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Missoula Independent

Explorer 2013

Explorer 2013

Missoula Independent

1

We’re chompin’ at the bit. With so much of western Montana choked in wildfire smoke late last summer, too many adventures on our to-do list were left unchecked. We can’t wait to get out. Maps are spread out on the kitchen table, the car’s tuned up, all the camping and fishing gear’s been pulled down from the attic, and we’re ready to cash in on some well-earned vacation days.

We know you feel the same way. It’s why you’re in Montana— to disappear into the landscape for a while, to float on the rivers, to test your limits, to clear your mind. And it’s why we offer you Explorer, to help you choose which adventures to pursue, and provide suggestions, directions and advice to ensure that they go off without a hitch. In perusing these pages we hope locals and visitors alike will discover at least one activity that satisfies their itch for summer fun under the Big Sky. Maybe that’s escaping into Glacier National Park’s backcountry or birding in the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge. Perhaps you’d rather go fly-fishing for trout (or pike, as our resident fishing guide suggests) or sink your butt into an inner tube and float through downtown Missoula with a cold beer in hand. In any case, consider Explorer your guide to summer in western Montana, complete with a comprehensive events calendar. So get outside and soak in these long, clear-skied days while we got ’em. Don’t forget your camera, and to send pictures to your mom.

photo by Chad Harder cover illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

Explorer 2013

Missoula Independent

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Experience Montana Current & Upcoming Field Courses - Open to the Public -

June 2013

Birding By Ear

Historic Preservation

Urban Archaeology

June 1, 8, 15, & 29 8am-12pm Missoula

June 17-21 Missoula

(Underground Missoula) June 24-28 Missoula

July 2013

Hunting Dinosaurs

Wild Wetlands

Pictograph & Ghost Caves

Offered 3 times: July 15-19, July 22-26, & July 29-Aug. 2 Glendive

July 26-28 Condon & Swan Valley

(Landscape Archaeology) July 29-Aug. 1 Billings

Learn More: 4

Missoula Independent Explorer 2013

umt.edu/sell/experiencemt

photo by Chad Harder

Table of Contents Refresh: Escape to a water park...................................................6 Glacier: Leave the crowds behind ............................................14 Fish: You might just like pike .......................................................24 Float: Find your inner tuber .........................................................34 Bike: Pedal to your next pint .......................................................42 Look: The mindfulness of birding..............................................50 Camp: Tips for the not-so-rugged ..............................................58 Plan: Summer calendar of events .............................................64 Spotlights: Missoula MADE Fair ..........................................................70 Jimmy Eat World ................................................................90

Advertising Focus Pages Bitterroot Valley .....................................9 Downtown Missoula .........................17 Sportin’ Life ..........................................27 Great Northern Town Center.........32 Explore Montana............................... 37 Sustainable Living ..............................49 Pamper Yourself .................................53 Art, Antiques & Collectibles ............55 Real Estate............................................56 Hip Strip.................................................65 Lodging..................................................68 Automotive ...........................................71 Glacier Park ......................................... 73 Whitefish................................................74 Flathead Valley ....................................75 Mission Valley..................................... 76 Play, Laugh, Learn ..............................81 Healthy Living......................................82 Philipsburg............................................83 Dish.........................................................94

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson EXPLORER EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen Jamie Rogers

COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst, Lorie Rustvold SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson MARKETING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler

2013 Night Show: Jars of Clay Tues, Aug 6, 6pm Reserved & General Admission $12, $15, $18 Bitterroot Motors Bullorama Thurs, Aug 8 - 7pm Missoula Stampede PRCA Rodeo 7pm Wed, Fri & Sat North Star Amusements Carnival Dock Dogs Appearing on the west lawn. Big Air Insanity Tour Aug 7-10 See the top freestyle motocross riders in the world perform their X-TREME STUNTS! Missoula Napa Demolition Derby Sun, Aug 11 - 4:30pm

Free Nightly Entertainment Wed: Shane Clouse Thurs: Russ & the Revelators Fri: Mark Duboise Band Sat: Northern Lights All shows at 5:30 & 9:00 in the Beer Garden

Missoula Independent P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Phone number: 406-543-6609 E-mail address: independent @missoulanews.com PRESIDENT Matt Gibson

Explorer 2013

Missoula Independent

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When a water park is the perfect escape by Jessica Mayrer

S

ure, Montana’s got plenty of river and lakes to float around on. But sometimes you need the adrenaline rush that only a five-story-tall water slide provides. Luckily, there’s no shortage of squeal-worthy slides, and other water park attractions, within hours of Missoula.

Silver Rapids Indoor Water Park at Silver Mountain Resort As an enclosed facility, Silver Mountain is insulated from the temperature changes and freak snowstorms that frequent the Rocky Mountains in the late spring and early fall. That’s a big selling point, as is Silver Mountain’s balmy 84-degree water. Don’t miss Silver Mountain’s “FlowRider,” a perpetual wave fed by 680,000 gallons of water rushing through every minute. It’s a wholly controlled surfing environment. While the water is toasty and there’s no paddling to catch a wave, don’t get cocky. Staying on your surfboard isn’t easy. Those looking to perfect their surfing technique can purchase a one-hour FlowRider lesson for $15. Or tackle the wave on a boogie board. “Anybody can do it,” says Silver Mountain’s Sales and Marketing Director Neal Scholey. Silver Mountain has a variety of waterslides, including the enclosed Gold Rush and the Moose Sluice, a twisty descent that accommodates several people in a raft. The Hoop Lagoon, meanwhile, is a watery basketball court that provides a unique venue for a game of horse. And then there’s Trestles Surfside Grill, which features two massive hot tubs, flat screen TVs, cold drinks and a refuge from the high-energy park. Trestles offers

a view of the Silver Rapids, meaning parents can sneak in a drink while keeping an eye on the kids. Park admission is included in the price of an overnight stay at the resort, which, depending on the accommodations, runs about $50 per person for a family of four. How to find it: Head west on Interstate 90 into Idaho and take exit 149 at Bunker Avenue.

Big Sky Water Park There’s a reason Roger Elliott has remained at Big Sky Water Park for 31 years. The park’s general manager likes his job, in part because his responsibilities include personally testing out waterslides at the beginning of every season. “It’s really fun,” Elliott says. Of course, fun’s the point. With 10 waterslides, Big Sky is Montana’s largest water park. Less than three hours from Missoula, the trip to Columbia Falls is worth it if only to check out Big Sky’s two speed slides, especially The Geronimo. Built atop a hill, the slide boasts a seven-story descent that spits riders out into the clear water below. “They’re probably going anywhere from 25 to 30 miles an hour,” Elliott says. The Shredder X-Treme is cool, too, because it’s wide enough to accommodate up to three tubers. The Shredder climbs, then stalls just long enough for you to catch your breath, before dropping off suddenly, a stomachlurching sensation.

Those two slides constitute just a taste of Big Sky’s offerings. There are also kiddy rides, Water Wars Balloon Battles (in which you get to launch water balloons at your loved ones), a cyber video arcade, bumper cars, an antique carousel and an 18-hole miniature golf course. Big Sky charges $24.99 for an adult water park pass; kids get in for $19.99. An additional $7 buys an all-inclusive “value pass,” which provides access to the additional amenities. “We try to open up by mid-June and go through Labor Day,” Elliott says. How to find it: At the intersection of U.S. Highway 2 and Montana Highway 206 in Columbia Falls, about two and a half hours north of Missoula.

Splash Montana

SILVER RAPIDS

Splash Montana surprised me. It’s within biking distance from my house, but I’m a bit ashamed to admit that I had never visited prior to last year, partly because I had a vision of it being overcrowded. Missoula’s Aquatics Supervisor Eric Seagrave, who oversees the park, says that’s not necessarily the case.

It’s usually pretty quiet weekday mornings before noon, Seagrave says. Similarly, “Adult Night,” which Splash hosts every Thursday evening between 7 and 9, offers a less chaotic Splash. While adult night is alcohol-free, Seagrave says it tends to attract singles. “They’re really looking to go to a place where they can meet other unmarried people,” he says. Each of Splash’s three slides is three stories high. The red slide is enclosed and, as such, it’s the fastest and capable of shooting a rider out into the water below within five seconds. The yellow slide is a twister, and Seagrave says that it’s not unusual to feel a little dizzy at the end of it. The third slide, which is orange, is large enough for two people to slide together. Not far from the slides is a 50-meter lap pool. Half of the pool is open to the public between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. The other half holds an inflatable obstacle course, its centerpiece being a scalable wall. Splash also offers swimming lessons and other activities, including water volleyball and water polo. Adult admission is $6, $4.25 for students and kids 11 and under get in for $3.75. How to find it: Splash Montana is in Playfair Park, at 3001 Bancroft St., off South Avenue.

SPLASH MONTANA

photo by Jason Pignanelli

337 W. Main St. Hamilton, MT • 406.363.4552

photos courtesy Jason Pignanelli (L) and Big Sky Water Park (R)

SPLASH MONTANA BIG SKY WATER PARK

Wingate by Windham in Missoula

Fairmont Hot Springs Resort

It’s always summer inside the Wingate’s indoor waterpark. Rainbow flip-flops, a beach ball and an umbrella adorn turquoise and white walls not far from patio tables topped by red, green and blue umbrellas. “This is our little kiddy pool,” says Bill Toth, the Wingate’s customer service manager, pointing to a shallow pool with a mushroom waterfall and a tot-sized frog slide. A larger and slightly deeper pool collects those shooting out of Wingate’s two three-story waterslides. A television screen in the lounge transmits video of what’s happening upstairs, at the mouth of the slides, so parents can keep an eye on their kids. The Wingate doesn’t sell day passes; water park access is limited to hotel guests and private parties. Because the park can be reserved, it’s a prime spot to hold birthday parties or other private gatherings. Party rental rates run between $100 and $150. You can bring your own food and drinks, but not booze.

Fairmont’s waterslide is five stories tall and 350 feet long and fed by hot natural spring water, making this slide is ideal for year-round frolicking. The resort also boasts two Olympic-sized swimming pools and two mineral soaking pools; all are replenished with natural spring water. Fairmont also has a fitness center, steam rooms and an outdoor pool bar that, during the summer, serves tropical drinks. Fairmont guests have free access to the pools. However, the resort charges guests an additional $1 per waterslide trip. For day-trippers, an all-inclusive day pass, which includes pool and slide access, sells for $16. Kids 10 and under pay $12. How to find it: Head east on Interstate 90 to exit 211. Turn right toward 1500 Fairmont Road.

How to find it: 5252 Airway Boulevard, off West Broadway.

FAIRMONT HOT SPRINGS RESORT

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Missoula Independent

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Explorer 2013

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photo by Chad Harder

photo courtesy Waterton Lakes National Park

bout two million people visit Glacier National Park every year, the vast majority in the summer. If you come in search of solitude, you won’t find it following the crowds. We can help you break away. Here we suggest six activities you won’t find in most visitor guides. All they require is a little sense of adventure … and maybe a scuba tank.

A

the Goat Haunt checkpoint joked about how security had been beefed up since 9/11. “The moose outnumber us 10-to-1,” he said. “They’re our backup.” Aside from Goat Haunt, Waterton offers a little bit of everything for everyone. Red Rock Parkway nearly guarantees the sight of bears on

Head to Canada It’s hard to call Montana’s northern neighbor a “secret,” except you’d be surprised how few travelers take advantage of the Waterton part of Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. The small Waterton Townsite, located about an hour from East Glacier, plays host to quaint lodging, lakeside camping, galleries and restaurants, and provides easy access to jaw-dropping hikes, abundant wildlife and one of the most remote U.S. border crossings. photo courtesy Michael Schweizer Goat Haunt looks nothing like the typical international point of entry. There are a couple of small buildings and usually just nearby ridges and grassy fields. The parkway ends one or two border agents. It’s only accessible via at Red Rock Canyon, which looks more like a boat from Waterton Townsite—a ride that usunorthern Arizona landscape that something surally pauses in the middle of Upper Waterton rounded by snow-covered peaks. Crandall Lake, Lake so you can view the clear-cut of trees marklocated to the west of Waterton, is one of the ing the border. One time I visited, the ranger at more serene settings in the area and provides a 16

Missoula Independent Explorer 2013

pristine view of Akamina Ridge. The five-mile hike to Crypt Lake starts on Waterton’s east side and is regarded as one of the best in all of Canada. The regal Prince of Wales Hotel overlooks Upper Waterton Lake and seems like something out of a Bond film. For all that Waterton offers, it’s a wonder why more people don’t invest the extra travel time and visit. It’s not like the moose-to-tourist ratio will suffer too much. —Skylar Browning

Bike under moonlight Of all the ways Glacier blows your mind, biking Going-to-the-Sun Road under a full moon ranks pretty high. It’s dreamy to be quietly pedaling up those mountains aglow in moonlight, and thrilling winding your way back down. So plan your summer trip to Glacier around the full moon. We recommend beginning the ride at The Loop, the road’s sharp switchback across from Heaven’s Peak. From there it’s about eight miles to the top of Logan Pass. Park at The Loop, gear up—headlamps and taillights a must (and extra layers, too)—and push off after 10 p.m. It’s uphill, of course. Drop down into your granny gear and you’ll be fine. The climb takes at

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photo by Chad Harder

least an hour, but the scenery’s so incredible you won’t even notice your burning quads. When you reach Logan Pass, bow to the grandeur of Clements Mountain and otherwise enjoy being on top of the world. And then head back down. Actually, check that. First, test your brakes, then head down. It’ll only take about 20 ridiculously fun minutes to get back to The Loop. —Matthew Frank

Find summer snow

There’s really no such thing as the “end” of a ski season here in Montana. When the lifts shut down, well, that’s just when the real workout begins. And of all the state’s treasured summer ski spots, Glacier’s Logan Pass is near the top of the list. Simply head up the park’s famed Going-tothe-Sun Road and keep your eyes peeled. If you

don’t see skiers and boarders walking along the road near the top of the pass, you’ll certainly see them on the trails leading away from the Logan Pass Visitor Center. Finding a line is as easy as following the other folks with gear. Of course, even when you’re skiing in shorts, there’s still plenty of danger on the slopes. This isn’t machine-groomed resort snow; wet slides in summer are as big a concern as avalanches in winter and spring. Exposure, too, is something to keep in mind when you’re on a glacier above 6,600 feet on a hot, sunny day. Snow’s reflective. Bring plenty of sunscreen. If you are just following the nearest person with skis, remember that many folks undertake longer, tougher treks on Logan Pass. Some snowfields are close enough that access isn’t a problem, but even so, go with a buddy. Know your limits, be mindful of the terrain and—most importantly—enjoy the hell out of it. —Alex Sakarriasen

Scuba dive

You don’t need to fly to Cancun or Acapulco to go scuba diving or snorkeling. Glacier National Park’s Caribbean-clear waters offer plenty of options to get your feet (and ears) wet. But it’s chilly. The waters are usually about 60 degrees on the surface, and 40 degrees 100 feet down. In Lake McDonald, east of the Sprague

photo by Chad Harder

photo by Chad Harder

Creek Camp, dive about 50 feet to find an underwater forest. Scientists think the trees date back 100 to 200 years when droughts lowered the lake level significantly. You can also dive in Lake McDonald at the shore off the Apgar Visitor Center or near Fish Creek, where the Fish Creek Bay Wreck lies about 10 feet deep. In Canada’s portion of the park, the north end of Upper Waterton Lake is home to the Gertrude, a steamboat that sank in 1918. —Kate Whittle

Fish the Middle Fork

Glacier is known for its hiking, climbing, skiing and unparalleled scenery. It’s less renowned for fishing. But Glacier is home to healthy populations of eager cutthroats and voracious bull trout. The fish tend to be small by Montana standards (glacial water tends to be low in nutrients and glacial streams usually don’t support big fish), but if you can find them they are usually willing to take a fly. For your best shot at some of the bigger fish around Glacier, we recommend driving Highway 2 along the Middle Fork of the Flathead

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Missoula Independent Explorer 2013

River, the southern boundary of the park. This is sort of the car-camping equivalent of trout fishing, but it allows you to fish a lot of unbelievably pristine water and drive along one of the most beautiful roads you will find anywhere. Though there are plenty of turn-offs and camping sites from which to access the river from the road, we recommend driving about 30 miles from West Glacier to where Bear Creek flows into the Middle Fork. This is where the Middle Fork leaves the highway and Glacier National Park altogether. It’s also where some of the best fishing in the area is likely to be. We recommend spending a day walking upstream from the confluence of Bear Creek and the Middle Fork. —Jamie Rogers

Leave your car behind

Everyone knows about Glacier’s Apgar and Saint Mary campgrounds. And that means they’re often packed. If you’re looking to get away from the masses, we suggest hiking into the park’s backcountry. Glacier has 65 backcountry campsites that offer pit toilets, food storage areas and flat spots

to pitch a tent. Some of those camps allow fires. Roughly half of Glacier’s backcountry sites can be reserved in advance and they often fill up fast. Remaining sites are made available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you’re hoping to secure a spot at the last minute, remember to obtain a backcountry permit through one of Glacier’s ranger stations or visitor centers prior to setting down stakes. Permits cost $5 per person each night. We particularly like the Cosley Lake Campground. It’s in the park’s northeast corner, which sees minimal traffic, and, because it’s at a relatively low elevation, opens early in the season, typically on June 15. Two of Cosley Lake’s four campsites are available on a first-come, firstserved basis. The hike to Cosley Lake is a spectacular and relatively level 8.7-mile stroll through the Belly River Valley past wildflowers, aspen and an overlook of Gros Ventre Falls. There are two other campgrounds within roughly two miles of Cosley Lake, including the Gable Creek Camp, which has two additional walk-in sites. There’s also Glenn’s Lake, with two more. —Jessica Mayrer

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Bigger fish to fry Purists cast aspersions, but we still cast for pike by Jamie Rogers • photos by Evan Phillipe Local fly-fishermen want trout. Fly shops sell trout flies. The tourists getting off planes are carrying trout rods. The fishing guides have imitations of trout food stuck in their hats. Missoula became famous for its trout fishery. But what many fishermen don’t realize is that the rivers around here are also home to pike. And for those who do know, it’s a point of contention. “Pike eat all the trout,” they say. “They’re not even supposed to be in our rivers.” Well, neither are brown and rainbow trout. When I used to work as a fishing guide on the lower Bitterroot and Clark Fork rivers, I would often ask my customers if they wanted to catch a pike. Some would scoff (perpetuating the myth of the snobby trout fisherman), while others would reply, “Yes!” Most of them, though, looked at me, and then at the river, and then back at me and made a face that said, “I don’t know. Are they fun to catch?”

Pike, or northern pike (or sometimes just “northerns”) are a warm-water species that thrives in lakes and ponds throughout the northern United States and Canada. They are like a big pickerel or smallish musky or a freshwater barracuda with dark skin and light markings. They have two sets of teeth: one of fork-tine sized incisors on the rim of the jaw, another lining the roof and tongue of their mouth. The teeth of the second set are razor sharp and angled toward the pike’s gullet like so many shards of a crushed light bulb. Their bodies are sleek and muscular and can grow to more than 50 inches. Their tail fins are broad like a canoe paddle. When you hold a pike out of the water, their fins refract yellow and red light. Fishing for pike in rivers is unlike any fishing experience you will have around Missoula. First of all, the equipment is different. Seven- or eight-weight fly rods are necessary to deal with heavier fish and the giant flies they eat (casting a pike fly with a trout rod will test your casting

skills in ways you might not be ready for). Catching them also requires your fly be connected to a piece of steel wire. And the places you fish for them are out of the ordinary as well. Because they are a species that prefers the still water of lakes, they are only able to survive in the stagnant backwaters and sloughs of the lower Bitterroot and Clark Fork (and in the chain of lakes within the Clearwater River drainage). These sloughs are often clear and relatively shallow. In the right light you can see to the bottom. As with trout fishing, catching pike in sloughs requires patience, but it is a different sort of patience. There is no matching the hatch or drag-free drift or prissy presentation. The main challenge with catching pike is finding them. “Blind casting” for them can be done, but in most instances you’re going to do little more than cause a needless commotion in the mellow water of a slough and spook your targets. “Sight fishing”—casting only once

you’ve seen a fish—is far more effective and a good deal more sporting. The problem is that pike can be hard to see. They are lay-and-wait predators and aside from gnarly sets of teeth and a bucket-sized mouth, camouflage is their most lethal weapon. They hunt by sitting tight to the bottom or suspending themselves in stands of aquatic vegetation. When a meal—which to a pike is anything with a pulse—swims by, they burst forward and seize the prey by its mid-section. They ingest their meal, which may be a trout or a duckling, headfirst and whole. But once you have found a slough, and realized that log on the bottom is actually a 40inch pike, all you need to do is get your squirrel-sized fly in front of their face and start retrieving. Seven out of 10 times that pike will start following your fly. Retrieve it faster. Four of the seven times a pike follows your fly, she will also eat it. It happens suddenly, in a flash of flared gills and gaping mouths. Then the fight is on. Pike are not the greatest fighters in the river. When first hooked, they tend to go berserk and make one screaming run away

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from you. But they tire quickly, and spend most of the fight rolling and thrashing on the surface. Because the pike population in Missoulaarea rivers is a product of bucket biology, there is no limit on how many you may take home for dinner. And it is on the topic of dinner that pike make up any ground they lost with being lackluster fighters. There is the idea that pike make poor table fare. This is a baseless claim, likely propagated by the same sniveling trout fishermen who deemed them unworthy of catching in the first place. Sure, pike are a little complicated to clean ( Y-bones must be removed from each flank), but I learned how to remove the thick white filets and backstrap by watching a YouTube video produced by a guy from Minnesota. It was worth it. The meat is flaky and white and has none of the fishy flavor of some trout. They are good fried, grilled, dipped in butter or sautéed with pesto. I am well aware that with all of this in mind, there are still fly-fishers out there ready to disparage our friend the pike. But now you know where I was coming from when my customers used to look at me and ask, “Are they fun to catch?” The answer is yes.

Josh Wing, a chef at the Blue Damsel Lodge on Rock Creek, offers the following recipe for seared northern pike with curried red lentils and carrot ginger soup. 1 medium-sized northern pike 1 quart organic carrot juice 1 ginger root 1 shoot lemongrass 1 medium-sized onion 2 cloves garlic 2 cups red lentils (soak overnight) 1 can organic coconut milk 1 quart vegetable or chicken stock 2 tablespoons madras curry 1 bunch cilantro For the soup, slice ginger root into 1/8-inch slices and lemongrass into one-inch chunks and simmer in carrot juice for 30 minutes. Add coconut milk and stock. Salt to taste and set aside on very low heat.

For the lentils, start by sautéing onions in two tablespoons of butter or olive oil on medium-high heat until tender and lightly browned. Add curry and finely minced garlic and continue to sauté until garlic is lightly browned, being very careful not to burn the garlic. Boil lentils in two cups of stock until just tender, but not mushy. Strain excess liquid and add onion/curry mix and set aside. Cut pike into individual portions and lightly salt and pepper. Sear fillets in two tablespoons of olive oil on very high heat until lightly browned. Finish in oven at 425 degrees. This should take no longer than five minutes. To test for doneness gently pull fillet apart. It should break apart easily and appear moist in the center. Remove from oven. For plating, place a generous scoop of lentil mix into the center of a large shallow bowl. Ladle soup into bowl and place pike on top of lentils. Serve with steamed broccoli or other colorful side. Garnish with fresh cilantro.

W

hen I moved to Missoula in the middle of a sweltering July, one of my first purchases was a $12 inner tube from downtown’s Army Navy store. On the sidewalk in front of the store, I remember the inflated black tubes were stacked as high as the awning, an advertisement for one of Missoula’s favorite—and cheapest—summer pastimes. I feared the tube would pop during my first voyage down the Clark Fork. But 10 summers later, it remains riverworthy, withstanding what has to be close to 100 hours of keeping my butt buoyant, despite the hazards posed by rocks and rapids, and the chafing ropes that’ve kept me tethered to multi-friend inner-tube flotillas. On the hottest summer days we Missoulians find few things more satisfying than a slow, halfsubmerged float and a cold can of beer. Collectively we create what’s come to be known as the “tuber hatch,” the window of time during which tubers hit the water with the ubiquity and fervor of stoneflies. “Just all of sudden, once word gets out—‘river’s ready’—and it’s four, five, six weeks straight of just non-stop,” says Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Warden Aaron Berg. It’s a non-stop parade of beer-swilling tubers on the lower stretches of the Blackfoot River and 36

Missoula Independent Explorer 2013

on the Clark Fork River through Missoula. Here we offer the newly hatched tips on what to do— and what not to do—to ensure a totally tubular experience on the water this summer.

Pimp your tube After my first couple of floats, I realized my tube required a critical modification: a cup holder. And so I grabbed a beer coozie and duct tape and added one. It worked great, freeing up both of my arms for paddling, and, of course, keeping my beer cold. There are many other items one can rig to a tube, such as a beach umbrella or a pirate flag, the latter being what one especially recognizable group of regulars flies from its flotilla every year. Want to bring your dog along for the float? Simply wrap the tube in some sort of material so the little mutt can sit atop the tube without falling through the hole.

Wait, who needs a tube? Perhaps you’d prefer an inflatable couch. Yes, that’s among the more memorable alternative inflatable vessels Berg, the FWP warden, has seen float past during his years working the Blackfoot and Clark Fork. “They’re sitting on this blowup

couch drinking beer as they’re floating down the river, like they’re sitting and watching a movie,” he recalls. He’s seen people floating on air mattresses, and on those “party islands” you typically see on lakes, big enough to hold 10 people, with a cooler in the middle. The rivers occasionally play host to bachelor and bachelorette parties, which tend to attract other kinds of inflatables. Berg has seen several blowup dolls, including one being straddled and ridden downstream, as well as an inflatable penis. “And it was giant,” Berg says. “It was like six feet. It was big … That was definitely pretty funny. They were having a good time. And they did have a designated driver with them. And that was cool.”

Get jiggy at Johnsrud “Cool” because too often drinking and floating leads to drinking and driving. Scan the pavement at the intersection of Highway 200 and Johnsrud Park Road, on the Blackfoot. You can still see burnt rubber from an accident that happened five years ago, Berg says. An intoxicated young man turning a Suburban onto Johnsrud Park Road didn’t see an oncoming motorcycle. Both vehicles burst into flames. The impact sent

the motorcycle driver airborne and into a ditch. He died of head injuries. The Johnsrud Park Fishing Access Site is ground zero of the tuber hatch. The popular putin and take-out point, about 20 miles east of Missoula, becomes a constant beach party. Chet Crowser, an FWP river recreation manager, remembers when, seven or eight years ago, a group chartered an articulated bus and parked it at Johnsrud, propped speakers in the windows, and unloaded couches and recliners onto the banks of the river. Another time, someone brought to the shore a generatorpowered turntable and stacks of speakers. The party’s toned down a bit in recent years, partly because of the presence of state wardens and river rangers like Berg and Crowser, but it remains Missoula’s summer river hot-spot. And that means it’s also where the effects of the tuber hatch are most visible. Dumpsters overflow with beer cans. Those are the cans that make it out of the water. Upstream a ways, in a deep hole below Thibodeau Rapids, there’s a footdeep collection of cans. In 2006 Blackfoot River cleanup volunteers plucked from the river 3,994 cans, 297 plastic containers, 250 glass bottles, 84 sandals and shoes, 62 pairs of sunglasses, two watches and assorted undergarments, among other items. Undergarments? Berg, for one, has come across people having sex on the riverbank.

Keep your beer aboard Littering’s a problem during the tuber hatch. Much of it isn’t intentional. 38

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“Do you swim to get back to your inner tube, having just inhaled a bunch of water, or do you drown trying to save the 12 empties floating around you?” Berg asks. “Most people choose to get themselves back to their inner tube.” So Berg urges tubers to strap coolers shut so they remain so when a rapid (or a friend) tips you over.

“Every once in a while you’ll get a bunch,” Crowser says, “and it’s like, ‘Man, I can’t believe those guys are out there.’ Sometimes you’ll see them hit the water, go down about 100 yards, and find the shore and walk back to their car. Other times, they keep floating on, and it’s like, ‘Man, they’re tougher than I am.’ I guess. To each their own.” But it’s dangerous. Crowser cautions that tubers should always be aware of river and weather conditions. On the fringes of prime tubing time, hypothermia is common—lots of “blue lips and cool-looking folks out there,” he says.

New water to float

Also, remember this: Glass bottles are prohibited on the Blackfoot. That’s the citation law enforcement most often issues to tubers and beachgoers. During a busy July, Berg says FWP might write as many as 75 glass-bottle tickets.

Hatch haste Crowser says it happens every year: Sometime in April or May, when temps reach the 70s and it feels summery, a few tubers can’t help themselves but hit the river, no matter how high and cold it is.

This summer marks the first time in a century that all boaters can float the Clark Fork through Milltown. The dam is gone and years of restoration work is about complete. No doubt tubers will celebrate the feat by clicking cans while floating past the place where tons of dammed up mine tailings used to sit. But be sure to scout the area first; it’s braided and full of logjams. A couple of years ago, rescue workers sent a dummy down that stretch of river to see how a human might fair against two Interstate 90 bridge piers. The dummy briefly disappeared under the first abutment, and then swirled through an eddy and submerged beneath the second, never to be seen again. Sure, it was a dummy, but after a long day of floating and drinking in the sun, we tubers sometimes display about the same level of maneuverability and intelligence.

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“I

’m concerned about your safety.” The words from our bartender were leveled with the type of seriousness usually reserved for last call after a long night—you know, after you’ve consumed half the bar, just as you’ve stumbled off your barstool and right before the bartender reaches for the phone to call a cab. Or the cops. Except, in this situation, we had hardly even sipped our first beer. We weren’t disorderly. We were simply talking about a bike ride. Specifically, my friend Brian and I were debating the route of our Bitterroot brewery bike tour, which would consist of four craft breweries in the span of about 22 miles between Hamilton and Stevensville. We could take the bike trail along Highway 93, where we’d be safely off the busy road but riding past clusters of businesses and other development in the burgeoning valley. Our other option was the more scenic East-

side Highway, where we’d pass through the idyllic small town of Corvallis and alongside farms, historic sites and plant nurseries, but also face long stretches of road with little to no shoulder to protect us from fast-moving traffic. Brian and I were leaning toward Eastside. Our bartender was not. “I really am concerned about your safety,” he repeated. “People get clipped all the time on that road. You’ve got nothing to ride on. All it takes is one distracted driver and you’re done. I would take 93. Seriously.” “But … ,” I started to say, not sure how much I wanted to debate the issue. “But we do have helmets,” Brian offered with a smile. The bartender turned his back on us. We knew then we’d be taking Eastside.

Brian and I had no intentions of manufacturing any extra adventure for this trip. In fact, we had meticulously planned the day to minimize effort and maximize our time simply bellying up to some of the Bitterroot’s best taprooms. The itinerary called for us to meet at Bitter Root Brewing in Hamilton, home of the oldest brewery in the valley (it opened in 1998) and, as it turned out, a particularly protective bartender. After a beer there, we’d bike a few blocks north to Higherground Brewing, the pizza and beer joint opened by two Hamilton friends in late 2011. With two beers in our belly and less than a mile on our odometer, we would pedal the bulk of the trip north to downtown Stevensville and Blacksmith Brewing—a 20-mile trek via

Eastside Highway. Our last stop was about 1.5 miles away at western Montana’s newest brewery, Wildwood, where we had a shuttle car waiting. All told, there was only one stretch of serious pedaling, and even that was

made easier by some advance planning and good luck. Hamilton sits about 200 feet above Stevensville, so by traveling north we ensured a mostly downhill ride. Even better, our trip happened to take place on an especially windy day. At one point, weather reports warned of local gusts up to 20 mph. Fortunately for us, the wind was coming out of the south, meaning it’d be at our backs the whole time. The thought crossed my mind that this may actually be too easy, that raising full beers may prove more laborious than getting to each of the breweries, and that even the laziest of Explorer readers would fail to find much excitement from such a trip. But 20 miles is still 20 miles, and anything can happen during such a long stretch. Who knows? Maybe we’d get hit by a car.

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Brian and I hadn’t even reached Eastside Highway before he admitted that he wasn’t quite in biking shape. “I’m feeling this already,” he yelled over his shoulder as we pedaled up a steady climb on Fairgrounds Road, up Mockingbird Hill, on our way out of Hamilton. “I’m fine. I’m just saying.” We had already downed two beers each— Brian had the Bitter Root’s Porter and Dry Fly IPA at Higherground, me a special release Scotch ale at Bitter Root and Higherground’s Hurrah Scotch Ale—and were having a little trouble shifting gears (pardon the pun) into biking mode. Plus, while the gusty winds were

supposed to be at our backs the majority of the ride, they pushed us all over the road as we cut east to our route. By the time we reached the top of the hill and made a left-hand turn onto Eastside Highway, our thighs were burning. I started to think we should’ve filled a growler for this stretch of the trip. The views along Eastside, however, provided an immediate payoff. To our left stood the Bitterroot Range, jagged and snow-capped. Open space and farmland stretched out on either side of the road. Within a few hundred feet we were at the entrance to the prestigious Stock Farm community to the east and the historic Daly Mansion to the west. There was even a good-sized shoulder on the repaved road for us to ride on.

It felt like we reached the small town of Corvallis, about five miles away, in a matter of minutes. We passed tired-looking bicyclists traveling the other direction, against the wind, who signaled two things: we’d made the right decision to pedal with the wind at our backs, and biking the Eastside Highway wasn’t entirely treacherous because someone else had clearly made it. Even our legs had found their stride. “You know, you’re going to end up working a lot harder than I am,” said Brian as he glanced down at my Specialized mountain bike. Knowing that we were going to ride mostly on paved trails or roads, he opted to bring his Specialized road bike. Sure enough, between the wind, downward slope, his skinny tires and

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light frame, Brian needed little to no effort to cruise along. I wasn’t exactly working hard, but noticed I was pedaling a heck of a lot more than my friend. “I’m not really worried about it,” I said. “My legs feel fine. It’s my ass I’m worried about. I haven’t done a long ride since last summer.”

“My legs feel fine. It’s my ass I’m worried about. I haven’t done a long ride since last summer.”

My backside grew increasingly sore as we continued north from Corvallis without stopping. We passed more noteworthy sites, ranging from the bucolic Teller Wildlife Refuge to the amusingly blunt Moo Poo Compost facility. Even as the shoulder disappeared and we started to ride on a sliver of the lane covered in gravel, the cars mostly kept their distance. One Harley buzzed us despite no traffic in the opposite lane, but it didn’t affect our pace. We reached the halfway point and started talking about our next beer. That’s when I heard a series of loud bursts coming from Brian’s rear wheel. He had a flat. Score one for the mountain bike crowd. I may have had to churn my pedals a little harder, but my thick tires rolled right over the roadside gravel. Brian’s tire wasn’t so lucky. At least we had something to make it seem like this was a challenging trip. But if we’re being honest, even the flat was a minor setback. Brian patched it in a matter of minutes. It took longer to wait for the patch to seal on the rubber than it did to actually fix the gash. And once we were back on our bikes, we found ourselves surprised by how quickly the miles ticked by.

By the time we pulled up to Blacksmith Brewing, the only sign of any effort was our sore bums. We stood at a table as Brian quickly downed a Polaski Porter and I had a Gill’s Irish Red. Blacksmith is home to perhaps one of the nicest taprooms in western Montana—it was built in 1908 as a steam laundry and, later, a 48

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blacksmith shop, and features exposed brick walls and vaulted ceilings. But we didn’t spend much time there. The appeal of reaching the finish line was too strong. We pushed off from Blacksmith and rode along a bike path across the Bitterroot River to Highway 93. It took maybe five minutes to reach Wildwood Brewery and the end of our ride. Neither one of us had ever been to the location—Wildwood only opened in March 2012—and we were struck by its understated location and sparse taproom. It looks like a French farmhouse, tucked away off the highway with a single wooden sign showing where to turn. Inside, a short bar sits in one corner and a few tabletops are arranged around the brew tanks. It’s only open four hours a day, from 4 to 8 p.m. Brian ordered a special German dopplebock called Loquacious Duck, which was poured into a snifter. I went with a similarly

celebratory selection and got the five-beer sampler. It had been about two hours since our first drink at Bitter Root, and we were done. The only thing left to do was pick up our other car back in Hamilton and, since we’d managed to build up an appetite, get a bite to eat from Bitter Root’s kitchen. Plus, we could declare victory to the cautious bartender who doubted the safety of our route. When we walked into Bitter Root, the bar was crowded and the kitchen slammed. We found a table and the same bartender we had before walked over and asked what we wanted. Brian and I, still wearing our bike helmets, excitedly looked at the guy and proclaimed, “We made it!” He looked at us blankly. He had no idea who we were. “Great,” he said. “Now, can I get you a beer?”

Appreciating the mindfulness of birding by Kate Whittle • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

I

never used to understand the appeal of birding. For one, birds terrified me as a kid, and I still have a phobia of dead birds (unless we’re talking about chicken, roasted and slathered in barbecue sauce). I once went on an Environmental Studies 101 trip birding around the SmurfitStone mill’s settling ponds, which provide good habitat for waterfowl but are not terribly scenic. It was a near-freezing, rainy day, and the enthusiastic, mostly middle-aged birders leading us students were thrilled to spend hours looking at ducks and geese. I was antsy, cold and bored within half an hour. Birding gets a strong hold on people, though. The National Audobon Society has about 500 chapters throughout the U.S. In December, when some of us would rather be inside by the fire opening presents, some birders go out with binoculars for the annual Christmas Bird Count. Birding is competitive: People will endeavor to do “Big Days” or “Big Years” during which they attempt to identify as many species in that period of time as possible. Just what is it that keeps birders coming back? Birding’s appeal, I realize, hits a few different parts of human nature. Intellectually, it satisfies the human need to identify, name, categorize and collect. It’s also fun to watch creatures hunt and kill and fight and mate. Missoula-area birder Radd Icenoggle has another theory on why birding becomes a lifelong love for many people. Icenoggle, a Carhartt-wearing native Montanan and practicing Buddhist, finds birding to be a kind of meditation or spiritual practice. “There’s a mindfulness in birding,” he says. “Especially birding alone, you’ll notice things fade away.”

Icenoggle compares birding to the Zen concept of walking meditation, where one focuses on synchronizing breaths with footsteps. He finds meditative qualities in other Western activities, too. “Fishing is a very mindful practice. I know guys who go fly fishing and they never catch a thing, but that’s not the point,” he says. I test the idea of meditative birding while out by myself in Greenough Park. I’m unable to identify even half of the calls I can hear, but as I walk on a dirt path, with the sharp, sweet smell of Rattlesnake Creek in my nose and cool morning air on my face, outside worries do fade away. I notice a dipper bird perched on a rock in the creek, doing its funny up-down bob. A lone mallard shoves his head into the water for a drink. Above me, gumball-sized pygmy nuthatches flit about, singing high single notes into the cottonwoods. My heart rate and breathing are slow and even. For a few moments, I’m aware of myself and my surroundings. I think Icenoggle would say that’s the point.

Birding around Missoula Birding doesn’t require a ton of know-how or gear. Just grab a pair of binoculars, some kind of guide and get up early to hear and see the most birds. Most major field guides have been turned into smartphone apps, which include pictures and audio of bird calls. You don’t even need to venture very far from Missoula city limits to see a wide array of species. Here’s some places we suggest visiting.

Greenough Park This nature park in the Rattlesnake is home to many birds, including ruby-crowned kinglets, song sparrows, pileated woodpeckers, dippers, flickers and more. Placards around the park identify and describe species in the area, including dippers and song sparrows. With easy parking access on Monroe Street and short trails, Greenough is ideal for a short trip alone or with the family.

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Kim Williams Trail Stroll up the Kim Williams Trail, just off the University of Montana campus, to see species including red-tailed hawks, black-headed grosbeaks, ruby-crowned kinglets and great blue herons. Across the river, several telephone poles are home to osprey, who can be seen fishing in the Clark Fork River.

Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge If you’d rather get out of town entirely, take Highway 93 south to Stevensville, turn east on the Stevensville cutoff, drive about a mile and turn onto the Eastside Highway. Drive another quarter-mile, turn north on Wildfowl Lane, and drive until you reach the refuge visitor center. Here, you can follow a few miles of nature trails and observe waterfowl including snowgeese, sandhill cranes, ducks and much more.

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I’d driven maybe 10 miles of steep, winding Forest Service two-track before I noticed my gas gauge hovering above empty. My heart sank into the pit of my stomach. Worst of all, I wasn’t entirely sure where we were. Somewhere in the vast Beaverhead National Forest southwest of Ennis, that much I knew. But was that Black Butte to the left? Had we meandered that far south already? John and I had been singing along to Jim Croce’s “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” on a loop for quite a while now. I pushed a fly rod out of my face, turned down the music and told John the bad news.

Park it right there Camping tips for the not-so-rugged by Alex Sakariassen • photos by Cathrine L. Walters “Dude, seriously? When was the last time you filled up?” “I don’t know,” I answered, unable to look him in the face. “I guess I forgot to check after we stopped for flies.” I’ll admit, I was pretty hungover that morning. We’d spent the previous evening at Norris Hot Springs, then pitched my tent next to the car at a little camping spot off Highway 84. We tossed back quite a few beers before turning in, just as we had on a dozen other car-camping trips since college, and got up with the sun for some fishing on the Madison River. After several cups of coffee and a few hours of haggard casting, we decided to head into the mountains to try our luck in some smaller trout streams.

“Where the hell are we, anyway?” John asked, gazing out across a plateau in what I believed to be the middle of the Gravelly Range. “Not sure. Can you reach in the back and grab the map?” As soon as I said the words, the memory of our last car-camping excursion came to me— specifically the mishap involving a bottle of soda and my trusty DeLorme gazetteer. I pictured it still sitting on a pile of boxes in the garage, surely dried out by now. That’s when the “E” light came on. There’s an unexpected art to car camping in Montana. Sure it may not be the most rugged outlet for adventure, and there’s certainly a much greater risk of injury on a grueling backcountry trek. But we’ve all felt the sudden onset of anxiety brought on by a missing rainfly or a shortage of beer. As much as car camping is a brief escape from the bustle of city living, we still expect a particular level of comfort when we’re a mere five yards away from a car battery. It’s the small oversights—like failing to fill the gas tank—that can put a serious damper on an otherwise relaxing weekend in the zone where civilization and wilderness blend. I didn’t get stuck in the Beaverhead. Miraculously, I not only managed to guess correctly which two-track led to Dillon but had enough petroleum fumes left to coast the last few feet to the pump. I have, however, muddled through enough gone-awry trips to offer some pointers on avoiding the simple mistakes, the obvious mistakes and the mistakes that you’ll never live down.

the most spectacular scenery in western Montana are going to make that bottle of Jameson disappear fast. Before you know it, the stars are out and everyone’s ready to hunker down around a fire. Bad time to find out nobody brought firewood. Don’t leave it to a drunk friend with a hatchet to keep the party going.

DON’T SKIMP ON THE ICE One of the beauties of car camping is that you don’t have to haul gallons of beer on your back. However, there’s nothing worse than coming back from a few hours of fishing to find a cooler full of cans bobbing in lukewarm water. A bag or two of ice won’t keep the refreshments chilled for long when the temp spikes. And it really, really sucks to draw the short straw when someone has to drive for more. BRING PLENTY OF FIREWOOD Odds are someone will bring a bottle of the hard stuff for a night in Blodgett Canyon. Two brats and a three-mile hike through some of

FIND SOMETHING TO DO Relaxation’s great, but once the tents are up, the chairs are unfolded and you’ve killed a brew or two, boredom will undoubtedly set in. There’s absolutely no excuse for this. You are, after all, nestled in among the pines of western Montana. Try planning the weekend around an activity. If you’re in the mood for a hike, camp on the shores of Holland Lake in the Seeley-Swan Valley and take an easy three-mile stroll on the Holland Falls National Recreation Trail. Want to catch some fish too? Rock Creek is one of the most popular trout streams in the greater Missoula area, and the canyon has numerous hiking trails of varying lengths and difficulties. There’s even a disc golf course up the Blackfoot River now, with several state campsites not far off. You can always just bring a book, but nothing eases the guilt of camping car-side faster than a long walk in the woods.

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PACK THE PORK There’s no such thing as too much bacon when it comes to car-camping. Provided no one forgets the stove (a development on par with running out of gasoline), you’ll find that bacon makes just as good a midnight snack as it does a morning jump-starter. It’s amazing how fast a pound of the stuff will evaporate in certain company. Same goes for s’mores ingredients, too. Of course, everyone has his or her go-to car-camping fare. I’ve seen one friend on the verge of tears when the Pepperidge Farm Brussels ran out. PREPARE FOR COLD Even in summer, Montana’s thermometer can get pretty damn low. The warmth from a campfire only extends so many feet, so remember to dress in layers. A fleece and jacket might take up valuable space in a backpack, but there’s more than ample room in the trunk of a car. Abandoning the flip-flops for shoes around sunset isn’t a bad idea either. Last time I forgot to bring a sweater, my sleeping bag smelled like a bonfire for months. (On a related note, storing a leaky gas can next to your sleeping bag is also not advised.) AVOID HOLIDAYS, OR PLAN AHEAD Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Labor Day— these are possibly the worst times to try and find a roadside campsite. Odds are the RVs have descended by night like mosquitos, leaving zero space for the posse that got a late start. Even an average weekend can be tough, but the odds are more in your favor. If you have your heart set on a specific spot, either book ahead, if possible, or consider sending someone in your group a night early. BRING CASH Some Forest Service campsites don’t require campers to pay, but most state ones do. And in the days of plastic payment, people forget to keep a few bills handy. These payments help agencies maintain the very place you’re bedding down in. So before you get too far from an ATM, check to see if someone’s carrying cash. It’s only $7 in most cases. CLEAN UP YOUR CRAP Fortunately, no one I’ve car camped with has suffered from this oversight. But those who came before us often have. I can’t count the number of times I’ve bagged beer cans or sifted through ashes to pluck out bits of broken glass all because some jerk never learned to take out the trash. If you want to leave your own space a pig sty, go ahead. But courtesy goes along with car camping, including leaving a little firewood behind for the next crew. Be respectful, be safe, and we can all have fun this summer. Just don’t forget to check the gas gauge.

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3

months of adventure

photo by Steele Williams

June THURSDAY JUNE 6 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free.

the First Friday art stroll, which takes place throughout Missoula galleries and businesses from 5–8 PM. Free. For a list of galleries visit Missoula Cultural Council’s blog firstfridaysmissoula.blogspot.com. SATURDAY JUNE 8 Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded— it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Dapper Canadian rappers Sweatshop Union bring the hip-hop of the north to Montarctica for a show at Stage 112, in the Elk’s Lodge, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $10. Visit stageonetwelve.com.

FRIDAY JUNE 7

SUNDAY JUNE 9

Gander on the wonder that is the artworks of local creators and handicrafters during

From here on we’re talking about the Herron Half Marathon and 10K Trail

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Run in Kalispell. These races take place on running and biking trails around town, and all proceeds benefit Foys to Blacktail Trails, a nonprofit organization dedicated to expanding public access in the lands leading from Foys Lake to Blacktail Mountain ski area. To register visit runflathead.com. The Ed Norton Big Band puts some swing in the month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6–8 PM. $5. Visit missoulawinery.com. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY JUNE 10 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

Masquerade, paper faces on parade. Hollywood Undead, Pop Evil, 3 Pill Morning and All Hail the Yeti play the Wilma on Thu., June 27, starting at 7 PM. $26, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 12 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. THURSDAY JUNE 13 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

fle ticket could win you your very own yearling mule. This mule fest is at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds in Hamilton. $5/day or $10 for the whole three-day shebang. More information at montanamuledays.com. Spin, weave, dye, felt, knit and crochet the day away, and gander at the fine sheep and goats that make it all possible, at the Big Sky Fiber Arts Festival, which also takes place at the Ravalli County Fairgrounds in Hamilton. In fact, $10 buys you admission to the mule fest and the fiber fest. More information at bigskyfiber.com

FRIDAY JUNE 14

Some 80 artists and crafters descend on the Hilton Garden Inn for the 5th annual Under the Big Sky Fine Arts and Crafts Festival. 10 AM to 6 PM on Friday and Saturday, and 10 AM to 4 PM on Sunday. Free (except for all the stuff you'll want to buy).

Squint and pretend an armored Russell Crowe’s in the ring during the chariot races at Montana Mule Days, at which a $1 raf-

Walk gently to the Top Hat for bluegrass from Hillstomp. 9 PM. Cover TBA. Visit tophatlounge.com.

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SATURDAY JUNE 15 See the sights in the best way possible— via bicycle—during Pedal the Pintlers. The race features distances from 20 to 100 miles of road riding, with majestic views of lakes, peaks and anticlines. Ride and registration start at Washoe Park in Anaconda at 7 AM. Cost is $45. For more information call Chad at 563-2034 or email chadlanes@msn.com. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM.

Supplements Bath & body care Essential oil blending bar Herbal extracts Flower essences Inspiring gifts Owned & operated by local, trained herbalists 180 S. 3rd W. 728.0543 www.Meadowsweet-Herbs.com

Celebrate Lewisia rediviva, the Bitter Root, Montana’s state flower, and get your own at the annual Bitter Root Day at the Ravalli County Museum in Hamilton. Also join the jerky competition and nosh on wild game stew. More information at brvhsmuseum.org. SUNDAY JUNE 16 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY JUNE 17 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes

during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. WEDNESDAY JUNE 19 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Kraptasti Karaoke welcomes all the Garden City Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. THURSDAY JUNE 20 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out

to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. The Missoula Osprey kick off the 2013 season with a two-game homestand against the Helena Brewers. 7:05 PM. missoulaosprey.com. FRIDAY JUNE 21 Stevensville (or “Stevi” to those in the know) is recognized as the first settlement in Montana, and the town celebrates that distinction every year with a parade, pony rodeo, chuck wagon cook-off, barnyard games and dancing in the street (for real) at its two day Western Heritage Days. Bring your shitkickers and an appetite for food and history.

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SATURDAY JUNE 22

SPOTLIGHT

cra ft ta lk

In the thoroughly excellent YouTube video “Craft Talk,” comedic musician Leslie Hall sets out to make “the biggest gem sweater in the world,” and leads two minions on a song and dance adventure of going to the craft store, knitting the sweater, sewing on the gems and displaying it using a fork lift. “Make it, make it, faster faster, work through the pain,” Hall sings, while cavorting about wearing tight gold leggings and oversized glasses. “Craft Talk” is hilarious, but it’s also a good example of the passion and joy that goes into crafting of all kinds. And Missoula’s own skilled crafters and artists display their wares two times a year at the MADE Fair, which is an epic, inspirational treasure hunt for craft nerds or just a great time to browse cute and useful things for everyone else. The December fair (held in the Holiday Inn last year) is always a friendly but frenzied dash to get the neatest holiday gifts. So craft aficionados, rev your engines for the June fair, at Caras Park, and if it’s anything like last year, it will include handmade goods ranging from pet collars to puppets to upcycled furniture to growler koozies. Get your craft talk on. —Kate Whittle WHAT: 6th Annual MADE Fair WHERE: Caras Park WHEN: Sun., June 30 HOW MUCH: Free to browse MORE INFO: missoulamadefair.com

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All you Ned Overend wannabes take note: The Hammer Nutrition Missoula XC mountain bike race is a grueling up-and-down affair full of technical riding and breathless climbs. The event takes place at Marshall Mountain Ski Area just outside of Missoula. This year’s event features championship and UCI Elite races today, as well as the Hair of the Dog Super D on Sunday for those who can still pedal. For a full list of costs, events and trail maps visit missoulaxc.org. You’ll be coming around the mountain when you take part in the inaugural Trail Rail Run, which follows the old Milwaukee and Northern Pacific railroad grades from Mullan, Idaho, over Lookout Pass, and all the way to St. Regis, Mont. Race lengths include 50 miles, 50K, 30K and 10K. Head to trail railrun.com. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Cue up for some meat eatin’ at the Big Sky BBQ Festival, which takes place at Marshall

Mountain during the Hammer Nutrition XC bike race. Lots of local chefs cook up mouth-watering BBQ, and there’s beer, of course. Stay until the end and enjoy a live performance by The Hasslers. All proceeds from the festival go to the Montana Food Bank Network. Free bus shuttle rides to Marshall Mountain are available. Visit bigskybbq.com. SUNDAY JUNE 23 Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by. At the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. Knitting Factory presents Hinder with Aranda, Devour the Day and Acidic at the Wilma T h e a t r e . 8 P M . $ 2 7. 5 0 . ticketweb.com. WEDNESDAY JUNE 26 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on numnums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite.

Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. THURSDAY JUNE 27 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. The six masketeers known as the Hollywood Undead do the dirty modern rock and roll without the Hawaiian noises at the Wilma Theatre, with openers Pop Evil, 3 Pill Morning and my uncle Gravy’s band All Hail The Yeti. 7 PM. $26. Tickets available

at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight FRIDAY JUNE 28 Along the Bitterroot River lies a land of imagination where jousting knights, regal ladies, saucy wenches, Faerie Queen, witches, nobles, peasants, and the court of the Queen mix with fair-goers, many in period costume, and are entertained by Order of Epona on magnificent horses and Warlord in armor, fighting for the chance to rule the kingdom! Gypsy encampment, history, Robin Hood, faeries, troubadours, storytellers, street performers, shows, troupes. This is the three-day 2013 Big Sky Renaissance Faire in Stevensville.

Nosh a turkey leg while imbibing beer, ale or mead. The Queen’s Feast boasts dinner and entertainment for $35. Admission is $6; $3 for those 12 and under. For full schedule visit bigskyrf.com. Pop in the Sha-na-na cassette (Google it), shine up the trouble buggy and take a cruise up Higgins Ave. tonight for the kickoff of the Garden City River Rod Run. This two-day classic car-based good time also has tunes and plenty of trips down memory lane. For a full schedule kick the tire and light the fire over to missoula downtown.com. Pro rodeo action itself is a hoot, but we go to the Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo at the Polson Rodeo Arena every year so our kiddos can bust some mutton, one of the few times when it’s okay to pull hair. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for children under 12.

Next time, don’t be late for the furniture sale. Old Crow Medicine Show plays the Wilma on Wed., July 3, starting at 8 PM. Advance tickets sold out, but some may be available at the door.

SATURDAY JUNE 29

SUNDAY JUNE 30

Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at the Circle Square (missoulafarmers market.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM.

Is it chicken fajita or chinese chicken? Anywho, Canadia’s sweethearts, Barenaked Ladies, bring cheeky and sentimentally sweet Hawt Traxx™ to the Big Sky Brewing Co. stage, with Ben Folds Five and Guster. 6 PM. $50. Tickets available at ticketweb.com.

Run, don't walk, to Potomac’s Pioneer Festival, which features 11- and 6-mile trail runs, as well as a 1-mile fun run. Contact Emily at 244-0004 for more info. 72

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July MONDAY JULY 1 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

The Missoula Osprey aim to turn a triple play during a three-game homestand against Helena, starting tonight at 7:05 PM. Visit missoulaosprey.com. WEDNESDAY JULY 3 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on numnums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Not to be confused with the New Crane Peppermint Program, the hard-playing Old Crow Medicine Show returns to MSO to show this town that gettin’ down doesn’t always mean that you can get back up. Wilma Theatre. 8 PM. $35.

THURSDAY JULY 4 Tell your children “I was there” by attending the inaugural Dynamite Dash in Lincoln. The event takes place at Hooper Park and features a 1-mile, 5K and 10K run/walk. More importantly, there is a 1mile beer run. Check out the calendar of events at lincolnmontana.com. Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well

drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Send King George packing cuz it’s Independence Day, freedom loving Americans. And what better way to celebrate our freedom than with a trip to see the Fireworks Spectacular, in the parking lot in front of Bob Ward’s at Southgate Mall? The party starts at 9 PM, with music, presentation of colors, the national anthem, and then, kaboom! Fireworks at 10:30 PM. Free. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. FRIDAY JULY 5 Gander on the wonder that is the art-

works of local creators and handicrafters during the First Friday art stroll, which takes place throughout Missoula galleries and businesses from 5–8 PM. Free. For a list of galleries visit Missoula Cultural Council’s blog firstfridaysmissoula. blogspot.com. SATURDAY JULY 6 Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM.

Widespread Panic and Bloodkin play the Big Sky Brewing Amphitheater on Tue., July 9, at 7 PM. $35, tickets available at ticketweb.com.

A VIBRANT MOUNTAIN TOWN NESTLED AT THE EDGE OF

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK.

Howl at the moon, cherubs, for tonight your tween fantasies come to life when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents its first screening of the summer with Moonrise Kingdom at 9:32 PM at Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Visit missoula outdoorcinema.org. SUNDAY JULY 7 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY JULY 8 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY JULY 9 It’s not the summer concert season unless Widespread Panic is visiting Missoula. Catch the venerable jam band at Big Sky Brewing Ampitheater. Bloodkin opens. 7 PM. $35 at ticketweb.com. If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY JULY 10 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite.

Solar powered artisanal cheeses handcrafted in the wilds of Polson Montana. Find us at the Clark Fork Market!

flatheadlakecheese.com 406.883.0343

IT’S LIKE STONEHENGE BUT WITH CHEESE

Take some time, a little, a little bit, and check out radio stalwarts Jimmy Eat World, who want to play more than “The Middle,” at the Wilma Theatre, at 8 PM. The question is, will you let them? $26. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com. (See Spotlight.) Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. THURSDAY JULY 11 Toast the Best of Missoula during the Independent’s annual celebration of the city at Downtown ToNight. Featuring performances by two of Missoula’s best bands. Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo..............................June 28 The Chamber Blast-Sporting Clay Fundraiser.....June 29 Firecracker Fun Run................................................July 4 Arlee Powwow..........................................................July 4 Color Me Wild Sandpiper Gallery.........................July 5 Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow.........................July 19 Cherry Festival.........................................................July 20 Flathead Lake 3-on-3 Hoop Shoot .......................July 26-28 Bobcat BBQ Golf Scramble....................................August 3 Water Daze ..............................................................August 3 Cruisin' By The Bay.................................................August 8-10 Outdoor Art Festival................................................August 10 Festival On The Flathead........................................August 16 Flathead River INFR Rodeo....................................August 22 Rotary Chili Cook-Off ............................................August 24 Smokin' On The Water & Brew Tour ....................August 31 Polson Fly-In ............................................................September 7

photo courtesy Tom Robertson

th

The 7 annual Missoula Marathon takes place Sunday July 14.

Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight SATURDAY JULY 13 Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—

it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets.

Hoursvary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Raise your radios and do the Dobbler cuz Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents Say Anything, at 9:28 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873 and visit missoulaoutdoorcinema.org.

live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY JULY 15 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. TUESDAY JULY 16 If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY JULY 17 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. THURSDAY JULY 18 The sweet sounds of Sarah Jarosz fill the Top Hat at 8 PM. $18-$22. Visit tophatlounge.com. Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

Original hipster dad Steve Earle and The Dukes play the Wilma on Thu., July 18, starting at 8 PM. $34, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and vootie.com.

SUNDAY JULY 14 This summer marks the 7th annual Missoula Marathon, once voted top race in the nation by Runner’s World magazine. The course stretches from Frenchtown to downtown Missoula, and passes bucolic green fields, shade-giving pine trees and hose-wielding heroes. If the marathon’s too much, check out the half-marathon, 78

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5K, kids race or beer run. For more information visit missoulamarathon.org. The Ed Norton Big Band puts some swing in the month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6–8 PM. $5. Visit missoulawinery.com. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus

Country music legends Steve Earle and The Dukes grace the stage at the Wilma Theatre, so best be on your best behavior, guy who yells “Play Copperhead Road!” every time Mr. Earle steps up to microphone. With special guests The Mastersons. 8 PM. $34. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and vootie.com. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight

(406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Appointments available evenings and Saturdays Southgate Mall (Next to Dillards) • Missoula, Mt Independent dentists since 1983

They see me rollin’, they hatin’. Weird Al Yankovic plays the Wilma on Fri., July 19 starting at 8:30 PM. Tickets $38-$45, available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com.

FRIDAY JULY 19 The man, the myth, number one in your hearts, number two on the charts, Weird Al Yankovic brings his too-funny-forFontana, California music chicanery to the Wilma Theatre as part of The Apocalypse Tour. Prepare yourself, Colonel Kurtz. 8:30 PM. $38–$45. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com. Load up the kids and head on down to Darby for the annual Logger's Days Competition, held at the south end of town on Highway 93. Kicks off Fri., July 19 at 6 PM with games and music. Saturday's events start at 9 AM with a parade, with 17 logging events to follow, including hot saws and log rolling. Free to attend.

Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM.. It must be “twee time” as Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents Little Miss Sunshine, at 9:22 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873 and visit missoulaoutdoorcinema.org. She’s my cherry pie. Check out the Flathead Cherry Festival on Main Street in Polson, which includes games and booths all day.

SATURDAY JULY 20

TUESDAY JULY 23

Area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle

If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for

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you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY JULY 24 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on numnums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park featuring the Amanda Cevallos Band. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11– 2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. If you haven't seen the Heartless Bastards live then you have no soul. Or heart. Oh, you bastard, just head to the Top Hat at 9 PM. $20. Visit tophatlounge.com.

The Anthropologie catalogue gets trippier every time. Bay area pysch-soul band Monophonics plays Stage 112 on Wed., July 31, at 9 PM. $10/$7 in advance at ticketfly.com.

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• All types of pain/injury, Headaches Neck and back pain • Respiratory health: Allergies (NAET), Asthma Sinusitis, Rhinitis, Bronchitis • Insomnia/Sleep Issues • Women’s and Men’s Health • Health Maintenance & Wellness • Stress Reduction • Mental/Emotional Health Depression/Anxiety/ADD/ADHD/OCD • Digestive Health/IBS/Crohn’s Disease/Chronic Constipation/Diarrhea

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THURSDAY JULY 25 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. FRIDAY JULY 26 Have you ever asked yourself this: Where is me shirt, me noggin’, noggin’ shirt? Then maybe you are a candidate for Celtic Festival Missoula. This two-day family affair celebrates all things Gaelic with music and food, plus it supports the University of Montana’s Irish Studies Program. Caras Park. Free. For a full schedule visit celtic festivalmissoula.com.

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If you was ever gonna go to court but then you got high, perhaps a trip down the multi-genre lane of Slightly Stoopid is the ticket you need to ride. Big Sky Brewing at 8 PM. With special guests The Grouch & Eligh. $95 VIP/$35 general. For tickets visit ticketweb.com. Celebrate Hamilton's heritage at the annual Daly Days, which include historic reenactments and demonstrations at the Daly Mansion and several events in downtown Hamilton, including a street dance Friday night, vintage car show and brew festival. $5 Daly Mansion tours, kids under 12 admitted free. Might be long hard times to come but that doesn't mean we can’t kick back a little. The Hardtimes Bluegrass Festival outside Hamilton invites families to camp out and enjoy a weekend of traditional blue-

grass from groups like Pinegrass, JD Webb and Downstate Ramblers and Red Desert Ramblers. $10/$5 for kids under 12. Camping fee is $10. Line-up and directions at hardtimesbluegrass.com. SATURDAY JULY 27 Missoula favorite Greg Brown visits the Top Hat at 9 PM. $34-40. Visit tophatlounge.com. I know what you’re thinking: Any chance I could ride some sandy trails, hit up some rocky technical sections and climb tens of thousands of feet all in one day, in one race? You sure can, psycho. It’s time for another round of Montana’s toughest crosscountry event, the Butte 100 Mountain Bike Race. The competition starts and ends at the Homestake Lodge and only allows 250 riders for its 50- and 100-mile races. Sign up at butte100.com.

photo by Chad Harder

The Western Montana Fair runs Aug. 6 through Aug. 12 at the Missoula Fairgrounds Events Center.

Area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Don’t take Lou for granted and hear the voices of Ed Asner and Christopher Plummer as the Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents Up, at 9:14 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873 and visit missoulaoutdoorcinema.org. Try the tastiest brews of the 'Root at the annual Bitterroot Microbrew Fest, which includes food and music and runs from 3 PM to 10 PM on Bedford St. in Hamilton, at the corner of Second and State. SUNDAY JULY 28 Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make 84

Missoula Independent Explorer 2013

some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by. At the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5.

ket at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM.

Boogie provocateur J Boog, AKA Jarell Damonte Houston, brings his pizzazz and whatnots to do work on the Top Hat Stage, 134 W. Front St., at 9 PM. $17/$15 advance.

If Wrangler butts drive you nuts, hop into that old steed, or better yet catch a ride on the stagecoach, and head out to Big Sky Brewing for an evening of country tuneage for all you hard-workin’, authentic, real Americans with up-and-coming country crooner Kip Moore. 7 PM. $25. Visit ticketweb.com.

TUESDAY JULY 30 Here ye, here ye, clever baseballists. The Missoula Osprey, Flagship Program, Ronald McDonald House, Hospice Care Foundation and Brain Injury Alliance announced their partnership on a new and exciting summer fundraiser: Dinner on the Diamond. Have dinner on the grass of Ogren Park Allegiance Field, enjoy a croquet tournament and Calcutta bingo. 5:30 PM. $50 for dinner. Entry into the croquet tournament is $25 and $20 for the Calcutta. Tickets available for purchase in advance. For more information call 543-3300. If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Mar-

WEDNESDAY JULY 31 Get a nut, have a ball, or just own up to the fact that if it’s fried what’s inside don’t matter at the long-running, always punning Testicle Festival out at Rock Creek Lodge, 22 miles east of Missoula, where party people make some noise and see some breasts (mostly their own). I kid, I kid. There are beers, tunes and two-and-a-half tons of bull testicles to eat at this four-day fete, which runs July 31-Aug. 4, until the wee hours. For camping and ticket info visit testyfesty.com.

Join us for these Local Sierra Club Outings Free and open to the public!

Learn to survive in the outdoors outing, Missoula. July 27-July 28 - to sign up, contact Mike at jarnevic@earhlink.net

Deadman Point at Blue Mountain, Missoula (women only). June 10 - to sign up, contact Maria at mairemt@earthlink.net. Fred Burr Reservoir, Bitterroot Mountains (women only). June 19 - to sign up, contact Mary Owens at trekker320@aol.com Canyon Lake, Bitterroot Mountains. July 13 - to sign up, contact Mary Owens at trekker320@aol.com. Kayak Paddle from Forest Grove to Big Eddy, Superior (women only). July 15 - to sign up contact Maria at maire-mt@earthlink.net Glen Lake, Bitterroot Mountains (women only). July 24 - to sign up, contact Mary Owens at trekker320@aol.com Learn to survive in the outdoors class, Missoula. July 25 - to sign up, contact Mike at jarnevic@earthlink.net

Dinah Lake Trail from Lake Elsina, Mission Mountains (women only). July 29 - to sign up contact Janet Fiero at janetfiero77@gmail.com Grizzlies in the Gallatin. August 3 (date tentative) - to sign up, contact www.montana.sierraclub.org click on outings Glacier country paddling, car camping and hiking (women only/member preference) Aug 9-Aug14 - to sign up, contact Janet Fiero at janetfiero77@gmail.com Great Burn backpack (member preference). August 23-August 25 - to sign up, contact Bob Clark at bob.clark@sierraclub.org Missouri River Badlands canoe trip (member preference). Sept. 5-Sept. 10 - to sign up contact, Janet Fiero at janetfiero77@gmail.com or John Wolverton at yodelingdog@hotmail.com Camp, hike & paddle to Wild Horse Island, Flathead Lake (member preference). Sept. 7-Sept. 8 - to sign up, contact Maria at maire-mt@earthlink.net or Mike at jarnevic@earthlink.net

The Sierra Club's Montana Chapter is helping to protect the landscape and natural resources of Montana for future generations.

For more information visit: www.montana.sierraclub.org

The long-running, always-punny Testicle Festival out at Rock Creek Lodge runs July 31-Aug. 4.

Head to Caras Park for Out to Lunch. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite.

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Prepare for a heavy dose of psychedelic soul and funk when Monophonics play Stage 112 inside the Elks Lodge. 9 PM. Cover TBA. Visit stageonetwelve.com.

August THURSDAY AUGUST 1 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown StandUp Comedy at the Union Club.

Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. FRIDAY AUGUST 2 Gander on the wonder that is the artworks of local creators and handicrafters during the First Friday art stroll, which takes place throughout Missoula galleries and businesses from 5–8 PM. Free. For a list of galleries visit Missoula Cultural Council’s blog firstfridays missoula.blogspot.com. Cream, get on top. The 101st Creamery Picnic in Stevensville includes a bevy of family fun, like a parade and barbecue competition. Saturday kicks off at 8:30 AM with a 5K and 10K Milk Run, starting at the U.S. Forest Service Building. Learn more at creamerypicnic.com. SATURDAY AUGUST 3 Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmers-

market.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. If Satan is your motor, or if you will survive, or if you’re going the distance, and especially if you know what band I’m referencing (not King Missile), then you are certainly psyched for California altrockin’ superheroes Cake, who perform for you and all the other humanoids out at Big Sky Brewing. 8 PM. $35. Visitticketweb.com. There is gonna be Pussy Galore on the big screen when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents the James Bond classic Goldfinger, at 9:05 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 8290873 and visit missoula outdoorcinema.org. SUNDAY AUGUST 4 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY AUGUST 5 That sensation you feel is "country music sensation" Gloriana at the Top Hat at 9 PM. $22. Visit tophat lounge.com.

Sensational country music sensations Gloriana attack your aural sense with tunes that make you question your musical sensibilities. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9 PM. $22/$18 advance. Visit tophatlounge.com. TUESDAY AUGUST 6 The Western Montana Fair and Rodeo is the jam every summer: vikings to nosh on, sheep to pet, bulls to battle, Zipper rides and flirtin’ with boys. But you know what? The demo derby is where things get really real. Check it all out at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave., today through Sun., Aug. 11. Visit westernmontana statefair.com. If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 7 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

Wholesale Jewelry Diamonds New & Vintage Musical Instruments Firearms Unusual Merchandise

Downtown Missoula 434 N. Higgins • 542-6606

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THURSDAY AUGUST 8 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. SATURDAY AUGUST 10 Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Martin Scorcese’s peek into the cocaine-fueled (I’m looking at you, Neil Young) and ego-driven (Robbie Robertson) lives of The Band during its final performance is on tap when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents The Last Waltz, at 8:53 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 8290873 and visit missoula outdoorcinema.org. SUNDAY AUGUST 11 The Ed Norton Big Band puts some swing in the 88

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month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6–8 PM. $5. Visit missoulawinery.com. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. TUESDAY AUGUST 13 Matisyahu means "gift of god" in Hebrew. Tonight, it means he's gracing the stage at the Big Sky Brewing Amphitheater at 6. $35/$30 in advance at ticketweb.com. If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 14 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

Those stick shifts have got to go. Cake plays the Big Sky Brewing Amphitheater on Sat., Aug. 3, at 8 PM. $35.

tanglesmt.com

275 W. Main St • Explorer 2013

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Locally grown vegetables, fruits, flowers, plants, eggs, honey and baked goods. Saturdays • 8am-1pm May 11 - Oct. 26, 2013 Tuesdays • 5:30pm-7pm July 9 - Sept. 11, 2013

SPOTLIGHT

eat it, too

Performers on Saturdays 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Let me get something stuck in your head for you: “Hey, don’t write yourself off yet, it’s only in your head you feel left out or looked down on / Just try your best, try everything you can / And don’t you worry what they tell themselves when you’re away.” Jimmy Eat World’s 2001 hit, “The Middle,” might seem a tad cheesy, but let’s face it, it’s an enduring pop masterpiece with just the comforting words you want to hear when you’re, say, a lonely, angsty teenager (or just feeling like one). The last time Jimmy Eat World visited Missoula was in September 2007 at the Wilma. It was, I remember through thensober eyes, a packed show with a crowd so enthusiastic that the band seemed genuinely surprised. People were moshing. Jimmy Eat World elicits fond memories from a wide range of age groups, and no wonder, since it’s been around since 1993. It started as a punk band and evolved, as many bands did in the late ’90s, into a more “emo” pop rock band. In 2001, the band perfected its mix of emotional lyrics, pop hooks and driving choruses on Bleed American, which spawned singles including “The Middle,” “Salt Sugar Asphalt,” and “Sweetness.” (The album was renamed Jimmy Eat World in sensitivity of the 9/11 attacks.) It astonishes me to realize it’s been a dozen years since that album came out, and it still hits the same sweet spot in my brain as it did when I was a preteen. Throughout the years, Jimmy Eat World has kept a certain adolescent earnestness and enthusiasm for life. I hope I keep mine, too. —Kate Whittle

WHAT: Jimmy Eat World WHERE: The Wilma WHEN: Wed., July 10 at 7 PM HOW MUCH: $26, get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s More Info: thewilma.com

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THURSDAY AUGUST 15

FRIDAY AUGUST 16

Mah gawd, Gorilla, Total Fest is back once again and itchin’ to drop the elbows on all comers, Verne Gagne’s goons bedamned. This three-day rawk fest is more than just a rawk fest. It features the kind of music Granny H can really can get into: loud, soft, duos, shirtless, black-shirted, covered in tires, on fire, reckless, oh so farking heavy. For a full list of bands, venues and costs visit totalfest.org. Tell ‘em Gary Glitter sent ya.

The Missoula Osprey finish a four-game series against the Grand Junction, Colo., Rockies. Check out missoulaosprey.com for more info.

Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight

SATURDAY AUGUST 17 Total Fest continues and is back once again and itchin’ to drop the elbows on all comers, Verne Gagne’s goons be-damned. This threeday rawk fest is more than just a rawk fest. It features the kind of music Granny H can really can get into: loud, soft, duos, shirtless, black-shirted, covered in tires, on fire, reckless, oh so farking heavy. For a full list of bands, venues and costs visit totalfest.org. Tell ‘em Gary Glitter sent ya. The Missoula Osprey start a three-game series against the Orem, Utah, Owlz. You can feel sorry for the Angel affiliate Owlz playing firstbase, Albert Pujols has nine years left on his contract. Check out missoulaosprey.com for more info. Take on the best the Flathead has to offer at the Polson Triathlon. The race offers

the usual tri events: a 1,500-meter swim in Flathead Lake, a 24.9-mile bike through the surrounding area, and a 6.2-mile run that ends on Main Street in downtown Polson. Visit polsontriathlon.com. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded— it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Finally, after all these years, one of the great inquiries of our society may finally be answered. That query is this: Who let the dogs out? To find out head to the 2013 Pet Fest, at Caras Park. Pet supplies, wiener dog races and an opportunity to find a new furry friend or two abounds. 10–3 PM. Free. Visit petfest.net.

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Learn the stories that are underneath the rocks and point at stuff you recognize, like Brad Pitt’s hair, when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents A River Runs Through It, at 8:42 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 8290873 and visit missoula outdoorcinema.org. SUNDAY AUGUST 18

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Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY AUGUST 19 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. TUESDAY AUGUST 20 If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 21 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanat-

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ics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. THURSDAY AUGUST 22 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight SATURDAY AUGUST 24 Tell Uncle Cooter that the woodpile done been piled high enough and slip into your glad rads for Missoula’s biggest downtown party, River City Roots Fest, which features a 4-mile run, art shows, and most importantly, dancing in the streets. For a full schedule of events visit rivercityroots festival.com. Don’t tell the Welshman next door, but the Bitterroot Scottish Irish Festival is back with two days of kilt-filled competition, Gaelic fun, music and food, at the Daly Mansion in Hamilton. For more information visit bitterrootscottishirish festival.org. See some of Montana’s best golfers make fools of themselves and have a toot doing it at the Big Hole Cow Pasture Golf Tournament. The tournament takes place in a pasture near the town of Wisdom

Feel the breeze. Red Fang headlines Total Fest, which runs Thu., Aug. 15 through Sat., Aug. 18 at venues throughout town, with dozens more bands. $50/$45 in advance for festival pass.

and features hazards of the cow variety along with prizes for first and last place, as well as Most Original Golf Cart and Most Original Golf Attire. One reminder: Don’t mess with the Cow Pasture Committee. To enter or for more info call 689-3260 or 834-3264. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com),

and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Hey, bub, get your noir on when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents Naked City, at 8:21 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 8290873 and visit missoula outdoorcinema.org. SUNDAY AUGUST 25 Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western

swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. MONDAY AUGUST 26 Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY AUGUST 27 If early morning grub-grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28 Ditch that dagnasty old Bomb burrito from the gas station in favor of noshing on num-nums during Out to Lunch, at Caras Park. Food vendors and musicians are at the park to please your mouth and ear holes. Besides, that TPS report can wait. 11–2 PM. Free to kick it, a couple bucks to get a bite. Continued on page 98 Explorer 2013

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$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drivethru, & delivery. Open every day 11 to late.

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) bagelsonbroadway.com Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 butterflyherbs.com Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 bernicesbakerymt.com Locally owned and operated for 34 years Bernice’s Bakery is a Missoula landmark. Located along the Clark Fork River, Bernice’s offers you an incredible view and downtown access. No trip to Missoula should be made without a stop at Bernice’s. Enjoy cupcakes, pastries, quiche, lunches, awesome iced coffee, and the world’s best cup of joe. Then take a walk by the river. Open 7 days a week from 6am – 8pm. Come see why Bernice’s has been voted Missoula’s Best Bakery for 18 years running. xoxo bernice $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 • bigapizza.com Biga Pizza offers a modern downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick-oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread-making. Biga Pizza uses local products and the freshest produce, as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 bridgepizza.com A popular local eatery on Missoula's Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick-oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, and salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula's place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional 94

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The Catered Table 205 Main St. Stevensville (406) 777-7090 cateredtable.com The Catered Table offers casual fine dining at its best. Seafood, steaks and pasta are our specialty. Just 25 minutes from Hamilton or Missoula on Stevensville's Main Street. Join us for an outstanding meal and enjoy a microbrew beer or a glass of wine from our growing international selection. Ask for our catering department to quote on your special event. 5 PM - 9 PM Tues-Sat, Sun/Mon reserved for catered events. $$-$$$

Dickey's Barbecue Pit 143 W. Broadway Downtown Missoula 203-1557 Taste why Dickey’s Barbecue is the world’s best barbecue since 1941! Try our 8 juicy hot-pit smoked meats, like our southern pulled pork or our family recipe polish sausage. We even offer 11 home-style sides, like our creamy cole slaw and fried okra. Don’t forget we’re also your catering experts! Any event, any size – let Dickey’s do the cooking, and you can take the credit. Graduation parties, weddings, office functions, you name it! Dickey’s Barbecue is the perfect catering choice for groups of all sizes – from 10 to 10,000! Don’t forget: Kids eat free Sundays and everyone enjoys FREE ice cream every day! Dickey’s Barbecue...Seriously, Pit Smoked. Open 7 days a week. Offering a full liquor bar. $-$$

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch,

meeting friends or family, or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 elcazadormissoula.com Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $$$

Five Guys Burgers & Fries 820 E. Broadway 830-3262 • fiveguys.com Five Guys gives you exactly what their name offers: burgers and fries. But burger-lovers visit for the best burgers and fries in town. If you have a hankering for an amazing burger and world-class french fries, Five Guys is your place. $-$$

Flippers 125 S. 3rd West 721-4895 Flippers is the Hip Strip's only Bar and Casino. Stop by and enjoy friendly staff, a local atmosphere, and try your luck on our machines. Also, enjoy our twelve domestic and micro beers on tap along with a delicious burger! We are open 8 am. to 2 am., seven days a week. See you on the Flippside! $-$$

Hi-Country Snack Foods of Montana Lincoln 1-800-433-3916 www.hicountry.com Explore Lincoln's legendary Hi-Country Trading Post, the home of Hi-Country Beef Jerky. Also featuring: food from across the state, regional art & carvings, homemade fudge & confections, quality jewelry & apparel, gift packs galore & home spice kits! Call for our FREE mail order brochure 1-800-433-3916. $-$$$

Since 1972

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Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch; we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

Lake Missoula Tea Company 126 E Broadway, #22 529-9477 lakemissoulateacompany.com We invite you to visit our custom tea bar upstairs in the Masonic Hall (above Adventure Source). Offering a range of loose leaf tea from around the world and teaware. Have a cup, purchase your favorite bag, attend a tea tasting, and share stories about your tea experiences. $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 mustardseed.com Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award-winning desserts made fresh daily, local and regional microbrews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and gluten-free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$

Red Bird 111 N. Higgins 549-2906 redbirdrestaurant.com A hidden culinary treasure nestled in the historic Florence Building. The Wine Bar offers casual dinning with over 25 wines by the glass & an extensive beer menu with live music on Mondays. The Restaurant offers intimate evening dinning showcasing local ingredients and transforming them into edible artwork. Wine Bar Monday-Saturday 5-10:30 Restaurant TuesdaySaturday 5-9:30. $$-$$$

Red's Bar Home of "Dead Pecker Row" DPR Inc. 127 Ryman • 728-9881 redsbar.net Red's has a huge sports memorabilia collection including the largest football helmet collection in 96

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the state as well as two full service bars, 11 plasma TVs, keno-poker games, an official Montana Lottery terminal, and 2013 "Golden Tee" to accommodate our patrons. Come on down, support your favorite team and have a good time with your friends, family, & acquaintances at Red's Bar, Missoula's Sports Bar since 1952. $-$$

tions and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer brewed right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. Feel free to come as you are to Spice of Life! Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Tues - Sat 5:00 to 9:00.$$-$$$

River Rising Bakery 337 Main St Hamilton 363-4552 riverrisingbakery.com Serving all-butter pastries, delicious and nutritious muffins, cream scones, and delectable desserts. Or choose from our selection of homemade soups, salads, and sandwiches found nowhere else. Open 6:30am-5:30pm Monday-Friday, 8:00am-4:00pm Saturday, 8:00am-2:00pm Sunday. Weekday local business lunch delivery available 9:00am-1:00pm. $-$$

Not Just Sushi 403 N. Higgins 549-7979 sushihanamissoula.com We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 every night. Very family friendly. 549-7979. $-$$

Second Street Sushi 322 S. 2nd St. Hamilton 363-0600 Second Street Sushi is dedicated to providing the finest sushi experience in the Bitterroot Valley. Daily specials, delicious entrees, and a full beer, sake and wine menu complement a healthy and fulfilling dining experience. Lunch 11:30-2:30 Dinner 5-9 Mon-Sat. Walk in or call ahead. 363-0600. $-$$$

The Shack Restaurant & Catering 222 West Main 549-9903 theshackcafe.com Voted Best Breakfast in Missoula again and again, it’s been a Missoula favorite since 1949. Open every day from 7a.m to 9:30p.m. Great food, weekly dinner specials, fine wine & beer selection. See our complete breakfast, lunch and dinner menu online.

Spice of Life 163 S 2nd St Hamilton 363-4433 thespiceinhamilton.com Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our handmade burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include hand cut steaks, sustainable seafood selec-

Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's Best Budget Lunch year after year. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$

Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$

Two Sisters Catering 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-3005 twosisterscateringmontana.com Two Sisters is a full-service caterer. We will help you with small to large events. Twenty years of experience in the food business. Voted Best Caterer in the Indy for the past 5 years. Let us take the stress out of your party or event! Call Beth at Two Sisters.$-$$ $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

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So, um, what's the TP for? The Gourds headlines the River City Roots Festival Sunday, Aug. 25, at 5:30 PM, in downtown Missoula. Free. Continued from page 93

The Ravalli County Fair starts at 10 AM with a parade through downtown Hamilton, and includes livestock shows, pie auction, music and rodeo every night. More info at rc.mt.gov/fair. THURSDAY AUGUST 29 Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. SATURDAY AUGUST 31 Pretty people, fresh numnums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area Farmers’ Markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoula saturdaymarket.org), and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com), and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary 98

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slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. The last homestand of the season starts tonight at 7:05 for the Missoula Osprey, so load up on the Cracker Jack while you still can. Visit missoulaosprey.com. Super humans form a super team for super time. See what comes of it when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents its last screening of the summer with The Avengers, at 8:20 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested d o n a t i o n . C a l l 8 29 - 0 873 and visit missoulaout doorcinema.org. To print event listings in the Independent, send your event info by 5 PM on Fridays to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. To submit stuff online, head to the arts section of our website, scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


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