531-3000.

While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age or so, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like— and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682.

nightlife Mr. Pibb, hit the road! Mountain Dew, here’s your pink slip! Refine your Soda Firing technique every Mon. at 6 PM through July 2 at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St. $200/eight-week session. Call 543-0509. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free.

May

26

Bend, stretch and play every Tue. and Thu. at Happy Mama, 736A S. First St. W., where Yoga for Everybody eases the suffering at 9:30 AM. $12 drop-in/$10 advance. Call 880-6883.

Still cruising around in diapers and suckling on breasts? Well, then, the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group

Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. If they’re under 24 months old, bring the kiddos to the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., where Families First’s Family Motion offers corporeal strength for you and yours at 11 AM. $4.25/Free for members. RSVP 541-PLAY. Toes will tap and fingers will snap (in the painless way) when the Rocky Mountain Rhythm Kings ride into Snappy Sport Senter, 1400 Hwy. 2 E., every Tue. at noon. Free, donation suggested. Call 257-7525. Find strength and the will to fight at the Breast Cancer Support Group, which meets at noon each Tue. at St. Francis Xavier Church, 420 W. Pine St. Free. The Shootin’ The Bull Toastmasters Club meets at noon at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Road. The first few are free. Call 529-5488. For the latest Latin cardio dance craze, try a dose of Zumba every Tue. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. The dictionary defines “BOGO” as an acronym for “Buy One, Get One,” which means BOGO Pottery Tuesdays ease your entry into ceramics ownership from noon–6 PM every Tue. at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Call 5497555 or visit zootownarts.com. Teens who still don’t know how to edit and post video to the web are invited to Media Club at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library, where they’ll do just that. Free. Call 721-2665. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife It’s Tuesday, and you ate your last UM student for breakfast, so why not Dine With the Elks from 5:30–7 PM? This week, deep fried spiced chicken breast, fresh deviled potato salad, cole slaw, chile beans and strawberry shortcake accompany the flashy pianizing of Adrienne Dussault. $9 per plate. RSVP 549-0542. E v e r y Tu e . a t 5 : 3 0 P M , Intermediate Bellydance/ World Fusion meets at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., but be warned that prior dance experience is recommended. $7. Call 531-3000.


SPOTLIGHT w h i te l i g h t I kind of want to move in with SSION, or at least follow them on tour for a bit. Are there SSION-heads? Can I start a Missoula chapter? Let me back up a little. As their MySpace page loads, I’m greeted with the hirsute visage of lead singer Cody Critcheloe, whose crooning ties this queer-positive punk dance party of a band together as much as the ‘80s synth beats and drum magic keep the crowd dancing around in my head. In terms of a show forecast, I see the Badlander floor crowded with a blend of exuberant ex-students, joyous postal workers and

WHO: SSION, with Panopticon WHEN: Wed., May 27, 9 PM

Photo courtesy of Megan Mantia

WHERE: The Badlander HOW MUCH: $8

AmVets refugees. I see cardboard, lots of cardboard fashioned into outrageous floral masks and at least a tail or two in the crowd. I envision a non-stop groove-a-thon, with distractor-repulsing lyrics like “Gee whiz/ Street jizz/ It feels more dirty than it really is/ Late at night/ In the park/ We’re gonna shoot white light all through the dark” doing exactly what they’re intended to do.

Instructor Holly Jeremiassen teaches young people aged 10 and up the finer points of glass fusing every Tue. at 5:30 PM during Youth Glass Class at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $15 per session. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. Get gooey during Open Instructed Studio at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., every Tue. at 6 PM through June 30. $168/eight-week session. Call 543-0509. The Missoula Art Museum presents the four-week course Figure Drawing for Adults at 6 PM, in which Bob Phinney and a

So if you’re not super comfortable getting your boundaries pushed in a way that’s not typically violent and misogynistic, this show might not be for you. But on the other hand, SSION’s music is so alluring and acts so magnetically on the soles of your dancing shoes, perhaps this evening’s a great match for your tender sensibilities. Get out there and see what it’s like to revel in “The Other” before last call sends you, a newly converted apostle of plurality, into the dark Montana night.

slew of live models merge to introduce you to the basics of the form. $75/$67.50 members. Call 728-0447. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/ advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Renew your oath to do no harm and recharge your regenerative battery at the monthly Healer’s Gathering, which takes place the last Tue. of each month at 6:30 PM at the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Call 273-2871. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/class or $35/four classes. Call 549-7933.

—Jonas Ehudin

Experience cross-cultural experiences with native speakers during a session of Spanish lessons, which meet at 6:30 PM every Tue. and Thu. through July 2 at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. $200 per session. RSVP espanolmt@gmail.com. Stop playing games with yourself—Game Night featuring “mostly Scrabble” takes place at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. 6:45 PM. Free. Wrapping up Mental Health Awareness Month, the Bitterroot Public Library presents the consumers and families panel “Living Well with a Mental Health Diagnosis” at 7 PM. Free. Call 363-4463 or 531-5699. If you’d like to subject your wordsmith work to critique, bring six typed lyric sheets to the Nashville Songwriters Western Regional Workshop, which begins at 7 PM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. Free. Call 542-9258, or e-mail song writers@mardimilligan.com. You’re invited by Turning the Wheel to take part in some Body-Centered Creative Expression to live music every Tue. at 7 PM. $5–10 donation.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 May 21–May 28, 2009


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end an entire feline line for just $10. RSVP 549-3934.

Hey wrong-side-of-the-street-rider: You can learn to bike responsibly at Free Cycle’s Bike Well classes at 7 PM at 732 S. First St. W., where class also convenes on Wed. and Thu. Call 541-7284 for times.

Take a load off in the company of friends every Wed. from 9–11:30 AM as Aspen Hospice, 107 Bell Crossing West, hosts the Caregiver Coffeebreak. Free. Call 642-3010.

You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Suite 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? The Irish name “Ashling” has certified hypnotic qualities, which are amplified when the name is shared by two beautiful medical school graduates. As an aside, what is the English translation of the mysterious moniker? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real every Tue. at 8 PM, when Hip Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. A splash of Portland, Ore. joy touches down at the Badlander, where Viva Voce celebrates the release of their new album, Rose City, with a little help from Cut Off Your Hands at 9 PM. $12. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. DJs Karl K, Dillon, Cosmic Diva, Timmie Irie, Tobin and Kris Moon play music for the iriehearted every Tue. at 9 PM when Reggae Night overstands all your troubles at the Badlander. Free. The moon’s always full and the pack’s always howlin’ at the Wolf Den’s Open Mic Night in Polson. Free. 9 PM. Call 883-2054. Forego the weekly shower and join Unwashed Promotions for live music and moist DJs Harvey and Heyska when Punk Rock Tuesday fumigates the Palace Lounge every Tue. at 9 PM. Free. L.I.V. Karaoke night gives your larynx a weekly workout with a 9:30 PM sesh at the Elbow Room. Free. Call 531-7800.

WEDNESDAY May

27

Please, please, just get your cat(s) fixed, all right? The Humane Society of Western Montana hosts the all-day low-income event Spay Your Mama!, where you can

Missoula Independent

Page 30 May 21–May 28, 2009

Join the Flathead Audubon Society’s Neal Brown for the two-hour jaunt Birds of the Wild Mile every Wed. through June at 9 AM at the trailhead of Bigfork’s Wild Mile Nature Trail. Free. Call 837-5018. Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. If you can toddle, you can play: The Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents Toddler Playgroup at 11 AM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. Increase your digital proficiency to at least second grade level every Wed. at 12:30 PM when the Missoula Public Library presents an ongoing series of computer classes in the classroom near Web Alley. Free. Call 721-2665. I’m restricted from revealing the title of the 2 PM Afternoon Matinee at the Missoula Public Library, but I will offer the knowledge that when rearranged, the letters in the name of the classic film can spell out “Gladly Sounds,” “Gals Duds Only,” or “Sad Old Gun Sly,” to name but a few options. Free. Call 721-2665. Get down with Gramps and the baby when Heather Adams leads Family Dance at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 3 PM every Wed. in May. Call 5417240 for pricing. Parents and families experiencing difficulties and/or chaos with their Guardian Ad Litems (GALs) are invited to a confidential bi-weekly meeting of the Missoula GAL Family Support Group at 4 PM in the Missoula Public Library’s small meeting room. Free. Email missoulagalfamilygroup@yahoo.com. Stevensville’s newest brewery— Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St.—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Russ Nasset at 5 PM. Free.

nightlife The wheel in the sky keeps on turning during Beginning Pottery at The Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., which meets every Wed. at 6 PM through June 1, with no class April 8. $168/eight-week class. Call 543-0509. Combine a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with live models in their birthday suits—18 and over only, please—and you’ve got the Missoula Art Museum’s Hump Day Figure Drawing group every Wed. from 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Call 728-0447. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her Afro-Brazilian Dance Class, which takes


place every Wed. at 6 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing.

Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat—and no smoke—but plenty of girl power: Head underground at 9 PM every Wed. when The Palace, 147 W. Broadway, presents Ladies’ DJ Night. Free.

Blue Argon plays “eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn” every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

Spit the gorf out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327.

Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482.

Prepare yourself the best way you can for Colorado’s Dovekins, who play the Top Hat at 10 PM with local cover fire from Baba Ganoush. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865.

Who watches the watchmen? You do, should you choose to attend this quarter’s Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) Citizen Advisor Meeting, which begins at 6:30 PM at FWP’s secret hideout, 3201 Spurgin Road. Free. Call 542-5500.

This Missoula legend has nothing to do with ground beef: Wasted Wednesday at the Top Hat offers unlimited tap beer and MGroup at 10 PM and the wisdom you’ll gain is worth the $7 cover many times over. Call 728-9865.

A revolving cast of local singers and musicians makes up the band Katy and Friends, who do the rocking every Wed. at 6:30 PM at the Cottage Inn in Kila. Free. Call 755-8711.

Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

THURSDAY

Learn to mystify and entrance by wiggling those hips every Wed. during a Hula/Tahitian Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where you can learn beautiful and energetic rhythms at 7 PM. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482.

May

Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. That last time doesn’t count: Cult director— film director, that is—Guy Maddin’s film My Winnipeg, which features animation by

Photo by Chad Harder

Not exactly “gangsta,” but a little intimidating, in a prep school kind of way. From left, Jim Badcock and Tashia Gates star in the Montana Actors’ Theatre production of Hate Mail, which runs through Sat., May 23, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, with a 6 PM show on Sun., May 24. $10/$5 student rush. Call 945-2904.

Andy Smetanka, is officially unveiled at 7:30 and 9 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $7. (See Scope in this issue.) Enjoy their final musical offering of the year at Sentinel High School Main Gymnasium at 7:30 PM for the Awards Concert. Free. Wednesdays are for the tango, and nobody know this like the Downtown Dance Collective, where Abby and Diego offer three tango options beginning at 8:30 PM every week. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Kansas City—which, by the way, is not in Kansas—lends us their sleaziest dance rock as SSION plays the Badlander at 9 PM with local dreaminess provided by Panopticon. $8. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, maintains a healthy balance every Wed., when Ladies’ Night features Guitar Hero contests and kicks off at 9 PM. Free, unless you buy something. Call 363-6969. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s what-happens-on-the-rickshaw-stays-on-the-rickshaw trivia question: If you’re lucky enough to meet just one Emerald Isle lass with the name Ashling, go ahead and call her by the English translation, “Dream.”

28

Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Enjoy WORD’s story hour for children aged 3–5 years at 11 AM every second and fourth Thu. of the month, and get the games, activities and snacks at no extra charge. Free. Call 543-3550, ext. 255.

Try a high energy, low impact workout on for size every Thu. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, where African Boogie gets you sweating with the basic body forms found in African dance. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Hold your cards close to your chest when the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins

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Hours: M-F 9am-6pm Sat. & Sun. 10am-5pm Missoula Independent

Page 31 May 21–May 28, 2009


Ave., hosts a high-stakes—no, not really—Pinochle Tournament at 1 PM. Cover TBA. Call 543-7154. Pretend that’s Patrick Swayze breathing down your neck during Open Instructed Studio at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., every Thu. at 1 PM through July 2. $168/eight-week session. Call 543-0509. School’s out early, which means it’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. C a l l 239 - 7718 o r e - m a i l info@slumgullion.org. If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:15 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Even those without a bun in the oven will benefit when the Happy Mama Prenatal Center, 736 S. First St. W., presents a low-impact Community Yoga Class every Thu. at 4:15 PM. $5 suggested donation. Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Be the blender for a fruit smoothie of movement traditions every Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, where Shake, Rattle and Pose: Yoga Dance Fusion carries you through the motions and delivers you at Oneness’ door. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife Th e C h i l d r e n ’ s M u s e u m o f

Missoula Independent

Missoula, 225 W. Front St., celebrates fatherhood as they host Dad’s Night at 5:30 PM, which features entertainment by Matt Nord and Caleb Van Gelder, a healthy and tasty meal and play time with the kids. Free. RSVP 541-PLAY. Nobody move, nobody get hurt: John Seiver plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171. The Montana Community Autism and Aspergers Network invites you to their monthly meeting at 6:30 PM in the large meeting room at the Missoula Public Library. Free. If you’re sick and tired of outdated Horton techniques, you’re in luck every Thu. at 6:30 PM, when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Modern Horton Technique Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Learn how to support your child’s transition into kindergarten with WORD’s five-week series “The ABC’s of Kindergarten Readiness,” which begins at 6:30 PM every Thu. through June 11. Free., and childcare is available. RSVP 543-3550, ext. 255.

Page 32 May 21–May 28, 2009

Scream back at the void, but use your inside voice as the Missoula Public Library offers a 7 PM episode of that philosophical rock block known as Socrates Cafe. Free. Call 721-2665. Come to The Cottage Inn in Kila for a 7 PM Irish jam session and stay for the weekly cribbage tournament at the world famous home of “Turbo Crib.” Free. Call 755-4572. If your normal swing spot’s become jam-packed with losers, head to the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., where swing lessons begin every Thu. at 7 PM and the dance party gets going in earnest at 8. $5. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. The real hip hop is over here: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Tue. at 8 PM during Hip Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Hear the boundaries of “folk” music ruthlessly pushed beyond their comfort zone when guitar heroine Patty Larkin shakes up the Masquer Theatre in UM’s

PARTV Center at 8 PM. $20/$18 advance. Call 243-4881. Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semi-unplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096. Bowling and karaoke go together like kowling and baraoke during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Grab a sheet of refrigerator cardboard and show off your breakinest moves—or simply watch our local pool of b-boys and b-girls—when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts the dance jam Top Rock Thursdays every Thu. at 8:30 PM. $2. Call 541-7240. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, led by the Metal Machine DJ, at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025.

Landslide hosts open mic night at the Bandit Saloon in Columbia Falls every Thu. and Tue. night, starting at 9 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Sean Kelly’s proves that everyone can appreciate good rockabilly music when they present Denver’s Hillbilly Hellcats at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Well, now that Missoula’s running around 12,000 people leaner, let’s get this summer thing started. I mean, I always find it difficult to party to the extent to which I’m accustomed while we’re marinating in that stew of undergraduated pheremones. Now that we’re alone, you and I, let me tell you a little secret that the migratory multitudes have either forgotten or never gained from all that book learnin’: Summertime in Missoula is akin to a bottomless glass of champagne with a little currant bubbling around in it. If you know what I mean, more power to you. If you just pulled in off the Interstate, welcome, and check us out. And finally, ye who hopes to attract a following at your next gathering, send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 22, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. And for Peet’s sake, don’t submit events through our website. Just don’t do it.


As Keanu Reeves’ character, Tod, stonedly intoned in the 1989 Steve Martin vehicle Parenthood, “You know, Mrs. Buckman, you need a license to buy a dog, to drive a car—hell, you even need a license to catch a fish. But they’ll let any buttreaming asshole be a father.” Maybe there ought to be a test for child-rearing eligibility—hold off with the spittle-flecked editorials, Libertarians, it was just a passing thought—but until that day, abused and neglected children in Missoula have the valiant volunteers of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) on their side. Throughout Montana, CASA volunteers speak for nearly 900 kids who’ve found themselves ensnared in the court system through no fault of their own. Here in Missoula, the 50 active CASA volunteers are overwhelmed, and the organization seeks to add 24–36 new advocates. If you’re wondering what this all has to do with your pursuit of fresh air recreation, here’s the lynchpin: The fifth annual Park 2 Park Montana Ride—Sept. 7–11, 2009—seeks riders to raise money for and awareness of CASA’s critical mission. So far, 18 cyclists have registered for this year’s event, a 400-mile “trip of a lifetime” from St. Mary, on Glacier Park’s eastern border, to Yellowstone Park’s north entrance at Gardiner. Your sturdy legs and stout touring frame are invited to be among the ride’s 50 participants, so sign up at park2parkmontana.org. Your deadline is July 15, but I won’t be mentioning this again for a while, so get on it. Call LaNette at 542-1208 with questions. Another opportunity for that philanthropic—or terranthropic, rather—streak within you comes as the Wilderness Institute announces its schedule of summer monitoring trips in the Sapphire and Blue Joint Wilderness Study Areas in the Bitterroot. From June 19–Aug. 23, a guided trip’s planned for nearly every weekend, and now’s the time to sign up at www.cfc.umt.edu/wi, or by e-mailing wi@cfc.umt.edu, or by calling 243-5361.

One final registration note: Missoulians on Bicycles (MOBI) hosts their annual two-day fundraising ride, the Tour of the Swan River Valley, on May 30 and 31, but the deadline to sign up is nearly upon us: Visit missoulabike.org by Fri., May 22, or you’ll just have to watch the whole thing on ESPN. And with that done, you’re ready to join the Rocky Mountaineers (TRM) on the fiercely named four-day Massacre Rocks Climbing Trip, which departs for south central Idaho on Fri., May 22. Gather your climbing and camping gear and contact Joshua at 543-0898, or mtsurveyor@gmail.com.

And Fox earns himself precious little sleep, as he’s in that 19th century get-up the next morning, as the MHNC hosts an Early Morning Birding Walk with that same Audubon impersonator at 8 AM on Sat., May 23. ‘Tis free, so call 327-0405 only if ye wish. Two great tastes that go great together: Seeley Lake’s 17th Annual Loon and Fish Festival begins at 10 AM on Sat., May 23, and runs through Sun. evening, with nature and art activities, book readings and signings, and much, much more. Visit alpineartisans.org, or call 793-5706. The day wouldn’t be complete without the grizzled visages of MOBI, who offer up the 100-mile Hamilton and Back ride on Sat., May 23, with an 8 AM meeting at the old 4-Bs Restaurant at the corner of Brooks and Reserve streets. Call Bob at 543-7704. And we’re back to the MNHC, where Fox Ellis continues his work as the venerable John James Audubon, host of the storytelling workshop “Breathing Life into Dry Bones,” at 1 PM on Sat., May 23. This one’s a touch spendy: $35/$30 members. RSVP 327-0405. As Jerry once sang, “The compass always points to Terrapin,”: This weekend, you’ve two opportunities to point your compass toward Whitefish’s Terrapin Farm, which hosts two days of Open Houses on Sat., May 23 (3–7 PM), and Sun., May 24 (10 AM–5 PM). Tours, gratis grub, gardening knowledge and free starts await. Call 862-6362. Get your rest in time for another early morning meeting with MOBI, who host the 75–95 mile (depending upon the route) Mission Meanderings Ride on Sun., May 24, for which you’re to meet up at 7 AM at Adventure Photo by Ashley Sears Cycling, 150 E. Pine St., or at 8:30 in downtown Ravalli. An event of an entirely different stripe takes place in Darby this RSVP with Patty at 745-4549. weekend, where the Townsend Ranch’s 10th Annual Grand And while “Mountain High” might be a little misleading, you’ll American Shoot begins at 2 PM on Fri., May 22, and features definitely be able to see mountains from this event, but whether three days of mounted cowboys with side arms a-blazing. You can you’re high or not is between you and your god: Splash forego the Kevlar vest, however, as they fire only blanks. Virtually Montana, which opens for special hours (noon–6 PM, Sat.–Mon.) this weekend, hosts their Memorial Day Ice recon the situation at townsendranch.com. The Montana Natural History Center (MNHC), 120 Hickory St., Cream Social from 1–3 PM on Mon., May 25. Regular admishosts three events with celebrity impersonator Brian “Fox” Ellis this sion prices apply, but the cream’s free. Hey, the library’s closed, so weekend. Beginning with the 7 PM lecture by “John James what else are you gonna do? And with that, I leave you to your own devices. Rec well. Audubon” on Fri., May 22, Ellis takes on the persona of the great American naturalist and artist. There’s a $4 suggested donation for that one. Call 327-0405. calendar@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 May 21–May 28, 2009


scope Missoula Independent

A stalking success story Andy Smetanka parlays an obsession into feature film work by Skylar Browning

There’s a fine line between stalking a celebri- director sidetracked into some nagging problems footage, the mesmerizing surrealism—and package ty and doggedly pursuing a hero for professional with his latest project. Specifically, he wasn’t sure it into an accessible “docu-fantasy.” He still comadvice. Local filmmaker and longtime Indy writer how to recreate epic historical events for an offbeat pares Winnipeg to his mother’s, um, “lap” and Andy Smetanka knows the line, and he’s not documentary of his hometown. It didn’t take long “fur,” but it’s gorgeous and poetic. Really. ashamed to admit that, maybe, he crossed it. After for the two to realize Smetanka’s animations may “I think it’s this fluffy, pillowy movie that peoall, eight years ago he traveled from Missoula to be the answer. ple just feel comfortable with,” says Smetanka. Michigan, and then borrowed his parents’ Subaru “He said something to the effect of, ‘Run “But I’m biased.” to drive with a friend to Winnipeg, all in an effort something by me and I’ll likely tell you to help Despite the film’s critical acclaim and to pass some time with his personal filmmaking yourself to creating that image,’” recalls Smetanka’s well-deserved pride, seeing the film deity Guy Maddin. Smetanka. “But he didn’t even hold me to that. has proven difficult for most U.S. fans. My “Let’s talk about some of the finer points of He just let me send him things.” Winnipeg screened in some major markets and stalking,” says Smetanka by way of introduction. Smetanka hadn’t been to Winnipeg since he handpicked northern cities that may actually care “I’ll tell you everything I know.” stalked Maddin for two days in 2001, but sud- about Canada (or Maddin), but it never received He can laugh about it now because, unlike denly found himself recreating the city’s skyline wide release. The U.S. DVD has also been indefimost stalker stories, Smetanka’s ends in triumph. for things like a Bolshevik revolt and a bison nitely postponed, although the Canadian market But at the time, his Winnipeg jaunt had the mak- stampede at Happyland, the local amusement already has access to it. There’s even a book ings of an embarrassing disaster. He never formal- park. He felt a little bit of pressure to deliver about the film—featuring Smetanka’s artwork on ly set up a meeting with Maddin, instead arranging some authenticity, to at least offer an outsider’s the cover, no less—but still no DVD. to stay with Maddin collaborator and easier-to-find romantic memory of the city. What he came up “That’s the thing with a Maddin film—it’ll university professor George Toles, ostensibly to interview the screenwriter for a zine article. He assumed meeting Maddin was part of the deal, but there were no promises. Meeting Maddin raised another issue— Smetanka had no idea what to say to him. He was a fan and an aspiring filmmaker—Smetanka watched Maddin’s eerily beautiful Careful, the tale of an alpine village tormented by the constant threat of avalanches, more than 100 times—but wasn’t sure how that translated to interesting conversation. Mostly, he was terrified that he and his friend would simply come off “like total dorks,” he says, and yet didn’t really care. “All I knew was that we had to get up there,” he says. “He had such a profound impact on us and we wanted to meet him, of course, but mostly we just wanted to go up to Winnipeg and absorb some of the strangeness for ourselves. And the thing is, he’s never addressed it since. He’s never been like, ‘Hey, dude, so how crazy is it that you just sort of came up here and stalked me once?’” Needless to say, Smetanka, Toles and Maddin hit it off. They shared coffee and toured the city. Animator Andy Smetanka created historical scenes for Guy Maddin’s critically acclaimed They talked shop, a lot. They also chewed the fat, docu-fantasy, My Winnipeg. Maddin credits Smetanka with turning him onto the event depicta lot. At one point Smetanka remembers driving ed above and featured prominently in the film: If Day, a staged Nazi takeover of the city. Maddin to an abandoned mattress warehouse where he was shooting his latest film and, partly with received nothing but praise from Maddin— open in New York, Los Angeles…and Fargo, and out of nervousness, asked about Winnipeg’s lispi- and a $5,000 payday. nobody will ever hear another thing about it,” est intersection, his favorite in Missoula being “The footage transfers came today and they says Smetanka. “It’s what makes him so cool to Lester and Sussex. Maddin responded with the are SENSATIONAL!!!!!!!!!!!!!,” wrote Maddin in an discover, but pretty frustrating when you want to most Nabokovian, Portsmouth and Ramsgate, early e-mail. “PERFECT! PERFECT! PERFECT! I brag about working with him.” without missing a beat. love the Bolshevik boner! Astonishing.” The wait will finally end for local audiences next Their fast friendship continued after the visit, Smetanka’s animations ended up being a sub- week. Smetanka arranged for a special Missoula with Smetanka sending both Toles and Maddin stantial part of what critics are calling Maddin’s screening—one night only—to show off the project his latest projects—mostly Volumen music videos best film. My Winnipeg debuted at the 2007 he’s been talking about for years, and the filmmaker shot, like most of Maddin’s work, in fast-edited Toronto International Film Festival—with he’s been obsessing over for even longer. black and white—for feedback. Smetanka in attendance—and won best of festival. “It’s been this great thing to walk around with “Guy was always enthusiastic and supportive, In the United States, it landed on Time magazine on your arm, but it’s hard to be excited about it so I kept sending him things,” say Smetanka. “He critic Richard Corliss’ list of 2008’s best films and without being able to share it,” says Smetanka. still asks about Volumen—he loves them.” prompted Roger Ebert to begin his adoring review, “This will be the coming out party so friends Over the years, Maddin’s films gained more “If you love movies in the very sinews of your imag- know that I haven’t been making all of this up.” acclaim and Smetanka started working almost ination, you should experience the work of Guy exclusively in stop-motion silhouette animation, Maddin.” My Winnipeg manages to take all of the My Winnipeg screens at the Crystal Theatre including an extended video for The Decemberists’ fantastical and endearing elements of Maddin’s Wednesday, May 27, at 7:30 and 9 PM. $7. The Tain. Then, in 2006, Smetanka called Maddin previous work—the rhythmic narrative, the melosbrowning@missoulanews.com with an equipment question and the Canadian drama, the dry humor, the grainy black-and-white

Page 34 May 21–May 28, 2009


Scope Comedy Noise Film Shorts Advice Astrology

Funny bones Chris Fairbanks grills Todd Barry, sort of by Chris Fairbanks

Todd Barry’s stand-up routine is underplayed and drier than the Gobi. Unlike the hammed-up variety of stand-up comics, Barry sits back and, with a smirk, points out the obvious. The New York City-based comedian has been at it since the mid-1980s and started showing up on television in the late 1990s. More recently, he starred as Mickey Rourke’s boss in Academy Award-nominee The Wrestler. Barry appears at the Palace this week with comedian Chris Fairbanks, a former Missoulian who now lives in L.A. and has found success with his own brand of self-effacing observations. We figured Fairbanks was the best person to grill his colleague on the upcoming show, laundry habits and the possibility of friendship.

CF: How do you describe your comedy when it is inevitably asked by somebody sitting next to you on an airplane? TB: I hate describing my comedy. Not that it couldn’t be described, I just hate doing it. If someone asks me on a plane, I just try to make it sound as boring as possible, so hopefully they won’t want to talk to me more. CF: Is that also what you’re trying to do with this interview? TB: It seems that way. But usually when I do it on a plane, the person gets the hint! YEAH! CF: Who are your favorite comics to watch these days? TB: John Mulaney, Myq Kaplan, Tig Notaro, Chris Fairbanks, Natasha Leggero, Tom Ryan, Andy Kindler, Louis CK, Sarah Silverman…

CF: You’re about to do a comedy show in Missoula, Montana, a quiet mountain town that rarely sees live standup comedy. What are your thoughts and/or concerns? CF: I notice I’m on that list, TB: I’ve never done a show which is very flattering, but I in Montana, and I’m really lookdon’t believe you’ve ever seen Todd Barry brings his dry comedy ing forward to it. I feel like to the Palace this week. me perform, right? Missoula probably doesn’t get TB: I have seen you permany comics coming through, so perhaps the audi- form. I thought that was a “test” question. ence will be excited and appreciative. Or maybe they’ll hate me. I also plan on doing some laundry CF: There are a lot of occupational hazards in Montana, so I’m looking forward to that, too. that go along with being a nightclub comic— womanizing and alcoholism being the most comCF: Do you commonly travel from town to mon. Do you have any lifestyle flaws that you town with your dirty laundry? blame on being a comedian? TB: I try to avoid doing laundry on the road, TB: I don’t blame anything on being a comedian. but I also try to avoid packing a lot. The Missoula show is right in the middle of the tour, plus I’m CF: What about never having a place to do gonna have a day off there, so it’s in the cards. your laundry, couldn’t you blame comedy for that? CF: You’re a famous comedian. Does it bothTB: You’re really obsessed with the laundry er you that the opening act (me) has a photo the thing. Did that humanize me, or something? Were exact same size as yours on the poster? you hoping my laundry cleaned itself? TB: I didn’t know the pictures were the same size, but I’m guessing you made the poster. CF: What about other interests or activities? What would you do if you weren’t a professional CF: No, I didn’t make the poster, but if I did, comedian? Do you play any sports? I would have put my photo very small and down TB: I’m not gonna answer that one, Chris, in the corner, just to represent how much less I’m because it’s so obvious you are just grasping at being paid. straws, desperately trying to connect with me. TB: If the picture was sized in proportion to your pay, there wouldn’t be a picture at all. Yeah!! CF: What’s something that most of your fans probably would be surprised to learn about you? CF: You’ve informed me, via e-mail, that on TB: I’m really good friends with Sting. the day before the show, I’m to show you around my hometown of Missoula and, in return, you’re CF: We’ve been acquaintances for a couple going to “treat me like shit.” Is this true, and if so, years now. Do you think after this show together, can you tone it down in front of my father? that we’ll be friends? TB: I’ll only treat you like shit when your TB: Once you fix that poster, yes. father isn’t around. Todd Barry and Chris Fairbanks bring their CF: So was that just a dose of the gritty, New stand-up comedy to the Palace Thursday, May York style of ballbusting “tough love” we 21, at 9 PM. $10. Westerners usually only get to enjoy in the movies? arts@missoulanews.com TB: Yeah. I was just being “gritty.”

Missoula Independent

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Bird’s Mile Home Family Portrait P.T. Tip of the week:

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Local trio Bird’s Mile Home reminds me—oldtimer that I am— of Missoula bands gone by, particularly the goofy cowpunk group Vi Thompson Overdrive. Not that Bird’s Mile Home is goofy. In fact, they’re dead serious rockers, but they share a particularly Western sound with bands like VTO—a noise deriving from equal parts narrative-driven melodic punk and cowboy strumming. Family Portrait, the new EP recorded at Missoula rock factory Club Shmed, offers four fine

The Racquet

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The Racquet self-released

The Racquet’s eponymous EP sounds like the early Irish punk rock outfit Stiff Little Fingers without the angsty politics. What you’re left with, then, is reggae-inspired riffs and earnest vocals, but not necessarily gripping songs. That said, the six-song collection is a pretty little package of glittery melodies, solid hooks, bouncy rhythms and yearning “whoa-oh-ohs.” “Lights” feels like a B-side rock ballad with a lostat-sea heartache, and sounds something akin to The Police meets The Cure. “Nothing to It”—certainly the best track on the album—revels in the kind of fist-raising, eye-closing melodramatic chorus any 1980s band from Aha to Depeche Mode covets, even without employing a synth. Derivative, yes. Not a

Black Dice Repo

Paw Tracks

On their fifth fulllength, Brooklyn’s Black Dice offer up an array of impressively warped experimental noises that straddle the line between aural insanity and slightly danceable avant-garde electronic music. Whether it’s the sound of mangled and sped up vocal samples, jagged synth tones, distorted off-time beats or random outbursts of noise, Repo confirms that Black Dice is one of the premier acts within America’s experimental music and noise scenes. As for the album itself, it kicks off with “Nite

Blind Pilot

Three Rounds and a Sound Expunged Records

Let me just say I love Ryan Dobrowski’s drumming. I love his slappy-echoey sound and his rolling, insistent beats. Now that Blind Pilot is getting the attention they deserve—and they do deserve it—the headlines are all about Israel Nebeker and his dreamy pure-toned boyishly husky oh-so lovely singing voice. So I thought I’d throw a little love Ryan’s way because he hits the skins with an insouciant brush tattoo that is indie-rock to the bone. The Portland guitar-drum duo recruited a mini orchestra when recording Three Rounds and a Sound, and the instrumental surprises—mariachi-ballad trumpet, upright bass played with a bow, vibra-

Missoula Independent

Page 36 May 21–May 28, 2009

songs full of angst and lyrical specificity—and also a hint of “Ghost Riders in the Sky.” Keith Moore plays clean, strong guitar backed by a loping rhythm section worthy of Johnny Cash. Timmy Arrowtop plays bass and Jesse Naab handles the drums. The songs are neither too slow nor too fast and intense enough to feel like punk rock, while still allowing airspace for vocals that sound like a rough complaint to an understanding bartender. This combination of clarity and intimate roughness is part of that old Missoula feel, the product of a commitment to a lo-fi, DIY approach. Right now the EP format seems just right—long enough to dig the sound, too short to tire of it—but I’ll cheer the day they’re ready to go album-length. (Ali Gadbow) Bird’s Mile Home plays a tour kick-off show at the Elk’s Lodge Thursday, May 21, at 9 PM, with Vera, Pebble Light and El Zombie Gato. $5. bad debut, though. The local trio—all brothers— exhibits just enough charm to make their repetitive, sometimes clumsy riffs feel less annoying and more on the homey, comfortable side. Nick Laslovich’s smooth vocals are easy on the ears, even if he lingers a bit overzealously on each note. If this group ratchets up the lyrical bravery, weaves in a little more instrumental fluidity and harnesses a bit more unpredictability they won’t need politics like SLF does—they’ll stand out as a fresh band with a retro edge. (Erika Fredrickson) The Racquet plays the Badlander Friday, May 22, at 9 PM, with Secret Powers and The CropDusters. $5. Creme,” a track that features an off-kilter beat, a host of layered synth tones, incoherent shouting and processed sound samples. Things get weirder on “Chicken Shit,” when spooky sounding vocal samples collide with high and low pitched synths and what sounds like a guitar run through heaps of effects pedals. Overall, the music throughout the rest of this release varies from dark and menacing to silly and psychedelic. Repo is best suited for those with an open mind toward unconventional song structure, musical dissonance and experimentation. And, like previous efforts, this trio pushes a sound that may borrow from a host of influences, yet possesses a distinctive and innovative flavor unlike anything you’ve ever heard before. (Ira Sather-Olson) Black Dice play the Palace Saturday, May 23, at 9 PM with Wolf Eyes and Rammer/Dunn. $8. phone—are as central to the album’s success as are the many pleasures of Nebeker’s lyrics. Every finely crafted song is worth a good listen or eight for the wordplay alone. But, moving on to the question of the day: Why is Blind Pilot not The Shins? I admit there are striking similarities between the up-and-coming Oregonians and Albuquerque’s indie rock darlings, but there is an essential difference. The Shins are mellow but electric, with effects included. Blind Pilot is essentially acoustic. Think hipster vs. band geek (in a good way). (Ali Gadbow) Blind Pilot opens for The Decemberists at the Wilma Theatre Sunday, May 24, at 8 PM. $29.


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Religious right Angels & Demons thrills where Da Vinci didn’t by Nick Davis

With the exception of genuine head-scratch- edge, an effort supported by a nifty costumeers like The Pink Panther 2 (can anyone explain— change wrinkle in which Langdon dons the black given Steve Martin’s crimes against Peter Sellers suit of an extremely stylish priest (sans collar, which and the rest of humanity as Inspector Clouseau, Langdon removes with a knowing look in the miras well as the first remake’s dismal critical and ror) and cuts a dashing figure through the latter half tepid box-office record—how the hell the thing of the flick. The interplay between Langdon’s blagot made?), movie sequels fall into one of two cat- tant agnosticism and the fervent beliefs of the world egories: those that follow an unexpectedly strong he navigates is handled splendidly here as well, original (Aliens, Terminator 2), and those that punctuated by his pitch-perfect reply to the Big simply have an air of inevitability independent of Question at a key moment in the movie. the quality of the initial product (any link in popAngels & Demons does have its share of ular horror-flick chains or any of the last three issues. Langdon’s sleuthing companion and Star Wars movies). The existence of Angels & Demons in cinematic form can in no way be attributed to the creative and popular momentum of its predecessor. In The Da Vinci Code, director Ron Howard and star Tom Hanks somehow managed to turn Dan Brown’s wildly popular page-turner into a plodding, confused wreck, a movie so devoid of impact that the Catholic Church looked a bit foolish in its strenuous early objections to the controversial subject matter. Finding the answer to the Big Question gets a little more The church makes no such exciting in Angels & Demons. mistake this time, as it has officially remained mum about Angels & Demons— love/lust interest is not nearly the catastrophe it though Howard and Hanks have both made was in The Da Vinci Code, but Ayelet Zurer, as remarks about Vatican-sized bumps allegedly creat- drop-dead sexy as she is, still feels like pasted-on ed by the church in the movie’s shoot schedule on eye candy as the Italian physicist Vittoria Vettra. location in Rome. And despite the fact that Angels & Howard juices up the sequel’s look with a fair Demons is a far more efficient vehicle for Brown’s share of whiz-bang camera work and for the most story and style, there really is no reason for the part successfully uses a fire/smoke visual theme, church to worry. In some ways, this movie is so pro- though at times those efforts border on the histrichurch it could be construed as an apology of sorts. onic. And streamlined though it is, the plot veers Hanks is back as American professor and reli- too often into the completely implausible and gious symbologist Robert Langdon, who once thus keeps the viewer from ever really buying into again gets ripped out of his domestic life and the story wholesale. thrown into a whirlwind holy mystery overseas. Still, this is a serviceable thriller and a giant This time (though Brown wrote and set Angels & improvement on the first go-round. Fittingly, conDemons before The Da Vinci Code, Howard troversy did find the movie when Swedish actor rearranged the chronology) he’s stuck in Rome, Stellan Skarsgård, who holds a significant role in but with nearly the entire tale unfolding in the the film as the head of the pope’s personal secuspan of 24 hours, the dramatic impetus keeps the rity detail, candidly characterized Dan Brown as movie unfolding at a breakneck pace never real- “a terribly bad writer” with a knack for keeping ized by the first one. the reader hooked: “It’s like eating peanuts at a Helping the cause is the decision by Howard bar,” he said. “You don’t like them, but you keep and his screenwriters to simplify the book’s major on eating them anyway.” plot points as the movie progresses, adding just That’s praise by damnation, to be sure, but it enough detail and character development in the sure beats the alternative. With a revamped run at early going to set everything up, and then backing Brown’s work, Howard may have pulled this franoff as the action carries the story to its robust finale chise out of the vortex created by The Da Vinci Code, and respectable denouement. As a result of this a movie that resembled the slag from a bartender’s approach, one of the most interminable aspects of spill pad more than an addictive tavern treat. the first movie—an incessant reliance on clumsy dialogue to convey background information—is Angels & Demons continues at the largely (though not completely) avoided. Carmike 10 and Village 6. Langdon is a far more compelling character this arts@missoulanews.com time around. Hanks plays him with a bit more of an

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Missoula Independent

Page 37 May 21–May 28, 2009


Scope Comedy Noise Film Shorts Advice Astrology OPENING THIS WEEK Dance Flick In this latest Wayans Brothers’ spoof, two young dancers from opposite sides of the tracks fall in lust and compete in a hugely important competition. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45, with a Fri. show at midnight and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Is Anybody There? Michael Caine is a retired magician who comes to live at a rest home run by the parents of reclusive Bill Milner (Son of Rambow), which leads to an unlikely friendship and growth on everybody’s part. Rated PG-13. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9 with no 9 shows Fri. or Sun.

Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5, 7, 8 and 10, with a Fri. show at midnight and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1, 2 and 4, and at the Village 6 at 7 and 10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past In an extreme nod to A Christmas Carol, super ladies’ man Matthew McConaughey is haunted by the ghosts of his exes in an attempt by his dead uncle to help him mend his playin’ ways and shack up with the love of his life, Jennifer

at 1:20. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. X-Men Origins: Wolverine He’s a quick healer with adamantium claws and a tendency to go berserk: Witness the tragic past and violent birth of Wolverine, and see several fabled mutants on screen for the first time. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30, with a Fri. show at midnight and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30, and at the Village 6 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with a Fri.

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:15, 2:30, 3:45, 5, 6:45, 7:30, 9:15 and 9:55, with Fri.–Mon. matinees at noon. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 7 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and at the Entertainer in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:15. Star Trek Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:45, 2:45, 4:45, 5:45, 6:40, 7:10, 7:45, 8:45, 9:40 and 9:45 with Fri.–Sun. shows at noon. Also

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian The first film shot inside Washington, D.C.’s Smithsonian Institution, this flick reunites hapless security guard Ben Stiller with reanimated figures from history, as well as a few new faces. Rated PG-13. Showing at both the Carmike 10 and the Village 6 at 4:30, 7:15 and 9:40, with a Fri. show at five past midnight (really, that’s Sat.) and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Paris 36 It’s the spring of 1936 in a blue-collar Paris neighborhood, where three desperate and unemployed people squat the local theater and stage the production that will finally put them on top in this intricately woven comedy. Rated PG13. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9:10 with no 7 shows Fri. or Sun. Terminator Salvation It’s 2018, Skynet is about to unleash its final assault of Terminator robots upon humanity and John Connor (Christian Bale) must decide whether to trust a really sketchy guy in this fourth installment of the franchise. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:40, 7, 8:15 and 9:35, with a Fri. night show at ten past midnight (again, that’s really Sat.), Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:50 and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:30, 1, 3:05 and 4. Also playing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:35, with a Fri. night show at ten past midnight and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4, and at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun.

NOW PLAYING 17 Again Imagine you had the chance to be, um, 17 again and re-do your life, this time avoiding such pitfalls as marrying your pregnant high school girlfriend and tossing away a basketball scholarship. Now watch the film. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7:15 and 9:45, with a Fri. show at midnight. Angels & Demons Tom Hanks is back as crack symbologist Robert Langdon—the one who broke The Da Vinci Code—and now he’s caught between the Catholic Church, the Illuminati, a sexy costar (Ayelet Zurer) and Ewan McGregor, who can’t use the Force this time. Rated PG-13.

Missoula Independent

“Hey, John: Skynet just called to say it’s time for your annual prostate exam.” Terminator: Salvation opens Friday at the Carmike 10 and Village 6.

Garner. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:20, 7:15 and 10:10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:25. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun.

show at midnight and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun.

FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D In DreamWorks’ latest animated 3D film, young Susan is transformed into a giant monster after being struck by a meteor. She’s whisked away to a secret military location, where she meets other monstrous folk the government has been collecting over the years. When aliens attack the planet, there’s no better group to save it. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:20 with Fri.–Sat. matinees at 1:15. Star Trek Young dynamic duo James Kirk and Mr. Spock take the U.S.S. Enterprise and her crew out for their maiden voyage, as director J.J. Abrams (“Lost”) boldly goes where no one’s gone before in remaking the 1979 film based on the ‘60s TV series. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:10, 4:40, 7, 7:30 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:20 and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20 and 1:50, and at the Village 6 at 4:10, 7 and 9:50, with a Fri. show at 15 past midnight (Once again, that’s very early Sat.) and Sat.–Sun. matinees

Page 38 May 21–May 28, 2009

Angels & Demons Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:05, 2:05, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 6:05, 7:05, 8:05, 9:05 and 9:50, with Fri.–Mon. matinees at 12:05. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 6:50 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 6:50 and 9:30. Dance Flick Showing Fri.–Mon. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:15, 2:20, 4:30, 7:25 and 9:40 and Tue.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:20, 7:25 and 9:40. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past Showing Fri.–Mon. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:20 and 9:55 and Tue.–Thu. at 1:50, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:55. Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D Showing Fri.–Mon. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:10 and 4:25 and Tue.–Thu. at 1:35 and 3:55.

playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 6:50 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4:15, 7 and 9:30. Terminator Salvation Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, with Fri.–Mon. matinees at noon. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 7 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. X-Men Origins: Wolverine Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:10 and 4:10. Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Anne Pastore. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., May 22. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; Wilma— 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton—961FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton—363-5141. S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l — 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.


Amy Alkon

Scope Comedy Noise Film Shorts Advice Astrology

HARRIED, WITH CHILDREN Women complain about how hard it is being a stay-at-home mom. After getting divorced, I discovered I could clean the entire house in a few hours— accomplishing way more than my wife ever did—and have all afternoon to do nothing. Men work long hours to support their families, only to be told they aren’t doing enough around the house. I think being a mom is important and value stay-at-home moms, but let’s talk turkey about who really has the hard job, okay? —Stay-Late-At-Work Dad It used to be that a stay-at-home mom’s work was never done—and for good reason. Chicken for dinner? Grab your coat, grab the ax and chase your bird around the yard, taking care not to slip and end up face down in chicken poo again. Finally catch the thing, chop its head off and see yet again that chickens can indeed run with their heads cut off—all the way to the next farm. Chase, catch, drain, scald, pluck, and hoist the 50-pound cast-iron kettle over the fire. And then there’s today: 1. Poke plastic wrap with fork. 2. Place in microwave. 3. Push button. Since I describe myself as “BARREN!” I sought informed opinions about the difficulty of the mom portion of the stay-at-homer’s chore chart. “People in general seem convinced that stay-at-home moms get a raw deal and work much harder than breadwinner dads,” said Glenn Sacks, executive director of Fathers & Families. “Having been a stay-athome dad with two kids during the years when they need the most intensive care, I can tell you that this is nonsense.” And no, he didn’t just jam a bottle in the baby’s mouth and turn on the ballgame. “Even though I’m a guy,” Sacks said, “I actually figured out how to get my daughter in the car and get her to her doctor appointment.” Stay-at-home moms, on the other hand, aren’t saying, “If only I had a nice cushy job like ditch-digging...” What those I spoke with find hardest is only having the company of a 3year-old all day, a companion whose intellectual interests are limited to answering questions like “How many fingers is this?” and “What does the cow say?” (Mommy somehow avoids throwing herself on the floor and screaming, “The cow says, ‘I went to Yale for this?! I went to Yale for this?!’”). And while the parent in the workplace can step out for a smoke, the stay-at-homer can’t even go to the bathroom by herself. Wouldn’tcha

know it, in the 36 seconds it takes her to rush through her business, the baby will scale the counter, find a butcher knife and see what happens when he sticks it into those holes where Mommy plugs the lamp. Women love their children, but an increasing number seem to hate being mothers like never before. It doesn’t help that many are perfectionistic in a way men generally aren’t, like with a housecleaning regime right out of Joan Crawford’s crazy scene in the bathroom in Mommie Dearest. They’ll beg their husband to pitch in, and when he does, screech that he’s doing it “wrong.” Well, ladies, if you absolutely, positively must have it your way, there’s a single best person to accomplish that. Meanwhile, the housekeeping clash is only part of the problem. And modern conveniences aren’t the solution; they might even be making things worse, freeing up mothers to fret over little Madison’s every move—in between spending hours rubbing her down with antibacterial wipes. There’s this idea that parents can’t give their kids too much attention, but psychologist Judith Rich Harris examined a vast body of research and found the parental micromanagement approach to child development was based on myth, not data. It’s in peer groups that children acquire the social skills they need to manage in society—as they have throughout human history. This suggests it’s in parents’ and children’s best interest to form co-op play groups of three to five families, with one parent (plus a helper) taking all the kids each weekday. Moreover, Boston College research psychologist Peter Gray found that children make great strides in social and emotional growth from “age-mixed play”—and he doesn’t mean two toddlers and their 38-yearold mother engaged in whatever edumacational exercises they’re saying are sure to fast-track the kiddies to Harvard Med. Clearly, the essential question isn’t whether it’s moms or dads who really have the hard job, but why anyone would go into parenting without fully investigating whether they’ve got the partner and the financial and emotional wherewithal to raise another human being. As for those who don’t have what it takes, childhood tragedies can be averted with helpful tools like the childproof cap—the one that comes in a little plastic packet labeled Durex or Trojan. Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r A v e , # 2 8 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Page 39 May 21–May 28, 2009


Scope Comedy Noise Film Shorts Advice Astrology

Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The fleas infesting dogs’ skin have greater leaping power than the fleas on cats. Why do you think that is, Aries? Maybe you should use your waxing brainpower to get to the bottom of this great mystery. Just kidding! While it is true that in the coming weeks you will have unusual skill in deciphering enigmas and clarifying ambiguities, I think you should direct that skill to really important matters that will improve your life for months to come—not to trivial questions like fleas’ jumping abilities.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Studies show that when most people take a shower, they lather the upper part of their bodies first and make their way down. I recommend that you take the opposite approach this week, Taurus. In fact, I think a similar strategy would be wise in just about everything you do. Start at the bottom and work your way up. Establish yourself at the ground level and then take care of the higher stuff. Pay respect to the roots and then tend to the branches.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A couple I know planned to have their second baby delivered at home with a midwife’s help. The father is a physician who assisted with childbirths during his residency, so he and his partner felt confident about conducting their rite of passage outside of the hospital. But once the mom’s water broke and labor began, everything happened faster than expected. The dad gave the midwife an urgent phone call, but the kid was already crowning. “Don’t cut the umbilical cord right away,” the midwife advised. “It will minimize the shock of transition if the baby can get the hang of breathing while still being nurtured as she has for the last nine months.” That’s exactly what they did. And I hope you will do the metaphorical equivalent, Gemini. Keep getting fed the old way for a while as you learn how to be fed in the new way.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): I swerve to avoid running over spiders that cross my path when I’m riding my bicycle. While at home, I prefer to shepherd flies out through an open door or window rather than swat them. I’m still not sufficiently enlightened that I’ve stopped trying to squash mosquitoes that dive-bomb me while I’m falling asleep, however. I’m working on it, but may need a few more years of meditation before I bring my reverence for all insect life up to the highest level. The way I see it, my fellow Cancerian, you’d benefit from working on a similar project in the coming weeks: improving your relationships with influences you don’t have a natural affinity for. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world,” wrote anthropologist Margaret Meade. “Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” An excellent example of that occurred during America’s Revolutionary War against England from 1775 to 1783. Of all the men in the 13 colonies who could have fought for freedom, only 16 percent did. I hope that gives you encouragement as you seek to fix a glitch in the status quo. You and your band of allies have more power than you know.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Up to one-tenth of the population is left-handed. Yet for centuries, even as late as the 1950s, there were social stigmas against left-handers— similar in some ways to the perverse prejudice that has been directed toward homosexuals. So strong was the taboo that many parents tried to convert their naturally left-handed children into righties. Thankfully, this absurd form of repression is now defunct. (Five of the last seven American presidents have been left-handed.) But it’s a good reminder that there are countless other ways in which our culture still attempts to coax us or force us into not being who we really are. But here’s the good news: It’s an excellent time for you Virgos to reject the pressure to be someone else and get back to where you once belonged. Reunite with the person you were destined to be!



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Tower of Terror is a thrill ride at Disney World. Riders are yanked up and down as they travel along a 199-foot pillar. A Florida woman named Denise Mooty believes this form of amusement is essential to her health. She says the extreme G-forces she’s exposed to on the ride help dissipate the fibrous adhesions in her belly. I recommend a similar kind of therapy for you, Libra. Not to break up fibrous adhesions, since you probably don’t have any, but rather to jostle your mental blocks, repetitive fantasies, and obsessive habits. They might just break into pieces and dissipate if you shake them in the right way.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s your choice, Scorpio. You could be a creative dynamo who changes the course of local history—or you could be a plain old boring sex maniac. What’ll it be? We here at the Free Will Astrology Libido Management Center encourage you to at least partially sublimate your unruly mojo into beautiful works of art, innovative business solutions, and brilliant strokes of collaboration. You don’t have to stop boinking altogether; just make it the second most important thing you rather than your raison d’etre.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The planets are conspiring to unleash energies that will touch you in ways you didn’t realize you needed to be touched. Any minute now you may begin to feel a pleasurable burning sensation in your soft underbelly, or a prickly wake-up call in your willpower, or a ticklish electricity running through your funny bone. What does it all mean? Maybe nothing. Or maybe it means so much that you can’t possibly analyze its meaning. What a valuable gift that would be! When is the last time you felt free of the need to have to understand everything?



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A long-time Capricorn reader named Allison wrote me an apologetic e-mail. She said that she has always loved my horoscopes, and still loves them, but for the foreseeable future she’s got to stop reading them. “Please don’t take it as an insult, because it’s not,” she wrote. “I just need to be less subject to outside influences for a while. Maybe that will help me get better at paying attention to my own intuition.” I understood exactly what she means. According to my analysis, this is one time when you may have to shield yourself from the noise around you—even the good and interesting noise—in order to hear your own inner voice better.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rolling Stone magazine has said that ’60s folk singer Tom Rush (born February 8) was a major force in launching the era of the singer-songwriter. He’s been lying low for a while, though. Recently he came out with his first new studio album in 35 years. I’m guessing that, like him, quite a lot of other Aquarians will also be climaxing new creations as 2009 unfolds—perhaps even works that are long overdue or that have been extraordinarily slow in the making. And what happens in the next few weeks will be crucial in that process.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All the problems we face in the United States today,” said comedian and presidential candidate Pat Paulsen, “can be traced to an unenlightened immigration policy on the part of the American Indian.” With that as your inspiration, Pisces, I urge you to take inventory of your own “immigration policy.” It’s an excellent time to do so, astrologically speaking. Here are some questions to guide you. What influences do you allow to pour into your sphere? Are they beneficial for your long-term mental health? What people do you invite to share your resources? Do they bring out the best in you? Do you have smart boundaries that keep out the bad stuff and welcome in the good? Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 40 May 21–May 28, 2009

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Lost Money! Hey all, I lost a US Bank envelope with about $800 in it on Tuesday, May 5th around 5:00pm. I think it fell out of my pocket while I was riding my bike on the oval or maybe even in a nearby neighborhood (McLeod st). Look...I know how stupid it may seem to ask for money to be returned, but seriously I need it. That money came from my VA check that I use to pay rent, buy food, and at this particular moment, to help my mother fly in to visit me for the first time in 8 months. If you find it...or hear about some friend of a friend who scored $800 on the ground...I’d appreciate you calling me. 501-545-1081 -Clark LOST-grey metal ring Lostgrey metal ring with Morse code design on Kim Williams/River trail Sun. 5/10. Reward! 546-9055.

Like learning how to ride a bike

543-2972

Lost & Found

Volunteers

YELLOW KITTEN. 4 month old neutered male. Has all shots. 8801466

•FINISHED HOME (6549 Kiki Court, Msla) NEW HOME DESIGNED WITH ACCESSIBILITY IN MIND. NO STEPS $349,500 CONCRETE RAMPED ENTRANCES WITH COVERED PORCHES & PATIO. ALL ONE LEVEL WITHIN MINUTES OF MISSOULA, GOLFING AND RIVER ACCESS.

Announcements fundraiser: An Evening of the Arts @MCT Center4Performing Arts, $20 at door-6pm Silent Auction & 8pm-Cabaret Show. (Blk tie affair!) Call 406-461-2900 info PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

Melinda Last week I said to myself, “you know, Melinda really is a great dog!” At the time I was watching her frolic and play with another dog so carefree, but as soon as I called her name she came bounding over eager to meet my request. I realized that maybe she has been being overlooked because at first glance there isn’t much to set her apart from all the other black dogs. I urge you to come give Melinda a second glance, you may be surprised. The Humane Society is located at 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. or call us at 549-HSWM

•NEW HOME/LAND PACKAGE (6605 West Kiki Court, Msla) LET US BUILD THE HOME OF YOUR DREAMS IN RIVERWALK ESTATES. DESIGNED FOR ACCESSIBILITY, COMFORT AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY. 3 BED / 2 BATH WITH OPEN FLOORPLAN DESIGN.

Earls Construction, Inc Mark Earls 721-3045 Visit my website for more pictures and other listings…

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Joy Earls 531-9811

Pl a c e yo u r c l a s s i f i e d a d . Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 41 May 21–May 28, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

9-1-1 DISPATCHER 1, F/T, Msla. Missoula County is seeking 9-1-1 DISPATCHER 1 applicants to qualify for consideration for future fulltime openings. This position performs work involved with 9-1-1 call taking and emergency service dispatching from a communications center. This is the entry level position for the 9-1-1 Center and is used to train employees for assignment to take emergency & non-emergency phone calls and to dispatch emergency medical and fire services. Must attain and maintain CJIN/NCIC and CPR/EMD certifications and be able to be reached by telephone as a message phone number is required. Employment is subject to a criminal background investigation which is conducted by the Sheriff’s Department. Requires passing a hearing test provided by the County, with a hearing reassessment every two (2) years. Requires the ability to maintain confidentiality. Requires one year experience working in a stressful environment with basic keyboarding skill demonstrated by a minimum typing speed of 45 WPM & AlphaNumerical Data Entry Test (both current within the last six months) which are taken at Job Service. Variable schedule, must be able to work rotating shifts, nights, weekends and holidays. Pay starts at $13.10/hr. CLOSE DATE: 05/29/09. #2975536 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

JOB INTERVIEW GUARANTEED! Our resumes get you an interview... guaranteed! Call Rainmaker Resumes today for a free consultation. 546-8244

ing full-time and part-time. Will be working 9 A.M. until finished, usually 3 or 4pm. Will include weekends. Will be cleaning rooms, vacuum carpets, dusting, cleaning showers and bathrooms and sinks. Will also vacuum hallways. Load cleaning cart. Carry out trash bags to trash dumpster. May also vacuum steps. Pay depends on experience. #2975532 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

operation practices. Salary and Benefits DOE. Please send resume and cover letter to: dpoteet@sustainablebuildingsystems.com

responsibilities include editing and designing annual membership directory and conference-related publications, developing electronic newsletter—web design skills a plus, and coordination and oversight of special projects. Must travel and assist with annual conference (non-editorial duties), once per year. Monday - Friday days. Competitive salary and benefits package offered. CLOSES 5/31/09. #2975518 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952

OPPORTUNTIES

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 FRONT DESK CLERK, FT & P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking Front Desk Clerks for all shifts. Must have computer experience. Good customer service skills. able to handle cash and credit card transactions. Will register and check out guests. Will also do some faxing. May help set up breakfast bar and do laundry duties when not busy. Employer prefers prior front desk clerk experience. Pay depends on experience. #2975533 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Fun Opportunity Mackenzie River Pizza Co Grant Creek Is hiring Servers and Cooks with great personalities that want to have FUN at work! Apply in person, you can download an application on our web site; www.mackenzieriverpizza.com 5210 Grant Creek Rd See Devin, EOE $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 150 www.easyworkgreatpay.com

JOBS, JOBS, JOBS. Part-time job! Full-time BENEFITS - to include medical and dental. If you are 1742 years old, The Montana Army National Guard has many positions available starting at over $10.00/hr. $20,000 Enlistment Bonus. $80,000 for College Education $20,000 for Prior Service. For more information call 1-800-GO-GUARD Kitchen Helper Needed Two Sisters Catering needs a part time kitchen helper; dishwashing and light prep; exp helpful but not required; hourly + tips; send your resume to Kitchen Help, PO Box 9094, Missoula, MT 59807 NO PHONE CALLS MEDICAL CLAIMS PROCESSOR, P/T, Msla. Family owned medical billing office is seeking a Medical Claims Processor who takes pride in their work. Those with medical office and/or medical insurance claims billing experience encouraged to apply. Must have at least 2 years of progressively responsible office experience and typing skills of at least 45 wpm net with minimal errors. Requires excellent computer and data entry skills, strong customer service skills, pleasant and efficient phone techniques, solid knowledge of office practices and procedures, and strong attention to detail. Will work Monday - Friday, 9 am to 4 pm, 1 hour lunch, for 30 hours per week. Pay is $8.00 to $8.50/hour depending on experience and ability, with potential for raises. Paid holidays. #2975453 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 MOTEL HOUSEKEEPER, P/T, Msla. Seeking part-time Housekeeper for local motel. Duties include: Cleaning guest rooms, changing bedding, cleaning bathrooms, dusting, vacuuming, and other cleaning as assigned. Successful applicant must have a phone; be dependable, on time and willing to work hard. Motel is one level—no stairs. Days are varied and include weekends. Hours are day shift, usually to start at 8:30 am for 20-30 hours per week. Potential for more hours. Must have access to a telephone. Pay starts at $7.50 to $8.00/hour depending on experience, ability to do job and positive work attitude. #2975522 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MOTEL HOUSEKEEPERS, F/T & P/T, Msla. Immediate need for motel housekeepers. Will be work-

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 PICKUP TRUCK & COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RV trailers and commercial trucks and buses to all 48 states and Canada. Log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com PROPERTY MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Excellent customer service & computer skills, & a positive attitude. Tax credit experience a plus. HOURS/DAYS: Monday - Friday, 8 AM - 5 PM. WAGES: $11.00 $14.00/hour, DOE. Complete benefits package and career advancement are offered. #2975524 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 RESTAURANT COOK, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a part-time (4 or 5 days/week) COOK for an established restaurant in Frenchtown. Duties include prep, line work and full menu cooking, as well as light cleanup in kitchen area. Seeking an individual with breakfast, lunch and dinner cooking experience. Work days and work shifts will vary. Rate of pay starts at $9.00/hour and will work 25-32 hours per week. Must have reliable transportation and this position also includes free golfing at the business golf course. #2975521 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RETAIL SALES - PART-TIME, P/T, Msla. Missoula’s leading off-price retailer is seeking part-time customer service associates. DUTIES INCLUDE: primarily serve as cashier, but may also, straighten racks, stock racks and displays, customer service and layaway and light cleanup as necessary. Work week will include nights and weekends with varied hours. Rate of pay will be $7-$8/hr. #2975538 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp UPHOLSTERER/SEWER, F/T, Msla. Local business seeking full time upholsterer/industrial sewer. Must have at least 6 month professional sewing experience. Will make, repair, or replace upholstery for household furniture. Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00. Competitive pay based on skills/ability. #2975526 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL A Missoula, Montana based company is seeking professionals with the following skills: NABCEP Certification or Journeyman/Masters Electrician. Experience in solar PV design and installation, solar thermal design and installation required. Knowledge and experience with general building and construction management. This position will oversee all solar PV and solar thermal designs and installations as well as serve as a co-leader in marketing, management and team leadership roles of the company. Candidate must have ability to communicate with engineers, architects, GC’s, owners, electrical inspectors and utility engineers in a professional manner. We offer a progressive and rewarding work environment with opportunities to take an active role in transitioning towards more sustainable building

Missoula Independent Page 42 May 21–May 28, 2009

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES for college grads. Elite career. Global travel. Paid graduate education. Great salary & benefits. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 PROGRAMMER, F/T, Msla. Local company is seeking a full-time, PROGRAMMER. Duties include: designing, developing, and testing website and/or enterprise level applications, maintaining existing code base including database scripts and stored procedures, reviewing business requirements and developing prototypes, working in a team environment using a structured development process and having regular communication with team on project progress, issues, and risks. REQUIRED: A Bachelor’s degree in computer science or related field OR 3-4 years related experience. Experience with HTML, ASP, .NET, VB, C#, SQL (SQL Server 2005 preferred), JavaScript, CSS, Coldfusion a plus. Samples of developed web pages helpful. Work days and hours are M-F, days. Wage is DOE but considered competitive. There are some benefits available after 90 days. This employer conducts reference and background checks. #2975534 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PUBLICATIONS EDITOR, F/T, Msla. A national nonprofit writers association based in Missoula seeks a full time Publications Editor. This position offers an opportunity for challenging work in a small office environment that fosters an enthusiastic, team atmosphere. Primary responsibilities include editing, designing and producing monthly newsletter. This includes planning issues, prompting contributing writers and photographers, scanning images, editing copy and writing headlines. The successful candidate must be skilled in MS Office, QuarkXPress and Adobe imaging software. Journalism degree preferred. Web design skills a plus. Secondary

RESENET-HERS Rater, NAHB Green Bldg Verifier, HVAC design experience, LEED-AP. Knowledge and experience with general building and construction management. This position will also serve as a coleader in marketing, management and team leadership roles of the company. Candidate must have ability to communicate with engineers, architects, GC’s, owners, electrical inspectors and utility engineers in a professional manner. Sustainable Building Systems, LLC is located in Missoula, MT. We offer a progressive and rewarding work environment with opportunities to take an active role in transitioning towards more sustainable building operation practices. Salary and Benefits DOE. Please send resume and cover letter to: dpoteet@sustainablebuildingsystems.com

SKILLED LABOR Production Labor Furniture Manufacturer needs Production Laborers (Temp/Full-Time) Apply: NORCO Products, 4985 Blue Mountain Road, Missoula, Montana 59804 We DRUG Test. SERVICE TECHNICIAN, F/T, Msla. A Missoula repair business has an immediate opening for a full time SERVICE TECHNICIAN to install, calibrate and repair electronic and mechanical scales and food machines. Schedule may vary and some travel will be required. An individual must have a strong electronic background with strong computer skills and mechanical aptitude. Must have excellent troubleshooting skills, be an independent worker yet a strong team player, a quick learner, and possess strong public relations skills. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. on a regular basis, be available to work occasional weekends, and have a valid drivers license. Military background is a plus. #2975529 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION NOW HIRING No exp needed. Good pay and benefits paid training, promotions, and regular raises. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044

Youth Homes is hiring a Development Assistant to work with and support developing and implementing marketing and fundraising efforts. We are seeking a candidate with computer, grant writing, communications and organizing skills. Tasks include: clerical work, event organizing, working with satellite programs and coordinating volunteers. This position requires travel to Hamilton weekly and reports directly to the Development Director. Candidate must have solid moral character and prefers a bachelor’s degree in marketing, business, communications or a related field. A minimum of 2 yrs work experience as well as work related to communications and databases. Non profit exp preferred. Submit cover letter, resume and list of 4 references to Liesel Marron, Human Resource Coordinator, online at info@youthhomes.com or by mail to PO Box 7616, Msla, MT 59807-7616. EOE. Closes 5/27.

THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877475-6289 U.S. NAVY Launch a career today. Advanced paid training, medical/dental, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044

HEALTH CAREERS CASE MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a Full-Time, Case Manager.Duties include evaluation of medical care alternatives for cases of injuries, illnesses, or medical/surgical diagnoses that require extensive service, act as a patient advocate working directly with the patient, assess, plan, implement, coordinate, monitor, and evaluate treatment plan. The Case Manager must communicate verbally and in writing with team members, patients, patients families, health care providers, physicians, and customers. A full job description is available at the Missoula Job Service front desk. The position requires a bachelor’s degree or higher in a health related field and licensure as a RN and three years clinical practice experience. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. #2975535 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Make a difference as a LPN! LPN needed to assist a quad man in his fun and active home. Graveyard shift. Good living wage, health benefits and training available. Please call: 542-0323 or apply at www.expresspros.com PCA / CNA, P/T, Msla. Assisted Living facility is currently hiring a part time graveyard shift PCA/CNA. Duties include assisting staff with the care of patients, meals, dressing patients, bathing and grooming. May be required to assist with oral medications under doctor’s orders or the direction of the nursing staff. Will also perform resident house cleaning, laundry duties, assist with activities and other duties as assigned. Previous experience is preferred, but not necessary. Employer will train. A desire to work with the elderly. Mandatory background checks. Must be able to obtain CPR and First Aid certification within 60 days (company will pay for certifications). The position is graveyard from 10PM to 6AM, Thurs. and Fri. Rate of pay is DOE. #2975528 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

$600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5. ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 EARN UP TO $500 WEEKLY! Assembling Various Products. No exp! Easy work! Part-time or fulltime. Call: 1-888-335-9661 Ad Code: X35 LOOMIX(r) FEED supplements is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800870-0356/kboen@loomix.com to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area. MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED. Earn $150 to $300 Per Day. All Looks, Types and Ages. Feature Films, Television, Commercials, and Print. No Experience Necessary. 1-800340-8404 x2001

LEARN TO TEACH AND TURN 10-15 hours/week to

$1000+ /month working from home.

Flexible Hours. Free online training. yourfreedomoffice.com

Instruction Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

T'ai Chi

SALES FT Car Sales- Busy dealership looking for outgoing sales associate. Clean MVR. Min. wage + comm. Benefits after 1 year. Call 5420323 to schedule interview.

Instruction

728-0918 missoulataichi.com ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing.

R e i k i I n t e g r a t i v e M e d i c i n e, L L C 2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

Learn Reiki Yourself! Reiki One Class June 6th 9am-6pm Cost: $130 CALL FOR MORE INFO • 360-9153


CLASSIFIEDS Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

$15

HAIRCUT

SPECIAL

KRISTA • 542-2978 Affordable • Quality • Personal

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

• Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

728-5693 • Mar y Place

541-8090

MSW, CHT, GIS

For free confidential help after an abortion

We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid

Call Word of Hope at

406-549-6565 “The past is not the past if it still affects your present.” Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Carla Green Massage, NCTMB 13 years, 211 N.Higgins #403, 4063 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 w w w. C a r l a G r e e n Massage.com

Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

at Cutting Crew 220 Ryman St.

I'm ! ing v o M B o d y C a re By Michelle I'm Moving to S u m m i t C h i ro p r a c t i c w i t h D r. K u r t S o l a r i 2 4 0 9 D e a r b o rn S t e . I

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

Black Bear Naturopathic

Adoption

IV Micronutrient Therapy

Dr. Christine White, ND

542-2147

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Congregations

A Touch of Class

needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

215 e main • missoula, mt • 541-6110 8:30am - 5:30pm weekdays 11am - 2pm Saturday

Bathing Beauties Beads 501 S. Higgins Ave.

Missoula 10-6 • 543-0018

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

1920 Brooks • 549-1729

The Multi Item Store LLC 1/2

1358 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Suffering with anxiety or depression? Think no one understands? Lucinda Bassett does. Get her free tape that will stop the suffering without drugs or alcohol. Call 800-652-9619. Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

TEN PERCENT SOLUTION Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical

742 Kensington • 542-8090

We make it personal

I spy... Missoula! Where am I?

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

May 30 & 31 Call for appointment 541- 8090 742 Kensington (intersection of Kensington & Bow)

NEW TO YOU Antiques & Treasures 11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

crystallimit.com “I found a brighter world, I found Unity”

The Goods

Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

LANDSCAPE TREES - Beautiful Evergreen trees direct from the farm. Colorado Blue Spruce, Norway Spruce, Fraser Fir. Sizes 5ft-8ft. Delivery avail. Prices start at $99. 208-245-2440

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220

Electronics

Open Every Day

www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT

The Goods

Sporting Goods

549-0777

Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

The Goods

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a $15 gift certificate to:

Missoula Academy of T'ai Chi Ch'uan missoulataichi.com • 728-0918

Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY. Get a free GE alarm system with no installation fee and no equipment cost. Most homeowners will receive an insurance discount as well. Mention this ad and get 2 free keychain remotes! Promotional code: A02087 - Call 888-951-5158

Computers

HIKING, BIKING, CAMPING AND BOATING Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Custom Fly Rods

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com GoPed Standup Scooter G230RC. 30+ MPH. Paid $800 new. Asking $300/OBO. 381-2561

WE NEED USED GUNS

Paying top dollar for rifles, pistols, revolvers and assault rifles. We buy, sell, trade & consign guns, plus FREE appraisls. We also buy Ruana Knives. Brady’s Sportsman’s Surplus Trempers Shopping Center 406-721-5500 Open 7 days a week www.bradyssportsmansurplus.com

A NEW COMPUTER NOW!!!! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit- No Problem. Smallest weekly payments avail. It’s yours NOW- Call 800-961-7754 GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800-803-8819 GET A NEW COMPUTER! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. CALL NOW 1-800-816-2232 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

Furniture

The Multi Item Store LLC

Auction

Tapestries Galore!

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the following units: 64, 80, 82, 83, 92, 101, 233, 274, 336, 337, 377 and 568.Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be viewed starting Tuesday, May 26, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, May 28, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

406-382-0272 OPEN MEMORIAL DAY

MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. 2935 Stockyard Rd. Unit K2 406.542.1202

Clothing

Thrift Stores 1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

Electronics 36 inch Sony Wega TV Huge flatscreen WEGA TV, 36in., works great, asking $350 call 2732826 or email shannonandbarb@gmail.com. DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 43 May 21–May 28, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Clothing

Automotive

Automotive

Wigs

109 S. 3rd W. • 543-6350

$7,995!

ALL NEW '09 JEEPS MUST BE SOLD BY THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS MAY 31st.

Music

'98 Saturn SC2 Only 78k miles (#9152KA)

$4,995 Outlaw Music

541-7533

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 728-5014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com FOR HIRE: Your very own highspunk blues band. From your backyard get together to corporate blowouts. Frank N. Furter 406381-3629

Pets & Animals

LDR Kennel

'04 Olds Alero 65K Miles (#91358)

$7,978 '08 Harley Davidson Sportster XL 1200 (#9141LA)

$8,888 '98 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Hard top (#9121B)

$9,875

'07 Kia Rio LX, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '06 Ford Taurus SE, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '05 Ford Taurus, low miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Olds Alero, 2 door, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Buick Century, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Pontiac Grand Prix, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Ford Focus Wagon, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Sable GS, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Olds Alero, 4dr, V6, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '02 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited, 5spd, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Subaru Outback Wagon, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Chev Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '02 Saturn, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Honda CRV, 4dr, 4x4, auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Chrysler PT Cruiser, touring edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, V8, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Ford Ranger Supercab Stepside, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge 1/2T, short, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Ford Cargo Van E-250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 ‘00 Ford Mustang V6, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '00 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab 4x4, Z-71 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Jeep Cherokee Sport, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '00 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '00 Plymouth Grand Voyager, 4dr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 Nissan Maxima, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '99 Toyota Camry, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Ford F250, V10, utility box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '99 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab, 3dr, auto, air, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '99 Honda CVR, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Plymouth Voyager Minivan, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '98 Buick Century, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '97 Saturn Wagon, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '97 Chevy Tahoe, 4dr, 1 owner, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '97 Buick Regal GS, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '96 GMC Yukon, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Chevy 1/2T 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Ford F-250 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '94 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, Concourse, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '94 Mercury Grand Marquis, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Ford F-150 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '93 Ford Explorer, 2dr, 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,495 '92 Chevy Suburban 3/4T, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '91 Lincoln Towncar, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995

LARGE SELECTION of yearling and 2-year-old Angus bulls for sale. Complete information, many calving ease, delivery available. Contact Clint Stevenson (406)3669023, Ryan Hughes (406)5811873 or Darrell Stevenson (406)423-7500 PRIVATE TREATY. Registered Angus yearling bulls. Super dispositions, low birth weights, great EPDs. Priced for commercial breeder. Fertility tested. West edge of Billings. Gnerer Angus (406)2598205 Silver Lab Puppies! AKC Silver, Charcoal, & Chocolate Lab Puppies! Ready August 10th! (406)-387-4007 http://www.highmountainsilvers.com

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

Automotive

DOMESTIC

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

‘07 Dodge Caliber SXT (stk9070LA), 7k miles, black, $13,998 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Jim's Cars

WE FINANCE

1801 W. Broadway • 543-8269

$9,999 Flanagan’s

3 Jeep Compasses MUST BE SOLD 5spd, FWD Starting at $18,223 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

6 Jeep Patriots MUST BE SOLD 5spd, FWD Starting at $16,985 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

3 Jeep Libertys 4x4 MUST BE SOLD 3.7, Auto, Sport Edition Starting at $21,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

18 Jeep Wranglers 4x4 MUST BE SOLD 4dr, X Unlimited Starting at $24,765 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘02 Subaru Outback Wagon, auto, air, 4x4.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 5438269 '03 Ford Focus Wagon, auto, air.....$6,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded!.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 '00 Ford Mustang V6, 5spd.....$6,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

IMPORTS Did You Know We Sell Tires? We Sell All Sizes, Imports and Domestic www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘01 Honda CRV, 4dr, 4x4, auto .....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘07 INFINITI G35 Coupe (stk9073la), Gorgeous & Fast, $21,995 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

$9,999 '06 Chevy Uplander Van FWD-7 Passenger 3rd Row (#9118LA)

‘08 Ford Focus Sedan (stk8550LA), 8k miles, white, $12,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300 ‘05 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean edition (stk 8332B), 55k miles, white, $17,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘08 Suzuki Forenza Sedan (stk9119LA), only 15 miles, silver, $11,925 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘ 0 6 To y o t a C o r o l l a S e d a n (stk8114B), 53k miles, maroon, $11,997 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘06 Toyota Matrix HB (stk8445C), 15k miles, tan, $15,788 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

SPORT UTILITY ‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD (stk8270C), 74k miles, black, $12,784 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

MOTORCYCLES ‘06 Harley Davidson Road Glide (stk9098LA), 4k miles, purple, $16,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

CLOSED SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS

'01 Toyota Camry 70h Miles, Auto, V6 (#9131LB) 406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

Automotive

Here Are Just Some Of The Cars On Our Lot!

12-6 • M-Sat • On the Hip Strip

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

Automotive

NOTHING OVER

Carlo's One Night Stand Costume Rental ries o s s e c Ac

Automotive

08 Harley Davidson XL 1200L Sportster Only 1,800 miles, windshield, pipes $8,800 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

REPAIR & SERVICE Did You Know Your Oil Change at Flanagan’s includes a complimentary car wash? www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

Car of the Week! 2004 FORD Ranger 4x4 4.0 liter engine, Speed Control, tilt steering, power windows & lock, Leather Sport bucket seats, remote keyless entry, FX4 Off-Road group, Aluminum 5 spoke 16" wheels, 6 Disc CD, only 29K miles.

Jeep • Mazda • Lincoln • Mercury

Family owned & operated since 1974

1700 Stephens Missoula • 406.721.1381

www.flanaganmotors.com

Missoula Independent Page 44 May 21–May 28, 2009

Flanagan’s 406.721.1381 • flanagansmotors.com

$17,995


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Missoula County Government

Missoula County Government

Notice of PublicHearing

Notice of PublicHearing

THE MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will conduct a public hearing at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West B r o a d w a y, M i s s o u l a , Montana, on the following: A request by George Anderson, for a variance from Zoning District #12A, Resolution #219, to reduce the required rear yard setback of 25 feet to eight feet for a detached outbuilding for the property legally described as the East 100 Feet of Lot 2 Oak Addition, Section 30, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, otherwise known as 2835 Strand. See Map W.

C r o s s w o r d s

Jonesin’

Written comments can be mailed to Jamie Erbacher, at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 or e-mailed to jerbacher@co.missoula.m t.us If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning & Grants at 406-258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

THE MISSOULA PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION AND THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will conduct public hearings at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West B r o a d w a y, M i s s o u l a , Montana, on the following: A request by Peak Fitness, represented by Andy Short of Territorial Landworks, for a variance from Resolution 2002-063 Attachment A Section (I) (A), permitted uses, to allow a recreational facility on a portion of the property presently zoned for residential and legally described as Tract B of Packwest Addition of Lot 2A and Tracts B, C, and D, Section 02, Township 12 North, Range 20 West. See map Q.

Any written comments can be mailed to Jamie Erbacher, at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 or e-mailedto jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning & Grants at 406-258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Missoula County Government

Public Notice

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana.

1. Downtown Master Plan

The Downtown Master Plan is a 25-year community vision spear-headed by the Missoula Redevelopment Agency (MRA), Missoula Business Improvement District (BID), Missoula Parking Commission, and the Missoula Downtown Association (MDA). The Plan outlines the fundamental concepts of future land use and transportation, as well as strategies for implementation, which will ensure the long-term health, character and vitality of Missoula’s urban core. The Plan was developed through a public process facilitated by the Missoula BID and the MDA in 2008 which included four (4) public workshops and eighty-five (85) stakeholder meetings. The Plan incorporates the input from this inclusive process and reflects the community’s vision for the future of downtown. See Map X for the Downtown Master Plan Study Area (the area affected by this amendment).

The City Council will conduct a public hearing on this item on a date yet to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The draft plan is available for public inspection at the Missoula Redevelopment Agency, the Downtown BID office, and the Office of Planning and Grants; or online at www.missouladowntownbid.org. Please call 258-4657 if you need further assistance accessing a copy.

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

"Movin' On Up"--deluxe apartment or not, we're getting there!

by Matt Jones

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Public Notices

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MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, in the City of Missoula, Montana until 10:00 A.M., Monday June 1, 2009, at which time bids will be opened and read in the conference room, for the purpose of providing 6000 tons of _” Asphaltic Plant Mix. All work is to be performed in accordance with the specifications on file in the Public Works Department, and shall be performed under the supervision of the County Engineer or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula Montana, 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Bid for _” Asphaltic Plant Mix”, SOLICITATION NO. 0509-001” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808

ments, rights of way and appurtenances; all water, water rights, watercourses and ditch rights (including stock in utilities with ditch or irrigation rights); and all other rights, royalties, and profits relating to the real property, including without limitation all minerals, oil, gas, geothermal and similar matters. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 21st day of May A.D., 2009. MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By: Patrick A. Turner, Deputy

this 27th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Gayle Johnston, Deputy Clerk. Dated this 21st day of April, 2009. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 38 Second Avenue East, Dickinson, ND 58601. Tel: (701)227-1841 MT BAR ID #2429. /s/ Charles J. Peterson, Attorney for the Plaintiff

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE SPENCER PROPERTIES, LLC, a Montana limited liability company, Plaintiff, Against STERLING PROPERTIES, LLC, a Montana limited liability company; SHIELDS LAW FIRM, PC and JON SHIELDS, ESQ.; STATE OF MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; DOES 1-10, Defendants.To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. On the 11th day of June A.D., 2009, at 10 o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, towit: The West one half of Lot 4 and that part of the NE1/4NW1/4, West of the Bitterroot River and Northwest of Highway 93; and the E1/2NW1/4NW1/4; part of the SE1/4NW1/4, Northwest of Highway 93, lying in Township 12 North, Range 20 West, P.M., also described as all that portion of the SE1/4NW1/4 lying North of Highway 93, State of Montana, and Lots 3 and 4 of the NW1/4 of Section 1, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, less the right of way for the Montana State Highway No. 93. Along with all appurtenant rights and claims, and together with all existing or subsequently erected or affixed buildings, improvements, and fixtures; all ease-

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-329 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., As Trustee For The Certification Of Soundview Home Loan Trust 2007opt5, Asset-backed Certificates, Series 2007-opt5, Plaintiff, v. Crystal Alcorn and Jeremy Alcorn, Defendents. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, CRYSTAL ALCORN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in the action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an action rescinding a Trustee’s Sale and Trustee’s Deed, and reinstating a Note and Deed of Trust covering property situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: Lot 11 of Bitterroot Meadows Phase II, a Platte Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. WITNESS my hand and sale of said Court,

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Missoula County Public Works to work within the Butler and LaValle Creek floodplain. The project is located in Sections 32 & 33, Township 14N, Range 20W and includes the replacement of the Deschamps Lane bridge.. The primary purpose of Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety, and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards, and to promote wise use of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 09-12 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., June 5, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

ACROSS

21 NASCAR ___ 23 Premium used in exchange rates 26 Size of some garages 27 Actress Smart 28 Unable to choose 29 Ark man 30 Spare bit? 31 "___ a Hammer" 33 Fish in a 2003 film 36 Thursday daydreamer's acronym 38 National auto body chain

39 Poetry competition 40 Bangalore wrap 41 Get the sleeping bag ready 43 What rock fans may dig 44 "Consarn it!" 46 Shag carpet feature 47 Tractor-trailer 48 Wretched, as poverty 50 Jet-black rock 51 Irish, e.g. 52 Be a sponge

DOWN

21 Game with a 20 at the top of the board 22 1980s home computer 24 ___ Jaya (Indonesian territory) 25 Where you'll find blond, curly hair, an overcoat, and a horn? 26 Where to show where the bad man touched you? 32 Flip ___ 34 Callender in the frozen food aisle 35 Z's Greek counterpart 37 It penalizes obstruction of hydrants 42 Dictionary 45 More needing a bath, perhaps 48 Single-celled organism: var. 49 Mouths, in Mazatlan 54 A/C stat 56 Summer hrs. in Minneapolis 57 Title for Italian monks

58 Emeritus: abbr. 59 ___ Speedwagon 60 Sense tested with Zener cards

1 "Te ___" 4 Springsteen title starter 8 What software may be stored on 14 Burlesque routine 16 Campfire snack 17 Green side 18 Crone, disparagingly 19 Wile E. Coyote's supplier 20 Back off

1 Div. that lost Super Bowls XIX-XXXI 2 Figure seen at Tiananmen Square 3 Where signs of visiting prostitutes are most frequent in the aviary? 4 Rice variety 5 Where a flea might hang out? 6 Victrola maker 7 Brand-spanking ___ 8 Naval tech. specialist 9 It preceded Roosevelt 10 Rice partner 11 Where you're likely to find three-day-old undies? 12 Mazda roadster 13 Silver Bullet Band leader Bob 15 It may get the last photo in the calendar: abbr.

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0415.

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause Probate No. DP-09-79 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KATHRYN A. DAGUE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to John R. Dague, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at GEORGE LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 210 North Higgins Avenue, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED May 12, 2009. /s/ John R. Dague, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-52 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BERYL G. RIGHTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ronald Righter has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Ronald Righter, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 6th day of April, 2009. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-77 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT ALBERT SHEA, a/k/a ALBERT ROBERT SHEA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Colleen Donnelly Shea, Personal Representative, 13445 Crystal Creek, Turah, Montana 59825, or filed with the Clerk of Court of the above-named court. Dated this 28th day of April, 2009. /s/ Colleen Donnelly Shea, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DR-09-311 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION In re the Marriage of Marci Giblin, Petitioner, and Matthew Giblin, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: You, the Respondent, are hereby summoned to answer the Petition in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of this Court, a copy of

53 Mr. ___ (Coke's answer to Dr Pepper) 55 Reverberating 57 It may be caused by stress 61 Grouped together 62 Diverts traffic 63 Say with confidence 64 Memo header, for short 65 Pinnacle

Last week’s solution

Missoula Independent Page 45 May 21–May 28, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Petitioner within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against your for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. Title to and interest in the following real property will be involved in this action: none. DATED this 13th day of May, 2009. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court. By: Susie Wall, Deputy Clerk

that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia Ann Adams, a Co-Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, Missoula, Montana 59802, or to Lily Paulette Koprivica, a Co-Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C., 201 West Main, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of April, 2009. THIEL LAW OFFICE, Attorney for Patricia Ann Adams /s/ Matthew B. Thiel. DATSOPOULOS, MACDONALD & LIND, P.C. Attorneys for Lily Paulette Koprivica /s/ David B. Cotner

includes the outstanding principal balance of $360,190.21, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 24, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.17458) 1002.115144-FEI

Trustee in Trust for CitiGroup Mortgage Loan Trust, Inc., Asset Backed PassThrough Certificates Series 2003-HE4. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 30, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $94,841.67. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $88,076.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 7, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.29216) 1002.116969-FEI

N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 ASAP# 3099777 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009

interest at the rate of 6.875% now totaling $3,952.69, late charges in the amount of $656.24, escrow advances of $267.50, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $58.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.25 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’ s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 11, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 5/11/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JESSICA HOPKINS Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3107058 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009, 06/04/2009

ly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 101 day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s. sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor In interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be -postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 10, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 ASAP# 3105333 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009, 06/04/2009

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-09-83 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DIANE KATHLEEN DELANEY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Trisha Thorson, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 8th day of May, 2009. /s/ Trisha Thorson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-09-61 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD GRIMES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be either mailed to Deanna Grimes, the personal representative, return receipt requested, c/o Attorney John W. Hart, Rossbach Hart, P.C., PO Box 8988, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 7th day of May, 2009. /s/ Deanna Grimes, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-84 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARILYN W. GUSTAFSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Benjamin D. Gustafson, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 12th day of May, 2009. /s/ Benjamin D. Gustafson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate Case No. DP-09-4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Frances O’Connell, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Daniel Hansen, return receipt requested, at 1333 Toole Avenue #B4, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 21st day of May, 2009. /s/ Daniel Hansen, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-72 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RUTH C. FASSETT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lester N. Fassett has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lester N. Fassett, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, P.C., 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 1st day of May, 2009. GEISZLER & FROINES, P.C. /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorney for Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-09-185 NOTICE OF NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Petition for Change of Name of the minor child of: Rachel Romanelli, Petitioner. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED HEREIN: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a verified Petition for Name Change of Kate L. O’Connell to obtain an order of the Court granted leave to assume the name of Kate L. Romanelli, will be presented to the aboveentitled Court, at the Missoula County Courthouse at, Missoula, Montana, on Tuesday the 2nd day of June at 1:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, and that at such time, application will be made for the relief sought in the said Petition. DATED this 20th day of April, 2009. WELLS & MCKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Jamie J. McKittrick MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-09-90 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VENUS SHRIDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Trustee will on JULY 18, 2009, at the hour of 11:00 o’clock A.M., at the South door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, the following described property: A Tract of land located in the SE1/4 of Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract 1-12A of Certificate of Survey No. 3446, which is subject to a Montana Trust Indenture recorded February 2, 2007, Document No. 200702841, records of Missoula County, Montana, from GRANT CREEK HEIGHTS, INC., as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF MONTANA, INC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of COLIN F. JOHNSON, as Beneficiary. Christy L. Brandon is the Successor Trustee pursuant to an Appointment of Successor Trustee dated February 6, 2009, and recorded in the land records of Missoula County, Montana. Grantor’s default consists of failure to make payments when due beginning with the monthly payments from and after November 28, 2008 in the amount of $1,750.00 each. The total sum owing on this obligation is $150,000 principal balance plus accruing interest at the rate of 14% per year totaling $7,000 as of February 28, 2009, $525 late fees, $1,730 escrow fees, and $688.50 other fees and costs. The Beneficiary may disburse amounts as may be required to preserve the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, they will be added to the obligation secured by the Montana Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale. Beneficiary elects to declare all amounts under said Note and Trust Indenture to be immediately due and payable in consequence of the Grantor’s default. Beneficiary directs that Trustee sell the real property above described for the satisfaction of the obligation. This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed and will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances. The sale purchaser is entitled to possession of the property on the tenth day following the sale. The sale is subject to bankruptcy filing, payoff, reinstatement or any other circumstance that would affect the validity of the sale. If any such circumstance exists, the sale shall be void, the successful bidder’s funds returned and the trustee and current beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damage. The Grantor or any person having a subordinate lien upon the subject property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due under the trust indenture and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. This sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED this 5th day of March, 2009. /s/ Christy L. Brandon, Successor Trustee, P.O. Box 1544, Bigfork, MT 59911, (406) 8375445. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/17/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200628950, Book 786, Page 1143, modified by Instrument 200827802, Book 830, page 1390, recorded 12-23-08, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Thomas W. McAnally, married and Larinda R. McAnally, married was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and American Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded American Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 3 of Seeley Lake Estates according to the Official Plat thereof, recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 16, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $378,548.14. This amount

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/21/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200731020, Book 809, Page 921, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kory Knie was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for First Horizon Home Loans was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5D of Crestview Heights Phase IIIA, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 26, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $210,204.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $199,323.71, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 4, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.18764) 1002.116157-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/26/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199906145, Book 574, Page 1617, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which William John Riel, individual was Grantor, Security Mortgage, Inc., a Montana Corporation was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 14 and 15 of Spring Valley Acres, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, as

Missoula Independent Page 46 May 21–May 28, 2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No. 08-0116664 Title Order No. 080162992MTGSI The following legally described trust property to be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 09/16/2009, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: On the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. ReconTrust Company, N.A., is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which Mark Christensen, a married man as his sole & separate property as Grantors, conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 04/03/2007 and recorded 04/16/2007, in document No. 200709041 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 795 at Page Number 736 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: The north 84 feet of lot 3 and the south 16 feet of lot 2 in block 1 of Forest View Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording reference is in book 211 at page 530 of deed records. Property Address: 2110 Woodlawn Ave, Missoula, MT 59804 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09-01-2008, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,944.21 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 08/01/2008 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 05/13/09 ReconTrust Company,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 10, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: All that certain parcel of land situate in the County of Missoula, State of Montana, being known and designated as Lot 17 in Block 9 of West View Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat thereof. Tax ID 1792959 Jeremy M. Fabich and Brandi Lee Fabich, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First Montana Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated February 15, 2005 and Recorded February 26, 2005 at 3:15 o’clock P.M. in Book 748, Page 726, under Document No. 200504480. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverHome Mortgage Company. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,123.24, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 15, 2009 is $166,200.17 principal, interest at the rate of 4.125% now totaling $4,262.13, late charges in the amount of $937.42, escrow advances of $799.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $85.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.78 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’ s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’ s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’ s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 2, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3091629 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 1 in Block 7 of the corrected plat of Hillview Heights No 3. and 4 in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the corrected plat thereof recorded in Book 11 of Plats at Page 57, Records of Missoula County, Montana. Victoria Clark, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated September 27, 2005 and Recorded on September 30, 2005 in Book 761, Page 802, as Document No. 200525832. The beneficial interest is currently held by Indymac Federal Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1354.24, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 10, 2009 is $160,600.30 principal,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: PARCEL I: TRACT 15A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1877, LOCATED IN SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. PARCEL II: TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR PRIVATE ROAD AND PUBLIC UTILITY PURPOSES AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1608. FURTHER TOGETHER WITH A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR PRIVATE ROAD AND PUBLIC UTILITY PURPOSES AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1877: AS IMPROVED BY: 1993 FLEETWOOD MANUFACTURED HOME, MODEL CHADWICK 56630, SERIAL #1 DFLP04A/6161 11-CW10, HUD TAG NUMBER IDA12651 1 AND IDA126510, 65’ X 26’ A.P.N.: 5806399 Douglas T Kiewatt and Ronda R Kiewatt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 10, 2008 and recorded on January 1’5, 2008 at 3:24 o’clock P.M., in Book 811, Page 1240, under Document NO 200801007. The beneficial interest is currently held by Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,469.88, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest ,due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 28, 2009 is $192,678.17 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $7,024.71, and other fees and expenses advanced of $99.90, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.99 per diem, late charges,: and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price mist be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strict-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 28 OF HAWTHORN SPRINGS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANAACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Darrin L Knudsen and Crystal L Knudsen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated March 23, 2007 and Recorded March 30, 2007 at 3:14 o’clock P.M. in Book 794, Page 803, under Document No. 200707506. The beneficial interest is currently held by National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,207.42, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 21, 2009 is $280,052.54 principal, interest at the rate of 7.375% now totaling $6,295.20, late charges in the amount of $294.63, escrow advances of $0.00, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $54.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.59 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’ s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’ s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 10, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 10, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Jessica Hopkins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3105714 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009, 06/04/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 20, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 9A of Carline Addition No. 60, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof. Ted L Hess, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as


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Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 10, 2005 and Recorded May 19, 2005 in Book 752, Page 1143, as Document No. 200511842. The beneficial interest is currently held by Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., GreenPoint MTA Trust 2005-AR3, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2005 AR3. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1267.31, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 16, 2009 is $299,218.33 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $6,209.37, late charges in the amount of $190.11, escrow advances of $575.63, and other fees and expenses advanced of $18.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $42.01 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 11, 2009 Charles Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA . County of Stark On March 11, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Jessica Hopkins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3107026 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009, 06/04/2009

the above property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10`h day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 16, 2009 Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Jessica Hopkins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota My Comm. Exp. 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3112912 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009, 06/04/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 24, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 4 of Corrected Plat of El Dorado, a plated subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 13 of Plats at Page 9 Ashley Miller, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 21, 2007 and Recorded September 21, 2007 in Book 806 , Page 109, as Document No. 200724956. The beneficial interest is currently held by Primary Capital Advisors LC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,125.35, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2009 is $173,831.68 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $5,731.28, late charges in the amount of $225.08, escrow advances of $676.75, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $30.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Parcel l: TRACT 33A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3448 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONEQUARTER OF` SECTION 29 AND THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M. MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Parcel Il: TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENTFOR THE INGRESS AND EGRESS ACROSS THE NORTHEASTERLY, 60 FEET OF TRACTS 34, 35, 36, 37 AND 38 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1605 Lance E. Roeske, as Grantor(s), conveyed ‘said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 14, 2006 and Recorded July 21, 2006 in Book 779, Page 451, as Document No, 20031 7960. The beneficial interest is currently held by American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,189.59, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent,,...monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 28, 2009 is $318,001.81 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $11,328.84, late charges in the amount of $328.44, and other fees and expenses advanced of $134.20, plus accruing $62.08 per diem, late interest at the rate of charges, and other costs and fees that, maybe advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real ;property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person,. including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents; ‘(valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied...as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s. fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had `no’ default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 1 5 days for any reason, and in the event ,.of’ a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and

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CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

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State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the going instrument _ and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JESSICA M HOPKINS Notary Public State of North Dakota My Commission Exp. Dec. 24, 2014 ASAP# 3084024 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

February 20, 2009 is $133,800.72 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $3222.83, late charges in the amount of $167.44, escrow advances of $279.78, and other fees and expenses advanced of $984.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 2/25/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JOAN MEIER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/2013 ASAP# 3084918 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3084858 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 7 of Emma Dickinson Homesites, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, According to the Official Recorded A.P.N.: 1122403 Joseph U. Kirschten and Kimberly D. Kirschten, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 24, 2007 and Recorded September 6, 2007 in Book No. 805 Page 304, under Document No. 20073298. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,099.65, beginning July 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 23, 2009 is $215,605.06 principal, interest at the rate of 9.4750% now totaling $16552.73, late charges in the amount of $908.60, escrow advances of $920.05, and other fees and expenses advanced of $341.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $55.97 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3084034 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 22G of AMENDED PLAT OF COBBAN & DINSMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES NO. 3, LOT 22, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Parcel ID #5837498 Mary Kristin Richard, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by May 29, 2007 at 3:49 o’clock P.M. under Document No. 200713173 The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. * Book 798 of Micro Records at Page 259 The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,063.49, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 23 of Addition to Thayer’s Country Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Bryan Volkmann and Bridgett Volkman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 16, 2006 and recorded on March 22, 2006 at 2:43 o’clock P.M., in Book 770, Page 1337, under Document No 200606343. The beneficial interest is currently held by LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Ownit Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-4. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,403.01, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 27, 2009 is $190,433.20 principal, interest at the rate of 7.875% now totaling $7,710.44, late charges in the amount of $335.61, escrow advances of $1,661.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $290.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $41.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such

Tell ‘em you saw it in the Independent!

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4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990 Free Rent, Free Cable! 2 or 3 beds: 1510 Cooley St. $725-$850 Open Daily: 239.6483 Upscale Living on the Clarkfork! Granite, Tile, Fireplaces, Underground Parking. $1050 $1200 Open Daily: 239.6483 We pay Heat! Free Rent! 1 or 2 beds on the Clarkfork $635 - $735 Open Daily: 239.6483

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Missoula Independent Page 48 May 21–May 28, 2009

3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990

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For available rentals:

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1925 14th: central 1-bedroom, storage, off-street parking, breakfast bar, shared yard, $490 GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

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422 Madison • 549-6106

1 BD Multiplex 528 Hickory, $475/mo. 2 BD House - 115 N. Johnson $775/mo. 2 BD Apt - Uncle Robert Lane, $620/mo.

1250 1st: 3-bedroom, 1100+ square feet, some qualifications, heat/cable paid, $710 GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

3Bd/1Ba $875/mo. 730 Turner #1, Handicap access, Missoula. Grizzly Property Management 542-20260

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3915 Hwy 200 E #2, 2 bd/1ba, $595 all included, Grizzly Property Management, 542-2060

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Call PPM for all your rental needs

This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

Homes for Sale Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Professional Property Management

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.

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RentalsHouses ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

Roommates

1902 Pine Tree Hollow - Thompson Falls Newer, spacious 2bdrm/2bath, edge of town & gorgeous! $148,500 KD Dickinson Portico Real Estate 240-5227 2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting. $210,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 2bd/1ba, 2car gar Immaculate 217 South Ave W. $232,000 Close to Univ. Anne Jablonski 5465816 www.MoveMontana.com 3 Bed/2 Bath in Stevensville. Nice Bitterroot home with great views from back deck. Low maintenance vinyl siding, large double car garage.$269,000 MLS# 902482 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12890 for pics 3BD/2BA, DECK & SHED 4721 Sage St. in Westview Mobile Park. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 Bed/3 Bath Spacious home with great views. Gas fireplace, jetted tub, wood laminate floor. Storage shed large garage, and paved drive. $339,900 MLS#805015. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics 4 mos New Liberty, 28’x52’, 3bd 2ba. Move or lease lot. Realtors welcome. $81,000 546-5816 4800 SQ FT MULLAN RD AREA HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, great floor plan, family room with wet bar, vaulted ceilings, and more, $448,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4BD/3BA, 3GAR + VIEWS 6960 Linda Vista 4 doors off Upper Miller Creek. Anne Jablonski 5465816 www.MoveMontana.com 4bd/3ba, Lovely Home w/Views 6960 Linda Vista $349,500 Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com

ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com

832 Cherry St. $239,500 Lower Rattlesnake - 2bed/1bath, brand new kitchen & bath, garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Rooms available in remodeled fraternity house from 5/15-8/1. Close to UM on Gerald. $350/month with deposit includes all utilities. Call MREM 406-541-6468 or visit www.millenniumrem.com

838 Stoddard - 3bdrm +1 bonus, huge yard, west side, tons of room. $234,900. KD Dickinson - Portico Real Estate 240-5227

Share small, furnished, 2 bedrrom with yard, garden, dog? $440/month + $250 deposit. 8804422

Homes for Sale 1333 Toole #C-13 $132,500 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House M-F 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico

921 S 4th St W. $249,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 A Career in Real Estate with Access Realty, we offer training, great commission splite and support. 406544-3098 www.AccessRealty.net ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Condos / Townhomes

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 3 Bdr/1.5 Bath, New interior paint & flooring, great deck, double garage & fenced yard. $189,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Affordable Home Ownership STOP RENTING! At $107,500 the price of home ownership is possible and you may qualify for down payment assistance. Low income guidelines apply. Call for info. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths! Nice! 1421 Eaton St. #28, Missoula $107,500. Call Sharon Scarborough at Prudential Montana Real Estate 329-2034

www.mindypalmer.com

FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus rooms, great deck and mountain and valley views, large sauna, just 20 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689 REDUCED PRICE! 3bdrm, 1 bath, single garage. Fenced yard and covered front porch. Newly remodeled. MLS# 808575 $84,900 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:18883 for pics UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, single attached garage, new flooring, interior paint, updated kitchen, new furnace and more, $149,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

U P D AT E D P O T O M A C A R E A HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $268,800. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

Manufactured Homes FROM $40,762. New Modular Homes. *No Money Down* FHA, VA & Tribal Loans. $8,000 tax credit. Champion Homes. 303-573-0067. Free brochures and price sheet. www.coloradofactorymodulars.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Homes for Sale

Austin McKee

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

The Top Hat! 134 W. Front First time on the market in 25 years! This property features a large 2-story building with basement and adjoining 1-story building. Total: 9,000 sq.ft. est. Downtown Missoula, off-street parking. Price includes all beverage liquor license and gaming license.

Proud to be a part of Windermere's new commercial real estate division!

"Raised on Real Estate" Experience with a fresh perspective. CELL: 546-5705 • www.Live-Montana.com

www.mindypalmer.com

639 South Ave. W, Msla

4 Bed/2 Bath Remodeled • New roof New heating & AC Many upgrades Large corner lot

$245,000 • 546-2177

Joy Earls

RICE TEAM

Two 5 acre parcels 15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $159,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $299,000.

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Visit my Open House Sunday 5/24 • 11-1pm website for 2815 O'Shaughnesy, Msla more pictures 4 Bd/3.5 Bth and other Immaculate & Convenient listings… $254,500 MLS 900070

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Mortgage & Financial

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are You may be able to: Still• Lower Historically Low! your monthly

Mary Mar ry REALT O R ® , B r ok e r Office 406-728-9295 Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Mortgage & Financial

10250 Valley Grove Dr $299,000 • MLS#902264 Price just reduced on log home w/acreage between Lolo and Missoula.

You may be able to: payment

• Lower from your monthly payment • Switch an ARM • aSwitch from an ARM to a to predictable fixed-rate predictableloan fixed-rate loan

LUXURY downtown CONDO in Wilma Bldg. $482,000

• Get term to • Geta ashorter shorter term to pay payoffoff your your mortgage faster mortgage faster • Finance your closing costs

Missoula Proper ties

• Finance your closing as part of your new loan costs as part of your new loan. Don’t miss your chance,

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com

New Listing! Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

Bridget Bowers REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 207-5387 • Bridget@GreaterMontanaRE.com BitterrootMontanaProperties.com Specializing in: Homes with Acreage

6420 Lower Miller Ck Rd 3BD/2BA in Maloney Ranch area. $288,500

Polson Restaurant Bistro “class act” Isabels •Seller retiring •Turn key. •Fully equipped bistro •Convert to other enterprises?

MLS# 903173

Priscilla Brockmeyer

Hwy 93 Polson Now $237,000

Wilma Mixon-Hall • 883-3346

SavoirFaireProperties.com

370.7689

Where Service Meets Technology Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Don't miss your contact mechance, today. contact me today.

Proudly serving Missoula, Mineral & Ravalli Counties

NEW 4BD/2.5 BA home in Missoula 44 Ranch Subdivision Spacious, master suite, full basement, gourmet kitchen. 2409 Snaffle Bit Way $297,000 • MLS 809362

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 544.3098 www.AccessRealty.net

Astrid Oliver Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Home Mortgage Consultant Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com 1800 S. Russellhttp://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ St. Ste. 200 Missoula, MT 59801 astrid-oliver Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Credit is subject to approval. astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Some restrictions apply. This http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver information is accurate as of

Astrid Oliver

date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Mortgage Credit is subject toFargo approval.Home Some restrictions apply.is a Wells Fargoand Bank, This information isdivision accurate asof of date of printing is 2009 Wells subject to change N.A. without©notice. Wells FargoFargo Home Bank, N.A.Fargo All Bank, rights Mortgage is a division of Wells N.A. 2009 #63731 Wells Fargo Bank,reserved. N.A. All rights reserved.03/09-06/09 #63731 3/09-06/09

Missoula Independent Page 49 May 21–May 28, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

We're very excited to have Jean Clark working at Portico. Jean has a background in real estate administration, marketing and graphic design. Jean's been in Missoula for four years; before that she lived and worked in and around Dillon and Big Timber, Montana, where she owned and operated a guest and cattle ranch. She looks forward to meeting and working with all of Portico's clients.

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Out of Town

20 Lot Bitterroot Subdivision, 42 acres, views of Bitterroots & Sapphires. Appraised $127,500 each. $864,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185 www.AccessRealty.net

Beautiful parcel with meadows. Perfect property to escape to rural Montana but still only 20 minutes to downtown Missoula. $179,000. MLS# 900454. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12888 for pics

LOLO. 3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1 acre. Large great room off open kitchen. Wood-burning fireplace. Living room, sun room, Jacuzzi, separate shower in main bath. Fenced garden area. Beautiful property. $257,500. 370-1368. View online www.outdoorsmontana.com

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

35 acres in 3 tracts, creek frontage, springs, access to several cabin sites, remote, off the grid in the Garnet mountains 75 miles east of Missoula, $120,000. More lots available from $27,500 to $45,000. Montana International Realty 406-883-6700 5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $575,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.RiverRidgeMT.com FORT BENTON REALTY, LLP. 800406-0946. Rocky Mountain Views 10 acres+ 3 bedroom, 3 bath home. Huge barn, 2-car garage. Conrad. $275,000. www.fbrealty.com

Commercial 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $339,900 MLS# 901476 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595

Out of Town

www.mindypalmer.com

America’s Best Buy! Where in the U.S. can you own 20 acres, 30 minutes from major Texas city? Only $15,900. $0 Down, $159/mo. 1800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

Turn key cabin in the Garnet Mountains, 24.49 acres, off the grid, gated access, spring water, new propane appliances, 9 miles south of Helmville. $140,000. Montana International Realty 406883-6700

Mortgage & Financial For unsecured debts of $7,500 or MORE, call the Debt Relief Group, an Attorney Listing Service today! Understand your options. FREE - No Obligation Consultation. Call 1888-648-8546 Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Beautiful Townhome! 2127 A W Kent Street, Missoula 3 Bed/2 Bath/Double Garage Located conveniently close to the center of Missoula, this townhouse boasts class and style.

PorticoRealEstate.com 445 w. Alder • Missoula • 406/327-8787

What will be the next page in your family scrapbook?

MLS# 902150 $175,000

For all your home mortgage needs call

Marjorie Dula marjorie@landlmortgage.com

880-1373 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

Missoula Independent Page 50 May 21–May 28, 2009

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

#228,949


Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

$4.99 lb.

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

$2.99 lb.

Gold'n Plump All Natural Drums Or Thighs

2

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56 oz.

Extra Lean Boneless Pork Loin Roast

$1.99 lb.

Knudsen Organic Blueberry Nectar

Black Dog Ale

4 lb. Bag Organic Valencia Oranges

$2.49 quart

Napa Valley Bistro Mediterranean Antipasto Stuffed Olives

$2.79 each

Hass Avocado

69¢ each

$2.49 12 oz.

Batavia Indonesia Green Tea Bags

California Strawberries

$2.99 50 count

Mrs. Renfro’s Assorted Salsas

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$3.99 32 oz.

California Raspberries

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$4.99 6 pack

Pabst, Rainier, Busch Cans

$10.99 18 pack

Twisted Tea Green Citrus Iced Tea

$3.99 6 pack

Leaping Horse California Wine

$3.99 .75 liter

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 51 May 21–May 28, 2009


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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