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Up Front: Tribes wait to take in quarantined Yellowstone bison Etc.: Anti-gay crusader drafts anti-antidiscrimination bill Scope: Local supergroup Stellarondo kicks out new album


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Up Front: Tribes wait to take in quarantined Yellowstone bison Etc.: Anti-gay crusader drafts anti-antidiscrimination bill Scope: Local supergroup Stellarondo kicks out new album


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nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Chad Harder

Over the last few decades, trapping has become a hot button, emotional issue in western Montana. As anti-trapping groups push for change, many trappers realize they need to do a better job of defending their place in society. For some, that means addressing the ethics of what they do, and having a much deeper conversation about wildlife and land-use. In short, it’s about proving that trappers are still relevant........14

Monday is now open mic with Mike Avery @ 10pm

News Letters The ethics of spear hunting and lawmakers packing heat ...........................4 The Week in Review Brueggeman’s replacement and Carlyle petitions PSC ..........6 Briefs Wolken steps up and The Corner files for Chapter 11 ...................................6 Etc. Anti-gay crusader defeats his own purpose ........................................................7 Up Front Tribes await quarantined Yellowstone bison..............................................8 Ochenski Obama speech a resounding dud .............................................................9 Writers on the Range Conservatives concoct another “War on the West” .............11 Agenda Global Issues & Foreign Film Series. ..........................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Food desire vs. food truth............................................................19 Happiest Hour Red beer at the Savoy Casino & Liquor Store................................20 8 Days a Week The trappings of living in the mountains.......................................22 Mountain High Over Seeley’s Creeks and Ridges cross-country marathon...........29 Scope Stellarondo kicks out a new album with a “no rules” attitude.....................30 Noise Jason Webley, Huey Lewis and the News, Pearl Jam, and Fergus & Geronimo..31 Theater Montana Rep’s Bus Stop offers dynamic charm .........................................32 Film No Strings Attached raises the romcom bar ....................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

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PUBLISHER Lynne Foland PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 January 27–February 3, 2011


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Tuesday afternoon on Higgins Avenue in downtown Missoula.

Q:

This week the Independent reports on the future of trapping and efforts to outlaw the activity on public land. Would you support such a ban? Follow-up: What’s your preferred method of killing animals?

Kevin “Hobo” Petitpas: Well, the way I see it, Montana is first and foremost a frontier state. You shouldn’t just take away trapping here. For some it’s a traditional way of life, either for sustenance or just as a way to make money. I’m not a local here, but shit, I know that. Ready! Aim!: Quickly.

Brandon VanArsdale: Sure, why not? I mean, trapping animals? Really? It doesn’t even work all the time, so that means it’s kind of inhumane, right? I say if you want to kill something, just go kill it. Eat your heart out: Well, I’m a vegetarian, but if I were to want to kill, I’d prefer to go with a quick heart or lung shot, and I might just grab the heart and take a bite out of it. I mean if you’re going to do something, you might as well do it right.

Drew Grissom: Well, I just moved here last week, and I don’t know much about trapping. But I definitely don’t want to jump to conclusions. It should be allowed on private property, but on public land, well, that’s a rougher issue. As long as everyone follows the guidelines I imagine it’d be okay. Archery class: A good old-fashioned bow and arrow. It just seems like a classy way to hunt.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Spears? Really? As reported in the Independent, Sen. Greg Hinkle wants to return Montana to the Stone Age by allowing spear hunting during general rifle season (see “Going primitive,” Jan. 20, 2011). When is enough enough? We’ve got bullets, arrows, and traps; we’ve got year-round, unlicensed recreational killing of many predator and “nongame” species in addition to regulated hunting and trapping seasons. As if there weren’t already enough methods and opportunities to kill animals in Montana! And just why is a Treasure State legislator infatuated with Neanderthal blood sport? Hinkle, in his service to citizens of Montana, cited defensive end Jared Allen of the Minnesota Vikings. Allen’s showy exploits are available online, where he spears an elk on an Illinois game farm. That’s right, a football player from Minnesota, spearing domesticated elk on an Illinois game farm is influencing legislation in Helena. Sadly, the bill passed the Senate last Wednesday by a vote of 27-21 (two Republican senators were absent, and one lone Dem crossed over to vote with all the Republicans). Next up, the House. Let’s consider suffering, something that 27 of our senators failed to do or simply dismissed. A poorly placed bullet can quickly be followed by another, but what about with a spear? I posed this question to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks. Is there research on injuries to animals from poorly thrown spears? Is there data from other states? Shouldn’t this be part of the discussion? This answer came back from the FWP Law Enforcement Bureau: “When this bill was introduced, we sent out an inquiry through National Association of Conservation Law Enforcement Chiefs regarding this issue. Of the 50 states, 35 responded, with all but one not allowing spears or atlatls for hunting big game. Many states did allow it for either small game or birds, however. The one state that did allow it for big game hunting (Alabama) had only one season behind them and had no information regarding wounding, etc.

Rachel Brouwer: Yes, it should be banned. Mostly for people’s safety, and the safety of their pets. I have some friends who had dogs caught in traps, and it’s extremely upsetting. I have constant fear when I go out. Go primitive: With a spear. That should make it more challenging.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 January 27–February 3, 2011

That is really the extent of the information available to us at this time.” FWP is taking no position on SB 112, maintaining that it’s a “social issue” with no biology involved.

“bigByoilallowing to move their weight and greed through the Pacific Northwest and Montana to the Alberta tar sands, we will become accomplices in ruining the wild land and water we love and the quality of life and freedoms we currently

enjoy.

Is spear hunting actually about hunting—or really just about ego and killing? Kathleen Stachowski Lolo

Read your heart out The Heart of the Monster, an exposé on ExxonMobil’s proposed heavy haul, written by David James Duncan, Rick Bass and a team of dedicated and concerned people, is like a horror story except that it is real and is about to happen if we don’t do something to stop it. Everyone should read this book. What ExxonMobil is bulldozing through is monstrous and devastating (see “Crossroads,” Jan. 20, 2011). By allowing big oil to move their weight and greed through the Pacific Northwest and Montana to the Alberta tar sands, we will become accomplices in ruining the wild land and water we love and the quality of life and freedoms we currently enjoy. And all for a sickening addiction—oil. There are less destructive ways to go about this. And just to clarify, this is not a right versus left political issue. The entire tiny town of Kooskia, Idaho, showed up at a recent meeting on the topic and every one of them—loggers, tree huggers, anglers, hunters, river guides, geeks, hippies, old farts—said “hell no” to big oil and sent the businessmen slithering out of town with their tails between their legs. There was very clear consensus. My husband and I know very well how crucial healthy ecosystems are and how they contribute to healthy cultures. We have spent much of our adult life working in and advocating for wild places. We recently hunkered down in the wild woods of the Seeley Swan Valley to live a quiet life and do our art—we thought. After reading this book we see no other option than to stop this haul. Its ramifications are too far-reaching. In my husband’s words, “If we go on and on about being proud to be Montanans and then let this haul happen, we are giving up our lives to multibillionaires who don’t give a rat’s ass about what or who we are.” We can’t let their sweet lies brainwash us. This is trouble. Please get the book, read it, and help. Randi de Santa Anna Seeley Lake

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

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Saddle up for a Wild West Family Concert and help the Missoula Symphony Orchestra chase down an offbeat outlaw. Bad Bart is on the loose! This calls for Deputy Darko Butorac and his band of 70 musicians. He’ll give each instrument a shot and then show kids and parents alike how symphonic music can tell a blazing, smoking, heart-stopping story. Darko Butorac, Music Director • Plus a Surprise Guest Friday, January 28, 7 PM • The University Theatre Tickets: $8 • Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 East Main Street

Missoula Independent

Page 5 January 27–February 3, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 19

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

News Quirks

VIEWFINDER

by Chad Harder

David Paisley, 43, a former Hellgate High School girls’ basketball coach accused of arranging a sexual encounter with a fictitious 14-year-old girl over the Internet, pleads not guilty in Missoula County District Court to a felony charge of sexual abuse of a minor.

• Thursday, January 20 The Lake County Republican Central Committee appoints businesswoman Carmine Mowbray to fill the Senate vacancy left by the resignation of Sen. Jon Brueggeman. Committee Chairman Brent Matson calls Mowbray a “rock-solid conservative” whose “commitment to natural resource development is unquestionable.”

• Friday, January 21 After police pull over Michael Paul Kerish, 28, for going 50 mph in a 25 mph zone on South Third Street West, they arrest him for being under the influence of alcohol and marijuana and possessing psychedelic mushrooms, a felony.

• Saturday, January 22 In the 282nd game between the University of Montana and Montana State University men’s basketball teams, four of five starters score in double figures to lift the Griz to a 75-61 victory over the Bobcats in front of a record-breaking crowd of 7,312 fans in Dahlberg Arena.

• Sunday, January 23 Packaging manufacturer Rock-Tenn Co. announces plans to buy competitor Smurfit-Stone Container Corp. for $3.5 billion in cash and stock, making it one of North America’s largest paperboard companies. Smurfit-Stone still plans to sell the vacant Frenchtown mill.

• Monday, January 24 The Carlyle Group, the world’s second largest private investment firm, petitions Montana’s Public Service Commission to withhold scrutiny of its proposed purchase of Missoula’s Mountain Water Co. based on the fact that Mountain Water’s parent company, Park Water Co., is based in California.

• Tuesday, January 25 Anthony Brazington, 21, pleads guilty in Missoula District Court to felony charges of promoting prostitution. Police arrested Brazington and Richard Carpita in September, alleging the duo had prostituted five young girls via Craigslist. Brazington faces $100,000 in fines and 30 years in prison.

Missoula Independent

Mallard drakes and hens congregate on a lower stretch of Rattlesnake Creek Tuesday morning. While most mallards have migrated south, this paddling of nearly 20 ducks has been calling the creek’s frigid waters home for weeks.

Real estate Backed into a corner After years of construction, it appears time has finally caught up with “The Corner,” the posh condos on the corner of South Higgins Avenue and Brooks Street that were listed for sale just as the local high-end real estate market was tanking. Two weeks ago, project developer and architect Eric Hefty filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, as did his company, The Corner Development, LLC. Hefty declined to comment, deferring to his attorney, Harold Dye of the local firm Dye & Moe. Dye says both The Corner and the adjacent University Apartments on Roosevelt Street, also owned by Hefty, are implicated in the filings. Hefty found himself in a “foreclosure situation” with primary creditor Mountain West Bank, Dye says, and was forced into an emergency bankruptcy filing to protect his assets from the bank’s “imminent action.” “We’re going to try to sell things in an orderly manner to hopefully pay everybody off,” Dye says.

Page 6 January 27–February 3, 2011

“That’s the general goal.” According to The Corner’s website, two small residential condos and the entire 4,100-square-foot ground floor, designated as commercial space, remain for sale. Prices aren’t disclosed. A year and a half ago, the Missoulian quoted Hefty as expressing concern over the $3 million project’s timing, saying it isn’t “the best time to be a developer” and that the Missoula condo market is “probably on hold.” A condo glut remains, but 2010 data shows signs of increasing activity. “Currently, at 178 listings, we have fewer condos on the market than we have had since October of 2008 when we started tracking,” says Missoula Organization of Realtors CEO Ruth Link. “That tells us that some of the surplus has begun to be absorbed.” But the absorption has mostly happened at the lower end of the market. The median sales price for condos in 2010 was $164,410, significantly less than The Corner’s prices. Bankruptcy documents estimate The Corner Development’s assets at less than $50,000, with lia-

bilities exceeding $1 million. More thorough financial statements will soon be filed, Dye says. Matthew Frank

City Council Wolken steps up Roughly 12 hours after Missoula’s City Council selected Cynthia L. Wolken as Ward 2’s newest representative, she was busy fielding phone calls from media, charting out her increasingly chaotic schedule and hustling to make it to City Hall in time to be sworn in. “I’m still a little in shock,” Wolken said Tuesday morning. The 31-year-old attorney was still absorbing the news that she had beaten out 16 other applicants to replace outgoing council member Roy Houseman, who resigned at the end of December to take a job with the United Steelworkers Union. During the weeks leading up to Council’s Monday night vote, Wolken navigated a rigorous application process. It proved difficult for the Council, too, which was tasked with whittling an


Inside

Letters

Briefs

overflowing roster of qualified candidates down to one. “We’ve been put in a really hard position here tonight,” said Councilwoman Stacy Rye. Prior to the vote, community members sung high praises for Wolken, who ran for Council in 2009 before dropping out to care for a sick family member. An active member of the Missoula County Democratic Party, she’s been very involved with the Montana Woman Pipeline project and serves as the board chairwoman for the Montana Human Rights Network. “She has grace and integrity to continue governing as Houseman did,” said community organizer Molly Moody. Rye was similarly impressed by Wolken’s resumé, brains and—perhaps most importantly when working with strong-minded council peers—her temperament. “There is something to be said for emotional intelligence,” Rye said. After two rounds of voting, Wolken garnered votes from council members Marilyn Marler, Stacy Rye, Dave Strohmaier, Pam Walzer, Jason Wiener, Ed Childers and Bob Jaffe. Adam Hertz earned Lyn Hellegaard and Renee Mitchell’s support. Dick Haines picked Myrt Charney. Wolken says for the next couple of weeks she’ll focus on simply learning the ropes and becoming better acquainted with her constituents. From there, she’ll hunker down to work on issues close to her heart, specifically affordable housing and sustainable transportation. Her seat will be contested in November. She’s already planning her election bid. “I’m looking forward to rolling up my sleeves,” she says. Jessica Mayrer

Pets Wiener war A wiener dog finds himself in the middle of a dispute that may soon involve a lawsuit—high doggie drama even in a mutt mad town like Missoula Last March, Corinna Spelts’ dachshund named Gunner went missing in the South Hills area of Missoula, and 10 months later she still held out hope that she’d find him. As recently as Jan. 16 the 30-yearold posted an ad on Craigslist offering a cash reward for the squat pup to be returned home. Little did Spelts know that Gunner—or at least

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

the dog she thinks is Gunner—had been found, and, in mid-December, someone else had adopted him from the Humane Society of Western Montana (HSWM). “So now the dog has a new owner,” Spelts says, “and I have to go to court.” Spelts, who filed lost-dog reports with HSWM and Missoula County Animal Control, claims HSWM failed to perform its due diligence to find the dog’s owner when Gunner—if it is indeed Gunner—was dropped off at its facility after being found in Drummond. But HSWM Director Lora O’Connor says the shelter followed the protocol it always follows when someone drops off a stray, including listing the dog

in the Missoulian for several days and scanning it for a microchip. “We do everything we can to try to reunite lost pets and their families,” O’Connor says. “We want them to go back home. An acquaintance of the adopter saw Spelts’ Craiglist post, noticed a resemblance, and sent Spelts photos of the dog. They were enough to convince Spelts that the dog belonged to her. “Don’t count on them as a resource to help find your pet,” Spelts says of HSWM. O’Connor says she can’t remember a similar circumstance in her 10 years at the shelter, and she hopes Spelts won’t take legal action. As for the wiener dog—Gunner or not—the present owner, who declined to disclose its name, says he’s “fantastic.” Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Outdoors Search and rescue reactivated Missoula County Search and Rescue is officially back on the job this month after spending last fall and much of the winter on inactive status. Sheriff Carl Ibsen says he moved “immediately” to reactivate the local volunteer squad upon taking office in early January, recognizing a need to mobilize all of the county’s resources as soon as possible. “We’re in that season, and we have been for a while,” Ibsen says. “Winter is almost always reasonably busy with lost snowmobilers and lost skiers and you name it, and it just didn’t seem to make sense not to avail ourselves of the full resources that were there.” Former Missoula County Sheriff Mike McMeekin declared the Missoula-based unit inactive last July, following a series of internal spats he repeatedly refused to elaborate on. The Independent reported in early November that McMeekin had gone so far as to change the locks on the unit’s county-owned equipment bay, despite the fact that much of the equipment was donated to and owned by the squad. McMeekin’s actions, in part, prompted members in the Seeley Lake area to split from the group in August and form their own independent organization, Seeley-Swan Rescue, which remained on active duty. He attempted to calm the situation with a memorandum of understanding last fall, but the memo only furthered complicated relations with local volunteers. Now, Ibsen says, the county has reached agreements that are satisfactory to all. “I’m told by my other coordinators that everything’s running pretty good,” Ibsen says. “Both units are obviously hoping they’re not needed, but if they are they’re ready to go.” A number of changes will persist as search and rescue moves on from McMeekin. The two organizations will remain separate entities under the supervision and command of different deputies. Ibsen appointed Sgt. Dave Ball, a county rescue coordinator from years ago, to act as a central county coordinator for the two units. Any necessary tweaks or changes to operations will be thoroughly discussed among all parties, Ibsen says. “We as the administration will be taking our cues from not only our coordinators but from the memberships of the various units,” he adds. Missoula County Search and Rescue recently held its annual officer elections. Members voted for Ben Ehlers to replace Chris Froines as volunteer chief for 2011. Alex Sakariassen

$29,000

Fines handed down to former Montana Sen. Greg Barkus, 64, by a district court judge in Kalispell last week. Barkus managed to avoid jail time for his role in a 2009 boat crash on Flathead Lake that injured five including Rep. Denny Rehberg.

etc.

Dallas Erickson just won’t quit. After his persistent but ultimately futile attempts to put the kibosh on Missoula’s antidiscrimination ordinance, the anti-gay crusader from the Bitterroot Valley, along with Big Sky Christian Center pastor Harris Himes, are working with Rep. Kristin Hansen, R-Havre, to pass a state law that would retroactively forbid any local governments from crafting a civil rights ordinance like Missoula’s. Call it the anti-antidiscrimination bill. “I think that’s outrageous, and we will be sharing some pieces of our mind on that one,” says Missoula City Councilman Dave Strohmaier who, along with fellow councilmember Stacy Rye, introduced the citywide antidiscrimination law—the state’s first—that makes it illegal to deny services, housing or employment to people based on sexual orientation or gender expression. Hansen remains mum on the yet-to-be-drafted bill. But Erickson says a law is needed to protect children from homosexuals—whom he blames for sexual abuse within the Catholic Church and Boy Scouts—and to give employers the right to deny employment to them. “I think if I’ve got a youth group, and I have to hire somebody, I shouldn’t have to hire a gay person,” Erickson says. “And if I refuse that person because he or she is gay, I shouldn’t be sued for discrimination.” Research has repeatedly debunked claims promulgated by Erickson and others of his ilk. Gay people are no more likely than heterosexuals to be pedophiles, according to data compiled by a number of institutions including the University of California-Davis. Erickson’s fanatical misinformation campaign would be laughable if it wasn’t so profoundly harmful. In reality, Montana’s children don’t need protection from homosexuals. They need protection from homophobes like Erickson. His message marks gay people as deviants deserving of fewer rights than straight people. In a society keen on branding homosexuals as perverts and pedophiles, it should come as no surprise that gay teens are up to four times more likely than heterosexual peers to commit suicide. Just last year, the nation watched as a spate of persecuted teenagers killed themselves in highly publicized incidents. Those teens faced ostracism, bullying and verbal abuse. If the Montana Legislature endorses Erickson’s message, not only will lawmakers be signing off on state-sanctioned discrimination, they will hurt the same young people Erickson and his peers claim they want to protect.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 January 27–February 3, 2011


Beer Drinker’s Profile Josh

Big Game Food For Thought

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Waiting game Will quarantined Yellowstone bison find a home? by Alex Sakariassen

What brings you to the Iron Horse today? I'm here for a visit with my dad. It's the Steelers vs. the Packers in the upcoming Big Game. Which team do you favor & why? The Packers. Their uniforms make 'em look like huge cheddar block heads....... Beer of choice? Hefferveisen

The Big Game is just around the corner. Enjoy it at the Iron

R o b e r t M a g n a n , t h e Fo r t Pe c k Reservation’s fish and game director, has waited two years for an answer to a fairly straightforward question: Will the reservation in northeast Montana become home to a new herd of Yellowstone bison graduating from the state’s brucellosis quarantine facility at Corwin Springs? Despite nearly a decade of interagency discussions contemplating tribal land for quarantined bison relocation—and despite Fort Peck’s investment of roughly $200,000 in grazing land, solar-powered water troughs and wildlife-friendly fences to accommodate the ungulates—Magnan has yet to hear any guarantees. “We fenced the whole 5,000 [acres] with brand-new game-friendly fence,” Magnan says. “The money we received from

Several weeks ago, FWP began its latest round of discussions on where to place bison that have successfully passed through the state’s quarantine program. Some 50 bison determined to be brucellosis-free are currently awaiting temporary relocation, and in early January FWP identified three state-owned wildlife management areas— Marias River, Beartooth and the newly acquired Spotted Dog—that could serve as interim holding sites until the agency can develop a long-term plan. It’s an avenue FWP Director Joe Maurier believes wasn’t properly explored in earlier management discussions. “Nobody in the agency, it appears to me, was really looking at our own public lands as well,” Maurier says. “I think we have an obligation to look at that.”

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Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks recently began discussions on where to temporarily relocate 50 quarantined Yellowstone bison from Corwin Springs. Tribes in the state feel their expensive efforts to accommodate the animals are being ignored.

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various donors and grants helped us to get it going, and we’re all done with it now. We’re just waiting for the buffalo.” It’s an uncertain situation not only for Fort Peck but also for north central Montana’s Fort Belknap Reservation. There, tribes have put bison infrastructure projects on hold pending a response from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) on whether they’ll ever receive the animals. The reservation and its supporters in the environmental community are growing tired of years of talk and no action. “In a meeting last year with Fish, Wildlife and Parks in Helena, we were assured that this was part of the plan, that the tribes would be kept involved in the planning process and ultimately the distribution of these buffalo to tribes,” says Mike Fox, a Fort Belknap Community Council representative and former head of the reservation’s bison management program. “We never heard anything back.”

Page 8 January 27–February 3, 2011

FWP took a drastically different approach to bison relocation in 2010. The agency temporarily released 86 quarantined animals to Ted Turner’s Green Ranch near Bozeman and promised 75 percent of the herd’s offspring to Turner Enterprises. The decision led four bison advocacy groups to file a lawsuit against FWP alleging the state had privatized wildlife held in public trust. FWP defended its actions, stating that no other public or private groups were adequately prepared to house the bison. While Maurier says tribal lands are a “viable option,” he points to the ongoing legal battle as the reason behind the state’s sudden hesitancy to relocate bison to Fort Peck or Fort Belknap. “My view, frankly, is I don’t see a difference between [Green Ranch] and the tribes because the tribes are sovereign nations,” Maurier says. “When you say public, that means everybody has access to them in an unfettered manner, either for viewing or

hunting. And I think the fact of the matter is, on tribal lands that wouldn’t be the case.” “If we’re going to get sued for it,” Maurier adds, “why would I give them to the tribes if the court’s going to say, ‘No, you can’t do that’?” Yet according to the plaintiffs themselves, Maurier’s concerns are baseless. Both the Yellowstone Buffalo Foundation and the Buffalo Field Campaign told the Independent they support, and even encourage, the relocation of Yellowstone bison to tribal lands. Some with the FWP Commission agree that the tribes deserve equal consideration in the coming months. “I was strongly assertive at the commission meeting [Jan. 13] that Fish, Wildlife and Parks, before we move any bison away from Yellowstone, makes sure we’ve given full consideration to the tribe’s application for receiving bison, that they don’t receive short shrift,” says Commissioner Ron Moody, adding that he refuses to vote on any relocation measure “until the tribes say they’ve been treated fairly.” For Defenders of Wildlife, the tribes’ questions have gone unanswered for far too long. The group has supported both reservations for over a decade to expand the infrastructure for existing herds and improve bison-related tourism. “The latest science is showing that very few bison are genetically pure and free of cattle genes,” says Jonathan Proctor, Defenders of Wildlife’s Rocky Mountain Region representative. “So both tribes want to convert to genetically pure Yellowstone bison and try to manage them in a more wild manner.” FWP’s legal troubles aren’t the only hurdles facing bison relocation to tribal lands. Sen. John Brenden, R-Scobey, recently introduced a bill in the Montana Legislature banning any relocation of free-roaming Yellowstone bison out of the Corwin Springs facility—one of many legislative attempts to modify bison management. Brenden’s legislation, a rewrite of a bill he failed to push through in 2009, went before the Senate Fish and Game Committee last week. Maurier says he’s unsure what will happen to the quarantined bison if Brenden’s bill passes, but Proctor believes it will require the wholesale slaughter of all disease-free bison—and render the efforts of people like Magnan pointless. “I’ve had people say, ‘Well, why do you want Yellowstone buffalo?’” Magnan says. “Genetic purity. They’re the closest to our ancestors as we can get, and that’s why we want them. To retain that history.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Snuffed out Obama speech a resounding dud If, as so many political pundits predicted, the State of the Union speech by President Barack Obama was the kickoff for his 2012 re-election campaign, the president is in trouble. The rambling, unfocused and non-specific presentation to Congress was more like a very boring college lecture, except it lacked anything resembling proof to back up the theories being thrown out like popcorn to the pigeons. Simply put, the fire that was the Obama of two years ago has gone out, smothered in a wet blanket of wheedling pleas for bipartisanship to Republicans who have clearly professed their goal of making him a one-term president. It’s not hard to recall the excitement, joy and hope for a better future that accompanied Obama at the podium during his inaugural State of the Union speech. The rolling waves of applause filled the chamber as the huge Democratic majorities in Congress cheered the man who, against all odds, made history by becoming the first black president of the United States. Obama’s campaign slogan of “Hope and Change” stirred Americans to lift their weary eyes toward a new light on the horizon. We truly believed his every word—his commitment to average Americans, his determination to rein in the excesses of Wall St., to bring equity to the tax structure so the rich didn’t continue to get richer while the poor fell through the cracks into dissolution and despair. We thought, at least for a little while, that a new day had dawned in America, that we had left behind the lying, spying, war-mongering administration of Bush and Cheney and were on the path back to national sanity. But as time went on, the new president’s promises began to fade. While millions of Americans lost their homes and jobs, Obama and his Wall Street advisers decided to throw the lifesavers to the same “too big to fail” banks, corporations and investment firms that brought down the economy with their wild, greed-driven, get-rich-quick schemes, their massive executive bonuses and the house-ofcards deceptions upon which it was all built. The common folk, whose votes brought him to office, simply vanished beneath the waves of economic distress. In the meantime, hundreds of billions continued to flow toward the two futile, unjustified and unpopular wars started by George W. Bush. Although Obama promised all war costs would be contained in his budget, once in office the sorry practice of special “emergency” appropriations for the wars continued,

billions continued to disappear, and the blood of Americans and the victims of both wars continued to flow into desert sands and barren mountains far from our shores. Ironically, on the day Carol Browner, one of his top advisers on energy and climate change, departed the White House

that “wasThethefireObama of two years ago has gone out, smothered in a wet blanket of wheedling pleas for

bipartisanship.

with no plans to fill or even maintain her position, President Obama used his speech in a weak attempt to re-define coal and nuclear energy as “clean” energy sources for the future. In the meantime, we were once again treated to promises of meeting sustainable energy goals 10, 20, or 40 years in the future–goals which no serious person could possibly predict with certainty. Of course Obama was not alone in creating the collapse of his campaign promises. With Democrats controlling both chambers of Congress by the largest majorities in decades, we hoped to see change come to fruition. But no. Instead we were treated to the health care follies, in which Montana’s own Sen. Max Baucus turned not to the popular singlepayer model used by almost all industrialized nations of the world, but to the bloated insurance industry that squats like a fat spider, sucking the juices out of the economy. And sure enough, the resulting legislation does not reform health care, it only marginally reforms health insurance. In exchange, it man-

dates that all Americans must buy health insurance by 2014 and has no mechanism whatsoever to control what the insurance industry may wring from desperate citizens. The same Democratic-controlled Congress refused to cut military spending, preferring instead to keep the military-industrial complex rolling in taxpayer dough for pork barrel, home-district expenditures. Suggesting cutting $78 billion in five years from a military budget that is annually ten times that large seems ludicrous, at best—another illusory measure intended to placate listeners rather than cut one of the nation’s single largest on-going expenses. Or how about the repeal of the Patriot Act, the closure of Guantanamo’s torture cells, and the restoration of America’s reputation as an honorable, civilized nation? Here, the results are likewise severely disappointing to those who elected the Democrats and Obama to office. The Patriot Act has been extended, with new provisions to spy on Americans. Guantanamo remains open for business, if that’s what you call it, and America’s reputation remains what it was–a hypocritical bully on the world stage that substitutes military might for diplomacy, torture for decency, and deceit for transparency. If nothing else, WikiLeaks pulled back the curtain on all those charades. And so, last November, the Democrats watched 68 seats and control of the House of Representatives go to the Republicans, the single greatest loss by any political party since 1938. It wasn’t because Republicans were so great that we wanted to return to the sick days of George Bush’s reign of error. It wasn’t because the Tea Party lured voters with tea bags and tri-corner hats. It was because Democrats stayed home. With hopes shattered, the de-energized and disillusioned base of the Democrat Party could find little to motivate its vote again. As blues singer Etta James once sang: “Your love is like trying to light a fire with a wet match–you won’t even get a spark like that.” Substitute “speech” for “love” and it sums up the State of the Union. We got lots of smoke from President Obama, but no light, no heat, and certainly no fire. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.

Missoula Independent

Page 9 January 27–February 3, 2011


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387

549-3934

SHADOW

Shadow is a lovely lady who's looking for an active family that wants a great dog to be part of all the activities. She's a favorite of our volunteer dog-walkers, but she longs to have the commitment that just the right family can give her.

MOUSCHI

This lovely dilute torti is a study in understated elegance. Her colors are muted, her meow is tiny, and she seem to always have a gentle smile on her face. This cat is a true lady!

Flowers for every bride.

DOWNY

2-year-old Downy is a clever and lively dog. This hound/shepherd mix loves to learn and is in the market for a person who would teach him new things. The shelter staff is always finding new games and puzzles for this witty boy who has a constant thirst for knowledge.

ZEN

Zen is a 2-year-old Shih Tzu with a marvelous personality. This little guy has some allergies, but they are being managed with medication and special food until they settle down. Zen has a captivating personality and loves people, dogs, kids and cats.

In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

FRITO

Frito is special in many ways, but perhaps the most noticeable is his lovely blue eyes. They're something of a surprise in an orange and white cat, and anyone who adopted this handsome guy would definitely have a one-of-a-kind. 2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

S TA N L E Y

Stanley is a laid-back, mellow guy who just takes whatever life dishes out. No cat likes living in a cage, but Stanley never complains. He always looks as if he has a smile on his face, and he does indeed have a very happy personality.

The Flower Bed

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

SARAFINA

Sarafina got trapped in a shed for over a week, so she wasn't in very good shape when she came to the shelter. However, all of that is behind her now, and she is healthy, happy, and really wanting a new family of her own. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

JASPER

2-year-old Jasper is in the market for a very committed relationship. He is searching for a person who will spend lots of time with him. Bright and energetic, Jasper and would be the perfect dog for an active and intelligent person. Jasper stays true to his Labrador breed and loves tennis balls.

ETOILE

Etoile was found tired, hungry and lonely in the Montana wilderness. This gentleman has spent enough time in the cold and would like to know how it feels to have a home and family of his own.

www.missoulafoodbank.org Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

CHAMP

We think Champ could be a champion in many different ways -he's friendly, goodlooking, and a true easy keeper. Unfortunately, at the shelter he's a champion eater, so his new family might want to start him on an exercise program!

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275

627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

BUBBLES

1-year-old Bubbles is what we call at the shelter a “Leader of the Band.” Bubbles lives life in a large way, never missing a moment to have fun or explore. After a long hard day of chasing toys and inspecting every book, paper and speck of duston the bookcase, he’ll always make time to snuggle with you.

SQUEEZER

Squeezer is a fabulous senior gal who enjoys fluffy beds and scratches behind her ears. Come visit her and she will surely melt your heart with her big green eyes and fuzzy fluffy fur. Squeezer is seeking a peaceful home where she can lounge about as she reflects on life’s mysteries.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

Missoula Independent

Page 10 January 27–February 3, 2011

237 Blaine 542-0077


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

False alarm

CASH PRIZES PAID

Conservatives concoct another “War on the West”

for 1st, 2nd, 3rd

by Paul Larmer

If a new report from the U.S. Senate and Congressional Western Caucus is any indication, the next two years will be long and painful for Interior Secretary Ken Salazar as well as for other officials charged with managing natural resources in the West. The “War on Western Jobs Report” penned by Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso and Utah Rep. Rob Bishop, the new chairman of the House Subcommittee on Public Lands, lays out grievances against the few environmental policies promoted by the Obama administration. “There is a renewed ‘War on the West,’” warn the authors, both Republicans. “This administration’s anti-business, anti-multiple use agenda threatens Western communities. It is killing jobs and undermining state and local budgets.” In the section titled “Job Killing Policy #3: Impeding Domestic Energy,” Barrasso and Bishop attack Salazar’s decision last year to cancel 77 natural gas leases in Utah’s canyon country, some on the borders of national parks. They also criticize new Bureau of Land Management (BLM) policies that call for the consideration of wildlife, air and water quality and other values before leasing public lands for industrialization. “The administration has put vital American energy resources off-limits and arbitrarily cancelled existing lease rights,” they charge. Spinning sensible conservation measures as an act of war is a well-worn tactic here in the West. In the 1990s, conservative lawmakers labeled Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt’s attempt to modernize mining and grazing programs on the public lands a “War on the West.” It worked. Roused by the notion that the feds were out to destroy the region and its ranching and mining culture—and backed with industry money—a small army of Westerners squelched most of the reforms. These days, despite the soaring deficit, no one much talks about imposing a royalty on minerals extracted from federal

lands, or charging anything near market rates for the right to graze livestock. When the Bush administration took over, all notions of reform—or even of honoring the existing environmental laws governing public lands—were thrown out the

Most “ Westerners see the ‘War on the West’ for the trumped up media sound

bite that it is.

door. Through a series of administrative orders that “streamlined” environmental reviews and expedited leasing and drilling, George W. Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney and Interior Secretary Gale Norton (who now works for Royal Dutch Shell Oil) made energy extraction the top priority. The directives coincided with rising oil and natural gas prices, setting off an unprecedented petro-boom in Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico. Wherever the industry pointed, the Bureau of Land Management doled out leases–tens of thousands of them covering tens of millions of acres. Though the Bush directives scarred vast areas of land, conservative lawmakers said not a word, while most conservationists assumed their customary defensive stance, protesting leases on the most scenic and ecologically important lands, pushing for more aggressive regulations at the state

level and waiting for the day when a friendlier administration moved to town. Enter Ken Salazar. Though it has moved slowly, Salazar ’s Interior Department has finally started to assert its vision. In addition to the oil and gas reforms, Salazar announced in December that the BLM would again consider protecting lands with outstanding wilderness qualities—an authority that, for the first time, Interior had ceded under Bush. These shifts bring some badly needed balance back to public land management. Predictably, though, they have provoked the alarmist crowd. Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch told The Deseret News that the wilderness policy “is a brazen attempt to kowtow to radical environmental groups by locking up more public lands in Utah and other states.” Now that Republicans control the House, Secretary Salazar will become all too familiar with the walk to the House Resources Committee chambers. Chairman Doc Hastings, from Washington State, has already promised to grill Salazar on his wilderness policy in the coming weeks. Barrasso and Bishop will also get to take their shots. Most likely, all will blame the administration for the recent slowdown in public-lands drilling, even though depressed natural gas prices and new gas-field finds in the East are the cause, not administrative policy changes. The rhetoric will be hot, but let’s hope Salazar and the administration resist the bullying. They need to send a strong message: Most Westerners see the “War on the West” for the trumped up media sound bite that it is. We just want our public resources—including wildlife and wilderness—managed with care.

Sign Up @ 7PM

& Remember, Male Amateur Night Feb. 13

Facebook: The Fox Club Cabaret

Paul Larmer is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He is the magazine’s executive director in Paonia, Colorado.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 January 27–February 3, 2011


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS In the areas of Education, Income & Health United Way of Missoula County • United Way of Ravalli County United Way of Missoula County and our Bitterroot affiliate, United Way of Ravalli County, seek proposals for funding from nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations based in Missoula and Ravalli Counties whose work addresses these general priorities:

EDUCATION: Helping children and youth achieve their potential INCOME: Promoting financial stability and independence HEALTH: Improving people’s health Potential applicants that do not currently receive grant funding from UWMC or UWRC must request an application packet by 2.7.11 by emailing info@missoulaunitedway.org, or calling 549-6104. Applicantions from organizations that do not request materials directly from United Way will not be accepted.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Americans seem to have collective amnesia when it comes to historic foreign affairs. Consider this: How many of you knew the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in 1979 in order to fight against anti-communist Mujahideen rebels, and that the U.S. fought a proxy war against the Soviets on Afghani land in the 1980s? If none of this rings a bell, you can learn more about this slice of history on Friday when the International Wildlife Media Center & Film Festival (IWMCFF) kicks off its newly created “Global Issues & Foreign Film Series” with the program “Afghanistan, the First Time.” It’s an event that aims to analyze Soviet and American involvement in Afghanistan, and features comments from UM student Shaima Khinjani, a

woman from Afghanistan who started a secret school for Afghani women in her home in 1996, when the Taliban ruled the country. Her husband, Dr. Faeez Akram, joins her. This self-described “intellectual salon” also includes a screening of The Ninth Company, a film about Soviet army recruits fighting in the Soviet War in Afghanistan, which lasted from lateD e c e m b e r 1979 t o m i d February 1989. –Ira Sather-Olson

FRIDAY JANUARY 28

MONDAY JANUARY 31

Missoula’s County Commissioners are looking for a few good volunteers to apply for a position on the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board. Grab applications at the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway St., or online at co.missoula.mt.us/mcbcc/ forms.htm. Applications are due by 5 PM on Feb. 4. Call 258-4877.

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

UM’s College of Technology announces that it’s offering free college prep classes for qualified veterans, including courses in math, writing and basic computer skills, starting Feb. 7. Orientation takes place at 5 PM on Feb. 7 in the College of Technology’s dining room, 909 South Ave. W. For more info or to enroll, call 877-356-VETS. Watch some puck hitters and support a local no-kill animal adoption center when the Missoula Maulers host a 50/50 raffle for AniMeals during the Missoula Maulers vs. Butte Roughriders hockey game, which begins at 7:30 PM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Visit missoulamaulers.com for ticket info.

SATURDAY JANUARY 29 Partnership Health Center, 323 W. Alder St., hosts free cervical health screenings for un-insured or under-insured women, from 9 AM–4 PM. Call 3295654 to schedule an appointment. Sip on some fermented grape juice and learn about a local watershed organization when the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts a “nonprofit nite” featuring the Watershed Eduction Network, from 5–8:30 PM. Free to attend. 50 cents from each glass of wine sold will be donated to WEN, and members of the organization will be on hand to chat about their work. Visit montanawatershed.org. If you live in the Riverfront Neighborhood, bring yourself and your kids to the Riverfront Neighborhood Council meeting, which occurs at the Currents Aquatic Center, 600 Cregg Lane, and begins with an all ages swim from 6–8 PM, followed by a council meeting at 6:30 PM that touches on a variety of topics including neighborhood planning. Free. Visit missoula-neighborhoods.org.

SUNDAY JANUARY 30 The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project presents its demonstration site charrette, starting at 4 PM in the Gold Dust Community Room, 330 N. First St. W. Free. Call 721-7513.

The inaugural run of the “Global Issues and Foreign Film Series” is Fri., Jan. 28, at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $5. Call 728-9380 and visit wildlifefilms.org.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 1 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at Joseph’s Coat, 116 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-1419. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, including groups for American Indian women and teens, every Tue. staring with dinner at 5:30 PM, followed by meetings at 6:30 PM. Free. Those with children are asked to arrive at 6:15. Call 543-6691 for more info and visit ywcaofmissoula.org/?q=node/57. UM’s Climate Change Studies Program and the Wilderness Institute present the “Conservation and Climate Change Lecture Series,” which kicks off this week with the topic “Global Change: Tipping Points for People and the Biosphere,” a talk with Rob Jackson of Duke University, starting at 7 PM in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6596.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 2 Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. This week’s beneficiary is the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, and will feature raffles for documentary screenings, the Yo La Tengo performance and BSDFF schwag. Visit kettlehouse.com.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 3 Seek out some future adventure during a Peace Corps Information Session, which features a presentation by local representative Tenly Snow and begins at 4 PM in Room 327 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288. Missoula families can explore a school that offers children in preschool through the fifth grade a place-based education that values nature, community and academic excellence when Clark Fork School, 2525 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts an open house from 6–7:30 PM. Free. Visit clarkforkschool.org for details or call Sam or Karin at 728-3395.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 January 27–February 3, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS

LEARN

MEDIA SKILLS Camera, Editing Video, Facebook,YouTube, & Television

Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A security officer called police after noticing blood and two trays of empty razor blade packages at a Walmart store in Venango County, Pa. Deducing that a shoplifter had cut himself while removing the blades, state troopers followed the trail of blood to Michael Barton, 29. (Erie Times-News) Zannish Frazier, 28, called police in West Linn, Ore., to say she was stranded in a park and needed a ride to the transit station. Officers who showed up found the woman toting six duffel bags, two of which turned out to be filled with stolen laptops, clothes and jewelry. “It was almost like she went Christmas shopping,” police Sgt. Neil Hennelly said after arresting Frazier for burglary and theft. (Portland’s The Oregonian)

Training Wed, Feb 9th, 5:30pm call 542-MCAT

ANOTHER NAIL IN THE POST OFFICE’S COFFIN - As more Netflix customers switch from mail-order DVDs to Internet downloads, its streaming movie service is hogging North America’s bandwidth, threatening the Internet’s capacity to handle other uses, according to the network management company Sandvine. Its annual report on broadband usage said that just under 2 percent of Netflix subscribers account for 20 percent of all Internet traffic during peak home Internet usage hours in the United States and Canada. Sandvine forecasts Netflix will strain broadband capacity as more and more customers abandon the mail. (Slate) HARD TIMES - Executions in the United States declined 12 percent in 2010, in part because of “the high costs of the death penalty at a time when budgets are being slashed,” according to the Death Penalty Information Center’s annual report. Texas led the nation, carrying out 17 of the 46 U.S. executions. (Reuters) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Michael Eck, 50, was loading a cannon outside Trafalgar, Ind., when it accidentally went off and fired a two-inch cannon ball through his right hand. Police said Eck and two other men had fired the cannon at least three times already before the accidental shooting. (Franklin’s Daily Journal) When Johnathan W. Hartman, 27, got into an argument with a woman while sitting in a car in a parking lot in Billings, Mont., police said he pulled out a gun, threatened to kill the woman and then fired two shots, one of which went through the car’s roof. A delayed third shot fired when Hartman tried to tuck the gun into his waistband but accidentally wounded himself in the buttocks. (Billings Gazette) DUPE OF THE WEEK - Joseph Jones, 73, told sheriff’s investigators he was awakened by a phone call to his motel room in Spartanburg, S.C., from someone claiming to be the manager. The caller explained that a prior guest had left behind some “highly sophisticated cameras” that were hidden and needed to be removed. Following the caller’s instructions, Jones smashed the television with the ceramic toilet tank cover, then threw the set outside and shattered all the mirrors in the room. Next, the caller said that a midget was trapped in an adjoining room, and Jones “needed to help police get to him.” Jones dutifully broke through the wallboard. By then, the real motel manager had received noise complaints from nearby guests and called the authorities, who concluded that Jones was the victim of an elaborate prank, which had targeted guests at other motels. No charges were filed, but the manager asked Jones to leave. (Spartanburg’s WXII-TV) OVERREACTION OF THE WEEK - When his girlfriend turned down his marriage proposal at a Burger King in Pico Rivera, Calif., Francisco Hernandez, 22, went to his car, which still had “Stacy Will You Marry Me?” written on the back window. He drove onto the sidewalk, through some bushes and into the restaurant parking lot, where he reportedly tried to run the ex-girlfriend down. He narrowly missed, then tried to drive away with two flat tires. He abandoned the car and ran, according to Los Angeles County sheriff’s Lt. Andrew Hernandez, but “then our helicopter guys spotted him walking down the street carrying a bouquet of flowers.” (Los Angeles Times) LITTLE THINGS MEAN A LOT - An unnamed man in Granby, Quebec, appeared before a smallclaims court demanding compensation for a penis enlarger he insisted didn’t work, although he spent 500 hours trying to make it. The man said he paid $262 for the X4 Extender Deluxe Edition because an advertisement promised results. (Canadian Press) Surgeons at Taiwan’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering said their experiments showed that electricity is a safer alternative to scalpels for performing penile surgery. Their report, “Determination of Human Penile Electrical Resistance and Implication on Safety for Electrosurgery of Penis,” noted that a highly concentrated electrical current performs a cleaner cut with much less blood. Because of the potential risk of determining how much electricity a penis could safely withstand, Dr. Vincent Tsai noted the researchers performed their experiments on themselves, attaching electrodes to both the head and the shaft of the organ, then applying voltage—but not anesthetic. Their conclusion, Tsai said, was to use less power for shorter durations. (Australia’s news.com.au) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATIONS - Police said Shemika McVey, 21, stabbed boyfriend Maurice Davenport, 22, with a kitchen knife at their Indianapolis home after he refused to let her view his Facebook page. (Indianapolis Star) Troy Hixon, 45, his girlfriend, another woman and his father, former Ku Klux Klan Exalted Cyclops George Hixon, 73, were drinking at home in Osceola County, Fla., when, according to the sheriff’s report, Troy Hixon threw his girlfriend down and began shooting into the ground near her. The unnamed girlfriend told deputies that the incident occurred during an argument that began after she complained she was forced to drink cheap beer while the men drank “good beer”—Budweiser, according to the report. Troy Hixon explained the gunshots by telling a deputy he “did the redneck thing” by shooting holes in a trash can full of water so it could drain. Both Hixon men were arrested after they made threats against the deputies. (Orlando Sentinel) UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITY - Reporting on Iowa’s Treasure Hunt program to return unclaimed cash, stocks and property to residents, State Treasurer Michael Fitzgerald said the person who stands to gain the most, an 85-year-old man in Storm Lake, refuses to file the necessary paperwork to claim what’s owed him: $1,632,427 in cash and stocks valued at $446,874. “We have made overtures to him,” Fitzgerald said. “He knows the money is there. It appears to be a situation of him not wanting to be bothered.” (The Des Moines Register)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 January 27–February 3, 2011


hree summers ago, David Cronenwett stood in front of 13 guests at the Pine Butte Guest Ranch in Choteau holding a beaver pelt in his hands. As the ranch’s natural history educator, it was Cronenwett’s job to provide background stories to guests before they headed out to explore the Pine Butte Swamp Preserve. He had just finished explaining the early beaver boom in North America, and he was in the

T

middle of describing the beaver’s current role in the wetlands, when a guest suddenly interjected: She wanted to know how he had acquired the beaver pelt. When Cronenwett suggested that a local trapper probably donated it, the woman sat back angrily and said, “That dirty bastard.” It wasn’t the first time Cronenwett had met with this kind of reaction, but being a trapper himself, he took the comment personally.

“I tried not to come off defensive,” Cronenwett says. “I told her I was a trapper. I told her that it was one way to supplement a living, a way to get outside and interact with the landscape, and to be connected to a tradition that’s been going on for millennia.” As the week went on, Cronenwett and the guests took hikes across the prairie and into the mountains. The time spent together, he says, helped diffuse the tension.

“You’re with these folks for many hours of the day and it’s a good way to get to know people,” Cronenwett says. “Once you get to know people, it’s much easier to have these discussions.” On a larger scale, discussions about trapping don’t come quite as easily. Over the last few decades, trapping has become a hot button, emotional issue in western Montana. The passion has escalated even more in the past few years,

INHUMANE. OUTDATED. DOG KILLERS. TRAPPERS HEAR THE CRITICISM FROM ALL SIDES, BUT REMAIN STEADFAST IN DEFENDING ONE OF THE STATE’S OLDEST TRADITIONS. by Erika Fredrickson • photos by Chad Harder

When Dee Baker arrived in Seeley Lake in 1978 there was a strong commercial market for fur. He trapped commercially for 12 years, often heading on long ski trips into the Bob Marshall Wilderness. These days, he says, he’s happy to have trapping as a recreational endeavor.

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Photo courtesy of Footloose Montana

Stories about non-target wildlife—like this dead Clark’s Nutcracker in an elevated leg hold trap—have surfaced over the past winter, providing evidence to anti-trapping groups like Footloose Montana that it’s time to ban trapping on public lands.

especially around urban settings like Missoula and in the developing Bitterroot and Flathead valleys. Stories in the news about domestic dogs maimed or killed in traps have driven a large portion of the uproar. But other issues about trapping rise to the surface with equal fury, such as the ethics of trapping and its overall safety in an ever-populating West. In the early 1980s, the late trapper and renowned conservationist Bud Moore all but predicated the debate when he told Fur, Fish and Game magazine that, while he personally felt trapping could still play a role in the modern landscape, it would ultimately be society at large that would determine whether it’s good or not, and whether it would continue. As society at large carries out that debate, trappers find themselves increasingly on the defensive. Even a starting point to the conversation—an understanding of what trapping is—can be hard to pin down. For instance, the Bitterroot-based anti-trapping group Footloose Montana states on its website: “Trapping is a poorly understood activity in Montana—and trapping organizations would like to keep it that way.” Meanwhile, the National Trappers Association’s ethics handbook states: “Trappers who act responsibly and ethically don’t have anything to hide. However, they need to appreciate the fact that most people know little or nothing about trapping.” Montana’s Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP), which supports trapping for management and regulates it for recreational use, agrees that a basic ignorance about trapping remains a huge obstacle. “Groups that oppose regulated trapping have painted it as unduly cruel, dangerous and a threat to wildlife populations,” says FWP wildlife biologist Jay Kolbe. “The vast majority of the general

public has, at best, only a passing knowledge of it, and these messages may be all they have with which to form an opinion. “The facts are much different,” Kolbe continues. “Today, most trappers use specialized methods and equipment to hold or dispatch animals ethically and which limit the possibility of non-target captures. Many of the traps that caused the recent and highly publicized injuries to dogs were illegally set. Fact is, trappers who follow the law will avoid most conflicts; those that don’t will and should be prosecuted like any other game-law violator.” As anti-trapping groups push for change, many trappers realize they need to do a better job of defending their place in society. The task at hand isn’t as simple as merely explaining the mechanics of trapping and hoping that will suffice. For those trappers who consider themselves progressive and conscientious, it means addressing the ethics of what they do, and having a much deeper conversation about wildlife and land-use. In short, it’s about proving that in a swiftly changing landscape, trappers are still relevant. And it’s a point some of them are already working hard to drive home.

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ootloose Montana has established itself as one of the most vocal critics of trapping in the state. In 2009, the organization, which focuses on domestic dogs in traps, formed Montanans for Trap-Free Public Lands and campaigned for Citizens’ Initiative 160. The ballot initiative aimed to ban all trapping on public lands with the exception of trapping used for science, propagation, health and safety. Though the initiative didn’t make it on the ballot, the campaign succeeded in stirring up strong emotions on all sides of the issue.

On its website, Footloose Montana offers at least 10 examples of stories relating to dogs getting killed or hurt in traps. The organization also cites examples of birds and other non-target animals that have met their demise due to either illegally set traps or, in some cases, legal traps set near high-use recreation areas. A few months ago, not far off the Fred Burr Trail in the Bitterroot, a couple of cross-country skiers discovered a dead Clark’s Nutcracker in an elevated leg hold trap. The skiers notified FWP and gave Footloose Montana the photos with a request to remain anonymous for fear of backlash from the offending trapper. Other stories surfaced over the past winter including one from a family in Wolf Creek whose Labrador showed up with a trap on his paw eight days after he went missing. For Footloose supporters and many dog owners, trapping on public lands is unnecessarily risky. “I’ve been kept hostage by the trapping season because I don’t want to expose my dogs to the danger,” says Anja Heister, Footloose’s executive director. “Now I go to the places around Missoula and I’m not using the public lands that I pay taxes for.” For many anti-trappers, the issue stretches beyond the danger posed to domestic dogs. Broader arguments include trap cruelty, the “incidental” trapping of endangered species or nontarget animals, and a lack of regulation by FWP. “It is a good-old-boy club where the trappers make the regulations,” says Heister. “There are a lot of trappers within Fish, Wildlife and Parks. They have a furbearer coordinator who is an avid trapper, and game wardens who are trappers.”

Last year, over 4,000 trappers purchased licenses in the state of Montana. One of the main concerns for Footloose is that trappers don’t have to take an education course to get a license, and theoretically trappers can also set out a limitless number of traps. The law requires lethal traps be set 300 feet away from trails, while a snare has to be at least 1,000 feet away. FWP sets quotas on four species—bobcat, otter, wolverine and fisher—and trappers must notify the agency if one is caught. But for many other species, there is no limit on how many animals can be trapped. Footloose claims there’s little enforcement, and even less incentive for trappers to adhere to suggestions like checking traps every 48 hours. For the organization and its supporters, trappers don’t care. “In my personal opinion most trappers couldn’t care less about animals suffering,” says Heister. It’s a damning conclusion for trappers. Though many of the cases involving domestic dogs are linked to illegal trapping, the incidents have become the black mark on all trappers and, subsequently, the chief argument for a ban. It’s exactly the kind of example Footloose needs to champion another ballot initiative. “In the United States,” Footloose Montana states, “trapping is an overwhelmingly recreational activity, meaning animals—including, every year, family pets—suffer for fun. Meanwhile, the pelts a trapper does sell are probably adorning

a fur coat worn by a rapper wannabe in some urban center far from Montana’s high mountains.”

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ee Baker has heard the criticism that trapping is purely about recreation. Almost no trappers in the state makes a living on trapping these days—market prices are far too low and, in general, modern activities and the modern lay of the land has changed its viability as a commercial activity. But for Baker, it’s the very fact that trapping is no longer highly commercialized that makes it valuable and viable. Fur booms of the past have taught him that large-scale competition, unchecked, can lead to disastrous consequences. Like a local foodie who prefers a community garden to industrial agriculture, Baker likes to see his fur kept small-scale and local. Baker’s history of trapping in the Seeley area backs up his views. When he arrived in Seeley in 1978 there was a strong commercial market for fur. That particular fur boom started in the 1960s and lasted through the early 1980s, with beaver pelts selling from $80 to $100 each. Seeley-Swan beaver pelts, says Baker, were considered some of the best quality at the North American Fur Auctions in Canada. “This valley’s famous for its furs, especially beaver,” he says. “They are a rich, lustrous color, and when they go on commercial fur markets they’re graded [on par] with Alaskan and Canadian beaver.”

Many trappers say new technology has made kill traps more efficient— and, therefore, more ethical. Newer snares like the Quick Kill Snare Spring cinch down more effectively to kill quickly. Other mechanisms include a Break-Away “S” hook, which releases any potential non-target animals like deer that can put 80 pounds of pressure on it.

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Page 15 January 27–February 3, 2011


Trappers who take trapping seriously say it’s a labor-intensive, time-consuming endeavor. “Trapping isn’t like hunting where you could go out for a few hours and then be done,” says David Cronenwett. “There are a lot more logistics.”

The fur boom brought trappers from Great Falls, Kalispell and other parts of the state to the valley, adding to the 20 or 30 trappers that already lived and worked there. “The beavers just got hammered,” Baker says. “They didn’t get wiped out, but the population got low. At that

point, the Montana Trapping Association (MTA) stepped in and told Fish and Game that beaver were being over-harvested.” For five years, beaver season was closed. When FWP opened it again, only a limited number of beaver could be trapped. The new quota, coupled

with a commercial market on a downslide, brought the beaver population back. It’s a bittersweet moment in history for trappers. A certain amount of greed and a certain lack of foresight endangered the species, but Baker says it was a lesson for local trappers to

take leadership with issues of resource management. “There have been a lot of instances like this in history where trappers as an organization have stepped in to protect resources,” Baker says. Baker grew up on a farm in rural Tennessee and graduated from the University of Montana with a degree in sociology. At the age of 32 he moved to Seeley and, at the suggestion of a friend, learned how to trap. He trapped commercially for 12 years, often heading on long ski trips into the Bob Marshall Wilderness. It was a lifestyle with which he felt comfortable. “I think growing up in a rural area on a farm your perception of animals can sometimes be quite different than people in an urban area,” says Baker. “Your consciousness is formed from everyday relationships with animal populations. It’s not formed by media or Walt Disney or Hollywood—and I’m not saying one is better than the other; I’m saying there’s a real difference. If I came from a different place I might have thought trapping was a terrible way to kill an animal. But growing up where I did, that’s not how I looked at it.” The Seeley-Swan has changed significantly over the past decade. The few residents like Baker who continue to trap have had to adjust to a population influx, to people living and recreating on land that had been untouched. With the influx, Baker says, came a change in attitude toward trapping. “There are people in the community now who don’t look favorably at trapping—unless they have beavers eating trees in their yard or foxes eating their chickens,” he says. Instead of shrinking away from the change, Baker has embraced it by thinking locally. In 2001, he and his wife opened an artisan shop called The Grizzly Claw Trading Company, where he serves espresso, hosts literary readings by local writers, and sells the wares of 60 Montana artisans. Among the store’s inventory is a small selection of fur pillows, fur hats and jewelry made from beaver teeth and claws. The fur comes directly from trap lines Baker’s been working for over 30 years—with the exception of a few areas that are now subdivisions. “It’s a mixed blessing,” he says. “I regret those places are so populated and, at the same time, it’s hard to have a retail business when no one is coming through your door. I just hope the development is planned so that the wild spaces here stay wild.”

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In the early 1980s, the late trapper and renowned conservationist Bud Moore all but predicated the debate when he told Fur, Fish and Game magazine that, while he personally felt trapping could still play a role in the modern landscape, it would ultimately be society at large that would determine whether it’s good or not, and whether it would continue.

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Page 16 January 27–February 3, 2011

avid Cronenwett grew up in New Jersey and earned a music degree from Cornish College with an emphasis in classical guitar. Despite his urban beginning, Cronenwett’s interest in natural history led him to rural Montana. In 2003, he founded the Wilderness Arts Institute, which offers courses in ethnobotany, birding, fire-starting and shelterbuilding, among other skills. He consid-


ers himself a naturalist first, and only an occasional trapper. When he traps, he hikes into the woods on foot or with snowshoes, setting traps and collecting the fur for personal use as clothing lining and outdoor accessories. But having spent time in both big cities and rural areas like the Yaak Valley and Choteau, he’s thought a lot about the debate over contemporary trapping. On his natural history blog called “A View From Aerie Mountain,” Cronenwett usually writes about fire ecology, wind impacts, prairie islands and birds, often combining hard science with meditative thoughts on nature. But after watching the anti-trapping campaign begin to build last year, and sometimes finding himself on the defensive with guests at the Pine Butte Ranch, he decided to tackle the issue in a blog post he titled “On Trapping.” In the post, he explores the way anti-trappers frame trapping in contrast to other activities like hunting, conservation support and dog walking. Hunting, in particular, has seen changes in perception over the last decade. Though extreme animal rights activists view killing any animal as egregious, many in Montana—including Footloose—view ethical hunting as an important part of the local food movement, and not antithetical to animal welfare. Trapping does not hold the same position of reverence. T h o u g h C r o n e n w e t t d o e s n’ t equate the two activities, he questions whether it’s a fair assessment to see them so differently. “There is a strong message that hunting is good but trapping is bad,” he wrote on the blog. “Apparently, there are some who believe that all hunts end with a quick and humane kill, but…there are some very ethical folks who have taken shots that unintentionally caused great suffering…Does this mean that hunting should be banned because accidents happen occasionally?” Another comparison between hunting and trapping makes the point that a hunter eats the animal he kills, providing valuable sustenance. Most trappers don’t eat the meat, but Cronenwett says that the money gained from pelts provides a need in the same way eating does. And just because a trapper doesn’t eat his kill, it doesn’t mean the meat’s going to waste. Dee Baker, for instance, says he uses the flesh for bait, or leaves it for birds and other animals to eat. “The carcass is recycled into trapping coyotes,” explains Baker. “If I trap the coyotes, then it’s been used. If I don’t, then that meat gets recycled back into the animal kingdom.” Yet another comparison between hunting and trapping takes issue with the level of skill involved in trapping. Hunters take time to track an animal while, according to trapping critics, trappers simply set down traps and leave. Cronenwett says that just as unethical hunters will be sloppy in their work, an unethical trapper will do the same. But if you are an ethical trapper, it’s a laborintensive, time-consuming endeavor.

“Trapping isn’t like hunting where you could go out for a few hours and then be done,” says Cronenwett. “There are a lot more logistics. You need to get several sets out there in different locations, check your traps every day or every other day, and then go get them again. It’s something that takes planning.” Cronenwett also takes issue with the idea that anti-trappers get so furious about trappers killing wildlife, but not with others who may make a larger, albeit less direct, impact. In “On Trapping” he compared a jet-

dogs say that with adjustments in land use and more trapper education, the tradition could continue without public conflicts. “As far as dogs ending up in traps,” Cronenwett says, “that needs to be mitigated and I think there’s room to compromise.” In fact, Cronenwett sees other areas where trappers and anti-trappers could find common ground. He wrote on his blog that trapping of “rare animals” like wolverines should be “halted immediate-

Photo courtesy of Simon Williams

David Cronenwett usually writes about natural history, but after watching the anti-trapping campaign build last year, he decided to take on the anti-trapping criticism. “My biggest beef with trapping is there is no ethical trapping movement,” says Cronenwett. “Trappers need to step up and write about these issues.”

setting corporate lawyer add what impacts are to a “local-rural-guy who supplements his income with some beaver trapping.” “It gets him outside locally and as such, is part recreation and provides a service to local ranchers who would like to hang on to some of their cottonwood trees…,” he writes of the local. “While the attorney’s impacts are unseen and unrecognized, they are significant. I am admittedly painting a simplistic example…but am doing so to illustrate the fact that these issues are complex…” Cronenwett acknowledges one of the biggest marks against trapping is the issue of dogs getting hurt or killed in traps. He says it’s, once again, a circumstance of unethical trapping. Trappers like him who have never had run-ins with

ly.” The biting reaction he received from fellow trappers after that post, however, confirmed just how entrenched they are in their ways. It will take time for trappers to truly engage in an open dialog about the future of their work. “My biggest beef with trapping is there is no ethical trapping movement,” says Cronenwett. “Trappers need to step up and write about these issues, think about them…This discussion, this battle over trapping is important, because this is a place where it can still be done and it can be done well.”

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umerous peer-reviewed studies show trapping on a local level can reduce the numbers in an immediate

area and mitigate conflicts with land owners. For people like Joe Miller, experience backs up those studies. He is regularly allowed to trap coyotes sneaking onto ranches, or “damage beaver” that cause flooding and harm private property. “Beaver will overpopulate and eat themselves out of house and home, and the [excess] will die by disease and starvation rather rapidly,” he says. “And, in the process, they do so much damage.” Whether there’s a study or not, when the coyotes stop showing up on a ranch for the calving season, his job is done. Miller defines an “environmentalist” as someone who is a steward of the land. It wasn’t that long ago—10 years or so, he says—that his definition would have been different—“some greenie, tree-hugger down in Missoula.” His role as a trapper has brought him face-to-face with those tree-huggers, and it used to be something he despised. But in 2003, Miller was asked by the Montana Trapping Association to talk with a group of college students about trapping at Northwest Connections—a nonprofit founded by UM environmental studies grad and executive director Melanie Parker, her husband, conservation specialist Tom Parker, and Bud Moore. At first he was uncomfortable speaking to a crowd of people who likely held anti-trapping views. After the first talk, however, his view changed. “I just immediately fell in love with it,” says Miller. “It forced me to think outside the box.” Miller’s talks usually focus on his time spent on ranches like the Union Creek Ranch in the Potomac Valley, where he traps coyotes. The ranchers tell Miller that, though they lose some animals to direct coyote predation, they lose even more during calving season when stressed heifers sense coyotes on the perimeter. “If you take coyotes out, more will come in,” Miller says. “You’re not trying to eradicate the population, you’re trying to reduce the impact via trapping.” First, he reduces the population in the immediate vicinity and then creates a barrier by trapping around the perimeter. “Coyotes are incredibly smart animals,” says Miller. “The risk is not worth the reward: They’re that savvy. There’s still the ebb and flow of coyotes from the Garnets in the big picture. But the felt impact at the ranch is noticeably lessened.” Serious trappers like Miller put enormous efforts into trapping. For his coyote work, Miller spends three months out of the year prepping equipment and scouting out areas before he ever sets a single trap. Last year he scouted out a potential line that took him from ranches in Seeley through the Potomac Valley, across the Garnets to Bearmouth and up to Drummond. When he did set up the trap line—about 100 traps in all—he ran it on rotation so he could check the traps within 48 hours.

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“That’s what I could handle,” he says. “If I had more than that I felt like my work would get sloppy.” That’s not to say his trapping has been perfect. As with hunting, accidents happen. Over the course of five years Miller admits he’s accidentally snared two deer—one of which was released safely. The other one ran into the trap when a logging project sprang up nearby. Though Miller had scouted out deer routes beforehand, the unanticipated logging project funneled the herd toward his trap line. “I felt really bad about it,” he says. “I really sat back and thought twice about ever snaring again, but I continued to because most of it I can predict.”

coming from, and it’s not my mission to convert them to supporters of trapping. My mission is to hear them out and, if they want, to share the knowledge I have so they can think clearly about the issue, too. It works both ways.”

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ike Stevenson tracks carnivores from the backyard of his cabin at the base of the Mission Mountains all the way to the top of the peaks. Using a snowmobile, skis and snowshoes, he works his way up designated trails, documenting animal tracks. He’ll note small ones like mice and rabbit, but mostly he has his eye out for carnivores like wolverine, lynx, mountain lion and fish-

were our mentors and heroes, and we wanted to know what they knew.” Despite his early romantic ideals, Stevenson doesn’t pretend that trapping occurs without suffering. He does believe the perception of traps being cruel has been exaggerated through anti-trapping campaigns, especially since new technology has made kill traps more efficient. “I do have a lot of experience using conibears with beaver, muskrat and marten and they kill very quickly,” he says. “You can tell when an animal’s been alive in a trap because they’ll pull the wire and there will be tracks and scrapes and claw marks. But 99 times out of 100, when those animals are caught in a conibear, it comes down on the back of the neck and [kills] it.”

“In a way you can’t argue the truth that trapping isn’t what it was a century ago or in the Great Depression,” says Northwest Connection’s Tom Parker. “It was an extremely honorable profession then, and people actually wore furs for the utility and warmth and longevity.”

Any kind of wildlife management carries the weight of controversy. While FWP considers trapping to be a tool, Miller knows that others doubt it. Over the last couple years he says he’s had to defend trapping more and more. Even Melanie Parker at Northwest Connections challenged him to think deeper about why he does what he does. Specifically, she asked Miller: What if we didn’t trap and we let all the predators and prey sort it out? “If there’s one person who can make a statement and force me to think, it’s Mel Parker,” laughs Miller. “I have to say, I pondered that question, literally, for months. There was not a day that went by that that question didn’t go through my head.” For Miller, the answer isn’t cut-anddried. And even between trappers and FWP, there isn’t always an agreement on how wildlife should be managed. The most important thing, he says, is that the conversation continues. “I never used to respect other people in regard to anti-trapping sentiment,” says Miller. “Now, I respect their opinion. I really do. I understand where they’re

Missoula Independent

er. When he sees those tracks he punches their locations into a GPS device, adding to the long list of data he’s collected over 12 years. Stevenson is a former trapper currently on staff with Northwest Connections. Along with Tom Parker and a few other trackers, he is working to map how carnivores travel on the landscape and how variation in habitat affects them. It’s a project that’s helped him put into perspective the life and death issues—the suffering—that wildlife deals with on a day-to-day basis, as well as in the broader ecosystem. Stevenson’s interest in wildlife and trapping started when he was growing up in Montana and Alaska where his father worked as a forest ranger. He recalls veteran trappers hanging around the ranger stations. One of those trappers was Bud Moore, whom he met when he was 13 and whose articles Stevenson read in Fur, Fish and Game. “Those old-time trappers were the ones that really got out there more than anyone else,” says Stevenson. “They kind of knew the secrets of the forest. They

Page 18 January 27–February 3, 2011

Leg hold traps are different. They generally cut off the blood supply and numb the leg. A No. 3 offset jaw leg hold for a coyote, for example, catches the front foot and holds it without forcing the jaws to dig in. “When an animal is caught in a leg hold trap—don’t let any trapper fool you—yes, there is pain and that animal is scared,” says Stevenson. “But it’s not as gruesome as a lot of the anti-trappers try to paint it to be. Animals will fight it, but usually not for long, and then they’ll just kind of lay around until you come up.” That animals like mink have reportedly chewed off their leg to get out of a trap doesn’t indicate that it’s the norm, adds Stevenson. With leg holds, trappers have to kill the animal themselves. Stevenson says he kills coyotes with a .22 pistol. Smaller animals can be killed with a stick. “I know it sounds like clubbing baby seals,” says Stevenson, “but it’s an effective way to dispatch a small animal. Then you can stop the heart with your foot or hand by stepping on the [chest].” It’s the kind of details left out of fairytales and nursery rhymes, but for

Stevenson, the death and pain associated with trapping needs to be understood relative to the rest of the natural world. “Animals don’t just lie down under a tree and go to sleep,” says Stevenson. “They usually die of starvation or another animal eats them. There’s a lot of pain out there and for us to participate in the reality of the natural world, is part of that circle.”

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hen I-160 hit the Montana Trappers Association’s (MTA) radar two years ago, the group met with several organizations in western Montana to rally for support. Most of those organizations were already on the trappers’ side, such as cattlemen and outdoor sporting groups. But MTA did meet with Footloose Montana a couple of times, before Footloose drew the proverbial line in the sand. Jim Anderson, a regional director for MTA, says that while it’s his hope to broker another discussion between the groups, the prospect of it going anywhere looks grim. “Some kind of forum would be nice where we can get together,” he says. “It is such an emotional issue for people…whether or not we are adequately or properly doing a good job of managing our wildlife, some people simply are not going to change their mind.” Footloose remains steadfast in its conviction that trapping on public lands for commercial and recreational purposes must be stopped. The group continues to map out trap locations so that those people recreating on public lands can avoid them. It continues to put on workshops for dog owners who want to learn how to release their pets from traps. Most importantly, it will continue to fundraise and build support for its cause in the hopes of gaining enough signatures so that, within the next couple of years, it can finally put trapping up for public vote. “Trapping is a privilege that can be taken away by society at any time,” says Heister. “It’s cruel and it keeps the public hostage. It needs to end.” Despite the impasse, many trappers remain committed to a broader discussion of what they do, and how they do it. The issue for them isn’t just if trapping should continue, but how to continue it ethically. It’s more of a discussion to be had among themselves, as opposed to with organizations like Footloose. In Cronenwett’s sign-off for his post about trapping he made his plea not to the anti-trappers out there, but trappers whose way of life is at stake and whose reputation is on the line. “The image of the bloodthirsty, cruel trapper plying his trade in the backcountry…must be overcome,” he wrote. “Trapping based on ecology, legitimate cultural values and unassailable ethics is the only kind of trapping that will survive in the United States and elsewhere in the future.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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Food desire vs. food truth FLASHINTHEPAN Reviewing restaurants for a newspaper in a city with good food is what many people would call a dream job. I won’t deny the obvious perks of subsidized restaurant inspection, but as I live this dream I’m finding it often puts me at odds with my own values about food, and if I’m not careful it will take years off my life. As it stands, a packet of Alka-Seltzer inhabits the spot in my wallet where a condom once lurked. The antacid sees a lot more action. If I listened to my gut I wouldn’t eat half of what I swallow in the line of duty, and if I listened to my heart, I’d eat even less. I’m much closer to being a militant locavore than most readers of my restaurant reviews would ever suspect, but as a critic I have to judge the dishes on their own terms, evaluating them according to criteria that a majority of readers can relate to. Were it not for this job I’d usually order vegetarian in restaurants, forgoing the ubiquitous mystery meats. The only meat I really want to be involved with is the kind that’s in my freezer: deer from last year’s hunt that lived a happy life and was dead before it even heard the bullet; beef and pork from farmer friends who raise clean, humane meat; the occasional store-bought organic chicken. Alas, this job has me eating more fried fat and grease than I’d otherwise choose, and sometimes even loving it in spite of myself. But as I’ve grown older and wiser I’ve realized that I don’t always have to swallow, and I can learn everything I need to know from just a bite or two. My dog, who ends up eating ribs on a regular basis with no evident angst, may be my professional dilemma’s happiest beneficiary. Albuquerque has more New Mexican restaurants than any city in the world—a distinction worthy of note in culinary circles. After all, how many gastronomes get excited at the mention of Florida-style food, Idaho cuisine, or the delicacies of New Hampshire? The mere mention of green chile can induce visceral pangs of longing, in and outside of New Mexico. New Mexican food—at least what they serve in restaurants—epitomizes my love-hate relationship

by ARI LeVAUX

I’d eat those chicharrones because they’re so irresistible, while whining softly to myself about how much better the chicharrones would probably taste if they were made from local pork. The same basic conflict appears when I review fancy restaurants that drench everything in butter, thicken it with flour and sweeten it with sugar. Even if they braise the pork belly with five-spice rather than deep-frying it, it’s still hogs from a factory farm. Lecturing my readers about how much better a restaurant’s fajitas could have been if only they were made with local beef would get very old, very quickly. Readers want to know if the enchiladas are flat or rolled, or if the carne adovada has cumin. Telling the world that the cook needs to start a garden and shop at Whole Foods would be like a music critic deciding a song can’t be good if it has no redeeming social value. The distinction between art for its own sake and art with an embedded agenda is the difference, according to James Joyce in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, between “proper and improper art.” Improper art, Joyce says, aims to impregnate you with an idea or desire, while proper art shows you a Photo by Ari LeVaux glimpse of truth. Food criticism is all about desire. If the mammary secretions of incarcerated, drug- I describe the way one place adds chicharrones to its addicted cattle. Even a green chile can’t change that. posole, New Mexican mouths will water. If I were to A similar dilemma exists regarding chichar- muddy that picture with my feelings about the rones. In the southwest, chicharron is a broadly health, ethical and environmental consequences of defined term that refers to a spectrum of deep-fried the industrial food system, it would compromise the pork possibilities. Chicharrones come in all sizes, aesthetic of the piece. And if my pieces weren’t aesthetically satisfying, with varying ratios of meat to fat. Some chicharrones are made from sections of belly flab normally turned the boss would hire someone else for the job, and I into bacon. Others are made from chewier chunks of wouldn’t get to review sushi joints, where at least I shoulder meat. Chicharrones can be boogie board- can point out that wild-caught mackerel is on sized sheets of waffle-textured pigskin, or even Seafood Watch’s “Best Choice” list, unlike, say, whole pork chops. At any particular restaurant, my hamachi, which is usually farm-raised on an unsusreaders will want to know if the chicharrones burri- tainable diet of fish feed. That means I’ll have to suspend my disgust at the to is best smothered in red or green chile. If I were paying my own way, and eating my way, shameful wastefulness of flying raw fish around the I’d at least ask them to hold the cheese on that bur- world. But if I don’t inspect the red dragon rolls, green rito, because in addition to hating the thought of tamales and chicharrones of Albuquerque, somebody where the cheese came from, it gives me heartburn. else will. So I guess it might as well be me. with restaurant criticism. At its best, New Mexican food is an expression of this region’s landscape and culture, a song of corn, chile, and pinto beans. But in the American economy, the selling of food is greased by the insertion of commodities like cheese, flour, pork bellies and sugar. Still, I can see profound elegance in a green chile cheeseburger. But all too often I also see potential unrealized. Most cheeseburgers, even expensive ones, amount to disgusting patties of industrial feedlot meat on bleached white buns stuck together with melted squares of orange-stained cheese made from

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey months of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2011, Bernice. Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses

local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Cat Bake Shop 2000 West Broadway (next to Noodles Express) 542-9043 Come try Missoula’s newest coffee house & bakery. Try our signature buttery morning buns, scones, cinnamon rolls, huckleberry coffee cake, & organic artisan breads. We also offer a variety of cakes, French pastries, & full coffee menu. (Banquet room available for morning meetings.) Tues - Sat. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the

Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Missoula Independent

Call ahead for a breakfast sandwich to go on your way to class, work, or even on your way to the ski hill

721-6033

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Page 19 January 27–February 3, 2011


the

dish

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 “Should I wait until I have dental insurance before seeing a dentist?” No. Waiting for insurance coverage often results in small problems becoming much larger and more expensive. Most dental insurance plans have very limited benefits. Over half our patients do not have dental insurance. Many use financing plans to make sure small problems don’t become big ones. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Delivery hours: M-F 11-2. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Jazz Wednesdays starting at 7pm. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5 - close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Chilly weather is here. Stop in, warm up, & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

HAPPIESTHOUR The Savoy Casino & Liquor Store What you’re drinking: Red beer, made with Bud Light, tomato and clam juices. Why you’re drinking it: We’re typically purists when it comes to beer. We like our ale dark and straight up. Skip the veggies and mollusks, please. However, while state Sen. Jim Shockley’s citation last week for drinking canned red beer while driving inspired the Republican to step down from his position chairing the legislative committee drafting tougher DUI laws, it inspired us to devote this week’s Happiest Hour to his beverage of choice. What it tastes like: It’s like a salty Bloody Mary with beer. Savoy bartender Jack Arcand says Budweiser, or Bud Light, is essential when mixing a red beer. For some reason, Arcand says, other light beers, like PBR, just don’t work. And dark brews overpower the tomato juice flavor. One benefit of adding juice to an already light ale—for us and Shockley, who had a BAC of .03 when a Missoula police officer pulled him over—is that it takes a few before intoxication sets in. “You’ve got to drink a lot of these to get wasted,” Arcand says. Who you’re drinking with: Arcand and James Gillison, who says he spent one entire day this week at the Savoy drinking red beer.

Januar y

COFFEE SPECIAL

Jim Shockley, R-Victor

Photo by Chad Harder

“For the record, I live like two blocks from here,” Gillison says. Happy Hour specials: Spend $5 gambling and the Savoy will buy you up to three drinks per hour, all day, every day. If you’re not a gambler, a pint of red beer runs $3. The Savoy also sells canned Budweiser Chelada for $2.75. As Shockley knows, canned red beer is very convenient. How to find it: 123 West Broadway, between Higgins Avenue and Ryman Street. —Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Va l e n t i n e

Butterfly House Blend $9.95/lb Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro Hot Noodle Bowls Grilled Teriyaki Dishes • Sautéed Seafood Entrées ...are sure to keep you warm this winter! When we say Not just Sushi! we mean it.

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com Missoula Independent

Page 20 January 27–February 3, 2011


Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring international & Irish pub fare as well as locally produced specials. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic

wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun Wed 8-3pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Burger Shack 205 Main St., Stevensville 777-2370 Come take a bite out of our 1/2 pound big & beefy burgers. The only burger joint in Missoula and the Bitterroot serving 100% Certified Angus Beef, hand pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over a dozen mouth watering specialty burgers to choose from, like the Inside Out, stuffed with creamy gorgonzola cheese and fresh chopped bacon. Or the Philly Cheesesteak made with 100% Certified Angus top sirloin - touted to be the best outside of Philly! It's not just a burger, it's a destination. The Burger Shack is open Monday - Saturday, 11:00am to 8:00pm. Also serving beer & wine. Orders to go 7772370. $-$$

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton • 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu

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Missoula Independent

Page 21 January 27–February 3, 2011


Arts & Entertainment listings January 27–February 3, 2011

8

days a week

THURSDAY

27

January

If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Bring an appetite for something literary when the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, presents its “Brown Bag It! Book Discussion Group” on Churchill by Paul Johnson, starting at noon. Free. Call 363-1670. End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 4–7 PM at the winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Enjoy lunch and a presentation that awards businesses, organizations and institutions that encourage the use of sustainable transportation when Missoula In Motion presents its Transportation Best Practices Award ceremony, which occurs on Feb. 3 at 11 AM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $10/$5 members. RSVP’s are requested by 4 PM today. Call 258-4961 to register.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. Butter up your folk biscuits when local band Butter plays indie folk during the Top Hat’s “Artists-In-Residence” family-friendly concert series every Thu. this month from 6–8 PM. Free. Grill it up and drink it down when Sockeye Sawtooth socks it to you with a set of alt

Photo courtesy of Michael Weintrob

“Would you care for a game of footsie?” Brooklyn’s The Pimps of Joytime play a danceable mix of funk, soul and pop at the Top Hat Tue., Feb. 1, at 10 PM. $10, with advance tickets at Ear Candy Music and Rockin Rudy’s.

country, blues and Americana, starting at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Blast off into the world of permaculture when Paul Wheaton hosts a lecture on “Rocket Mass Heaters” starting at 6:30 PM in the large conference room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com/permaculture/missoula for more info. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Ladies can dance to the beat of booty busting tunes during Dance Dance Party Party, a dance party for women that runs from 7–8 PM at YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free, all ages. No booze, boys or judgement allowed, but leg warmers are optional. E-mail Roe at rohanna.erin@gmail.com. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the

Ireland and America - a relationship set to music The University of Montana Irish Studies Program presents

Bridging the Atlantic A Free Public Lecture exploring the 300-year musical link between Ireland and America

PJ Curtis Ireland's premier musicologist UM Music Recital Hall Saturday, February 5, 7:30 - 9:00pm Part of the Springtime of Irish Music and Song Series Sponsored by

Missoula Independent

Tickets for Music Concerts Available at: www.griztix.com; the Adam's Center; The Source; The Southgate Mall; Worden's; Rockin Rudy's. Information at: www.irishmontana.com www.friendsofirishstudies.org, or call Terry at 544.0311

Page 22 January 27–February 3, 2011

Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night for the layperson, begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes $7 pitchers of Bayern beer, prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com.

Affordable, Convenient, Discreet, Local Oldest Dispensary in the Bitterroot!

• 12 FREE clones • FREE 1/2 ounce • Large selection • Exclusive strains • Edibles • Lotions & creams • FREE local delivery • Monthly raffle

406-363-8108 1986 N. First Street, Suite F • Hamilton

Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Bowling and karaoke go together like finger snaps and open-heart surgery during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Women give a thumbs up to spirits during Ladies’ Night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which features half-off drinks for women and occurs this and every Thu. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Jah insists that you take a puff from a musical pipe when Chele Bandulu, Supa J and DJ Green play reggae at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Bust a hip move when the Dead Hipster Dance Party celebrates its 150th party with giveaways of free drinks, prizes for “best dancer” and “best dressed,” plus hot dance cuts DJ’d by Chris Baumann and Mike Gill, starting at 9 PM at the Badlander. $3. Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations and a bit of karaoke during ladies’ night and live karaoke with Party Trained at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Thu. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 28, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Winter Reading Club 2011 January 15 - March 15, 2011

Read books to earn prizes! Sign up at Missoula Public Library or join online. 301 E Main Street, Missoula www.missoulapubliclibrary.org 721-BOOK (2665) Think...MORE! MPL thanks the Winter Reading Club Sponsors: • Civitella Espresso Bar • Grizzly Claw Trading Company • Kayla Romberger, Artist


Avoid shrinkage of your dancing parts and bust a move to the UF Okies when it plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Purr it up with some bass heavy electronic music when BassFace presents its Pussy Cat Party for AniMeals, which features sets of various electronic styles by locals Ebola Syndrome, Kris Moon, ir8Prim8 and AP, at 9 PM at the Top Hat. The show also includes a raffle, silent auction, visuals by Amber Bushnell, and breakdancing by “Soled Out.” Free, but AniMeals will be accepting donations.

FRIDAY January

28

Families can get help narrowing their search for quality child care, and find out if they qualify for assistance, with Child Care Assistance, which is offered by Child Care Resources from 8 AM–5 PM Mon.–Fri. at its office, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St. Free. Call 728-6446 and visit childcareresources.org. It’s all about the money when the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St., hosts the 36th annual Economic Outlook Seminar, which features the theme “Paying for the Recession—Rebalancing Montana’s Economy” and begins at 8 AM. $80. Call 243-5113. The Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., will be closed today due to building maintenance. It reopens at 10 AM on Sat., Jan. 29. Call 721-BOOK. Head down to Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave., every Fri. to catch a “Clarity Book Meeting with Great Freedom/ Balanced View: Clarity in Everyday Life,” which begins at 10 AM. Free. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Missoula’s County Commissioners are looking for a few good volunteers to apply for a position on the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board. Grab applications at the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway St., or online at co.missoula.mt.us/mcbcc/forms.htm. Applications are due by 5 PM on Feb. 4. Call 258-4877. Do your part to help run an important cultural festival by becoming a volunteer for the 2 011 B i g S k y D o c u m e n t a r y F i l m Festival, which occurs Feb. 11–20 at the Wilma Theatre. Visit bigskyfilmfest.org/ bsdff/festival/volunteers for a list of volunteer positions, and more info. E-mail volunteer@bigskyfilmfest.org with questions. Missoula’s Parks and Rec Department announces a host of activities for adults and kids starting in February, including a J u n i o r P l a y m a k e r s W i n t e r Yo u t h Basketball League and a movement series called Pilates at Parks. Visit missoulaparks.org for specifics and call 721PARK or stop by the Currents Aquatics Center to register.

End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 4–7 PM at the winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St., hosts “Give Kids a Smile Day,” an event where local volunteer dentists from the Montana Dental Society offer free dental screenings and dental work to low-income children, from 4:30–6 PM. Screenings will occur in the mall’s community room, located in the corridor near PetStop. Call 549-2778.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703.

Stanzas slip off the page when local poet Mark Gibbons hosts a bilingual reading of his book Mauvaises Herbes—with help from his son Sean Gibbons and UM prof Michel Valentin—starting at 7 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 5499010 and visit shakespeareandco.com.

A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.)

SPOTLIGHT movers and rollers

UM’s College of Technology is offering free college prep classes for qualified veterans, including courses in math, writing and basic computer skills, starting on Feb. 7. Orientation takes place at 5 PM on Feb. 7 in the College of Technology’s dining room, 909 South Ave. W. For more info or to enroll, call 877-356-VETS. Those in Whitefish enjoy a preemptive strike of aesthetics during the 2011 Whitefish Artwalk, which starts at 5 PM and includes a slew of downtown businesses showing a variety of works. Guided tours of the walk are at 5 PM and 6, starting at Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave. A reception at the studio follows from 6–8 PM. Free. Call 862-5929 and visit stumptownartstudio.org. Help support an organization that operates Ogren Park at Allegiance Field during Play Ball Missoula’s annual Hot Stove Banquet and Auction, which begins at 5:30 PM with a silent auction and reception, and moves into dinner and a live auction at 7 PM, all at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $85 per person/$750 for a table of 10. Call 543-1007 for tickets. Josh Farmer waters your hearing receptors when the keyboardist/guitarist and vocalist plays the Top Hat’s “Family Friendly Friday” concert series, from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Leave your “bro face” where you found it when EL3-OH! plays gypsy jazz in the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-8703. Step into an intellectual salon when The Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave., presents the debut of its “Global Issues and Foreign Film Series,” which this week features the program “Afghanistan, the First Time,” and includes a talk by UM student and Afghani native Shaima Khinjani, plus a screening of the Russian film The Ninth Company, starting at 7 PM. $5. Call 728-9380. Introduce your buckaroo to something stringy when the Missoula Symphony Orchestra presents its Family Concert, which offers an interactive and educational concert with a “Wild West” theme, starting at 7 PM at the University Theatre. $8. Visit missoulasymphony.org for more info and to purchase tickets. Call 721-3194.

Photo courtesy of William Munoz

Writers need to write, painters need to paint, and modern dancers need to writhe and slither their bodies onstage. They can’t help it. It’s in their blood. And, in their quest to explore the boundaries of movement, they do things like suspend themselves with pulleys in order to climb backwards up a stepladder. Or they roll up into the arms of another dancer, so they can be held upside down by their fellow aesthetic partner in crime. Those moves I just described comprise some of the 18 dance vignettes in choreographer Susan Marshall’s piece “Cloudless,” which was hailed by The New York Times as “dramatically taut and emotionally rich.” This week, 10 UM students will present restaged excerpts from the critically acclaimed piece—re-titled as “Cloudless Suites”—during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert. It’s a student run showcase that aims to raise funds for dance students to attend and present new choreographic works to judges at the Northwest Regional American College Dance Festival in Idaho this March. This celebration of motion also features new work by Luke Miller, a member of Marshall’s contemporary dance outfit known as the Susan Marshall & Company. His composition utilizes six student dancers, and is described as an amalgamation of outlandishness and poignancy. WHAT: American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert WHO: UM School of Theatre and Dance WHEN: 7:30 PM nightly Fri., Jan. 28–Sat., Jan. 29 WHERE: The Open Space, on the bottom floor of UM’s PARTV Center HOW MUCH: $5 suggested donation MORE INFO: Call 243-2832 Students are also planning to show their goods. Steve Teran’s “Strut,” pictured, features lots of attitude and music by Appaloosa and the Scissor Sisters, while Michael Becker and Collin Ranf’s duo performance titled Silt explores the similar experiences of two people, and is set to Radiohead’s tune “Nude.” Here’s another nugget of info to note: In December, Miller and fellow company member Darrin M. Wright came to UM to teach a master class to students as part of a guest artist residency. The fruits of their pedagogy will be seen in “Cloudless Suites,” and if you dig what you see this weekend, you’ll get to see “Cloudless” performed in its entirety during UM’s “Dance in Concert” performance in April. —Ira Sather-Olson

Missoula Independent

Page 23 January 27–February 3, 2011


Watch some puck hitters and support a local no-kill animal adoption center when the Missoula Maulers host a 50/50 raffle for AniMeals during the Missoula Maulers vs. Butte Roughriders hockey game, which begins at 7:30 PM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Visit missoulamaulers.com for ticket info. Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets.

Help some UM dancers get to a regional dance festival while absorbing their sweeping moves during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert, which features student performances of work by renowned choreographer Susan Marshall and others, and begins at 7:30 PM in The Open Space, on the bottom floor of UM’s PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2682. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a

Do You Own Property in Montana? Business owners must complete and return a business equipment reporting form by February 15. If you haven’t reported business equipment in the past or you haven’t received a reporting form in the mail, please contact your local Department of Revenue office. Non-profit, religious or charitable organizations may qualify for a property tax exemption. Applications must be filed annually by March 1 to be considered for the current tax year (those who have received an exemption since 1981 only need to reapply if the property or its use has changed.) Disabled veterans (or surviving spouses) may claim an exemption or reduction of property taxes if the disability is rated at 100%. Applications must be filed annually by April 15 to be considered for the current tax year. Residential property owners may be eligible for reduced property taxes if you meet household income criteria. Applications must be filed annually by April 15 to be considered for the current tax year. For more information please contact your local Department of Revenue office, visit revenue.mt.gov, or call toll free (866) 859-2254 (in Helena 444-6900).

Wanna help us support our less fortunate hairy friends? Tangles is accepting food & or monetary donations for AniMeals through the months of January & February.

www.tanglesmt.com

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

Neighborhood Stabiliza on Program 3 (NSP3) Montana Department of Commerce

On October 19, 2010 Congress allocated funding for the third round of the Neighborhood Stabiliza on Program (NSP3). In Montana, the NSP3 Program will be administered by the Montana Department of Commerce. The Department of Commerce an cipates receiving an award of $5 million in funding. These funds will be awarded by the MTDOC to eligible en es to stabilize neighborhoods whose viability has been, and con nues to be, damaged by the economic effects on proper es that have been foreclosed upon and abandoned. The funds can also be used to demolish blighted structures or redevelop demolished or vacant proper es within areas of high need. Coun es, ci es, towns and tribal governments are eligible to apply for the funds in areas of greatest need, as defined by the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). To determine if your community is eligible, please contact the MTDOC. Eligible en es must submit an ‘Intent to Apply’ for NSP3 funds in order to be considered for NSP3 funding. The ‘Intent to Apply’ form and instruc ons are available on the Montana Department of Commerce website at:

h p://comdev.mt.gov/NSP/default.mcpx The completed ‘Intent to Apply’ form is due to the MTDOC on or before February 8, 2011. Eligible en es must provide a descrip on of their proposed project and how it meets the NSP3 criteria. For those eligible en es that submit an ‘Intent to Apply’, a full applica on and compe ve process for the NSP3 funds will follow in May 2011. Applicants who do not submit an ‘Intent to Apply’ form on or before February 8, 2011 will not be eligible to apply for or receive NSP3 funds. Please contact the Montana Department of Commerce NSP staff or further informa on at 406.841.2770 or docnsp@mt.gov.

Missoula Independent

performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $ 2 0 . C a l l 7 2 8 - P L AY o r v i s i t mctinc.org for tickets. All feel-good bets are on when Steve Betz plays “feel good Americana” at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Local bluesman Kevin Van Dort shoots plenty of indigo stuff from his axe when he plays blues at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. The Jimmy Snow Country Show advises against branding your boss with a branding iron when it plays country at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & G r i l l i n Fr e n c h t o w n , 1678 0 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during Combat Karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sweet at Karaoke by Figmo at Joker’s Wild Bar and Restaurant, 4829 N. Reserve St., which features “Brain Strain” trivia and “Scaryoke Karaoke” and begins at 9 PM. Free. Even Congressman John Boehner finds reason to lighten the funk up and get into a groove when Kung Fu Kongress plays funk at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5. Drag queens and kings give your undies something to scream about during the Panty Rock Drag Show, a night of drag and DJs spinning dance music starting at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Proceeds from the event go toward the UM Women’s Resource Center production of the Vagina Monologues. Hang with the prime minister of honky tonkin’ when Bob Wire & The Magnificent Bastards play country at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559.

Page 24 January 27–February 3, 2011

Matt Powell brings the aural heat when he DJs tunes at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., at 9 PM. Free. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Be a rolling pin in a sea of sweaty body parts when Tom Catmull and The Clerics lead the way with a set of Americana and roots music, at 9:30 PM at the Union Club. Free. Beauty is in the bloodshot eyes of the beholder when Ugly Pony plays at 9:30 PM at the High Spirits Club & Casino in Florence, 5341 Hwy. 93 N. Free. Call 273-9992. Just don’t drink the rust colored kool-aid when Russ Nasset & The Revelators play country and rockabilly at 9:30 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill in Whitefish, 27 Central Ave. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. When life gives them ground meat, The Lil’ Smokies serve up a piping hot plate of bluegrass when it plays at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

SATURDAY

29

January

The Missoula Businesswomen’s Network presents its annual symposium featuring seminars plus a keynote speech from Nan Gardetto, the woman who created Gardetto’s Snack Mix, from 8 AM–5 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $50/ $45 MBN members. Visit discovermbn.com to register.

Partnership Health Center, 323 W. Alder St., hosts free cervical health screenings for un-insured or under-insured women, from 9 AM–4 PM. Call 329-5654 to schedule an appointment. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Alterations” with Odette Grassi. Free. Donations are appreciated but not expected. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Travelers’ Rest State Park, one half-mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12,

presents a talk with Salish elder and tribal member Louis Adams on tribal history, stories and culture starting at 11 AM at the Holt Museum and Visitor Center at the park. $3 per adult/free for children under age 18 and all current Travelers’ Rest Preservation and Heritage Association members. Visit travelersrest.org or call 273-4253. Bitterroot Gymnastics presents a carnival for kids ages 2–12, which runs from noon–4 PM and features an obstacle course, rock wall, inflatable jumper, and other activities, all at the gymnastics center, 736 Cooper St. 50 cents per ticket. Call 728-4258. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 2 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.)

nightlife Treat your snaggletooth to a bubbly barley soda and some fine tunes when the Walrus James Band plays Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St., at 5:30 PM. Free. Visit blacksmithbrewing.com. Sip on some fermented grape juice and learn about a local watershed organization when the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts a “nonprofit nite” featuring the Watershed Education Network, from 5–8:30 PM. Free to attend. Ten Spoon donates 50 cents from each glass of wine sold to WEN, and members of the organization will be on hand to chat about their work. Visit montanawatershed.org. If you live in the Riverfront Neighborhood, bring yourself and your kids to the Riverfront Neighborhood Council meeting, which occurs at the Currents Aquatic Center, 600 Cregg Lane, and begins with an all ages swim from 6–8 PM, followed by a council meeting at 6:30 PM that touches on a variety of topics including neighborhood planning. Free. Visit missoula-neighborhoods.org. You can admire his beard, but I would advise against touching it. Missoula roots music favorite Tom Catmull plays a solo set at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT.


Slide slap guitarist Dan Dubuque slips a little soul into your Indonesian rendang when he plays at 7 PM at IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave. Free. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Help some UM dancers get to a regional dance festival while absorbing their sweeping moves during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert, which features student performances of work by renowned choreographer Susan Marshall and others, and begins at 7:30 PM in The Open Space, on the bottom floor of UM’s PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2682. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Simmer yourself with an intimate tale set during World War I when the Whitefish Theatre Co. Black Curtain Reader’s Theatre presents a reading of Mary’s Wedding by Stephen Massicotte, which begins at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Cultural Center, 1 Central Ave. $8 at the door. If you purchase a ticket and bring a friend, your friend gets in for free. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefishtheatreco.org. The Jimmy Snow Country Show advises against branding your boss with a branding iron when it plays country at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Keep the head banging to a minimum when the Indulge Jazz Quintet plays smooth jazz at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. Drink from the rock ‘n’ roll gumbo when Andrea Harsell plays folk rock, blues and country at 8 PM at

the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but passthe-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free, with visuals by V3R. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Sing a fast tune or five during Greyhound Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every Sat. at 9 PM. Free. Bust out a cover tune and dance the night away when Combat Karaoke overtakes Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, with a combo of karaoke tunes and dance music this and every Sat. at 9 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sweet at Karaoke by Figmo at Joker’s Wild Bar and Restaurant, 4829 N. Reserve St., which features “Brain Strain” trivia and “Scaryoke Karaoke” and begins at 9 PM. Free. Hang with the prime minister of honky tonkin’ when Bob Wire & The Magnificent Bastards play country at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Matt Powell brings the aural heat when he DJs tunes at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., at 9 PM. Free. Hail the cloven-hoofed master and freak out with a band that mixes rock with a psychedelic influence when the Voodoo Horseshoes play a CD release party at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Locals The Dodgy Mountain Men and Traff the Wiz open. Dance like you have red ants in your socks when a DJ spins dance music at Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., this and every Sat. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. Just don’t drink the rust colored kool-aid when Russ Nasset & The Revelators play country and rockabilly at 9:30 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill in Whitefish, 27 Central Ave. Free.

Joan Zen lets you take a sip from a tranquil milkshake when she plays a mix of reggae, jazz and soul at 9:30 PM at the Union Club. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. San Francisco’s Sleepyhead awakens your dead limbs with a mix of UK funky, house, dub, techno and other styles when he plays at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $10. Locals Ebola S y n d r o m e a n d I l l e g i t i m a te Children open.

SUNDAY

30

January

Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $ 1 6 . C a l l 7 2 8 - P L AY o r v i s i t mctinc.org for tickets. Tickle your senses with good tunes during “Four for Four: Celebrating the Bicentennials of Mendelssohn, Schumann, Chopin and Liszt,” a keyboard benefit concert with performances by Barbara Blegen, Margery Whatley, Christopher Hahn and Steven Hesla, starting at 3 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $25 reserved seats/$10 general admission/ $5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project presents its demonstration site charrette, starting at 4 PM in the Gold Dust Community Room, 330 N. First St. W. Free. Call 721-7513.

YOGA FOR BEGINNERS WITH SARAH PEDERSON, LMT, RYT Sarah teaches principles from Alignment Yoga, paying attention to structural alignment and creating a friendship with gravity. If you have ever wanted to learn the basic principles of yoga, this is a great place to begin. It is Sarah's pleasure to introduce new students to yoga.

Mondays, 9am-10:30am • $45 for a 4-week series Sliding scale is available. 825 W. Kent St. For a complete listing of our classes and to learn more about our project, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org. or contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033.

nightlife Missoula’s Speculative Movement, an all-ages, all-concepts allowed multimedia organization meets to critique stories, make zines, write screenplays and music, and work creativity on anything else that falls under the science fiction/horror/fantasy umbrella, starting at 6 PM at 1843 S. 14th St. W. Free. Visit specmovement.forumotions.com. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Bathe your senses in something literary when UM’s Second Wind Reading Series hits the Top Hat at 6:30 PM with a reading from author and creative writing profes-

“Smile, though your heart is breaking . . .” 5th Annual

Missoula Labor Film Festival Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins, Missoula Fri., Feb. 26 6:30 p.m. Demand – the hidden world of sex trafficking 7:45 p.m. American Casino – subprime lending scandal Sat., Feb. 27 6:30 p.m. The Philosopher Kings – custodians in academia 8:15 p.m. Modern Times – Chaplin’s famous silent film

www.missoula-labor.info

Missoula Independent

Page 25 January 27–February 3, 2011


sor Kevin Canty, as well as second-year MFA creative writing student Alice Bolin. Free. Explore the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during a “Clarity Book Meeting with Great Freedom/Balanced View,” which runs every Sun. at 7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Simmer yourself with an intimate tale set during World War I when the Whitefish Theatre Co. Black Curtain Reader’s Theatre presents a reading of Mary’s Wedding by Stephen Massicotte, which begins at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Cultural Center, 1 Central Ave. $8 at the door. If you purchase a ticket and bring a friend, your friend gets in for free. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

MONTANA REPERTORY THEATRE

WILLIAM INGE’S

2011 NATIONAL TOUR JANUARY 25-APRIL 16

TWO WEEKS IN MISSOULA:

MONTANA THEATRE EVENINGS / 7:30 PM

JANUARY 25-29 FEBRUARY 1-3, 5 SATURDAY MATINEE / 2:00 PM

JANUARY 29 TALKBACK: AFTER THE JAN. 28 PERFORMANCE PARTV BOX OFFICE: 243-4581 HOURS: 11:30-5:30 WEEKDAYS

Buy Tickets

IINDIVIDUAL TICKETS ONLINE AT:

www.montanarep.org www wm

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Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with $4 martinis, plus jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 8 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Amur River Jazz at 8, followed by the Indulge Jazz Quintet at 9:30. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Enjoy a brew and a moving picture when the Palace hosts a movie night, featuring “the finest of badass cinema” starting at 9 PM. Free. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

MONDAY

31

January

If you’re a woman and you’d like to help empower other women ages 9–18, and create positive change in their lives, consider becoming a volunteer for GUTS! during the spring semester. Applications are due Jan. 31 and can be downloaded online at ywcaofmissoula.org. Call 543-6691.

Missoula Independent

Page 26 January 27–February 3, 2011

Give science two thumbs up during UM’s Integrative Microbiology & Biochemistry Seminar Series, which begins at 4:10 PM in Room 110 o f t h e I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Sciences Building. Free. Call 243-5122.

nightlife Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM in the basement classroom number 3 of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use the alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org. Build bridges with some fellow Missoulians with an informal game when The Garden City Duplicate Bridge Club hosts bridge lessons and informal games for newcomers and beginners every Mon. at 7 PM at the Bridge Club, 3108 S. Clark St. Call Michael at 890-0743 or e-mail him at Studd_31@hotmail.com for pricing. Tap it like you mean it when Sole Muzik, featuring Grandfather Glen with tap/body percussion by Chris Ruthledge, performs from 7–10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlander’s Service Industry Night, which runs this and every Mon. and includes drink specials for service industry workers starting at 9 PM. Free. Also, if you have an iPod, bring it in and they’ll play it. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign-up. Jam the indigo out of your system when Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents Blues Jam Night with Kevin Van Dort, where you can come play or listen to blues music every Mon. starting around 9 PM. Free. Contact Kevin at 396-5731 to play. Local DJs Geeter, Milkcrate Mechanic and Hendawg kick binary code to the curb when they play a variety of electronic music during Milkcrate Mondays at the Palace, which this week features a “vinyl only night” that begins at 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAY

01

February

Child Care Resources, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St., presents “New Child Care Provider Orientation,” a workshop that covers licensing rules and regulations of child care licensing and other topics, from 9 AM–2:30 PM. Free. Visit childcareresources.org/ registration to register and call 728-6446. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Shoot the bull and polish your public speaking skills when the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters Club meets every Tue. at noon, at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Road. Free. Visit shootinthebull.info. Bring a green pen and an ecologically open mind when author and UM Davidson Honors College d e a n J a m e s M c Ku s i c k s i g n s copies of his book Green Writing: Romanticism and Ecology, starting at noon at Fact & Fiction in the University Center Bookstore. Free. Call 243-1234. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at Joseph’s Coat, 116 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-1419.

nightlife Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, including groups for American Indian women and teens, every Tue. staring with dinner at 5:30 PM, followed by meetings at 6:30 PM. Those with children are asked to arrive at 6:15. Free. Call 5436691 for more info and visit ywcaofmissoula.org/?q=node/57. Hear some stellar folk licks when indie folk band Stellarondo plays a kid-friendly CD release party set at the Union Hall, upstairs at 208 E. Main St., starting at 5:30 PM with openers The Scribblers. $5. Then, at 8 PM, Stellarondo returns with a longer set at the same venue, beginning with tunes by opener Amy Martin. $10. (See Scope in this issue.) Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. E-mail terillovet@hotmail.com.


Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Plucking the day away. Local slide guitarist Dan Dubuque plays Iza Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., on Sat., Jan. 29, at 7 PM. Free. Dubuque also performs at the Badlander’s “Live and Local” night Tue., Feb. 1, at 9 PM with openers Peoples. Free.

See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess the answer to something easy or hard during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4152. Keep your mind outta the gutter. Learn what exactly the “backdoor” is while wrapping your head around the “stop and go” and slurping down a fuzzy navel during free poker lessons at 6 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Includes drink specials. Call 549-4152. All genres are encouraged— except, perhaps gangsta rap— every Tue. at 6 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. UM’s Climate Change Studies Program and the Wilderness Institute present the “Conservation and Climate Change Lecture Series,” which kicks off this week with the topic “Global Change: Tipping Points for People and the Biosphere,” a talk with Rob Jackson of Duke University, stating at 7 PM in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6596. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third S t . W. , p r e s e n t s t h e t a l k “Childhood Vaccinations: A

Naturopathic Perspective,” which features comments by Dr. Teresita Martinez of The Golgi Clinic and begins at 7 PM. Free. Call 728-0543. UM student Adam Finch hits all the right low notes when the bassoonist plays a student recital at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? On the human body, where would you find the Islets of Langerhans? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Chance mixes with money and prizes during bingo night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which occurs this and every Tue. starting at 8 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at

9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Ladies get their drink on and celebrate themselves with $1.50 well drinks during Ladies’ Night at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which runs this and every Tue. starting at 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Slip and slide with your favorite slap slide guitarist when Dan Dubuque plays the Badlander’s “Live and Local Night” at 9 PM. Free. Peoples opens. Keep it on the cool side when you listen to some hip hop and enjoy a drink special or two during HipHop Tuesday with Wapikiya Records, which features DJs spinning beats along with guest MCs starting at 9:30 PM at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. Free. Call 830-3276.

4:10 PM in Room 110 of the Interdisciplinary Sciences Building. Free. Call 243-5122. Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Nor thside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. This week’s beneficiary is the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, and will feature raffles for documentary screenings, the Yo La Tengo performance and BSDFF schwag. Visit kettlehouse.com. Let Russ Nasset blast your sorrows away when the country musi-

cian plays a solo set at 5:30 PM at Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St. Free. Call 777-0680. Pianist Jodi Marshall tickles your senses with her deft piano skills while you munch Chinese food when she performs every Wed. from 6–9 PM at Hong Kong Chef, 2009 Brooks St. Free to attend, with free potstickers. Call 549-6688. Don’t bring a sterile mind to Dirty Minds, a new trivia night at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, where guessing the right answers gets you points to win prizes, every Wed. from 6–8 PM. Cost TBA. Call 830-3277. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333.

Be sure to belt out something twangy when Solid Sound Karaoke hits The Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave., every Tue. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Chug plenty of crunk juice so you can swivel around with your pimp cane when Brooklyn’s The Pimps of Joytime plays a mix of funk, soul and pop, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $10, with tickets at Ear Candy Music and Rockin Rudy’s.

WEDNESDAY

02

February

Spend lunchtime polishing your public speaking and leadership skills when the Hamilton chapter of Toastmasters meets this and every Wed. from noon–1 PM at Perkin’s Restaurant & Bakery in Hamilton, 1285 N. First St. W. Free. Call Mark at 381-9832. Teens grades 7–12 go with the media flow during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Media Lab, which features the opportunity to make short videos, mix music and learn new ways to use media, this and every Wed. at 4 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Feel free to dress up like Mr. Wizard during UM’s Ecology & Evolution Seminar Series, which begins at

Missoula Independent

Page 27 January 27–February 3, 2011


Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Be the knot master you have always aspired to be during the Missoula Urban Demonstration Project’s “Knot Tying Workshop,” which meets at 7 PM at MUD’s Headquarters, 629 Phillips St. Call 721-7513 to RSVP and for pricing, and visit mudproject.org for more info. Smooth jazz makes the sake and pad thai go down easy when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents live jazz

every Wed. at 7 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3237. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s THUNDER ALLEY BOWLING

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Missoula Independent

play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Missoula’s Trivial Beersuit, a trivia night for the layperson, expands its tentacles to the Press Box for four rounds of trivia with sign ups at 7:45 PM, followed by the game at 8, this and every Wed. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St. Free. You can also find clues to every week’s game by befriending “Trivial Beersuit” on Facebook. Email Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The Islets of Langerhans are found in the pancreas, and they make/secrete hormones. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. No intensive training required: The Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., presents beer pong this and every Wed. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free, with prizes. Call 251-5402. Just don’t speak in acronyms during WTF Wednesdays and Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, where drink specials mix with music by The Tallest DJ in America every Wed. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “I Think We’re Alone Now” by Tiffany (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Play some licks, read your newest haiku, or make others giggle at your jokes during The Craggy Range Open Mic, an open mic night for musicians and other artists that features a number of house instruments for your use, every Wed. starting at 9 PM at The Craggy Range, 10 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Call 862-7550. Get a binary buzz with DJs Pillar, J@cob and a weekly cast of other rotating DJs when they play electro, breaks and progressive electronic tunes every Wed. at 9 PM at The Broadway Bar & Grill, 1609 W. Broadway St. $3. Be someone’s public dancer when Minneapolis’ Roster McCabe brings the heat with a set of “funky reggae dance rock,” at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

Page 28 January 27–February 3, 2011

THURSDAY

03

February

If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Seek out some future adventure during a Peace Corps Information Session, which features a presentation by local representative Tenly Snow and begins at 4 PM in Room 327 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288.

nightlife Missoula families can explore a school that offers children in preschool through the fifth grade a place-based education that values nature, community and academic excellence when Clark Fork School, 2525 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts an open house from 6–7:30 PM. Free. Visit clarkforkschool.org for details or call Sam or Karin at 728-3395. Families First Parent Educators present the “Adapting Guidance Series,” a program for parents on guidance and discipline strategies that begins at 6:30 PM at Paxson School, 101 Evans Ave. Free. Call 721-7690 or visit familiesfirstmontana.org. Slip into a movie that explores America’s suburban way of life in light of global demand for fossil fuels when the Peace and Justice Film Series presents a screening of The End of Suburbia, starting at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free, with a discussion after the film. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Get awed with stories from a pedaling master when adventure cyclist Willie Weir presents “Any Port in a Storm—Cycling and Wild Camping Through Portugal,” a talk on Weir’s recent travels to the South American country that begins at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall. Free. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt, after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30

PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not r e q u i r e d : Tr i v i a l B e e r s u i t , Missoula’s newest trivia night for the layperson, begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes $7 pitchers of Bayern beer, prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. Bob Wire wants you to leave the body butter where you found it when the honky tonk blogger plays at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Stop licking that fly swatter and get aurally intoxicated with some rock, Americana and folk rock when Chalfonts, The Box Cutters and Sockeye Sawtooth play the Palace at 9 PM. $3. Beam yourself toward aural ecstasy when The Northern Lights play at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. Witness a man who really likes to get his squeeze on when Seattle’s Jason Webley performs indie folk with elements of rock, folk punk and gypsy music—using the accordion, guitar and other instruments—at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy Music and online at seafarerentertainment.com. Javier Ryan opens. (See Noise in this issue.)

Show me your version of the artistic shock and awe (whatever that means) and I’ll show you my love by printing your events, but only if you kindly heed my super-easy-tofollow rule of sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 28 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH H aving been out of the game for some 15 years, I just recently laced up some boots and hit the Rattlesnake Trailhead with a pair of rented cross-country skis. It was awesome, but if there was one thing I learned that day it was this: Nordic skiing is one hell of a workout. I mention this because come Saturday, you’ll be able to work your muscles to the max on your Nordic skis during the annual Over Seeley’s Creeks and Ridges (OSCR) Trail Head Race Series Cross-Country Ski Marathon, which occurs at the Seeley Creek Nordic Ski Trails near Seeley Lake. It offers participants of all

ages the chance to slide and glide on a 50k course, a 20k course or a 10k course. Then, after you’ve busted your buns on the trail, you can relax during an awards ceremony and chili feed later in the day at the Seeley Lake Community Center. The 29th annual OSCR Trail Head Series Race Cross-Country Ski Marathon is Sat., Jan. 29, with registration at 8 AM at the Seeley Creek Noridic Ski Trails, located on Cottonwood Lakes Road in Seeley Lake. $45 for the 50k/$30 for the 20k/$25 for the 10k. Visit seeleylakenordic.org for a registration form, and call Lynn at 677-2343 with questions.

Photo by Chad Harder

SATURDAY JANUARY 29 Slap on your snowshoes and put on your learning cap during the Montana Natural History Center’s “Saturday Discovery Day: Forest Insects in Winter,” an all-day program with forest entomologist Amy Gannon where participants snowshoe around Pattee Canyon and learn about insects and forest ecology, starting with a meet-up at 9 AM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. $20/$15 MNHC members. Call 3270405 to RSVP. Just don’t wear hot pants during the Missoula Parks and Rec’s Frost Fever/5K Fun Run, which takes off from McCormick Park starting at 10 AM and takes you on a course along the Clark Fork River and neighborhood streets. $23, with race-day registration at 8:30 AM. Run your mouse over to missoulaparks.org for details or call 721-7275. All bets are on for the Moonlight Snowmobile Poker Run, a gambol near Lincoln that features 250 miles of groomed trails on your trusty snowmobile with the moon as your guide. Check out the deal at 362-3334 or e-mail mnordahl@linctel.net. Catch big air or just catch the show during Ol’ Uncle Justin’s Slopestyle/Big Air competition, an event for shredders and skiers at the Terrain Parks at Lost Trail Powder Mountain that begins with registration at noon. $10 to enter. Jump to ltpark.com for details.

SUNDAY JANUARY 30 All ladies are invited to train for their first triathlon or brush up on their skills when the The Women’s Club, 2105 Bow St., presents it’s “Get Ready for The Grizzly Triathlon” class, which meets at 9 AM for 12 weeks starting today. Call 728-4410 for pricing and more details.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 1 Any and all women who want to hike in the company of their fellow XX chromosome holders are hereby invited to a Ladies Hike Group that meets every Tue. and Thu. at 4 PM in Missoula. Contact Rissa at sim-

pleretreat@yahoo.com to find out meeting locations and to finalize plans. Avoid burial by powder during an Avalanche Awareness Workshop that occurs at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall, and at the same time and place on Feb. 2. A field trip for snowmobile riders follows on Feb. 5, and a field trip for skiers/snowboarders is on Feb. 6. Free, but skiers and snowboarders have to pay a $10 lift fee for the field trip. Visit missoulaavalanche.org.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 2 Go with the snowshoeing and learning flow when UM’s Outdoor Program presents a “Snowshoeing & Track ID” class, which begins with a pre-trip meeting at 5 PM today at the Outdoor Program, in UM’s Fitness and Recreation Center. The trip follows on Feb. 5. $30, includes instruction, gear and transportation. RSVP by Jan. 31 by calling 243-5172. Grab the good word on all the things urban foresters have to deal with—including insect pests, monocultures and road expansion—when the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) presents “Understanding the Urban Forest,” a talk with urban forester Ben Carson that begins at 7 PM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. $4 suggested donation. Call 327-0405 or visit montananaturalist.org.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 3 It’s all about heels up when Montana Snowbowl’s Telemark Evening Race Series begins tonight at the ski hill, 1700 Snowbowl Road. E-mail Gates Watson at gwatson@conservationfund.org for details. Get awed with stories from a pedaling master when adventure cyclist Willie Weir presents “Any Port in a Storm—Cycling and Wild Camping Through Portugal,” a talk on Weir’s recent travels to the South American country that begins at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 29 January 27–February 3, 2011


scope

Breakin’ the law Stellarondo kicks out a new album with a “no rules” attitude by Jason McMackin

The members of Stellarondo shun the notion of being any sort of Missoula “supergroup.” Instead, the band demonstrates a legitimate lack of ego—other than bassist Travis Yost’s black T-shirt, which states in bold white letters: “Rock Star.” That said, there is no escaping the local band’s individual resumes. Vocalist/guitarist Caroline Keys and percussionist Angie Biehl are members of the old-timey bluegrass band Broken Valley Roadshow, while Yost and guitarist Gibson Hartwell (formerly of Tarkio) play backup for Americana singer-songwriter Tom Catmull as the Clerics. Bethany Joyce of moody folk bands Wartime Blues and Butter rounds out the quintet on cello and saw. But those are only a few choice examples of the members’ current bands, one-offs, puppet shows, commercial jingles and various symphonies. It’s not that they don’t love their other bands, but, for the most part, the musicians say they consider themselves support to the lead singers and guitarists driving the other projects—“side-meat,” as Yost likes to say. In the collaborative astral art-folk ensemble that is Stellaronodo, everyone gets to make decisions. With an upcoming CD release and a tour on the horizon, the band’s testing out the freedom of a democratic regime.

Stellarondo wasn’t always a collaborative effort. It began as a solo project when Keys decided to take the 2010 RPM Challenge. The online project challenges anyone to write and record a minimum of 10 songs within the month of February—a deliciously truculent form of self-inflicted torture. There’s no monetary reward, just the reward of accomplishment, and Keys saw it as a chance to work with some select guest artists, dabble outside of the rules of bluegrass and, in effect, knock out some musical push-ups. Two weeks in, the onerous task of writing and recording on deadline began to cow Keys. When Biehl happened to pop in to visit one day, Keys took advantage of her percussive abilities to round out the recording. Biehl’s all-the-world-is-a-drum attitude helped define the group’s sound, Key says, with what you might call groundbreaking techniques: playing square slate pieces on the coffee table and dropping individual bits of rice onto the floor. Hartwell also came onboard at this time and the music began to gel. Everything was going well as they neared the challenge deadline, says Keys. But something had to give.

Near the end of the month while bustling around her home/studio, Keys broke her right pinky toe, leaving it at a right angle from its normal position. Packing for the hospital, Keys’ husband asked her why she was loading up her gear. In what is surely a demonstration of diluted commonsense brought on by artistic endeavors, Keys responded, “I have to write one more song. I don’t have time for this.” In the end, disaster was averted. The doctors took care of that little piggy and the album was completed on time. Last September, the current line-up recorded a second eponymous album, Stellarondo, in Northeast Portland (minus Biehl who recorded her parts at Club Shmed Studio in Missoula). Although each band member has a primary instrument, all sorts of devices show up in the sometimes folky, sometimes spooky end product. Some examples: wet wood, boob gourd, xylophone, jumprope and tympani. On the album’s first track, “Icarus Stops for a Burrito,” xylophone notes fall like the slow, outer part of a waterfall and create a dreamy soundscape. In “The March Brute,” quiet guitars balance with the ensemble’s backing vocals while mariachi–esque trumpets squeeze out what feels like ultimate sadness. Vivid imagery and some slick pedal steel make “Strawberry Cake” an instantclassic—perfect for the kind of slow dances where the lady puts both her hands square atop the boy’s shoulders. But unlike most songs of this ilk, it includes puppet-show dialogue mingling with the outro. This is a Stellarondo album after all. The band members agree that the most important part of recording was the fact that no one ever said, “No.” “This is the most collaborative group I’ve ever been in,” says Yost, “If you bring a ukulele you’re gonna play it. No rules. No one to say, ‘You can’t do that.’ What’s it gonna sound like? Who gives a shit? Try it.” “We’ve all been asked to be in bands because they need something: ‘I want cello. I need a drummer,’” Yost adds. “We’ve never been asked because someone said, ‘I need a creative musician. I don’t care what you play.’” For the first time in a long time, he and his bandmates are having an atypical musical adventure. They’re not worried about making money. They’re not worried about selling beer or getting customers through the door. They’re not worried if they never make it big. They’re not even worried about making people dance. “I’m more worried about making people cry,” says Keys. In the Land of Stellarondo, that’s a good thing. Stellarondo plays a family friendly show at the Union Hall Tuesday, Feb. 1, at 5:30 PM with The Scribblers. $5. The band plays an adult show later that evening at 8 PM with Amy Martin. $10.

Photo courtesy Kate Medley

Stellarondo is a who’s who of local musicians, comprised of Gibson Hartwell, Bethany Joyce, Angie Biehl, Caroline Keys and Travis Yost. “This is the most collaborative group I’ve ever been in,” says Yost. “If you bring a ukulele you’re gonna play it. No rules. No one to say, ‘You can’t do that.’ What’s it gonna sound like? Who gives a shit? Try it.”

Missoula Independent

Page 30 January 27–February 3, 2011

arts@missoulanews.com


Scope

Noise

Theater

Jason Webley The Cost of Living Eleven Records

Seattle’s Jason Webley plays an absorbing style of gloomy and contemplative indie folk. Mysterious lyrics sung in a raspy baritone combine with instruments like the accordion and guitar, while a cast of guest musicians drop violin, viola, percussion and guitarrón into the stew. Elements of rock, folk punk and gypsy music also creep in. In fact, The Cost of Living sounds like shades of Tom Waits mixed with the sharply honed musical dynamics of bands like Arcade Fire. Some of the tightest cuts include “Ways to Love,” a rousing tune that features obtuse lyrics about, of course, learning to love. “Clear” appears to be a postbreakup song, and showcases Webley’s ace guitar pick-

Huey Lewis and the News Soulsville W.O.W. Records

The last time Huey Lewis and the News recorded new studio material, it was a joke. Literally. The band placed its collective tongue firmly in its cheek and performed the theme song to Seth Rogen’s 2008 stoner comedy, Pineapple Express. With a sound strikingly similar to seminal ’80s hits like “I Need a New Drug,” the Bitterroot Valley’s most famous resident sang braindead lyrics like, “I got you, you got me, and we’re as high as we can be. So it’s all right.”

Pearl Jam Live on Ten Legs Monkeywrench Records

Get ready for an onslaught of Pearl Jam. In anticipation of the 20th anniversary of the band’s first album, 1991’s Ten, Pearl Jam is planning a yearlong celebration: re-released versions of Vs. and Vitalogy, a summer music festival “curated by” Eddie Vedder and the boys, and the debut of a new documentary made by Cameron Crowe. First, however, comes the latest in a long line of live albums. Live on Ten Legs captures some of the band’s newer material—and a few choice deep cuts—from shows performed over the last seven years. The acoustic “Just Breathe” and climactic “The Fixer” highlight the selections from last year’s studio release, Backspacer.

Fergus & Geronimo Unlearn Hardly Art

With their debut fulllength release, Fergus & Geronimo prove two things: They’re talented, clever musicians, and they’re unsure how to create a cohesive album. Unlearn showcases 11 well-written, cleanly recorded tunes, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, sometimes angry, earnest, or playful. Individually, they’re catchy and artful. Taken together, they’re a dizzying, schizophrenic soundscape. Fergus & Geronimo (Andrew Savage and Jason Kelly) are undeniably flexible musicians, and can

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ing, along with some heart wrenchingly stellar violin and viola melodies. But the best tune by far is “Meet Your Bride.” It starts off mellow, with lyrics asking the listener how they’ll meet their wife. Then, in a wild Waits-like climax, Webley starts shouting lines like “Tell me how are you going to meet your bride? / When she’s crawling at your ribcage and demands to come inside?” It’s a bit eerie and morose, but totally infectious, like the rest of the album. (Ira Sather-Olson) Jason Webley plays the Top Hat Thu., Feb. 3, at 10 PM with Javier Ryan. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy Music or at seafarerentertainment.com. Soulsville couldn’t be more different. Whereas the Pineapple cameo worked to playfully reintroduce Lewis to a younger generation, the new album is most definitely a nod to the band’s more earnest (and older) fans. The collection of 14 covers mines the Stax Records’ vault for classic soul ballads like “Respect Yourself ” and “Got to Get You Off My Mind.” It was recorded with the band’s long-time horn section, and reunites Lewis with the same producer who worked with him on chart-topping albums Sports and Fore!. It’s a low-risk setup for a band that hasn’t recorded a full album in nine years, and hasn’t been relevant in 25. But it works for what it is. Lewis’ raspy, barroom vocals carry each track, and are framed by tight arrangements full of soulful backup singers and blaring horns. Lewis may never recapture—or escape from—his past success, but Soulsville serves as a respectable spot to kick up his heels in the meantime. (Skylar Browning)

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Older fans will recognize a rousing version of “State of Love and Trust,” a song that appeared on the soundtrack of one of Crowe’s films, Singles. The 18-track collection ends, of course, with crowd favorite “Yellow Ledbetter.” So much self-imposed nostalgia may strike some as a turnoff. Even bassist and Missoula resident Jeff Ament, speaking with Rolling Stone, referred to the whole exercise as “fucking weird.” But buried under Pearl Jam’s exhaustive marketing machine lies a great band. If the rest of this year’s celebration is half as entertaining as Live on Ten Legs, it’ll be worth it. (Skylar Browning) channel any number of past genres. The title track and “Powerful Lovin’” are both accurate Motown. The scratchy chords and spare guitar on “Michael Kelly” evoke the Velvet Underground. “Baby Don’t You Cry” is rife with “la la las” reminiscent of the ’60s, and sounds rather like the Rolling Stones. “Where the Walls are Made of Grass” is a Latin-esque surfer-style tune, redolent with meandering horns and suggestive of a Steve McQueen-era soundtrack. Ironically, F&G criticize the very industry that shaped them. One tune’s a scathing indictment of hipsters and the music business: “Wanna know what I would do if I was you? I’d find another scene to leech onto.” All well and good, but even embittered, anti-establishment types like well-constructed albums. Fergus and Geronimo have the talent; now all they need is some focus. (Melissa Mylchreest)

Missoula Independent

Page 31 January 27–February 3, 2011


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Diner dashing Montana Rep’s Bus Stop offers dynamic charm by Erika Fredrickson

penchant for booze and young girls. Carl, the macho bus driver, and Will, the mostly level-headed sheriff, also get involved with the drama, which includes lustful trysts, heartfelt wooing, fights and other antics. A lot happens, but not in any action-movie kind of way. Like any good story, the characters transform by the end— some more subtly than others. Hannah Kanengieter played Audrey in last year’s Leading Ladies with impeccable comedic timing, and it’s no different with Cherie. Here, she takes the dumb-blonde stereotype and reinvents it with hilarity and woeful depth. Her situation is silly on the surface: A woman with glamorous dreams finds herself on a bus with a Montana hick against her will, but not exactly kidnapped. The hick, Jackson Palmer’s Bo, is strapping and not too bright. He’s a bit of a cliché in the first act—though if you went to high school in Montana, you’ll find his character totally probable—and he’s more threedimensional later on, with highly entertaining consequences. This is a story about circumstance and attraction. There’s a kinetic energy between the swaggering bus driver, Carl, played by Andy Meyers and the smokyvoiced Grace, played by Aleks Malejs. It’s light fun, but also a biological experiment: two people cross each other’s Montana Rep’s touring production of Bus Stop includes, path enough and you can get dynamite. from left, Erin Mae Johnson, Matt Warner, Hannah Then there are the lone rangers. Kanengieter and Jackson Palmer. The commonsense sheriff grounds the diner 30 miles West of Kansas City. Unlike “Lost” (or drama in this play more than any other character, and horror movies that use similar devices), it’s the interac- Rick Martino could probably pass himself off as a smalltion between the characters’ personalities that keeps town sheriff for the way he disappears into his characthe story dynamic. ter. Virgil, on the other hand, is the secret weapon of Montana Repertory Theatre’s production of Bus the play. He’s the stoic rancher who plays guitar and Stop hits the stage this week to kick off its national tour. gives good advice, but, at the end—and I won’t give it As is the case with so many of Montana Rep’s profes- away by saying this—you get the sense that maybe this sional plays, it showcases a powerful cast. More than was a story about him all along. It’s a startling moment. that, under Jere Lee Hodgin’s direction, it never gets Bus Stop is also about starting over. Erin Mae too wrapped up in superficial comedy or sinks too far Johnson hits Elma’s earnest desire for adventure with into melancholy—something for which other stagings perfection. She’s especially hilarious when it comes to of the play have been criticized. one of the highlights of the show—a rendition of the The lights come up on the inside of Grace’s diner, Romeo and Juliet balcony scene. It’s Matt Warner, howwhere Grace and her waitress niece, Elma, notice the ever, who adds nuance to this entire play as the profesphone lines are down. A bus arrives on the street out- sor with a questionable interest in Elma. Despite that side (set at the back of the stage), and you can glimpse ick factor, Warner’s portrayal of the ruddy-faced, charmthe diner sign flapping in the storm. Here’s where the ing man tilts him deliciously on the edge of disaster. His details of Bill Raoul’s scenic design really make an desire for love and a blank slate is so palpable, it’s impression. The flapping sign provides a constant almost hard to bear. reminder of storminess—like the whistling teapot gim“Lost,” symbolizes large themes and occupies a mick but better because it’s fresh and subtle. The diner truly other world. But Bus Stop inhabits a familiar setinterior is classic 1950’s design without being kitschy, ting to all of us—a diner—where people are just people, and the high-up shelves of plants—cacti and such—give in all their comic and tragic ways. an original touch to the diner cliché. Bus Stop continues at the Montana Theatre in As the four occupants of the bus blow in through the PARTV Center Thursday, Jan 27—Saturday, Jan. the door, you start to get the gist of the story. There’s 29 and Tuesday, Feb. 1—Thursday, Feb. 3, and Cherie, the pretty and bewildered nightclub singer; Bo, Saturday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 PM nightly, with a 2 PM a handsome and burly rodeo rider who’s taking Cherie matinee Saturday, Jan. 29. $20/$16 seniors and stuto his Montana ranch to marry her, oblivious to her dents/$10 for children 12 and under. unwillingness; Virgil, Bo’s father-figure mentor; and Dr. Gerald Lyman, a college philosophy professor with a arts@missoulanews.com In the ABC series “Lost,” a plane crashes on an island and the surviving strangers must band together against the external and often magical forces of the place. Like any plot device, it’s contrived, but it’s so easy to love the structure: These characters have no real escape (at least, at first), resulting in intense moments of heroism and cruelty by people pushed to their limits. Of course, “Lost” gets lost in its own device madness. Even if you love the show you have to admit that the island becomes the true character while the characters became vehicles for symbolism. A refreshingly simpler device emerges in William Inge’s Bus Stop (1955), a play that uses the force of a storm to randomly strand eight people in a roadside

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Page 32 January 27–February 3, 2011


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Chemical bond No Strings Attached raises the romcom bar Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural.

by Dave Loos

Pretend you’re shocked when I tell you that here at the Indy we almost never get films to review in advance of their official release date, at least not when it comes to mainstream Hollywood flicks. I don’t get to sit in a screening room a week before the rest of you, which of course means there’s always going to be a bit of a time lag between movie release and published review. This isn’t a huge deal, but it does make it hard to keep blinders on as other reviews are published two or three days before I even see the film. And while I never

Wabbit love.

read a review before writing my own, it can be hard to avoid seeing or hearing about the Rotten Tomatoes score. One thing I’ve noticed about the now ubiquitous Tomatometer is that it’s essentially an inverted bell curve. The vast majority of movies either score above 60 or below 40. Rare is the film that completely splits the critics, somehow failing to elicit any consensus despite the pooling of hundreds of opinions. No Strings Attached is one of those films—its Tomatometer score currently stands at 50 percent. Because I saw that score beforehand, it was in the back of my mind as I actually watched the film—mostly because I’m a dork and like this rare case study of a film with no consensus. But here’s my vote: I liked it. No Strings Attached has a lot going against it in its quest for critic approval, the most obvious of which is that it’s a romantic comedy with Ashton Kutcher in the lead. Let’s take Kutcher out of the equation for a minute and judge this film against its peers—namely the glut of mediocre to awful romcoms that have single handedly allowed Kate Hudson, Drew Barrymore, Jennifer Aniston and Matthew McConaughy to be referred to as “movie stars” for the last decade. Obviously it’s a low bar from which to judge, but the latest from director Ivan Reitman is at the top of a mediocre genre. That sounds like more of a backhanded compliment that I mean to it to be. While this is nowhere

near a great film, it does prove that in the hands of seasoned and veteran actors like Natalie Portman and Kevin Kline, and fantastic relative newcomers like Mindy Kaling (Kelly from “The Office”), it’s not hard to pull together an above-average romantic comedy when given a half-decent storyline. Plus, Ludacris is fantastic in his supporting role as a bartender and Kutcher’s confidante. Portman, in what can only be described as the exact opposite of her role in Black Swan, plays Emma, an ER resident who has a self-described “emotional peanut allergy” to long-term relationships and boyfriends. She is, however, willing to find time in her busy schedule for a sex friend. Enter Adam (Kutcher), whom she has known since adolescence and with whom she has recently been reacquainted. They form a friends-with-benefits pact that includes such rules as no cuddling, no breakfasts and no jealousy. When Adam informs a stranger on the street of this agreement, the stranger quickly replies, “That never works.” Of course it doesn’t. That stronger emotions eventually come into play is no surprise, but how No Strings Attached gets us there—and where it leads—is, dare I say, a bit charming. Ignoring the final, exceptionally cheesy resolution, there is fun to be had in following Emma and Adam as they attempt to remain emotionally detached for as long as possible. There is equal fun on the periphery, where Adam’s father (the always fun Kline) has started dating his son’s ex-girlfriend, and where Emma’s roommates (including Kaling) watch with amusement as the NSA agreement unfolds. This brings us back to Mr. Demi Moore (or as Ricky Gervais referred to him at the Golden Globes last week, Bruce Willis’ son). I’m willing to bet that the ambivalence of other critics toward this film has as much to do with Kutcher in the leading male role as anything else. His reputation precedes him, and that’s unfortunate because this is his best film to date. (Now that’s a backhanded compliment.) The former male model has come a long way since Dude, Where’s My Car, and while Kutcher is never going to win awards for his acting, that doesn’t mean he’s not capable of turning in funny, subdued performances as he does here. I kept expecting the crazed, over-amped and very annoying Kutcher of “Punk’d” fame to make an appearance. He never did. Given such a contrived premise, No Strings Attached is more enjoyable as a whole than it has any right to be. It’s been 27 years since Reitman directed Ghostbusters (yeah, I feel old too), and he proves here that nearly three decades later he still knows how to entertain us. I won’t dare ask for more from a romantic comedy. No Strings Attached continues at the Village 6.

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 January 27–February 3, 2011


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK 127 HOURS Director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionare, Trainspotting) returns with a film about every hardcore mountaineer’s worst nightmare. It follows the true story of adventurer Aron Ralston—played by James Franco—who decides to head out to Robber’s Roost in Utah to explore canyons, but ends up getting stranded after a gigantic boulder crushes his arm. Carmike 10: 4, 7:30 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:25 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:10, 7:25 and 9:45. THE MECHANIC The testosterone just oozes out of this remake of the 1972 original: Jason Statham is an ace assassin who teaches Ben Foster the bloody tricks of the

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THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER The third film based on C.S. Lewis’ fantasy trilogy gets a little 3-D love in a story that centers around Edmund Pevensie and company venturing to the end of the world in a ship, and features lots of eye candy like eerily glowing swords and shapeshifting humans. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:30 and 9:55, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05 and 4:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1 and 9:15. THE DILEMMA Vince Vaughn witnesses the wife of his coworker/best friend smooching another guy, and has to figure out the most dude-friendly way to break the bad news to his buddy. Jennifer Connelly, Winona Ryder and Queen Latifah co-star. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:40, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30.

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Bermuda Triangle to write a fluffy travel article. Along the way, Black gets shipwrecked, taken captive by small people, and is enlisted to help fend off a rival horde of tiny folks using things like his giant belly. Village 6 in 2-D: 7, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 The first part of the seventh (and, thankfully, last) installment of this ever popular book/film empire follows Harry and his pals Ron and Hermione as they try to bring down the dark lord known as Voldemort. Village 6: 9:15 only. THE KING’S SPEECH After English aristocrat Colin Firth gets crowned King George VI of England, he tries to rid himself of a nasty stammer so he can give good speeches to his fellow Brits, who are on the brink of World

SEASON OF THE WITCH Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman are 14th century crusaders given the not-so-fun task of transporting a witch—who allegedly caused the black plague— to a monastery, in the hopes her powers of pestilence will be destroyed. Along the way, some evil things start to happen. Carmike 10: 9:30 only, with no show on Wed. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:30 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4, 7:30 and 9:40. TANGLED The Rapunzel fairy tale gets a 3-D makeover in this “action-packed” animated version starring the voice of Mandy Moore as the girl with really long hair. Carmike 10 in 2-D: 4:20, 7:20 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:20, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and 4:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:20 and 4:40, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25 and 4:10. TRON: LEGACY This 3-D sequel to the 1982 classic ought to make your inner sci-fi freak scream with delight. It follows Garrett Hedlund as he plugs into a digital world—filled with flashy costumes and awesome looking spaceships—so he can find Jeff Bridges and return him back to reality. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:35, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:05, 6:45 and 9:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30.

Caffeine withdrawal is a bitch. The Rite opens Friday at the Village 6.

trade after Foster’s dad, Donald Sutherland, gets snuffed out. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:20 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 shows on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:40, 5, 7:25 and 9:50, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:05, 7:10 and 9:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. at 1:30. THE RITE A young priest with doubts about faith has a change of heart after he becomes an apprentice for exorcist Anthony Hopkins and notices that people are starting to act a little, well, evil. Village 6: 7:05 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20 and 4:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 4, 7:05 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer Cinema in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:20.

NOW PLAYING BLACK SWAN Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream) delivers yet another psychological head trip with a story that pits two ballet dancers, Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis, against each other as they fight for stage prominence during a production of Swan Lake. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, 4:15, 6:45 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

Missoula Independent

Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. THE FIGHTER Mark Wahlberg is the knockout star of this Rockyesque, biographical sports drama about the life of East Coast boxer “Irish” Micky Ward, who punched his way to the top thanks to expert training from his ex-convict half-brother, played by Christian Bale. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 6:45 and 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE GREEN HORNET Seth Rogen is a financially well-off son of a newspaper publisher who decides to put bad guys in their place by becoming a masked ass-kicking crime fighter in this 3-D adaptation of the classic 1930s radio program. Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) directs. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:10 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:35. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:25 and 10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:55 and 4:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton in 2-D: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 and 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:50, 6:30 and 9:20. GULLIVER’S TRAVELS Funnyman Jack Black is Lemuel Gulliver in this modern 3-D adaptation of the classic 18th century novel. The story follows Black as he sets sail to the

Page 34 January 27–February 3, 2011

War II. The film received 12 Oscar nominations. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:30. LITTLE FOCKERS Your favorite Focker Ben Stiller returns in this third, and last, installment of the comedy series that began with Meet the Parents and Meet the Fockers. This time around, Stiller has to contend with parenthood, a midlife crisis, and his nosierthan-thou father-in-law Robert De Niro. Carmike 10: 4:15 and 7, with no 7 show on Wed., and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 7:10 and 9:35. NO STRINGS ATTACHED Yes, this movie is about gettin’ it on. Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman are old friends who start knocking boots, and then Kutcher realizes he’s got a heart-on for Portman. Village 6: 7 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:35 and 4:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

TRUE GRIT The Coen brothers offer up their stylish adaptation of the 1968 novel, and 1969 movie, of the same name. Jeff Bridges is a booze-loving U.S. Marshal, enlisted by a 14-year-old girl to track down shady drifter Josh Brolin, after Brolin kills the girl’s dad. Matt Damon co-stars. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 3:45, 7:10 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15. YOGI BEAR This 3-D flick features Dan Aykroyd getting his bear on as the voice of Yogi Bear, who, with his pal Boo Boo, voiced by Justin Timberlake, must save Jellystone Park from getting bought and cut down by loggers. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 2:35, 7:15 and 9:30, and Mon.–Thu. at 3:55 and 7. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Capsule reviews by Skylar Browning and Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan. 28. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 35 January 27–February 3, 2011


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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30, groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children. 1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS in the areas of Education, Income and Health. United Way of Missoula County and our Bitterroot affiliate, United Way of Ravalli County, seek proposals for funding from nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations based in Missoula and Ravalli Counties whose work addresses these general priorities: EDUCATION: Helping children and youth achieve their potential. INCOME: Promoting financial stability and independence. HEALTH: Improving people’s health. Potential applicants that do not currently receive grant

THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat Buying Event of the Year” at Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, in Helena, Jan. 28th, 29th & 30th. 443-6400 or 266-5700. www.mtboatshow.com

funding from UWMC or UWRC must request an application packet by 2/7/11 by emailing info@missoulaunitedway.org, or calling 549-6104. Applications from organizations that do not request materials directly from United Way will not be accepted.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

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519 North Higgins SECOND HAND

CIRCLE SQUARE Recycling Missoula’s apartments since 1969

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-5326546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com

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ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293

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Table of contents

Residential & Commercial Pick Up!



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543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

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PET OF THE WEEK Audrey is a 1 year-old Lab Great Dane mix. This lovable girl enjoys lots of playtime and already knows some basic commands, but would love to learn more. She is also crate and kennel trained. Audrey would make a wonderful running companion and was just learning how to swim last summer! This beautiful pup is truly a ‘Go-Getter’ kinda gal and is looking for a human companion with the same spirit. WMHS 549-3934


ADVICE GODDESS

MARKETPLACE

By Amy Alkon

EXTREMELY OLD SPICE

The elderly horndog can be kind of cute—when he’s working the senior moment angle and asking all the girls in the bar, “Say, do I come here often?” It’s a whole lot less cute when the horndog isn’t some random old man but somebody you know socially; somebody who sent you “a detailed blueprint” of exactly what he’d like to do to you with his veiny, wandering hands. Never mind that this attention was utterly unprompted by you, that you’re both married, and that he’s twice your age, meaning that the movie stud he most closely resembles is Yoda. Where you went wrong is in not shutting the guy down right away. You don’t make a date with a guy to tell him you don’t want to date him. You especially don’t when the guy starts hitting on you at defcon “Let’s play Doctor Zhivago!” Chances are, you didn’t respond as you did because you’re some naive bunny, but because you’re a woman. Women evolved to be the nurturers and peacemakers of the species, making them prone to shove aside their best interest in favor of preserving people’s feelings. True to form— as a woman—you even apologized for causing “any confusion.” By doing what, existing in his eyeline? It’s not like you plopped into his lap in an I Heart Grandpa

T-shirt and asked for an, um, oral history (starting in his boyhood years, back when families subscribed to the Dead Sea Scrolls instead of the newspaper). Don’t be “civil” to this creepus. Don’t be anything to him—unless he persists in approaching you or contacting you, in which case, you should be the person who says, “Don’t contact me, don’t speak to me, don’t come anywhere near me.” In the future, resolve that your safety and comfort level will take precedence over not wanting to hurt or disappoint people or seem rude or unsympathetic. There’s a time to respect your elders and a time to recognize one of them for the dirty old masher he is. Yeah, sure, there’s all the “Do not go gentle into that good night” stuff he’s been reading, but I’m pretty sure the rest of that isn’t “Get her alone after lit crit group and blurt out, ‘Say, young lady, wanna see if I’m wrinkled all over?’”

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721-(PAWN)7296. Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multi-cord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-244-4255 or 406-5460587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

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GETTING TO NULL HER BETTER A woman I met somewhat recently admitted she was “head over heels” for me. Because I like to get to know a person before contemplating anything romantic, I said we should be friends first, take it slow and see where it goes. She agreed, but ends conversations by calling me “sweet pea” or “sweetheart,” making me suspect she isn’t okay with taking it slow. —Worried It’s sometimes what people don’t include in their requests for advice that’s the essential detail. It took me three emails to pull it out of you—the answer to my question, “Are you attracted to her?” Your reply: “I like her as a person but nothing more.” Well, she’s a girl, not an acorn you store up in case it’s a long winter. If you aren’t into somebody who’s into you, that’s what she needs to know—not that you want to “take it slow” (because with a little time, she could grow a new head and body and become exactly your type?). As for how this woman ends conversations, you won’t have to fret about what “sweetpea” really means once you help her get a sense of what you really meant by “taking it slow”: True love waits. But nowhere near as long as “couldn’t be less attracted to you.”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

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COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

MUSIC GUITAR WANTED! Local musician will pay up to $12,500 for pre1975 Gibson, Fender, Martin, Rickenbaker and Gretsch guitars. Fender amplifiers also. Call tollfree! 1-(800)995-1217

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533 WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world's premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

MORGENROTH MUSIC Inventory Clearance to make way for new products coming from NAMM, our annual buying show! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

GREAT WINTER DEALS

Outlaw Music

541-7533

I’m a 40-something married woman with an unwanted admirer. Last year, an 80ish married man, a member of my literary club, called me, confessed his passion for me, and begged me to have a romantic dinner with him. I reluctantly made plans to meet “Romeold” for coffee, intending to let him down gently. He took this “date” as a green light to e-mail me a lurid “fictional” story—a detailed blueprint for the affair he wanted us to have. Horrified, I canceled, apologized for any confusion, and made it clear that no affair was going to happen. He replied with a terse “So be it!” I avoided him all year, missing many club meetings. Last month, I ran into him at one. I was civil, but left him to chat with others. Afterward, he e-mailed a “special invite” to a critique group he’s started at his house. When I didn’t reply, he sent another invite with a bizarre faux-pology. I haven’t replied, and feel I can no longer attend the meetings due to his fixation on me. How can I get it through Romeold’s thick, balding skull that I’m totally uninterested and to please leave me alone? —Pursued

MISC. GOODS

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

INVENTORY CLEARANCE TO MAKE WAY FOR NEW PRODUCTS COMING FROM NAMM, OUR ANNUAL BUYING SHOW!

MORGENROTH MUSIC 1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210

1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 montanamusic.com

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 BOOKKEEPER. Extensive knowledge of Quickbooks, Excel, accounting procedures including AR, AP, financial reporting, etc. Position also involves some HR related tasks as well as other administrative duties. Requires Accounting degree or related experience. Wage DOE. #9950274 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 DELIVERY DRIVER with great customer service to pull, load, deliver and unload customer purchases in a friendly, timely, safe, and efficient manner. Purchases can include lumber, appliances, other bulky items and may include installation. Other in-store duties as assigned during non-delivery hours. Need to make sure load is secure before leaving, and perform regular inspections of truck. Class B CDL and good driving record required. Must meet all of employers training requirements and physical requirements. Work week will vary, as drivers rotate. Requires morning, afternoon and evening availability any day of the week. Pay starts at $11.81 per hour DOE.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 January 27 – February 3, 2011

FRAC SAND HAULERS - Tons of runs in Texas! Come to where the weather is warm, pay is great and the land is flat. 817769-7621, 817-769-7713 Garden City Harvest Garden City Harvest seeks Youth Harvest Project Coordinator to work in a therapeutic, serviceoriented, work program with youth in Missoula, Montana. We’re a nonprofit building community through agriculture with and for low-income Missoulians. Position closes 2/4. www.gardencityharvest.org GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800-GOGUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER. Perform routine maintenance for parks and recreation grounds and facilities, conservation lands and urban forest for City of Missoula. Any combination of training and experience

equivalent to graduation from high school and one year of maintenance and/or light equipment experience. Must have or be able to obtain a Montana driver’s license within 30 days of hire; may be required to obtain a Montana commercial drivers license (CDL) within 30 days of hire. #2978937 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RENTAL CLERK. PT for storage facility. Responsible for rental agreement paperwork, payments, and rental of U-Haul equipment and trucks. 30 hours per week from 8:30 am - 2:30 pm and every other Saturday. Pay starts at $8.00 per hour .#2978926 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SAWMILLS-Band/Chainsaw-Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In Stock ready to ship. From $4090.00. www. NorwoodSawmills.com/ 300N 1-800-661-7747

PROFESSIONAL Capital Campaign Consultant The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project (MUD) is seeking a fundraiser to launch and implement a capital campaign to relocate and expand MUD’s Tool Library and Truck Share programs. For more information, contact

info@mudproject.org or visit www.mudproject.org. Garden City Harvest ED Garden City Harvest seeks Executive Director to lead our efforts in fundraising, strategic planning and operations in Missoula, Montana. We’re a nonprofit building community through agriculture with and for Missoulians with low-income. We are accepting applications until the position has filled. Submit application including cover letter, resume and 3 references to: gch.director @gmail.com For more information go to www.gardencityhar vest.org Position closes 1/31. www.gardencityharvest.org.

SKILLED LABOR AGRICULTURAL FIELD TECHNICIAN and Farm Mechanic (2 positions) MSU-AESCARC - Moccasin, MT. Details at www.montana. edu/jobs, Lewistown Job Service, or call 406-423-5421. Screening Date: 1/27/11. MSU-Bozeman is an ADA/EEO/AA/Vet Pref Employer GENERAL MAINTENANCE. Holiday Inn Downtown is searching for motivated individual to join our maintenance staff. Previous maintenance experience preferred. #9950281 Missoula Job Service 728-7060


EMPLOYMENT HEATING APPLIANCE SERVICE TECHNICIAN. MUST have clean driving record. #9950266 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN. Residential wiring experience desired, must have valid driver’s license, be reliable and able to professionally interact with customers and general contractors. Wage negotiable. Hours/Days: Monday-Friday, 8:00-5:00. #9950213 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION ORGANIC CHEMISTRY TUTORS needed for upcoming 2011 academic year. Assignments typically involve 1-2 sessions/week for an 1-1.5 hrs/visit and require some availability late afternoon through the early evening and sometimes weekends. One year of teaching or tutoring experience is required. #9610939 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

America & Voyages around the world. Foreign travel experience to Latin America, Africa or Asia desired. Progressive compensation (Base plus commission for first year wage of $28,000 to $35,000, DOE and performance), rapid increases during years 2 & 3, health insurance, simple IRA, annual continuing education stipend & travel benefits. DEADLINE: 02/11/11. #2978923 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES Local data entry/typists needed immediately. $400 PT - $800 FT weekly. Flexible schedule, work from own PC. (800) 920-4851 NOW HIRING: companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. MT-4186

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Seeking Part time employee Experience necessary Inquire

TRIP PLANNER - SALES to plan and sell our trips for Latin

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

NEED MONEY? SAVE A LIFE. What better reward than the satisfaction of knowing you’ve made a difference in someone’s life? Here at BioLife Plasma Services members of our community proudly make a difference in people’s lives every day. We invite you to join our life-saving program and schedule a plasma donation today.

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BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 19 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Staying Healthy Through the Winter Join Herbalist Jessica Maisel as she shows us how to use medicinal herbs in our food, home and daily routine to keep us healthy throughout the cold and flu season. Thursday January 27, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Childhood Vaccinations: A Naturopathic Perspective Every parent is concerned with making the right decisions when it comes to their child’s health. Vaccines are a controver-

sial and complicated subject. It is important to be able to make an informed decision. Dr. Teresita Martinez of The Golgi Clinic will share the latest naturopathic perspectives on childhood vaccines and how to optimize your child’s health. Tuesday February 1, 7-9 pm, Cost: Free. Herbs and Kids Herbalist and Mom Jessica Maisel discusses creative ways to get your kids using and loving medicinal herbs to achieve and maintain optimum health. Wednesday, February 9, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Local Medicinal Herbs Herbalist and wildcrafter Jessica Maisel takes us on an in-depth exploration of 10 useful and abundant medicinal herbs local to the Missoula area including arnica, balsam root, red root, hawthorn, horsetail, yarrow, St. John’s Wort, poplar, monarda and oregon grape. Thursday, February 17, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Spring Cleansing for the Body

Series Spring is the perfect time to do a cleanse. Join Herbalist Jessica Maisel and learn how to effectively cleanse and purify your body in a safe and nourishing way from the inside out. This three part series will cover the reasons we need to actively cleanse our bodies, which herbs and supplements to use and how to use them properly for maximum benefit. We will prepare and share some Spring Tonic Soup at the last class! Tuesdays, February 22, March 1 and 8, 7-9 pm, Cost: $60. Healthy Skin from the Inside Out Join Meadowsweet’s Kimberly DeVries to learn about healing the skin from the inside out. Learn how you can help your liver and other eliminatory organs do their jobs better so the skin doesn’t have to take on a heavier load. Thursday March 24 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Makng your Own Natural Body Care: Healthy Skin from the Outside In Join

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Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

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Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919

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AUTOMOBILE TRUCKS

MOTORCYCLES

FULLY RESTORED 1954 GMC PICKUP. 1/2 ton, hydromatic transmission, custom paint & interior. Original 6 cylinder 235 hp. $30,000. Bill Miller (406)538-7271.

2008 HARLEY DAVIDSON. Soft Tail Deluxe 3100. Lots of extras. Below book at $15,000/OBO. 626-4406 or 480-1865

Meadowsweet’s own Kimberly DeVries to learn how to make your own natural body care. Kim will show us how to make a face lotion, face toner and a face scrub using herbs, essential oils, clays, fixed oils and other natural products. Thursday March 31, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Take home each product you make for an additional $10. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. 3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com

Mountain Man Medical Marijuana senior & veteran discounts. Free Delivery, Free Clones. Grow your own consulting. 871-1256

Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

Medical Marijuana

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

Paradigm Reiki Healing sessions and classes offered 549-0289 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

Mountain Man • Senior & veteran discounts • Free Delivery, Free Clones • Grow your own consulting

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How do you handle your awareness?

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PSYCHIC CLASSES Classes start in February! In Missoula & on-line Adrienne Elise

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PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA CONSULTANT SERVICES SOQ/RFP ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula has received approval from the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) to develop a federal-aid Community Transportation Enhancement Program (CTEP) project titled “University of Montana Crosswalk Improvements.” The City of Missoula is requesting proposals and statements of qualifications for engineering services to assist the Engineering Division in the design and oversight of construction of crosswalk improvements on public streets adjacent to the University of Montana in compliance with all applicable requirements under the MDT CTEP. Copies of the detailed request for statements of qualifications (SOQ) and Request for Proposals (RFP), including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, the minimum content of responses, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, can be obtained by visiting www.ci.missoula.mt.us/cityclerk/bid.htm, or by contacting Doug

Harby, Engineering Division, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59801,(406)-552-6091, or at dharby@ci.missoula.mt.us All responses to the detailed request for SOQs and RFPs must be submitted to City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Missoula, Montana 59802 on or before 3:00 p.m., February 11, 2011 CITY OF MISSOULA SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids for the construction of: MRA URD III – Residential Curb & Sidewalk Project – Phase 3 will be received by the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802-4297 until 11 a.m., local time, on Thursday February 10, 2011. The bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at the: Missoula Redevelopment Agency Conference Room, MRA office, 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT,

59802, enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for MRA URD III – Residential Curb & Sidewalk Project – Phase 3.” The envelope shall also be marked with the bidder’s name, address and Montana contractor’s registration number. This project consists of installing approximately 49,000 square feet of city sidewalk, 5,525 lineal feet of city curb, drainage facilities, ADA facilities, street repairs and associated work. A complete set of the project manual, drawings and specifications may be furnished or reviewed at Territorial Landworks, Inc. 620 Addison Missoula, Montana (406-7210142), upon a nonrefundable payment of $50.00 (plus shipping) by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). In addition, the project manual, drawings and specifications may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, (406) 5495002 and iSqFt® website: http://www. isqft.com. There will be a non-mandatory pre-bid conference at the Missoula Redevelopment Agency Conference

Room, 140 West Pine St, Missoula, Montana (406-552-6160), Friday January 28, 2011. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. Questions regarding the project manual, drawings and specifications shall be directed to the Engineer Territorial-Landworks, Inc.; 620 Addison, PO Box 3851; Missoula, MT 59806. (406) 721-0142 Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the pro-

posal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency against liability. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a per-

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 January 27 – February 3, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): What rewards do you deserve for all the good living and the hard work you’ve done since your last birthday? And what amends should you make for the mediocre living and the work you’ve shirked since your last birthday? If you choose this week to take care of these two matters with purposeful clarity, you will ensure the best possible outcomes. The reward you earn will be the right one, and the amends you offer will provide the proper correction. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Sometimes I fly in my dreams. The ecstasy is almost unbearable as I soar high above the landscape. But there’s something I enjoy dreaming about even more, and that’s running. For years I’ve had recurring dreams of sprinting for sheer joy through green hills and meadows, often following rivers that go on forever. I’m never short of breath. My legs never get tired. I feel vital and vigorous and fulfilled. Does it seem odd that I prefer running to flying? I think I understand why. The flying dreams represent the part of me that longs to escape the bonds of earth, to be free of the suffering and chaos here. My running dreams, on the other hand, express the part of me that loves being in a body and exults in the challenges of this world. Given your astrological omens, Taurus, I think you’re ready for whatever is your personal equivalent of running in your dreams. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An interviewer asked me if there’s any special ritual I do before writing these horoscopes. I told her I often say a prayer in which I affirm my desire to provide you with these three services: (1) that what I create will be of practical use to you; (2) that it will help you cultivate your relationship with your inner teacher; (3) that it will inspire you to tap into and use the substantial freedom you have to create the life you want. I hope I’m doing a good job, Gemini, because in the coming weeks your inner teacher will be overflowing with practical clues about the art of liberation.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Spring dawn: Turning toward the storm cloud, I lost sight of the bird.” Let this haiku-like poem by Julius Lester serve as a cautionary tale, Cancerian. You’re at risk of getting so fearfully fixated on a storm cloud that you may lose track, metaphorically speaking, of a rare and beautiful bird. And the thing is, the storm cloud isn’t even harboring that big a ruckus. It will pour out its flash and dazzle quickly, leaving virtually no havoc in its wake. That’s why it would be a shame for you to let your perverse fascination with it cause you to get separated from a potential source of inspiration.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Shockwaves of toxic misinformation pulse through the Internet on a regular basis. One of the latest infections attacked the subject of astrology. An astronomer in Minneapolis proclaimed that due to the precession of the equinoxes, everyone’s astrological sign is wrong. He was perfectly mistaken, of course, for reasons I explain here: http://bit.ly/AstroHoax. But few journalists in the major media bothered to check the accuracy of the sensationalist allegation before publishing it, and soon the collective imagination was on fire. Hundreds of thousands of people suffered unnecessary identity crises and felt emotions that were based on a fallacy. In the coming week, Leo, you should be on high alert for a comparable outbreak or two in your personal sphere. Be vigorously skeptical—not just toward the stories other people tell, but also toward the theories and fantasies that rise up in your own brain. Don’t believe everything you think.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You are usually conscientious about attending to the details. It’s one of your specialties to take care of little necessities. You often know what to do in order to fix mistakes and messes caused by the imprecision of other people. For now, though, I encourage you to take a break from all that. In my opinion, you need to regenerate and replenish yourself, and a good way to accomplish that is to let your mind go blissfully blank. At least consider it, please. Give yourself permission to space out about the intricacies. Steep yourself in the primordial ooze where everything is everything.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’ll be interested to see how you shift your attitudes about love in the coming weeks, Libra. Fate will be bringing you good reasons to move away from long-held opinions about the nature of romance and intimacy. Your subconscious mind will be stirring with new dispensations about how best to deal with and express your life-giving longings. All in all, the process should be pretty enjoyable, especially if you relish psycho-spiritual riddles that impel you to probe deeper into the mysteries of togetherness.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob: I am a professional obsesser. I mean I obsess on things a lot. But here’s the thing. When I do obsess on something and work with manic intensity to achieve it, I am changed in the process—frequently to the point of no longer desiring what I was once obsessed by! This makes me crazy! Any advice? —Flagrant Scorpio.” Dear Flagrant: This is a gift, not a problem. Figuring out what you don’t want is a key factor in developing self-knowledge. And often the only way to do that is by pursuing what you think you want. Ultimately you’ll be purged of your lesser longings and superficial wishes and be able to crystallize a clear vision of what you truly desire more than anything else.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in such a way that will allow a solution,” said philosopher Bertrand Russell. In other words, the words you use to describe your dilemma are crucial. If you’re lazy or pessimistic about framing your big question, you minimize your chances for finding a useful answer. If you’re precise and creative, you’re more likely to attract the information and inspiration you need. This is always true, of course, but especially so for you right now.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A “karma whore” is someone who performs an abundant number of favors and acts of kindness in the hope of accumulating extra good karma. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m thinking this week will be prime time for you to flirt with being such a person. Why? Because the blessings you bestow in the near future are more likely than usual to generate specific blessings coming back your way. You don’t necessarily have to go to ridiculous extremes— holding the door open for five people behind you, allowing ten cars to merge in front of you on the highway, flinging out casual but sincere compliments with reckless abandon. But from what I can tell, the more help you dole out, the more you’ll get in return.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may have no idea of how much power you have right now to start fresh—to escape the muddle of murky old failures. Your imagination might not yet be sufficiently lubricated to glide you into the expansive version of the future you deserve. But I’m hoping that this little horoscope of mine changes all that. I’m praying that you are already registering the pleasant shock I’m trying to jolt you with, and are awakening to the rampant possibilities. On your mark. Get set. Go!



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve never been a fan of gurus. My view is that everyone should be his or her own guru. But there was one guy whose antics were pretty entertaining. He was one of those crazy wisdom types who borrowed liberally from the trickster archetype. This is what he told his followers about how to interpret their dreams in which he appeared. “If you dream of me and I’m not kicking your butt, it wasn’t really me.” I’ll say the same thing to you, Pisces: The only teachers worth listening to, studying, and dreaming about in the next two weeks will be those who kick your butt. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

PUBLIC NOTICES son or group of people so identified. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula business licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as set out in the bid proposal. Any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement is subject to all appropriate federal laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency hereby notifies all bidders it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this invitation, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation. The Disadvantaged Business Enterprises’ contract goals are 0%. In accordance with Section 49-3-207, MCA, and Chapter 9.64, MMC contractors agree that for this contract all hiring will be made on the basis of merit and qualifications and that there will be no discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified, by the persons performing the contract. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids received , and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the Agency’s requirements. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified above. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact Doug Harby at the City of Missoula Public Works Office at 406552-6345. City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/ bids. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at Thursday February 10, 2011 at 11 a.m. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: GLO on Plat, located in NW _ of Section 1, Township 13N, Range 20W, Missoula Development Park From Trumpeter Court To Airway Blvd And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit as: On Lot 1-A Missoula Development Park, PH 2, Block 10, Lots 1A & 2A (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula MT.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. No need of road or access in platted subdivision 2. Now required when platting new subdivisions 3. Stopping sale of property A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 2, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: January 6, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: A portion of Woodville Avenue, located in the southeast corner of Section 27, Township 12N, Range 17W, being that portion more specifical-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 January 27 – February 3, 2011

ly described in “Lund-JamisonWheatley Agreement for Abandonment of a portion of Woodville Avenue in Clinton, Montana” (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula MT.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The portion of the road to be abandoned is not needed for any public purpose, nor can it be reasonably be anticipated to be useful for any public purpose in the future; 2. The abandonment will be in the public interest by allowing for an optimal placement of a wastewater treatment system on the Lund property; 3. All conditions of the Agreement attached as Exhibit A have been satisfied; 4. Adequate access to all affected properties will be preserved, as provided for in the Agreement attached as Exhibit A. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 9, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: January 3, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Tuesday, Monday February 7th, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing one (1) Injection Patching Machine. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 258-4816. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Injection Patching Machine” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATIONS The Office of Planning and Grants has received the following applications for Floodplain Development Permits: 1. County Floodplain Permit Application # 11-08 from Karl Tyler to work within the Lolo Creek floodplain. The project is located at 27235 Highway 12 West in Section 28, Township 12N, Range 22W and includes the construction of a new bridge. 2. County Floodplain Permit Application # 11-09 from John Gerlach to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 14100 Harper’s Bridge Road in Section 36, Township 14N, Range 22W and includes the construction of a new garage and storage building. The full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in these applications may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., February 18, 2011. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula MT 59802 or call 258- 4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY INVITATION FOR BIDS The Missoula County Facilities Management Department is currently soliciting sealed

bids for a water cooled centrifugal chiller for the Missoula County Detention Center located at 2340 Mullan Rd, Missoula, MT. Bids will be accepted until 3:00PM, Wednesday, February 9, 2011 by the Office of the County Auditor at which time bids will be opened and read. All work is to be performed in accordance with Invitation for Bid specifications posted on the Missoula County website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us /bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.htm. Bid specifications are also available through the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N Russell, Missoula, MT 59801, 406-549-5002. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the amount bid and must be in a form specified in MCA 18-1-201 thru 206. The security is subject to forfeiture if the successful bidder does not enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Interested parties may contact Bob Schieder, Systems Engineer, (406 )531 -0377 or bschiede@co.missoula.mt.us for additional information. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Invitation for Bid – Detention Center Chiller” and 4 copies submitted to: Barbara Berens, County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs- Laramie Loewen Defendant. )))))))Cause No. CV2010 - 31131-LT SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT LARAMIE LOEWEN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within ten (10) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an eviction and subsequent possession upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 11, ALL OF LOTS 12, 13, 14 AND THE EAST 25 FEET OF LOT 15 IN BLOCK 66 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 199 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 2284 WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 29th day of December, 2010. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Karen A. Orzech Justice Court Judge Dated this 23rd day of December, 2010. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 MT BAR ID#2429 By: /s/ Charles J. Peterson Charles J. Peterson, Attorney Attorney for the Plaintiff Please be advised that Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information you provide will be used for that purpose. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT INVITATION TO BID AIRPORT IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MISSOULA, MONTANA Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received and publicly opened at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, February 17, 2011 by the Missoula County Airport Authority at the Airport Terminal Conference Room for the construction of “Airport Improvements” to include the following: Terminal Building Entrance Sidewalk Rehabilitation Project This work is to include all tools, equipment, materials and labor to complete this project. Bids must be sealed and delivered: Missoula County Airport Authority 5225 Highway 10 West Missoula, MT 59808 at or before 2:00 p.m., local time on Thursday, February 17, 2011, and marked “Bid for Airport Improvements at the Missoula International Airport.” The bidder’s name, address and state Contractor’s Registration Number shall appear in the lower left hand corner of the envelope. All bids must be accompanied by lawful monies of the United States or a Cashier’s Check, a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Bank Money Order or Bank Draft, drawn and issued by a National Banking Association located in the State of Montana, or by any Banking Corporation incorporated under the Laws of the State of Montana, in an amount equal to not less than ten (10) percent of the total bid, payable to the order of the Missoula County Airport Authority as liquidated damages in the event said successful bidder shall fail or refuse to execute the contract in accordance with the terms of his bid. After a contract is awarded, the successful bidder will be required to furnish a separate Performance and

Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract. Plans, specifications, bidding and contract forms may be inspected at the Airport Director’s Office – Missoula International Airport, or at offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at 1 Engineering Place, Helena, Montana; 315 N. 25th Street, Suite 102, Billings, Montana; 2880 Technology Blvd West., Bozeman, Montana; 1321 8th Avenue North, Suite 104, Great Falls, Montana; or 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana. Copies of these documents may be obtained from the office of MorrisonMaierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59803 – Phone: (406) 542-8880, on the payment of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) nonrefundable, for each complete set. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive irregularities. The Contractor will be required to comply with the wage and labor requirements and to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedule of wage rates established by the United States Department of Labor as referenced in the Contract. Contractors and any subcontractors doing work on this project will require registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Avenue, Helena, Montana 596048011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800-556-6694. Contractors are required to have been registered with the Department of Labor and Industry prior to bidding on this project. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the bid documents and specifications. The Bidder is required to submit a Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities (included in the Proposal form). A Contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in these specifications. The proposed contract is under subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. This contract will be funded by revenue generated through the Airport’s PFC program. Bidders may not withdraw Proposals for a period of sixty (60) days after the bid opening date. The pre-bid conference is hereby established at 2:00 p.m. (local time) Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at the Airport Terminal Conference Room, Missoula International Airport. A tour of the work site at the Missoula International Airport will be conducted following the pre-bid conference. Signed: /s/ Cris Jensen Airport Director Missoula County Airport Authority MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-10-1649 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION ETRADA CO., LLC, Plaintiff vs. MOUNTAIN WEST BANK, N.A.; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; LeROY TRIPP; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff's ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff's title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVENAMED DEFENDANTS AND TO ALL OTHER PERSONS UNKNOWN: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff's attorneys within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to the land situated in Missoula County, Montana, legally described as follows: An Undivided onehalf interest in and to Lot 2 of RASER COMMERCIAL TRACTS NO. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 19 of Plats at Page 78. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 21st day of January, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Susie Wall Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 1 Cause No.: DV-09-1091 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, Plaintiff, -vs- DANIEL ARNEY and SALLY ARNEY, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS DANIEL ARNEY AND SALLY ARNEY: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed with the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought to collect a debt owed by the Defendants to Plaintiff. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL this 21st day of January, 2011. SHIRLEY E. FAUST, Clerk of Court /s/Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No 1 Cause No. DP 11 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT C. McGIFFERT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the


PUBLIC NOTICES above—named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BRIAN S. McGIFFERT, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 10th day of January, 2011. /s/ Brian S. McGiffert, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP 11 12 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KARRIE LEE FIMBRES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Co—Personal Representatives of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BONNIE ACEVES and MANUEL FIMBRES, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 14th day of January, 2011. /s/ Bonnie Aceves, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Manuel Fimbres, CoPersonal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-11-4 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS, AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARCIA JEAN STRAILE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lisa Bomberger has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Marcia Jean Straile, deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, and for the appointment of Lisa Bomberger as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the courthouse at Missoula, Montana on the 9th day of February, 2011 at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m. at which time all interested persons may appear and object. Dated this 14th day of January, 2011. /s/ Lisa Bomberger MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-10-1069 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. BRIAN SALONEN, Plaintiff, vs. NUTEC COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. d/b/a ROCKY MOUNTAIN COMMUNICATIONS, Inc., MONTANA 5— MINERAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, GOLD CREEK CELLULAR OF MONTANA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claims any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS; Nutec Communications, Inc. d/b/a Rocky Mountain Communications, Inc.; all all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’ title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent. YOU ARE HEREBY Summoned to answer to the Complaint in this action as filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs’ attorneys within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana and described as follows: A tract of land located in the Southwest one-quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian Montana, Missoula County, Montana, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the South one-quarter corner of Section 10; thence S.88º21’06”W., along the South line of said Section 10 a distance of 909.50 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing S.88º21’06”W., along the South line of said Section 10 a distance of 675.00 feet to a point in the centerline of an existing road; thence the following three courses along the centerline of said existing road: N.15º46’58”W., 92.1 feet; thence N.13º38’11”E., 268.23 feet; thence N.03º14’36”E., 145.00 feet; thence leaving the centerline of said road and running N.39º07’13”E., 976.92 feet to a point on a compound curve, said point being in the centerline of an existing road, thence Southeasterly along the centerline of said road and along said compound curve being concave to the Northeast and having a radius of 157.44 feet a distance of 169.90 feet to the point of compound curvature; thence continuing Southeasterly along said compound curve being concave to the North and having a radius of 539.43 feet a distance of 97.61 feet; thence leaving the centerline of said road and running S.07º40’E., 706.56 feet; thence S.35º03’30”W., 548.78 feet to the true point of beginning. WITNESS my hand this 20th day of January, 2011. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-203 NOTICE TO

CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JESSE EUGENE GEDDES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Nicholas A. Geddes, return receipt requested, at The Modine Law Office, 215 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 5th day of January, 2011. /s/ Nicholas A. Geddes, Personal Representative, 10412 Tookie Trek, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-11-25 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Adam Russell Luce, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Adam Russell Luce to Adam Russell Freeman. The hearing will be on February 22, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated January 6, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By Cori Ollin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-11-14 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VIOLET H. QUIRIN, a/k/a VI QUIRIN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kristine Fankell, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at Dye & Moe, P.L.L.P., PO Box 9198, 216 West Main, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. Dated: January 18, 2011 /s/ Kristine Fankell, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Case No. DP-10-201 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RICHARD HOWARD WILLIAMS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Darinda Williams, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 5th day of January, 2011. /s/ Darinda Williams, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-10-198 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MAURICE J. AHERN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will b forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PATRICIA L. AHERN, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2010. /s/ Patricia L. Ahern, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-11-15 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF STANLEY T. RING, a/k/a STANLEY THOMAS RING, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LINDA WOLFE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 27705 Blixit Creek Road, Bonner, Montana 59823 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 18th day of January. 2011 /s/ Linda Wolfe, Personal Representative 27705 Blixit Creek Road, Bonner, MT 59823 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Tuesday, the 8th day of March, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at the front door of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligations set out below, has been directed to sell and has elected to sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time of sale, and without warranty or covenant, express or implied as to title, possession, encumbrances, condition, or otherwise, the interest of the Successor Trustee, Martin S. King, and of the Grantor LINDA J. SNYDER in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula, Montana, to wit: A tract of land located in and being a portion of the NE 1/4 of Section 14, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, and being more particularly described as Parcel 2 of COS 5692. Said sale will be made in accordance with the

statutes of the State of Montana, and the terms and provisions of: that certain Trust Indenture dated January 19, 2007, and recorded January 19, 2007, in Book 790 at Page 1109 as Document No. 200701571 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, wherein LINDA J. SNYDER is Grantor, EARL M. PRUYN is the named Beneficiary, and STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. is the named Trustee; that certain Appointment of Successor Trustee dated March 5, 2009, and recorded March 27, 2009, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana, in Book 836 at page 268 as Document No. 200906833, wherein the Beneficiary substituted Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. with Martin S. King, attorney at law, as Successor Trustee. This foreclosure is made because the Grantor, LINDA J. SNYDER, and her successors in interest, have defaulted in the terms of said Trust Indenture and the corresponding Promissory Note in that she has failed to pay the monthly payments and pursuant to the terms of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised his option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. That on the date of sale, presuming no other payments are made and that the sale is not postponed, there will be due and owing the principal sum of One Hundred Fifty Thousand Four Hundred Eighty and No/100 ($152,000.00), plus interest at a rate of Ten Percent (10%) per annum totaling Forty-four Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-two and 45/100 Dollars ($44,452.45), real property taxes of Ten Thousand Three Hundred Sixty-eight and No/100 Dollars ($10,368.00), Six Thousand One Hundred Twenty-two and 33/100 Dollars ($6,122.33) in attorney fees and foreclosure costs through October 25, 2010, for a total amount due of Two Hundred Twelve Thousand Nine Hundred Forty-two and 78/100 Dollars ($212,942.78), together with costs and expenses of foreclosure and related trustee fees, costs and attorney fees allowable by law. DATED this 28th day of October, 2010. /s/ Martin S. King, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA):ss. County of Missoula) On this 28th day of October, 2010, before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Sale of Real Property Under a Deed of Trust as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula My commission expires: January 24, 2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/02/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200705409, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Darwin L. Kinyon and Jill M. Kinyon, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Challenge Financial Investors, Corp. was Beneficiary and Title Services of Missoula Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services of Missoula Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12, Forty-four Ranch Estates, according to the official plat thereof, as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s office Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 19, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $208,032.57. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $190,016.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 4, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s

rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.72357) 1002.178688-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 24, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $805,190.60. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 6, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $475,664.21. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 14, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including

Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/29/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200615934, Bk. 777, Pg. 1307, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert Che Garrard, Tonia D. Garrard was Grantor, Community Bank-Missoula, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12-17 Inclusive in Block 7 of Frenchtown Townsites according to the official plat thereof and recorded in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana excepting a portion thereof conveyed to the State of Montana on May 5, 1955 by deed recorded in Book 189 at Page 266 deed records of Missoula County, Montana as retraced by Certificate of Survey No. 5442. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $260,747.80. This

amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $251,769.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 11, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.72582) 1002.179340-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200714367, Bk 798, Pg 1453, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marcus M. Stenslie, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance

RESOLUTION NUMBER 2011 - 005 A RESOLUTION OF INTENT TO ZONE UNZONED PROPERTY LEGALLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 3 OF WESTFIELD CENTER, LOCATED IN SECTION 21 OF TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., IN MISSOULA COUNTY (SEE MAP K), ALSO KNOWN AS 8448 HWY 10 W, TO C-C2 (GENERAL COMMERCIAL). WHEREAS, 76-2-201 M.C.A. authorizes the Board of County Commissioners to adopt zoning regulations; and, WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners did adopt zoning regulations for Missoula County through the passage of County Resolution 76-113, as amended; and, WHEREAS, 76-2-202 M.C.A. provides for the establishment and revision of zoning districts; and, WHEREAS, a request to rezone the property legally described above was reviewed by the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board at a public hearing held January 4, 2011; and, WHEREAS, a notice of public hearing was advertised in the Independent on December 16, 2010 and December 23, 2010; and, WHEREAS, a hearing was held by the County Commissioners of Missoula County on January 19, 2011, in order to give the public an opportunity to be heard regarding the proposed amendments to the zoning district; and, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County will receive written protest for a period of thirty (30) days after publication of this notice on January 27, 2011, from persons owning real property within the contiguous boundaries of the C-C2 (General Commercial) zoning district. FURTHER, copies of the C-C2 zoning district are available for inspection at the office of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder and the Office of Planning and Grants PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 24TH DAY OF JANUARY 2011 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ATTEST: MISSOULA COUNTY Vickie Zeier, Clerk and Recorder. Jean Curtiss, Chair. APPROVED AS TO FORM: Bill Carey, Commissioner. James McCubbin, Deputy County Attorney. Michele Landquist, Commissioner

Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 2 of Meadow Hill Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $244,050.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $233,379.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 15, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request – 217 & 235 Catlin St., 1715 Trail St A request from Steven Sann, represented by Ken Jenkins of Montana Northwest Company, to rezone property located at 217 & 235 Catlin Street and 1715 Trail Street from RM2.7 (Residential multi-dwelling, 16 dwellings per acre) to RM1-45 (Residential multi-dwelling, 43 dwellings per acre). See Map F.

The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on this item at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March 7, 2011, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 January 27 – February 3, 2011


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

d s

"Sign of the Times"–but I repeat myself.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 "That doesn't look good" 5 They're tipped in pranks, supposedly 9 Bear whose porridge was deemed too hot 13 Suffix for cities 15 Novelist Waugh 16 Corporate honcho 17 Follow the law 18 Goneril's father 19 Jonathan Larson musical 20 Song from The Doors' "Strange Days" album, literally? 23 Getting by, with "out" 24 "Dallas" family members 27 Diamond stat 28 Little bite 30 Strip mall components 32 French cocktail 33 "Uncle Miltie" 35 Fox News correspondent ___ Ninan 36 Commodores hit, literally? 39 Get more mags 40 Do a five-finger discount 41 Member of the fam 42 Stretchy materials 44 "Toddlers & Tiaras" network 45 Capitol Hill figure: abbr. 46 Soft drink originally bottled in California 48 "___ the Frequency, Kenneth?" 50 2010 Italian Cannes entry, literally? 54 Morally right 57 Italian wine region 58 Actor Delon 59 "Understood!" 60 Tug McGraw's first MLB team 61 Like justice, as it's personified 62 Western lake 63 Goes on and on 64 Raid target

1 Fall birthstone 2 Bindle carrier 3 Peace symbol 4 Former Yankee pitcher Irabu 5 People like the one with which Eliot Spitzer got in trouble 6 Margarine 7 Patch of fake hair, maybe 8 "Some assembly required" extras 9 Santa Claus's French counterpart 10 Double-bladed weapon 11 What brave people use to fill in crosswords 12 It's divided into scenes 14 18-wheeler 21 Prefix meaning "nine" that can precede -gon 22 Type of heart valve 25 Tough spot for a mechanic? 26 Submit, as a letter 27 Poet James Whitcomb and singer Jeannie, for two 29 Actor Oliver of "The Big C" 31 "Survey ___...." ("Family Feud" phrase) 32 Stylish Lagerfeld 33 Dam outlet 34 Flower sung about in "The Sound of Music" 37 Removed vermin from 38 America's Cup entrant 43 Torrid 45 ___ Artois 47 Befuddled 49 Moby Dick's chaser 51 Letters before "://" 52 It may be printed upsidedown 53 Grinds to a halt 54 Tony Hillerman detective Chee 55 Point 56 Dead or Red

Last week’s solution

©2011 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

PUBLIC NOTICES having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.90439) 1002.179551-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/30/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200926473, Bk 850, Pg 322, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert C. Garrard and Tonia D. Garrard, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common) and to the survivor of said named joint tenants, and to their heirs and assigns of such survivor, who acquired title as Robert Che Garrard and Tonia D. Garrard, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common) husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and None Specified was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded None Specified as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE1/4 of Section 4, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract B-7 of Certificate of Survey No. 2310. Together with a road easement through the S1/2 of Section 4, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana and further described as follows: Beginning at the most Northwesterly corner of Tract “B”, Certificate of Survey No. 2172; thence S. 89 degrees 26’ 18’’ E., 1008.05 feet which line described the Northerly boundary of a thirty (30) foot wide private road easement; thence the next two (2) courses along the center line of a thirty (30) foot wide private road easement being fifteen (15) either side of the described line; thence S. 00 degrees 32’ 57’’ E., 655.75 feet along the North South mid section line; thence S. 89 degrees 20’48’’E., 631.29 feet to the Westerly boundary of Tract B-6 and B-7 of Certificate of Survey No. 2310. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 9, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $317,231.28. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $310,603.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 20, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91081) 1002.180483-FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/09/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture

in which SCOTT DEAN JOHNSON, AND MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/23/2006 and recorded 06/30/2006, in document No. 200616003 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 778 at Page Number 63 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 5 OF BITTERROOT HOMES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 809 DIXON AVE, MISSOULA, MT 59801-8619 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,614.96 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.125% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 12/22/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr., TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO 10-0164695 FEI NO 1006.123570 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which BONNIE M BRIGGS, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEYAT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/21/2008 and recorded 08/29/2008, in document No. 200820235 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 825 at Page Number 818 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 41 OF SHELBY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 12961 KIMWOOD DR, Lolo, MT 59847-9519. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2010 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $146,122.21 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 10/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 January 27 – February 3, 2011

by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/29/10 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO 10-0166687 FEI NO 1006.124432 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 4/4/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT,59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LARRY STOLLE and DAWN STOLLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/01/2009 and recorded 07/13/2009, in document No. 200917156 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 843 at Page Number 798 In the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, THE E 1/2 SE 1/4 SE 1/4 NW 1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 2O WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 4287 E CARLTON CREEK RD, Florence, MT 59833-6161. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $169,289.54 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.50% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 11/19/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO. 10-0151973 FEI NO. 1006.119979 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 18, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 40 OF SUNNY MEADOWS NO. 2. A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Keith A Walt and Michelle L Walt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 16, 2005 and Recorded on December 21, 2005 under Document # 200533821, in Bk-766, Pg469. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. as successor in interest to ABN Amro Mortgage Group Inc., f/k/a ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County,

Montana.The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,406.22, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October, 30 2010 is $185,616.75 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $11,787.15, late charges in the amount of $1,474.92, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2627.96, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.42 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default.The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 8, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 8, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V. Walt 41926.723 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND, BEING A CONDOMINIUM DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: UNIT 209, AS SHOWN AND DEFINED IN THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS FOR THE LYNNWOOD, A RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH ITS EXHIBITS AS RECORDED IN BOOK 170 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 581, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED .0261508918 INTEREST IN AND TO TRACT 1, BLOCK 2, HAMMOND ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF (REFERENCE: CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 255), TOGETHER WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON. TOGETHER WITH AN EXCLUSIVE USE AREA OR LIMITED COMMON AREA AS THOSE TERMS ARE DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION AND AS DESCRIBED IN THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ATTACHED THERETO AS BEING A STORAGE SPACE S-26, TOGETHER WITH THEIR APPURTENANCES. APN 5849375 WITH THE APPURTENANCES THERETO. APN: 5849375 Dale L Garberding and Roberta C Garberding, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 27, 2007 and recorded August 7, 2007 in Book 803, Page 266, under Document No. 200720401. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $690.57, beginning May 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 07, 2010 is $105,813.95 principal,

interest at the rate of 6.5000% now totaling $4,125.18, late charges in the amount of $207.12, and other fees and expenses advanced of $274.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 11, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 11, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Garberding 42011.040 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF SCOTT MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Carl R. Crisp and Susan S. Crisp, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Guaranty Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 1, 2006 and recorded on August 7, 2006 in Book 780, Page 720 under Document No. 200619828. The beneficial interest is currently held by One West Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,059.63, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 26, 2010 is $325,477.17 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $10,066.68, late charges in the amount of $1,123.98, escrow advances of $824.60, and other fees and expenses advanced of $283.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.85 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th


PUBLIC NOTICES day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 10, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest V. Crisp 41969.547 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA IN THE STATE OF MT: LOT 4 OF MODERIE LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jack C. Westre, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Source, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 27, 2007 and recorded on February 15, 2007 in Book 792, Page 28 as Document No. 200703753. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for GSR Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-OA1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-OA1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,666.96, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 28, 2010 is $457,500.61 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $22,531.35, late charges in the amount of $1,693.98, escrow advances of $2,680.70, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2811.24, plus accruing interest at the rate of $83.04 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and

acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Litton V. Westre 41462.822 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 4 OF K/O ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDINGTO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. John T. Oberg and Christine E. Oberg, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Montana First Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 13, 2007 and recorded April 16, 2007 in Book 795, Page 581, under Document No. 200708886. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,990.43, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 19, 2010 is $364,393.79 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $6,863.59, escrow advances of $123.83 and other fees and expenses advanced of $548.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $62.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Phh V Oberg 41392.707 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Ruth Addition, a platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 19 of Plats at Page 43 CHRISTIAN HUGHES AND DUSTIN L HUGHES, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 1, 2006 and recorded in Book 773, Page 658 under Document No. 200609909. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,534.94, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obliga-

tion as of October 01, 2010 is $177,841.55 principal, interest at the rate of 6.3750% now totaling $4,723.90, late charges in the amount of $1,056.49, escrow advances of $166.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $284.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.06 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Hughes 42011.125 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN AND BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE N1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 8; THENCE S.18°19’10” E., 2104.57 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 465.73 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE EAST, 792.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF WAY LINE OF MILWAUKEE RAILROAD; THENCE S.33°00’ E. ALONG SAID RIGHT- OF- WAY LINE , A DISTANCE OF 192.94 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIN ; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT -OF-WAY LINE RUNNING WEST, 897.37 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIN; THENCE NORTH, 161.81 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 34 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1666. NOTE: ANY CONVEYANCE OR SECURITY INSTRUMENT MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT AS DESCRIBED IN DEED FROM DONALD K. MEECH AND DORIS K. MEECH, HIS WIFE, SIMMS, MONTANA DATED JULY 1, 1969, TO GRANTORS AND GRANTEES HEREIN. John C Ruyle and Cindy S Ruyle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to David R Chisholm, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust recorded May 16, 2005 in Book 752 Page 694 under Document No.200511393. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank National Association. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,564.80, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 1, 2010 is $244,376.04 principal, interest at the rate of 5.9500% now totaling $6,058.50, late charges in the amount of $312.96, escrow advances of $964.55, and other fees and expenses advanced of $84.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $39.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required

to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 19, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Us Bank V. Ruyle/john C. 41810.384 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: PARCEL 12 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 351 LOCATED IN THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Vern L. Rollins and Lois M Rollins, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated June 3, 2009 and recorded June 8, 2009 in Book 840, Page 1378 and under Document No. 200913539. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,801.57, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 1, 2010 is $293,551.07 principal, interest at the rate of 0.06125% now totaling $6,059.01, late charges in the amount of $540.36 and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $49.26 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation

secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 25, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 25, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Phh V. Rollins/vern & Lois 41392.693 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 3 OF SCENIC VIEW ESTATES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISON IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David R. Krause and Jodie L. Hooker, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 31, 2006 and Recorded on September 06, 2006 under Document # 200622780 Book 782 Micro Records Pg. 820. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,490.17, beginning November 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 11, 2010 is $173,019.40 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $13,898.59, late charges in the amount of $1,119.80, escrow advances of $3,383.18, suspense balance of $1,024.77 and other fees and expenses advanced of $363.34, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.37 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 25, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 25, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest V. Krause & Hooker 41969.538 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the

Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK M OF CAR LINE ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Doreen M Bermingham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 30, 2006 and Recorded on March 31, 2006 in Book 771, Page 353 under Document # 200607104. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Americas as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2006-2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $852.14, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 19, 2010 is $98,968.87 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $9,342.61, late charges in the amount of $105.15, escrow advances of $1,932.07 other fees and expenses advanced of $2,423.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 American Home Mortgage V. Bermingham 41537.432 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5171, LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Caylee Kittelson-Hehn and Brian Hehn, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 06, 2009 and Recorded on April 10, 2009 under Document # 200908088, in Bk-837, Pg-124. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,475.60, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the

property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 5, 2010 is $217,488.26 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0% now totaling $5,437.20, late charges in the amount of $397.18, escrow advances of $12.06, and other fees and expenses advanced of $71.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.80 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 GMAC V. Kittelson-Hehn 41965.397 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 16A OF CAR LINE ADDITION BLOCK 18, LOTS 15AAND 16A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. KORY KNIE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON APRIL 27, 2007 AND RECORDED ON JUNE 3, 2007 IN BOOK 796, PAGE 805 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200710763. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX4 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated May 1, 2007. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $732.01, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 12, 2010 is $164,024.30 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $4,855.24, late charges in the amount of $420.30, escrow advances of $.70, and other fees and expenses advanced of $69.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.77 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 January 27 – February 3, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest Bank V Knie 41969.530 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property sit-

uated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA: LOT 157 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 2, PHASE III, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO GARY L. HANNINEN AND CAROL R. HANNINEN, AS JOINT TENANTS AND TO THE SURVIVOR OF SAID NAMES JOINT TENANTS BY DEED FROM PLEASANT VIEW HOMES, INC. RECORDED 09/30/2003 IN DEED BOOK PAGE 200337678, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TAX ID# 3790302 GARY L. HANNINEN AND CAROL R. HANNINEN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WILLIAM T. STEVENS, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON FEBRUARY 22, 2006 AND RECORDED ON APRIL 4, 2006 IN BOOK 771, PAGE 651 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200607402. The beneficial interest is currently held by HSBC Mortgage Services, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,526.62, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2010 is $185,369.28 principal, interest at the rate of 8.99% now totaling $26,291.46, late charges in the amount of $107.58, escrow advances of $2845.28, and other fees and expenses advanced of $125.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $45.67 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates

and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF

KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Hsbc V Hanninen 41472.525

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 8, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 26 of Meriwether, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof Richard J Bateman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Comp., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 14, 2006 and recorded December 18, 2006 in Book 789, Page 42 under Document No. 200632161. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley, MSAC 2007-HE5. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,431.51, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 15, 2010 is $216,798.03 principal, interest at the rate of 8.000% now totaling $25,350.65, late charges in

the amount of $57.27, escrow advances of $3,418.05, suspense balance of $-2,499.40 and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,954.52, plus accruing interest at the rate of $47.51 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee

for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 29, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On October 29, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Saxon V Bateman 41744.252

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 38 of Hawthorn Springs, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Russ L. Allaway and Kathy Allaway, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bitterroot Valley Bank, d/b/a Clark Fork Valley Bank, as original Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated June 5, 2008, and recorded as Document No. 200812624, Book 820, Page 202, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, which Montana Trust Indenture was modified on June 5, 2009, and a Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded June 9, 2009 as Document No. 200913839, Book 841, Page 279, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, and was further modified on February 18, 2010, and which Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded February 19, 2010, as Document No. 201003394, Book 855, Page 877, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The Beneficiary’s Interest in the Montana Trust

Indenture was assigned to Gravely Mountain Investments, LLC on or about December 30, 2010, by Assignment recorded January 4, 2011, in Book 872, Page 242, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $202,996.47, plus interest at a rate of 5.5% totaling $4,129.45, for a total amount due of $207,125.92, as of December 20, 2010, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 7th day of January, 2011. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula) On this 7th day of January, 2011, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 03/01/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to

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PUBLIC NOTICES the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MAUREEN ANNE GRAHAM, AND VERNON E CLINCH, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/15/2005 and recorded 11/23/2005, in document No. 200531329 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 764 at Page Number 1313 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 2 OF MILLER CREEK VIEW ADDITION PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY,

MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 7014 ALISHA DR, Missoula, MT 59803-3502. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 07/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $186,658.08 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and

costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 10/15/2010; ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee; 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407; Richardson, TX 75082; T.S. NO. 10-0136217 FEI NO. 1006.115992 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, the 1st day of March, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at the front door of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligations set out below, has been directed to

sell and has elected to sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time of sale, and without warranty or covenant, express or implied as to title, possession, encumbrances, condition, or otherwise, the interest of the Successor Trustee, Martin S. King, and of the Grantor PRINGLE LANDHOLDING, LLC. in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula, Montana, to wit: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 917. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 28030 Highway 10 West, Huson, MT 59846. Said sale will be made in accordance with the statutes of the State of Montana, and the terms and provisions of: that certain Deed of Trust dated October 31, 2007, and recorded November 2, 2007 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, in Book 808 at page 517 as Document No. 200728880, wherein PRINGLE LANDHOLDING, LLC is Grantor, FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MONTANA, INC. is the named Beneficiary, and FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY is named Trustee; that certain Appointment of Successor Trustee

dated October 27, 2008, and recorded October 28, 2008, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana in Book 828 at page 860 as Document No. 200824474, wherein the Beneficiary substituted Trustee First American Title Company with Martin S. King, attorney at law, as Successor Trustee; and that certain Loan Modification Agreement dated April 8, 2009, This foreclosure is made because the Grantor PRINGLE LANDHOLDING LLC, and its successors in interest, have defaulted in the terms of said Deed of Trust and the corresponding Promissory Note in that it has failed to pay the monthly payments and otherwise defaulted on said Deed of Trust and that certain Loan Modification Agreement dated April 8, 2009, and pursuant to the terms of the Deed of Trust, the Beneficiary has exercised its option to declare the full amount secured by such Deed of Trust immediately due and payable. That the principal sum now owing on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust is the sum of Four Hundred Sixty-four Thousand Six Hundred Nineteen and 04/100 Dollars ($464,619.04), together with interest at the default rate of 18% per annum, until the date of sale. That on the date of sale, presuming no other payments are made and that the sale is not postponed, there will be due and owing the sum of Four Hundred Sixty-four Thousand Six

Hundred Nineteen and 04/100 Dollars ($464,619.04) in principal; One Hundred Fiftyseven Thousand Eight Hundred Ninety-five and 69/100 Dollars ($157,895.69) in interest; and One Thousand Eight Hundred Fifty and No/100 Dollars ($1,850.00) in late fees, Eight Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty and No/100 ($8,760.00) for force-place insurance costs, totaling the sum of Six Hundred Thirty-three Thousand One Hundred Twenty-four and 73/100 Dollars ($633,124.73) together with costs and expenses of foreclosure and related trustee fees, costs and attorney fees allowable by law. DATED this 20th day of October, 2010. /s/ Martin S. King, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA):ss). County of Missoula). On this 20th day of October, 2010, before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Trustee’s Sale as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana, Residing at Missoula My commission expires: January 24, 2012

Request for qualifications Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for Montana manufacturers online database update and enhancement: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to update and enhance a database which provides information about Montana’s manufacturers. Up to $9,500 is available for this project. Proposals due February 4, 2011. Access the RFQ at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org or 406-258-3423 with questions. Request for qualifications The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to develop an Economic Gardening Strategic Plan for Mineral, Missoula and Ravalli Counties. Proposals are due February 11, 2011. Up to a total of $50,000 is available for this project. The entire Request for Qualifications can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org with questions.

HOME PAGE

Improve your Credit Score with Home Ownership By Diane Beck, 2011 MOR President How you manage your home ownership finances affects your credit score, your ability to refinance, and any potential future investment. Master these five ways to manage home-related spending to keep your credit score braggingly high. 1. Postpone that refinance until your credit is squeaky clean. Even a small blemish on a credit report can cost you at closing. One small unpaid bill could cost a lot. For example, a small blemish can drive the interest rate 0.25% higher which could translate to $13,000 over the life of a loan. The lesson? Even small items can damage your financial position. Get your credit report beforehand to see if there's anything damaging. If so, consider postponing a refinance or Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) until small but potentially costly dings fade over time. 2. Pay your mortgage – NOW. Not all late payments are created equal – almost nothing hits your credit score harder than a late mortgage payment. Payment history generally accounts for 35% of your credit score, which is bad enough, but credit score agencies con-

sider late home payments graver than late credit card or car loan payments. In fact, credit score agency VantageScore will knock off more than 100 points beyond what it would do for delinquent auto loans or credit cards. 3. Cool it on second mortgages & Home Equity Line of Credits . Drawing down a second mortgage or HELOC can have a negative impact on your credit score because 30% of your credit score is based on how much you owe to creditors. However, if you pay the loan on time, it will have less of an impact. Also, you can mitigate the credit score damage of a HELOC by staying within 30% of the limit. 4. Protect your mortgage to protect your insurance rates. Late payments on your mortgage may also affect your homeowner and automobile insurance rates, potentially costing you hundreds of dollars a year. Insurers may assume that if you're strapped for cash and pay your bills late, you're more likely to file a claim because you need the money.

PRICE REDUCTION

PRICE REDUCTION

• Bank wants it moved! • Lake access in the gated preserve • Nearly $200K under original appraisal 102 E Red Tail Lane Mission Bay Preserve

down from $750,000

Polson, MT

FEATURED LISTING

• 3 bed, 2 bath, basement • 2007 manufactured home, 5.6 acres • Beautiful views of Flint Creek Valley • Many recreational opportunities

• Exceptional home in Mission Bay

NOW $469,000

5. Pay your utility bills and property taxes on time. If you're late on your utility bills and your account is assigned to a collection agency, that agency may report it, causing a drop in your credit score. The good news is that utility companies often don't bother to report late bills to credit bureaus until your delinquency becomes serious. Interestingly, late payment of property taxes won't affect your credit score unless you find yourself with a lien on your property. Since liens are public records, they may appear on your credit report and might cause a drop in your credit score. In summary, owning a home doesn’t remove the need to maintain a high credit score. With these simple guidelines you’re able to use homeownership to build up your credit and equity, helping you get the most bang for your buck. When tough times do happen, knowing how decisions affect your credit may help to minimize negative impacts. Take the time to learn what tactics will help you and your family remain stable, even in the leaner times.

$199,000 MLS # 20110309

35 Papson Ridge Hall

• 2 Bed, 1 bath in central Missoula. • Hardwood floors, large kitchen • Sold as-is. Contact me to submit a bid on this HUD home or any HUD home! www.hudhomestore.com for more info

$186,000 MLS# 10008159

2103 South 4th West, Missoula

Savoir Faire Properties 883-3346

Tom Rue (406) 691-6900

Jon Freeland

cell 261-9293 • www.savoirfaireproperties.com

true@blackfoot.net • www.pintlarterritories.com

jfreeland@missoulahomes.com

Wilma Mixon Hall

Beautiful Georgetown Lake Acreage

$495,000

Enjoy the unobstructed views of Georgetown Lake and the Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Area from this beautiful 9-acre parcel. The property is a mix of meadow and trees gently sloping to within 100' of the lake shore. USFS land separates the parcel from the actual shoreline. Access is year round and power and phone are available. The final plot is recorded and septic is approved. The fishing in the lake is fantastic and the surrounding area offers unlimited year round recreational opportunities.

Fantastic Rock Creek Cabin

406-360-8234

Rock Creek Road, Clinton

$184,000 Deeded Creek Access. This great 1 br, 1 ba cabin is situated on 1.5 acres with deeded access to "Blue Ribbon" Rock Creek. The home features tile floors, Viking range and hood, gas fireplace with electric back-up heat in all rooms, lg walk-in steam shower and custom wood blinds. Great views, trees, easy access, and the entire 1.5 acres is grass with full u/g sprinkler system. Located just 8 miles up Rock Creek on paved, county maintained road. Commute to Missoula is about 35 minutes.

3 acres just 9 miles up, on the creek side of a paved, county maintained road. Beautiful level ground w/ septic system. Power and phone are to the property and wells in the area are shallow. Deeded access to Rock Creek from the property. Enjoy watching the Big Horn Sheep that roam the surrounding cliffs and hillsides. This is a great spot for a year round home or vacation cabin.

$159,000

Call Kelly Vigne-Lee • 546-8798 • www.streamsiderealty.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 January 27 – February 3, 2011


SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Passivhaus Designs • Smaller Homes • Additions/Remodels • 369-0940 OR 642-6863 • www.naturalhousebuilder.net

CHILDCARE Little Monkey Day Care Openings for ages 1-6. 1st Aid/CPR certified, RMA. Conveniently located on HWY 200 in Bonner. Contact Amanda for rates or questions at 406207-3900

HANDYMAN

General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

RECYCLING

HOME IMPROVEMENT

I.E. Recycling CURBSIDE RECYCLING U District, Rose Park, and Riverfront areas 4 pickups per month ONLY 2.50! GLASS bottles and jars, plastics, aluminum, tin cans, junk mail, magazines/newspaper, phone books. Call for more info! (406)396-5317

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

146 Woodford St. 728-1948

Drive a little, save a lot!

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

FREE LAUNDRY SOAP

MISCELLANEOUS Are You Afraid of the Dark? Don’t be! Winter Darkroom Workshops at Photographers’ Formulary in Condon Montana Feb 11-13 & 18-20 www.workshopsinmt.com

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing,

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 3 bed, 1 bath with large living room, a new bathroom & new flooring throughout bathroom & kitchen, new siding, and windows as well as a new roof. Convenient location. 2402 McDonald $148,000 MLS # 10006235 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Master bed w/ closet/office area, Large storage shed, new deck & underground sprinklers $220,000 • MLS # 10007009. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 4 bed, 2 bath, 1 car garage. Centrally located home, large living room & family room in daylight basement • $174,900 MLS # 10004809. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 4 bedroom, 2 bath home on large fenced lot, deck, fire pit, close to schools, walking paths and shopping. Newer furnace, water heater, gas fireplace. $245,000. MLS# 20110384. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $265,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503.

riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED UNIVERSITY DISTRICT HOME. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath home in a prime University District location. Gorgeous hardwood floors, built-ins, french doors, bright, sunny kitchen, great yard, and much more. $399,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Classic University Home, Great floor plan, fireplace, hardwood floors, Nice sized rooms, Lots of Bonus Rooms downstairs w/kitchenette, well maintained, oversized 2 car garage, 116 E. Sussex. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Condo Along the River -Close to the U, one-of-a-kind 2br Edgewater Condo, highly desirable, hardwood floors, lots of character, fantastic location. 521 Hartman #2, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garage, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12 & #5 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

@ 239-6696, Text Mindy0 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

manship at very affordable prices. missioncreekloghomes.com or (406)745-2110

GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-desac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

NEWER HIDDEN TRAIL HOME JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN MISSOULA. 3 Bdr/2 Baths, Great open floor plan, lots of natural light, laundry room, Dbl garage, easy access to trails. $199,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362 or visit... C>www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS HIDDEN TRAIL TOWN HOME JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN MISSOULA. 2 Bdr/1.5 Baths, Sngl Garage. End unit with a great open floor plan, lots of natural light, laundry, hardwood & tile floors, easy access to trails. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer

LOG HOMES. Hand peeled, hand crafted, saddle notch, full scribe, full length logs. Top quality crafts-

Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 3278787 porticorealestate.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

SOUTH HILLS HOME LESS THAN 1 BLOCK FROM CHIEF CHARLO SCHOOL . 4 Bdr/2 Bath, deck, double car garage, family room, laundry/utility room, great views, and much more. $175,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

912 Defoe • $169,900 3 bedroom two full bath home with GIGANTIC shop/garage. Brand new carpet just installed. Come take a look! Across from the Northside Trail System. MLS #10003358

RICE TEAM The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

Janet Rice • 240-3932

Robin Rice • 240-6503

370.7689

435 Mount • $199,000

priscillabrockmeyer.com

Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-

IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000 SQ FT LOT. Beautifully updated and maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Lolo area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room and family room, great kitchen with breakfast bar & dining area, master bedroom and more. $269,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Proper ties

2511 Sunridge Court • 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills • Central air, vaulted ceilings, • Yard w/ underground sprinklers & privacy fence. • $240,000 • MLS # 10007275

Mullan Heights • Missoula's finest new riverfront Condos. • Spacious 1, 2 & 2+ Bd units available • Underground parking, Elevators, Mountain & River • Views, Privacy Decks & Much More!! Starting @$139,900

9745 Glacier Lily, Frenchtown • 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • Master bed w/ closet/office area • Large storage shed, new deck & underground sprinklers • $220,000 • MLS # 10007009

979 Eaton • 4 bed, 2 bath, 1 car garage • Centrally located home • Large living room & family room in daylight basement • $174,900 • MLS # 10004809

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 January 27 – February 3, 2011

Right across from lovely Rose Park. This home has had many upgrades including remodeled kitchen featuring Hickory Cabinets, Brazilian Hickory laminate flooring throughout, all new stainless steel appliances. New blinds in the living room and solid core doors in all the main level rooms. The new roof was put on in May. The yard features a nice array of perennials. There is parking in the rear under the carport and a shed for extra storage. Call Mary Marry for a showing today. MLS # 10005191.

Mary Mar ry

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

406-544-2125 Missoula Properties


REAL ESTATE

LAND FOR SALE 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City sewer stubbed to the property line. $84,900. MLS# 10007449. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Bargain Lots at Georgetown Beautiful building sites at Georgetown Lake, 2.87 ac

for $55,000 and adjacent 2.25 ac for $70,000 or both for $120,000. Easy year round access, county maintained road, well & septic approved, power & phone to lot line. Open meadow, aspen patch, nice views and great area on Elk Meadows Road just 1/2 mile to lake and 6 miles to Discovery Ski Area. Realtors Welcome! www. fsbomt.info or 406-258-6632 Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $174,900. MLS#906774. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-

6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. OWN 20 ACRES, Only $129/month. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-2574555 www.sunsetranches.com Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and easy commute. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second

floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $135,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)999-4809 www.CreativeFinance.com TIRED OF LOW CD AND ANNUITY RATES? Invest with a fellow Montanan in Phoenix. Great return, constant and guaranteed. www.reitalternatives.com 406949-3078.

20110422, COMM. LEASE, $36,113.00, 1500 Burns 802910, CONDO, $112,500.00, 1400 Burns Unit #6 907112, RESIDENTIAL ACR, $119,000.00, 17467 W Nine Mile 802905, CONDO, $122,500.00, 1400 Burns Unit #1 10005438, TOWNHOUSE, $127,000.00, 1401 Cedar Street #5 10007969,TOWNHOUSE, $132,500.00, $ 1401 Cedar Street #22 10007563, SINGLE FAMILY, F MILY FA LY, $225,000.00, 203 N Curtis 10007231, RESIDENTIAL ACR, $225,000.00, $ , , NHN Grooms Road 20110251, CONDO, $239,500.00, 521 Hartman #2

10005829, RESI/ACREAGE, $275,000.00, 11574 Stolen Rock 10007442, SINGLE FAMILY, $284,900.00, 116 E Sussex 10001866, RESI/ACREAGE, $309,900.00, 231 S Grove St 10007265, SINGLE FAMILY, $334,900.00, 11 Columbine Road 10001829, RESI/ACREAGE, $349,500.00, 211 S Grove Street 10007409, SINGLE FAMILY, $369,900.00, , , 909 Herbert 10007707, SINGLE FA FFAMILY, MILY LY, $425,000.00, 506 Redwood 10007308, SINGLE FAMILY, $$499,500.00, , , 3209 Rodeo Road 803924, RESI/ACREAGE, $535,000.00, 2348 River Road

Community-Based, Client-Driven, Uniquely Missoula

porticorealestate.com

445 West Alder • 406-327-8787

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 January 27 – February 3, 2011


Honey-Cured 16 oz. Big Buy Bacon

Tender White Asparagus

Simply Asia 8.5 oz. Noodle Bowls

3

$3.99

2 for $5

for

$5

Gold'n Plump 10-12 oz. Stuffed Chicken Breast

2 for $7

lb.

Washington Large Pink Lady or Granny Smith Apples

Big Sky Brewing Cans or Bottles

$6.69 6 pack

LePetit Rosemary Foccacsia

$2.99

loaf

Sam Adams

$5.99 6 pack

$1.09 lb.

Boneless Beef Cross Rib Roast

$2.19

lb.

Hot House Red or Yellow Bell Peppers

T. J. Farms SouthernStyle Hash Browns

89¢

89¢

32 oz.

each

Blackstone California Wines

$6.99 .75 liter

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

$3.29

Organic Bunch Broccoli or Cauliflower

$1.49

lb.

lb.

Susan's Gourmet Mango or MangoPeach Salsa

Medium Butter Croissants

$1.29 4 count

$2.19 12 oz.

Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Tri Tip Steak

4 Inch Foil Wrapped Pot Iris or Daffodils

$4.99

$4.29

lb.

each

Coca Cola, Diet Coke, Sprite, Barq's, Dr. Pepper

Pizza Boat

$4.49

each

99¢ 2 liters

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


World Headquarters All Compact Discs, New & Used $2off All Jewelry 25% off All Body Products 25% off All Posters & Art 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off• All Clothing 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off All Valentine’s Cards & Goodies 25% off

Rudy’s II Record Heaven All Vinyl - New & Used 25% off All Turntables, Cartridges & Stereo Equipment 25% off SALE ENDS FEBRUARY 6


Missoula Independent