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Up Front: Realtors seek to limit ag’s influence over subdivisions Ochenski: Rehberg and Tester poised for heavyweight bout Scope: Benjamin Love explores the mythical powers of Hendrix


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Up Front: Realtors seek to limit ag’s influence over subdivisions Ochenski: Rehberg and Tester poised for heavyweight bout Scope: Benjamin Love explores the mythical powers of Hendrix


Missoula Independent

Page 2 February 3–February 10, 2011


nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Chad Harder

Since appointed as city attorney in 1977, Nugent has advised and defended seven mayors and worked alongside 18 different City Council incarnations. He’s overseen the creation of roughly 1,500 of the city’s 3,449 ordinances. He’s presented 21 cases to the Montana Supreme Court. Nugent has no doubt helped shape Missoula—and the state. But he’d prefer that you don’t make a fuss about it.........................................14

Monday is now open mic with Mike Avery @ 10pm

News Letters The anti-trapping community sounds off .....................................................4 The Week in Review Starving horses, fun runs and Rehberg rumors .....................6 Briefs Rollergirls go big, heavy haul protests and Kalispell’s LGBT shop.................6 Etc. Legislators too eager to override voter sentiment ..............................................7 Up Front Realtors seek to limit ag’s influence over subdivisions .............................8 Up Front Missoula group fights for custody-care reform ..........................................9 Ochenski Rehberg and Tester poised for heavyweight bout...................................10 Writers on the Range Pro-wolf groups stretching truth too far.............................11 Agenda Blue Mountain Clinic’s “Off the Rack 2011”...............................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan An ode to frozen, tough meat......................................................18 Happiest Hour Packers fans to huddle up at The Despo .......................................19 8 Days a Week Say “municipal minutia” 10 times fast............................................21 Mountain High Willie Weir talks foreign cycling treks............................................29 Scope Benjamin Love explores the mythical powers of Hendrix............................30 Noise The Black Swans, Nosaj Thing, Cake and The Slants ....................................31 Theater Sound of Planes sails on wordplay ............................................................32 Film Franco makes Oscar gold in 127 Hours...........................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 February 3–February 10, 2011


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Tuesday afternoon on Higgins Avenue in downtown Missoula.

Q:

This week the Independent opines on efforts within the Montana Legislature to overturn voterapproved initiatives. Do you support legislators overriding voter sentiment? Follow-up: If you could overturn one law, what would it be?

Allison Atwood: Well, in general, I’d say no. I mean if the people vote for it, then it’s what we want. Aren’t legislators supposed to represent us? Smoked out: I’d overturn the ban on smoking indoors. Those bastards. It should be a personal choice. If a bar owner wants to allow smoking, fine. And if they don’t, well, that’s fine, too. But they should stop trying to legislate morality.

Brent Gyuricza: Sometimes. I think we have an interesting way of getting things on the ballot, and that sometimes voters don’t necessarily understand what an initiative is about. Pot shot: While I’m not entirely opposed to medical marijuana, I’d put that law at the top of my list. I don’t know that it should be overturned by the Legislature, I’d rather just see it back on the ballot again.

Jean James: I don’t think that’s a good idea. The initiative process is supposed to be a vehicle available for voters to make laws, and we ought to be able to use it, without being overridden. Freeze brain: If it wasn’t freezing out I’d have a better answer, but at the moment I’m less focused on state government and more focused at the federal level. Specifically, our health care situation really, really needs to be improved.

Sonja Skovlin: Well, sometimes voters don’t make the most informed choice, and the hope is that legislators have the time to research an issue and make good decisions. That doesn’t mean it happens though! Nip the bud: They should revamp the medical marijuana law. I mean, I voted for it, but the current situation makes it too accessible to anyone.

Missoula Independent

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Trapping indefensible In “Feeling the Squeeze” (Jan. 27, 2011), trapper David Cronenwett bemoans the lack of “an ethical trapping movement.” Well, that’s because there’s no ethical virtue to recreational and commercial trapping. Torturing, clubbing and stomping innocent animals to death is indefensible. Causing panicked animals to chew off their feet (the norm), or spin until their entire limbs break off and then chew through skin, bone, veins, tissue and muscle to escape to certain death (so common trappers call it a wring-off ) is not defensible. Snaring animals and leaving them for days until their heads fill with liquid is not defensible. This last example trappers call a “jellyhead,” like the mountain lion found in the Bitterroot still alive and strangling in agony after five days in a snare, head big as a balloon, with her dead kits at her feet. Trappers today say anything to obscure the real horror. They “explain” that they are “recycling” when they trap small animals to use as bait for larger ones. And the carcasses they discard like pop bottles are now offerings for “the animal kingdom.” Huh? Animals aren’t trash to be recycled or thrown away. They are living, sentient creatures who suffer a terrifying, slow death for the pleasure of trappers. For every target animal trapped an average of two are discarded. That means 150,000 animals suffer and die this way every year in Montana. This also means that six species are losing their battle for survival: the fisher, pine marten, otter, lynx, wolverine and swift fox. Currently the tiny, sixpound swift fox is being reintroduced—at great taxpayer expense—for the second time while trapping continues. This is not recycling. It’s the wholesale, silent slaughter of our wildlife in the most inhumane way conceivable. Trappers claim they work harder than hunters, and hunters occasionally take bad shots that cause suffering. So what’s the difference? The difference is that with trapping suffering is the rule, not the exception. Hunters track game over long hours and rugged terrain and have our target squarely in our sights when we shoot. We don’t rig a trip-wire rifle over bait and go home. We don’t come back when convenient to see what kind of creature we caught. Trapping is like Christmas, say trappers. They never know what they’ll find. Then there’s the old chestnut that some trapped animals just “kind of lay around until you come up” to stomp on their chests and club them to death. The reality is these animals are in a severe state of shock.

Page 4 February 3–February 10, 2011

Trappers could come to the rescue. Yes, trappers could use their talent and skill to live-trap beaver families where people don’t want them and release them by high mountain streams where they’ll build up water retention and restore wetland ecology and wildlife habitat. Beaver dams are nurseries for all kinds of wildlife from birds to big game. Trappers can make a grand contribution to restoring the rich diversity of the Northern Rockies of the early 19th century, before the wholesale trapping of beaver drained aquifers, turned the land semi-arid and trapped beavers to extinction. By 1841 the land was silent, many

Kill the “tradition”

dispatching a small animal by beating it to death with a stick or stepping on its chest? Trappers boast a “connection to a tradition that has been going on for millenia.” Well, I can think of another “tradition” that went on for many more millennia than trapping, was just as cruel, and was finally abolished by the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1865. Some traditions ultimately are determined by society not to be worthy of continuance. Trapping is on the way to becoming one. About 4,000 trappers purchased licenses in Montana last year. Over 30,000 Montanans signed petitions for I-160, the initiative to ban trapping on public lands. Montanans are overwhelmingly speaking up on the tradition of trapping. According to “Feeling the Squeeze,” trappers are “enjoying dialoguing” with “anti-trapping environmentalists,” now concerned about finding a common ground. Perhaps that common ground could be our public lands, most specifically the safe use of those lands for humans and their pets, but also a respite for the wildlife that sustains all Montanans on many different planes. Oh, but wildlife, apparently we are doing them a favor. If it weren’t for trapping, they would die of starvation, and then, horror of horrors, another animal would eat them. How cruel nature is. And without trapping, they would miss the excitement of being painfully held in a trap waiting to be bludgeoned instead. On pain and suffering: At last we have some admission by trappers, Mike Stevenson among them, that trapping doesn’t occur without suffering. He says: “There is a lot of pain out there, and for us to participate in the reality of the natural world is part of the circle.” Perhaps if he truly wants to participate in the wondrous circle of the natural world he should consider spending a day in a trap, knowing it will be his last. David Cronenwett is correct when he says, “The image of the bloodthirsty, cruel trapper plying his trade in the backcountry must be overcome.” I wholeheartedly agree. My “unassailable ethics” tell me to vehemently oppose this cruel blood sport in the name of “ecology,” the “natural world” and, most of all, compassion. Susie Waldron Kalispell

Trapping, is it economically feasible? By most trappers’ admissions, no (see “Feeling the Squeeze,” Jan. 27, 2011). So what is it really about? Is it anything more than recreational entertainment for Joe Cosley wannabes who feel no remorse at

Correction: In last week’s issue, a photograph showed a Clark’s nutcracker in a foothold trap. The bird was apparently used as bait, not caught accidentally. The Indy regrets the error.

Animals “ aren’t trash to be recycled or thrown away. They are living, sentient creatures who suffer a terrifying, slow death for the pleasure of

trappers.

species trapped out of existence. Beavers were gone. In the 1850s they had to be reintroduced in Montana. I have great respect for the survival skills, including trapping, honed by people in earlier times. Today, trappers admit they are lucky to break even. There is no longer a need to trap on public lands. It’s just animal cruelty. Let’s consign this torture to history. Connie Poten Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 February 3–February 10, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 26

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

Attorney General Steve Bullock announces a lawsuit against National Credit Solutions, a debt collector for two defunct video rental chains, alleging it unlawfully attempted to collect money and sent negative credit reports without notifying customers. More than 12,000 Montanans have been affected.

• Thursday, January 27 Billings Flying Service airlifts hay bales, one by one, to feed more than 500 starving horses abandoned by Billings-area rancher James Leachman, who was charged last Friday with animal cruelty after five dead horses were found on his sprawling ranch earlier this month.

• Friday, January 28 Athletic Director Jim O’Day names Mark Plakorus as the University of Montana’s new soccer coach. Plakorus, most recently the associate head coach at Texas Christian University, beat out close to 200 applicants for the position. He takes over a team that finished 3-12-3 in 2010.

• Saturday, January 29 Roughly 200 bundled-up locals gather at McCormick Park for the 13th Annual 5k Frost Fever Fun Run/Walk. Proceeds from the Fun Run benefit low-income families, enabling them to access programs offered by the Missoula Parks and Recreation Department.

• Sunday, January 30 An icy patch of road on Interstate 90 west of Drummond triggers a series of vehicle collisions, backing up traffic for miles. Roughly a dozen vehicles slide off the road in near whiteout conditions. Law enforcement reports that 10 people are taken to St. Patrick Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

• Monday, January 31 Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester reintroduced legislation to prevent oil and gas development and mining on the American side of the North Fork watershed. “We’re pushing to build on the success we’ve had getting companies to retire oil and gas development leases in the North Fork at no cost to taxpayers,” Baucus says.

• Tuesday, February 1 Amid reports that U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg will challenge Sen. Jon Tester in 2012, Rehberg spokesman Brian Barrett says: “Denny has received a lot of support and encouragement to run for the United States Senate in 2012. He is weighing all of his options carefully and will announce his decision Saturday.”

More than two years have passed since the completion of the three timber frame picnic shelters in Silver Park along the Clark Fork River, but they remain fenced off from the public. That’s about to change, according to Chris Behan of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency. “This spring we’ll have a fully finished trail” linking McCormick Park to the California Street Bridge, he says. “That’s what we wanted—lights and more people down there before we set the shelters free.”

LGBT Advocacy and commerce A new Polson-based online marketplace aims to profit off the homosexual agenda. LGBTprosper.com, launched last September, features an array of goods for sale, including rainbow bracelets, vintage suitcases repurposed to serve as dog beds and T-shirts that say “God Accepts You” (with the letters G, A and Y standing out in pink cursive against lowercase white script). “One of our main thrusts is advocacy and commerce meeting together,” says Marianne Forrest, one of four company cofounders. Forrest, Karen McMullen, Bob Marsenich and Mark Nelson aim to catch the eye—and disposable income—of LGBT people. Researchers from the federally funded National Survey of Family Growth estimate there are at least 8.8 million lesbian, gay and bisexual people nationally. Others believe the number to be much higher. But one thing is certain: Gay people spend a significant amount of money. In fact, Washington D.C.-based marketing company Witeck-Combs Communications approximates that

the collective buying power of the LGBT population last year totaled more than $700 billion. Forrest and her colleagues hope they can glean some of that green. And kitschy rainbow paraphernalia aren’t their only selling point. Three percent of all proceeds generated through LGBTprosper.com are donated to the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Workplace Project, advocating proLGBT employment policies. Each vender or service provider listed on the website signs a non-discrimination contract and an agreement promising to support LGBT equality. “We feel like we’re offering a matrix that allows people to support the community and create prosperous community at the same time,” Forrest says. The site also provides space for equality-minded nonprofit organizations to list advertisements and events. Forrest says she and her partners dream of growing the site into a gay Amazon.com of sorts. “The site will have an enormous amount of impact as far as an individual’s ability to connect with other like-minded people,” Forrest says. By doing so, McMullen hopes LGBTprosper.com will enable LGBT people to

advance their social, economic and political agenda. “If you’re going to buy something, buy from LGBT-friendly folks,” McMullen says. “It’s not just LGBT individuals, it’s all people who support LGBT rights and social justice for all.” Jessica Mayrer

Big rigs Shifting gears If you see folks wandering the streets of downtown Missoula on First Friday with tire treads on their faces, don’t call 911. They’re just willing participants in All Against the Haul’s ongoing anti big-rigs campaign. “We’ll have an army of volunteers out there painting people’s faces with tire tracks and handing out stickers saying, ‘I’m being run over by big oil,’” campaign coordinator Zack Porter says of the group’s plans for Friday evening. “This is kind of the crux of just the early part of this campaign. There’s still a long way to go.” All Against the Haul and its Idaho counterpart, Fighting Goliath, began “shifting gears” last week,

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 February 3–February 10, 2011


Inside

Letters

Briefs

dropping the fight against ConocoPhillips in favor of using the company’s loads as a demonstration platform against a larger heavy haul proposal by ExxonMobil subsidiary Imperial Oil. It’s a move opposition leaders have discussed for months, and one they felt prudent in light of Idaho’s approval of ConocoPhillips’ shipments. “We’ve decided strategically that this is the right thing to do, to shift gears to Exxon,” Porter says. “But it doesn’t legitimize what’s going on right now.” The first of ConocoPhillips’ four loads left the Port of Lewiston earlier this week and will spend several days at Lolo Pass before descending to Missoula. A second shipment will follow late next week. Fighting Goliath co-founder Linwood Laughy says his group will monitor the Conoco loads as they roll through. “We’re going to do what it takes to observe [ConocoPhillips’] compliance with the permit,” Laughy says. Last Saturday, about 120 citizens from Idaho and Montana—including, according to Laughy, Nez Perce tribal members and one Idaho state legislator— lined the Memorial Bridge in Lewiston before marching to the port to protest in front of the ConocoPhillips loads. The rally, which drew only nine heavy haul supporters, was just the first. Porter says All Against the Haul plans to host a similar demonstration at Lolo Pass this weekend, with a second rally at the heavy haul stop between Lolo and Missoula later on. Details are forthcoming, but Porter hopes for and anticipates hundreds of participants. Anyone looking for All Against the Haul on First Friday can find them on the corner of Higgins and Main. “It’s time to get the message across,” Porter says. “We’re putting our war paint on this Friday.” Alex Sakariassen

Rollergirls League eyes Adams Center When testing out their new portable skate court inside the Adams Center last month, the Hellgate Rollergirls found the plastic track a bit noisier than the cement court they’ve grown accustomed to. However, falling isn’t quite as painful. “It’s not so jarring,” says Rollergirl Carrie Nelson, AKA “Scarlet AnnihilateHer.” The court is portable, too. That’s good news for the fledgling roller derby league, which was poised earlier this week to sign off on an agreement with the

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

University of Montana that would allow the Rollergirls to begin holding bouts in the Adams Center. “We are definitely moving on up,” Nelson says. They’re moving up and, as one would expect, they’re moving fast. Since a handful of aspiring roller derby girls committed to bringing the high-impact all-female sport to Missoula in July 2009, the phenomenon has exploded. After just more than a year of mobilizing support, the Missoula league moved into a Westside warehouse last April where their bouts have drawn upwards of 1,300 fans. It quickly became apparent that the divas need more room.

“Clearly we’ve outgrown that space,” Nelson says. The Rollergirls began eyeing the Adams Center, capable of seating some 5,000 fans. As of press time, the league had not yet signed a contract with UM, but Adams Center Executive Director Mary Muse told the Independent Tuesday that the university is prepared to move forward with the deal. “We’re excited about the possibility of working with them,” Muse says. “At this point, it looks pretty good.” That leaves the Rollergirls busy planning future bouts. Nelson says the league aims to hold its inaugural Adams Center match March 25, featuring local teams the Brawlin’ Mollies and the Dirt Road Dolls. From there, the ladies will look to invite teams from neighboring communities like Spokane, Billings and Coeur d’Alene so they, too, can throw elbows in the new digs. “We’re finalizing the rest of the dates right now,” Nelson says. Jessica Mayrer

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Health care States seeks power over prices Over the past decade health insurance rates in Montana jumped 88 percent, now consuming roughly 17 percent of the average family’s income. That’s a troubling trend for the state’s insurance commissioner, who, despite being charged to regulate the industry, has no authority to vet or deny premium hikes. “I think it should be troubling for all Montanans,” says Commissioner Monica Lindeen. “You have to wonder, if nobody’s checking to make sure, then there were probably rate increases that didn’t need to be as high as they were.” Montana, Georgia and Missouri stand out as the only states that don’t regulate insurance rates. Lindeen hopes to change that. She’s asked Rep. Robyn Driscoll, D-Billings, to sponsor House Bill 105, which would grant Lindeen’s office authority to scrutinize health care premiums. As originally drafted, the bill would give Montana’s insurance commissioner power to deny rate increases deemed excessive. But the insurance industry has pushed back. “Obviously, the health insurance industry, which has had no regulation in this area in Montana, is going to fight that,” Lindeen says. The bill has been amended to get the state’s largest insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana (BCBSM), among others, on board. While the amendments haven’t been made public, they likely limit the insurance commissioner’s power to deny rate hikes. BCBSM Spokesman Tim Warner says the original version of the bill would have been too costly for the industry to bear. “Without the amendments it could actually cause us to increase the administrative burden and the administrative cost,” Warner says, “[which could] have the potential to increase premiums.” At a time when health-care costs have skyrocketed across the board, Warner says BCBSM has shaved $10 million off of its administrative expenses over the last three years. Montanans should realize, Warner says, that insurance rates are the product of a complicated equation, and it’s simply not fair to demonize the insurance industry. “We end up on the pointy end of the stick,” he says. The Legislature’s House Business and Labor Committee will again take up HB 105 in the coming weeks. Jessica Mayrer

57

Votes cast in the House of Representatives Jan. 28 against a bill to expand mail ballot elections, which is now listed as “probably dead.” Rep. Champ Edmunds, R-Missoula, and others decried the proposal by positing outrageous voter fraud scenarios they felt would result from the bill’s passage.

etc.

Montana’s legislators must think we voters are as dense as the frozen hard-pack coating the Missoula Valley. The Legislature finds itself debating a slew of bills intended to override initiatives voters themselves have put on the books. A handful of legislators, including Jim Shockley, RVictor, seek to repeal Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act, which 64 percent of voters approved in 2004. Outfitter Bill Harris, R-Mosby, wants to reinstate outfitter-sponsored nonresident hunting licenses after 54 percent of voters abolished the licenses by supporting Initiative 161 last November. There’s even a proposal to amend the Montana Constitution to increase the number of signatures required for citizens to qualify an initiative for the ballot. The trend hit close to home last week when it was reported that Missoula County Attorney Fred Van Valkenburg had worked with Rep. Tom Berry, R-Roundup, to draft a bill to make moot Initiative 2, which 55 percent of Missoula County voters endorsed in 2006. The measure established adult misdemeanor marijuana offenses as the county’s lowest law enforcement priority. House Bill 391 wouldn’t just nix I-2, but prohibit local initiatives from establishing priority of enforcement of state law. “This thing needs to be nipped in the bud,” Van Valkenburg tells the Indy. “It’s bad policy. People at the local level should not be deciding how state laws are enforced. It would be outrageous if the people of some community said, ‘Well, we want to have partner assault treated as the lowest priority in our community.’ The liberal forces of the world would go crazy over something like that. But it’s nearly no different when it comes to marijuana.” Fair enough. But the thing is, I-2 doesn’t have any teeth anyway. It’s merely a suggestion. Van Valkenburg himself says the law has had a negligible effect on how local law enforcement does its job, and the number of pot busts in the county has remained steady since 2006. So we’re left wondering why Van Valkenburg feels compelled to invalidate it. “Marijuana is prohibited by virtue of state law, and it ought to be treated the same whether it’s Sydney or Missoula or Libby or Alzada,” he says. “If somebody’s got a gripe with marijuana being illegal they ought to take it to the Legislature.” Well, five years ago Missoulians had a gripe with local marijuana laws and put the issue on the ballot. That ought to be enough. Van Valkenburg’s proposal isn’t as ill-intentioned as some think. He’s apparently a stickler for the rules. But overriding voter sentiment is a slippery slope. Let’s hope our elected legislators don’t make a habit of it. After all, our votes do count when it comes to their jobs.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 February 3–February 10, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Plowed under Realtors seek to limit ag’s influence over subdivisions by Matthew Frank

A bill moving through the Montana Legislature would end the ability of local governments to reject new subdivisions for devouring precious agricultural land, a direct response to the Missoula development community’s claim that forced preservation of ag land infringes on private property rights. Senate Bill 209, sponsored by Sen. Bruce Tutvedt, R-Kalispell, would strike from the Montana Subdivision and Platting

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Missoula Independent

CFAC argues that the whole point of subdivision review is to ensure that what one person wants to do with their private property doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inflict unnecessary harmâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; in this case, limiting access to local food and open spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on the larger community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to pass on a rich agricultural legacy,â&#x20AC;? says CFACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paul Hubbard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Missoula County residents have stated that as being a key priority of theirs. It says it all over our growth policy documents. Our

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Senate Bill 209 would make it illegal for governing bodies to reshape subdivision proposals in the name of farmland preservation, as the Missoula Board of County Commissioners did last year with Blue Heron Estates in the Grass Valley, pictured.

Act a provision requiring governing bodies to consider a subdivisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;impact on agriculture.â&#x20AC;? Over the past three years the Missoula City Council and Missoula Board of County Commissioners haveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to the dismay of the development communityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;used that language to justify rejecting or reshaping subdivision proposals to preserve farmland. Instead, the bill, drafted by the real estate industry, would have governing bodies only consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;the impact of the proposed subdivision on surrounding agricultural operations.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reaction to people who have had their rights trampled,â&#x20AC;? Tutvedt says, adding that agricultural values like soil quality should not determine whether a subdivision is approved. The Missoula County Community Food and Agriculture Coalition (CFAC), a quasigovernmental organization sanctioned by the city and county in 2005, has helped foster local decision makersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; newfound concerns over the incremental loss of ag land. The group has become an influential voice in the local subdivision review process in recent years by informing governing bodies of subdivision proposalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; potential impacts on agriculture.

Page 8 February 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 10, 2011

working farms and ranches are a really important part of our heritage. We want to do what we can to see that working farms and ranches continue to be a part of the landscape and part of our community in the future.â&#x20AC;? Hubbard says Tutvedtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill limits the ability of communities to shape their own futures. The Montana Association of Realtors (MAR) drafted the bill, according to MAR Government Affairs Director Glenn Oppel, to give the review process â&#x20AC;&#x153;more predictability and certainty.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the public wants to preserve property, or preserve agâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whatever the public interest isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they should compensate the landowner for the value of that property,â&#x20AC;? Oppel says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to utilize the Subdivision and Platting Act to stop a subdivision thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s otherwise complied with the law. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with hereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just on CFACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side but on our side as wellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is disagreement about how that law is interpreted.â&#x20AC;? The proposed bill reflects the findings of a recent report commissioned by the Missoula Organization of Realtors (MOR)

and Missoula Building Industries Association (MBIA). In it local attorney Bill VanCanagan, who conducted the legal analysis, wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is certainly no doubt that requiring that land may either be farmed or left fallow and nothing else is unAmerican and, most likely, unconstitutional.â&#x20AC;? VanCanagan also argued that the Montana Subdivision and Platting Act was never intended to interfere with development, and that zoning is the appropriate tool to guide the preservation of agricultural land. He helped draft SB 209. MOR CEO Ruth Link says MOR and CFAC can still find common ground on a host of items relating to ag land, but not on the role of subdivision review. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The one thing [CFAC] wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compromise onâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and neither will weâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is subdivision review,â&#x20AC;? Link says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We feel like [agriculture] is a community ideal, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great thing, and we all want locally grown food, but we think there could be a policy that deals with it in a much more cohesive way, and in a more far-reaching way, than the incremental taking of land.â&#x20AC;? Link says MOR neither supports nor opposes SB 209. The bill goes further than amending the Montana Subdivision and Platting Actâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agricultural considerations. It would also implement a five-day timeline for planning departments to certify applications; force governing bodies to disregard opinions given by federal, state, or local government agencies unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supported by a formal written study; and prohibit governing bodies from considering cumulative impacts; among other things. Taken together, it would, according to the Missoula Board of County Commissionersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; position statement, â&#x20AC;&#x153;preclude elected officials from doing their sworn duty.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have way more issues than just CFAC with this bill,â&#x20AC;? says Commissioner Jean Curtiss. Sen. Tutvedt finds many of those same items problematic, too. He says he may work to take out most of the provisions Missoulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commissioners find troublesomeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except the one limiting agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s influence over the subdivision review process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a basic property right that a person can sell their property for its highest and best use,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think oversight of whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got agricultural value or not is an appropriate determining factor.â&#x20AC;? The Senate Local Government Committee plans to hold a hearing on Senate Bill 209 on Friday, February 4. mfrank@missoulanews.com


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Grassroots guardians

BETTY'S

BIG SALE

Missoula group fights for custody-case reform by Alex Sakariassen

Missoulians Mary Monroe, Steve Knight and Emily McKey congregate in the cramped House minority offices in Helena on a Friday evening, poring over notes from conversations with representatives and divvying up House Judiciary Committee members to contact over the weekend. Rep. Betsy Hands, D-Missoula, sits among them offering suggestions and brief tutorials on legislative process. The scene boils down to a strategy session between the folks at the core of Montanans Supporting Guardian Guidelines (MSGG) and their state representative, punctuated by talk of tweaks,

statute by calling for GALs to have a background in legal, mental health, domestic violence or child development services. The bill also sets practice and training standards for anyone serving as a GAL and establishes in writing a grievance process that includes review councils appointed by the separate district courts in the state. McKey admits HB 281 is a bit “barebones” compared to what most parents would like to see. “But it’s been an education for us over the year and a half that we’ve worked with Betsy,” McKey says. “She’s helped us recog-

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

From left, Steve Knight, Mary Monroe and Emily McKey meet with Rep. Betsy Hands in Helena to discuss House Bill 281, a proposed statute clarifying guidelines and a grievance process for court-appointed child advocates in custody cases.

cuts, amendments and careful political maneuvering. The meeting’s sole focus is House Bill 281, a bill roughly two years in the making that seeks to strengthen state laws governing guardians ad litem (GALs)—courtappointed representatives for children in custody cases. And while the introduction of Hands’ bill in the legislative session marks a significant step forward in remedying the ills many parents have experienced in the court system, MSGG has come to realize it faces an uphill battle in seeing its proposals become law. “We’re not trying to create another layer of government,” McKey says, referencing the concern voiced by several legislators during and after the bill’s hearing before the Judiciary Committee. “The layer exists, the guardians exist, the role exists. We’re just trying to make it a safe and effective role. We’re not creating anything new.” The sticking point for McKey and her cohorts is the glaring lack of laws pertaining to GALs in Montana. There are currently no specific qualifications for the position, and no established grievance process exists for parents experiencing problems with their GAL. The law books are even mute on when a GAL’s participation in custody proceedings should conclude. HB 281 seeks to fill in gaps in state

nize—as have other legal professionals along the way—that this is a first step. We need to look at something that has a realistic chance of passing, so we feel this is an excellent compromise.” MSGG began in late 2008 as a support group for Missoula-area parents who felt themselves the victims of GAL oversights or outright abuses. The organization quickly blossomed into an initiative aimed at implementing clear guidelines for GALs and gathered membership not only from across the state but from across the professional spectrum. Attorneys, judges, therapists, GALs and University of Montana researchers have all worked with MSGG to come to some consensus on what rules would best guide the practice. “All of us as mental health professionals and attorneys, we all have to have ongoing, continuing education,” says Knight, a Missoula-based social worker who has extensive experience dealing with GALS, and who approached Hands about drafting legislation. “It keeps us current on new developments and new information, and when there are guardians who don’t have an interest in having ongoing training it concerns me, because we could always learn more.” Yet proponents of HB 281 witnessed a combination of hesitancy, misunderstanding

and flat-out opposition during the bill’s Judiciary Committee hearing Jan. 24. MSGG and others provided lengthy personal and professional testimony supporting the need for GAL guidelines. Hands said the first hour proved incredibly moving, but the bill still has to contend with concerns that mandated training would make it harder to find interested GAL candidates and that the grievance process could establish an unconstitutional disciplinary procedure for attorneys serving as GALs. The latter is the primary reason that the Montana Bar Association does not currently support HB 281. “We’re subject to the rules of the courts and the jurisdiction of the courts,” Bruce Spencer, liaison for the Montana Bar’s board of trustees, said during the hearing. “The state bar feels very strongly that this bill and its grievance procedure takes us out of that scheme of regulation through the courts…and puts us in the hands of some sort of committee. For those reasons, we oppose the bill and urge at least that portion of it not to pass.” MSGG faces legislative negotiations in the days and weeks ahead, but did claim a small victory in Missoula late last month. On Jan. 21, the Fourth Judicial District Court officially adopted a list of 12 guidelines for GALs in Missoula County. Those guidelines mostly define the roles and responsibilities of a GAL in the district, and McKey believes they will help solve some of the problems parents have experienced in the past. They’re “not all that we’d like to see in place,” she says, but she and those with MSGG are glad that the local court system— specifically District Court Judge Robert “Dusty” Deschamps, who pioneered the document—is finally acknowledging longstanding concerns. “There are cases where the guardian never met the child,” McKey says. “There are cases where the guardian met the child very briefly once and years later is still making recommendations…So yes, we’re very heartened to see what’s here. It’s a terrific first step, but there’s a lot missing.” The changes have done little to distract from the bigger picture, however. With the group’s network growing outside the Missoula area, MSGG now understands that the fight is no longer local. “If [HB 281] doesn’t go through, it is just the beginning,” Monroe says on the steps inside the Capitol shortly after meeting with Hands. “We’re starting to represent the state,” McKey adds. “And not just Missoula.”

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Missoula Independent

Page 9 February 3–February 10, 2011


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Tale of the tape Rehberg and Tester poised to battle it out If the political tea leaves are being read correctly—and there’s every indication they are—this week should see two huge announcements by Montana Republicans. Denny Rehberg, Montana’s lone representative to the U.S. House, is expected to say he will challenge Jon Tester in 2012 for a U.S. Senate seat. Businessman Steve Daines, who had already announced his challenge to Tester, is expected to run for Rehberg’s House seat instead. The Capitol Hill newspaper Roll Call broke the story earlier this week, finally putting to print rumors and rumblings circulating for months. As Roll Call reported, a “Republican operative” says Rehberg conducted polling on the race in early January and saw results he liked. Rehberg came up with 48 percent to Tester’s 43 percent when matched toe to toe. Eight percent were undecided. Given the poll’s margin of error, that’s a statistical dead heat. The poll also showed that in a race matching Rehberg against Tester with Gov. Brian Schweitzer running as an Independent, Rehberg drew 44 percent, Tester 28 percent, and Schweitzer 18 percent, with 11 percent undecided. “Denny has received a lot of support and encouragement to run for the United States Senate in 2012.” Rehberg spokesman Brian Barrett said in a statement on Tuesday. “He is weighing all of his options carefully and will announce his decision Saturday.” Perhaps not coincidentally, both Tester and Rehberg’s offices quickly showed off the sizes of their campaign coffers. Tester reported “nearly $562,000” and Rehberg weighed in at “more than $553,000.” Daines, who has no announced opposition for the House seat Rehberg would vacate should he beat Tester, reports $206,500 left of the $225,000 he has raised in the last reporting period. Already—and it should come as no surprise—the looming heavyweight bout appears to be an ugly one. Here’s what Ted Dick, the Montana Democratic Party’s executive director, had to say when news of Rehberg’s potential challenge broke: “This is turning out to be one of the worst-kept secrets in Montana. Despite his near-fatal boat accident with a drunk driver, his frivolous lawsuit against Montana firefighters, years of deficit spending and voting against Montana, and an embarrassing record of, well, nothing, Dennis Rehberg wants a new job. He’s going to have a tough two years

Missoula Independent

Page 10 February 3–February 10, 2011

ahead of him explaining to Montanans why he deserves it.” And Dick’s counterpart in the Montana Republican Party, Bowen Greenwood, said this, as reported by Roll Call: “Sen. Tester is very highly vulnerable in 2012. It’s not a matter of who our candidate is, it’s a matter of his record.

“itAlready—and should come as no surprise— the looming heavyweight bout appears to be an ugly

one.

He voted for Obamacare and 60 percent of Montanans oppose that. He voted for the stimulus. He didn’t just break his campaign promise to oppose earmarks, he trampled on it. Jon Tester has betrayed Montana, and that bill is coming due in 2012.” A slugfest seems unavoidable in this matchup. The two incumbents have both been around Montana politics for a long time. Rehberg began his political career as a legislative intern in 1977 at the age of 22. Between 1980 and 1982 he was the finance director for congressional campaigns, and by 1985 he became a member of the Montana House of Representatives. Rehberg rose quickly through the Republican ranks to become Gov. Marc Racicot’s lieutenant governor in 1991. In ’96 he ran an unsuccessful campaign against U.S. Sen. Max Baucus, but won Montana’s lone U.S. House seat in 2000 and last November easily cruised to victory for his sixth term. The new Republican majority in the House recently appointed him chairman of the Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Sub-Committee.

Tester entered the Montana Senate in 1999. He served as minority whip in 2001, the minority leader in 2003 and became senate president in 2005. He won his U.S. Senate seat by beating incumbent Conrad Burns in a very close race in 2006. He sits on the Senate Appropriations Committee. Almost certain to be a focus of the campaign will be Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act (FJRA) that he introduced in 2009 but failed to get out of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. He did, however, attach it as a rider to the Senate’s omnibus spending bill, which was thought to be a “must pass” piece of legislation but was dropped by Senate leaders at the last moment. The bill, which came to Tester as a socalled “collaborative” agreement between a few conservation groups and some timber mill owners, trades off mandated timber harvests for the designation of about 666,000 acres of new wilderness. So far, Tester has yet to reintroduced the measure into this session of Congress and, given that the Republicans now control the House, the bill will have a much rougher ride should he decide to do so. The measure may face an equally tough ride here in Montana. A recent non-scientific poll in Helena’s Independent Record found that twice as many readers oppose the reintroduction of the bill than support it, and the poll garnered more than 2,000 comments from around the country. Unfortunately for Tester, those who voted “no” included not only opponents of new wilderness, but former Tester supporters who feel the bill gives away too many acres to logging, doesn’t designate enough wilderness, and removes existing protections for some wilderness study areas. And then there’s the health insurance reform measure vilified by Republicans as “Obamacare.” A Florida federal judge recently ruled the entire measure as unconstitutional and a likely Supreme Court appeal is ahead. The outcome could easily become an electoral drag on Democrats nationwide. One thing is certain, however, should Rehberg make his announcement on Saturday. This will be a brutal, 21-month, butt-ugly campaign that, from all appearances, has already started and will only go downhill from here. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Moving target Pro-wolf groups stretching truth too far by Denver Bryan

As a hunter, conservationist and also a supporter of wolves taking their rightful place in the West, I take issue with the position of most environmental groups on this matter. By just about every scientific metric, wolves have recovered in the Northern Rocky Mountains. At last count, we had a wolf population of 1,700 plus—many times greater than the 300 wolves initially seen by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as necessary to sustain a “recovered” population throughout Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Even though environmental groups helped come up with the figure of 300, several of them now argue that this minimum population is too low. But after listening to Defenders of Wildlife, the Environmental Defense Fund, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, I’ve come to believe that many of their arguments are disingenuous—primarily made just to placate their city-based members who have never lived in the West or in a rural setting with wolves nearby. These idealists have good intentions, but they seem to believe that wolves are just friendly cousins of the family dog. They don’t understand or accept that we all live in a human-altered environment that requires responsible management of wildlife, including wolves. Case in point: In the early days of wolf reintroduction, Defenders of Wildlife offered to pay ranchers for livestock losses caused by wolves as a way of easing the burden of reintroduction. But now that wolves are here to stay, they’ve recently dropped this program. Today, they expect the federal government—taxpayers—to pick up the bill for livestock losses. Another example is the Natural Resources Defense Council, which claims that wolves were recently put back on the endangered species list by a federal judge because their “recovery is still in doubt.” The facts show that Judge Donald Molloy was simply making a “letter of the law” interpretation of a small clause in the Endangered Species Act that says an endan-

gered species can’t be managed along state lines. Molloy is the same judge who last year ruled that it was okay to proceed with the first wolf-hunting seasons in Montana and Idaho. The Environmental Defense Fund seems to be trying to avoid both science and expert testimony altogether by

come to “I’ve believe that many pro-wolf groups’ arguments are disingenuous—primarily made just to placate their city-based members who have never lived

in the West.

appealing to our emotional side: It’s been using the example of “Limpy,” an injured wolf that left the confines of Yellowstone National Park and was killed during last year’s wolf hunting season. More recently, the director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, an organization I’m still a member of and have regularly contributed to, claimed that wolves are akin to migratory waterfowl and ocean-run fish and should be managed similarly—by the federal government, with states following its directives. This is quite a leap. Though many waterfowl and fish species travel great dis-

tances in short periods of time—often crossing many state and even international borders–wolves, like most predator and prey species that have historically been managed by the states they inhabit, are earthbound and relatively territorial. The only motive I can find behind this argument is a desire to centralize wolf management in the distant political arena of Washington, D.C., where environmental groups have a better chance of pushing their agenda. I think such groups don’t want state management of wolf populations because they know the outcome will be wolf populations managed to more tolerable levels. As a professional wildlife photographer living fairly close to Yellowstone Park, I’ve enjoyed viewing and photographing the wolves of Lamar Valley over the years, and I’m genuinely glad to see wolves restored to the Northern Rockies. But I don’t view them through the rose-colored glasses worn by many environmentalists. The wolf packs of Lamar and elsewhere are efficient predators. They don’t just take down “the old and the weak” as many environmentalists like to say. Wolf packs kill even healthy adult bull elk and moose with regularity. Currently, wolves are significantly reducing big game herds in several regions throughout the Northern Rockies, and nearly every major elected official in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming is actively working to regain control of wolf management within their boundaries so that wolf populations can be managed at levels acceptable to the majority of their residents. Environmental groups, responding to their many distant and urban-based members, push for high wolf populations and apparently don’t care what it’s like for those of us who live closer to the land, with wolves in the backyard.

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Missoula Independent

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Some of you call them “connies,” while others use the term “jimmy hat.” Whatever phrase you prefer, condoms aren’t just used for knockin’ boots anymore. In fact, here in Missoula, they serve as the main aesthetic component of some of the hippest looking dresses, suits, bras and ties you’ll ever lay your eyes on. This week, check out these avant-garde threads during “Off the Rack 2011,” Blue Mountain Clinic’s annual fashion show fundraiser where models stroll around on stage in tasteful clothing made from condoms and other latex materials. The fete also includes music by local indie folk favorites Butter, plus performances by members of the Downtown Dance Collective.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 3 The YWCA Missoula presents its annual meeting, which features a keynote speech from Luana Ross, president of the Salish Kootenai College, starting with registration at 8:30 AM, followed by the meeting at 9 AM, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. RSVP with Julie by Feb. 3 by calling 543-6691. Seek out some future adventure during a Peace Corps Information Session, which features a presentation by local representative Tenly Snow and begins at 4 PM in Room 327 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288. Missoula families can explore a school that offers children in preschool through the fifth grade a place-based education that values nature, community and academic excellence when Clark Fork School, 2525 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts an open house from 6–7:30 PM. Free. Visit clarkforkschool.org for details or call Sam or Karin at 728-3395.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 4 The harsh realities of global capitalism and union action on climate change rendezvous on the screen during the first night of the sixth annual Missoula Labor Film Festival, which starts at 6:30 PM with a screening of The Red Tail, followed at 8:45 PM with a screening of Time To Tackle Climate Change, all at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $9 both nights/$5 one night. Visit missoula-labor.info.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 5 Films on immigrant workers and the Bracero program hit the screen during the second night of the sixth annual Missoula Labor Film Festival, which features a screening of It’s a Free World at 6:30 PM, followed by Harvest of Loneliness: The Bracero Program at 8:45 PM, all at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $5 per night/$9 for both nights. Visit missoula-labor.info.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 7 Dine out to support a local organization that aims to provide safe, healthy affordable housing using sustainable methods, among other deeds, during a “dine out” benefit for homeWORD from 5–8:30 PM at Scotty’s Table, 131 S. Higgins Ave. Unit P3. For $15, you will receive a locally produced burger (or veggie burger), plus fries and a local beer. Scotty’s Table will then donate proceeds from this evening to homeWORD. Call 532-HOME.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 8 Hang with some patriots when the Missoula Patriots

The event itself aims to promote healthy sexuality. It also raises funds for the nonprofit’s outreach programs like the Montana Access Project (MAP), an effort to increase access to accurate health-care information through avenues such as a newly created text and Internet-based hotline for sexual health questions. –Ira Sather-Olson The “Off the Rack 2011” fundraiser is Sat., Feb. 5, at 8:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $20, A preshow reception occurs at 6:30 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., costs $50 and includes VIP admission to the show. Call 7211646 and visit bluemountainclinic.org.

host a meeting at Valley Christian School, 2526 Sunset Lane, which begins with a potluck at 6 PM, and moves into a talk at 7 on legislative issues and bills with guest speakers Lyn Hellegaard, Lloyd Phillips and Patty Lovaas. Free. E-mail Gloria at zibec@msn.com. Find out why the tar sands in Alberta aren’t such a great thing during “Montana to the Tar Sands: The True Cost of Oil,” a panel discussion with Steve Running and others on the impacts of the tar sands oil development on the environment, human health, native communities and Montana’s economy, starting at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. The Missoula County Democrats host a central committee meeting, featuring updates and comments on the Montana Legislature from Montana state Sen. Tom Facey and City Councilwoman Cynthia Wolken, plus updates on party strategies from Montana Democratic Party chair Jim Elliott and executive director Ted Dick, starting at 7 PM in Missoula’s City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Visit missoulademocrats.org.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 9 Find out what it takes to foster world peace and friendship when REI Missoula, 3275 N. Reserve St. Ste. K-2, hosts a Peace Corps Information Session with UM campus representative Tenly Snow starting at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-2288. Child Care Resources, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St., presents “Advocate for Early Childhood at the Montana Legislature,” a program where particpants can strengthen their advocacy skills to inform the legislature about the impact of its decisions on children, families and child-care businesses. $10. Visit childcareresources.org/registration to register.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 10 Hear about the effects of Alberta’s Athabasca oil sands during the talk “Tar Sands’ Impacts on Indigenous People and Montana Landowners,” a presentation with Marty Cobenais of the Indigenous Environmental Network and others, starting at 9:40 AM in Room 258 of UM’s Social Sciences Building. Free. Slip into a talk where the relationship between the faithbased community and sustainability is analyzed when the Sustainable Business Council presents the talk “Sustainability in a Faith Community Context and its Business Implications,” which features comments by pastor Peter Shober, and begins with refreshments at 5:30 PM, followed by the talk at 6, at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. Free. Visit sbcmontana.org and call 824-7336.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 February 3–February 10, 2011


Grizzly Athletics This Week Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When a woman reported that a man exposed himself to her and her children, police in Mesa, Ariz., knocked on the apartment door of upstairs neighbor Michael Polley, 55. He answered with his pants still around his ankles. Court records noted he became “immediately angry” at being interrupted and began cursing at the officers, who arrested him. (Phoenix’s The Arizona Republic) Police said Jerome Taylor, 20, entered a restaurant in Hartford, Conn., wearing a mask, pulled what looked like a gun on the cooks and demanded money. The cooks refused and grabbed their knives. Taylor promptly apologized and insisted it was all just a joke, and anyway, the “gun��� was only an iPhone. (Hartford’s WVIT-TV) Police alerted to the theft of a 50-inch television off a delivery truck in Auburn, Wash., arrested Johnathon Barnes, 22, whom they spotted right outside the police station pushing a shopping cart containing the stolen set. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer) MELODIOUS MUTANTS - Japanese scientists started breeding mice that sing like birds. The researchers at the University of Osaka genetically engineered the mice as part of their “Evolved Mouse Project,” which accelerates mutations to see what develops. “We checked the newly born mice one by one,” lead researcher Arikuni Uchimura said. “One day we found a mouse that was singing like a bird.” He explained the “singing mouse” was a random mutation but that the trait has been used to breed 100 of them so far and will be used to breed more like it. “I was surprised because I had been expecting mice that are different in physical shape,” Uchimura said, adding that the project had also produced “a mouse with short limbs and a tail like a dachshund.” (Agence France-Presse) VIDEO GAMES IN REAL LIFE - A 23-year-old man was hospitalized in Anderson, S.C., after an SUV hit him while playing a real-life version of the arcade game “Frogger,” where players move frogs through traffic. The victim had been discussing the game with his friends, said Chief Jimmy Dixon, who said the man suddenly yelled “go” and darted into oncoming traffic in the four-lane highway. (Associated Press) TRANSPARENT SCHEME - Mary Evano pleaded guilty in a Massachusetts court to 23 counts of filing false insurance claims after she and her husband intentionally ate glass particles. The couple collected more than $200,000 for claims filed against restaurants, hotels and grocery stores from 1997 to 2005. The couple owes more than $100,000 in medical bills. (Associated Press)

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For tickets visit the Adams Center Box Office, Griztix.com, or call 243-4051

VS Saturday, February 5th @ 2pm vs. Northern Arizona • Notice the 2pm tip off for this game • Promotions include: Dash 4 Cash, Karl Tyler Tuition Giveaway, and Show for Dough • Halftime Entertainment: Special dance performance by the Lil Griz Spirit Day Participants • UM Pep Band, Spirit Squad, and Monte

DRINKING-CLASS HEROES - Defense attorney Tom Hudson helped his client beat DUI charges after the prosecution presented law enforcement video of Ronald Deveau at a DUI stop in Sarasota, Fla. Hudson hired a private investigator to videotape on-duty law enforcement officers making the same driving mistakes that officers cite as reasons for suspicion: wide turns, crossing double yellow lines and riding on lane markers. After comparing videos, Judge David Denkin declared that Deveau’s drifting was insufficient evidence of impaired driving and dismissed the charges. (Sarasota’s Herald-Tribune) A Ukrainian entertainment firm in Dneprodzerzhinsk now offers drinking buddies for hire. “It is a pleasant companion who can enliven a boring evening,” Yulia Peyeva, head of Kind Fairy, which also organizes weddings and birthdays. “Virtually all of our people are talented. They can play guitar, sing or recite poetry. Today you may want to talk about art and tomorrow to read Faust.” (Agence France-Presse) LITIGATION NATION - After two men shot each other in a bar in New Kensington, Pa., one of them, Thomas Galloway, 42, sued the bar and its owner, claiming negligence because patrons weren’t searched for weapons before entering. Both men were armed, and Galloway was convicted of illegally possessing a weapon. A federal judge dismissed the suit. (Associated Press) PREDICTABLE RESULTS - When Jermaine Grosse, 26, was released from an involuntary psychiatric hold in Contra Costa County, Calif., he agreed to share a cab with a woman who’d also been released. When the taxi delivered them to the woman’s destination, Grosse asked the driver to help her with her luggage, then got behind the wheel and drove off. Police arrested Grosse the next day when they got a call from the Department of Motor Vehicles that he was trying to register the cab in his name. (Contra Costa Times) REASONABLE EXPLANATIONS - When police accused Michael Elias, 28, of half a dozen home burglaries in San Antonio, Texas, he explained he had to keep committing the burglaries so he could afford to pay his attorney $150 a week to keep him out of jail. (San Antonio’s KSAT-TV) Police who arrested William Liston, 33, in suburban Cleveland on suspicion of driving drunk said he explained, “Ozzy Osbourne and his music made me do it.” (Cleveland’s WJW-TV) ALL RUNWAYS LEAD TO RUSSIA - Earth’s magnetic north pole is moving toward Russia at the rate of nearly 40 miles a year. Scientists attribute the shift to magnetic changes in the planet’s core. One consequence of the shift was the closing of Florida’s Tampa International Airport for one week to renumber its main north-south runway to reflect its new magnetic alignment. (The Tampa Tribune) BOTTOM-LINE JUSTICE - Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour freed sisters Gladys and Jamie Scott, who had served 16 years of their life sentences for armed robbery, on the condition that Gladys, 36, donate a kidney to Jamie, 38, who requires dialysis. Barbour explained he decided to order their release so the state wouldn’t have to pay for Jamie Scott’s treatment. (Reuters) THE EYES HAVE IT - Prince Frederic Von Anhalt, 68, the husband of celebrity Zsa Zsa Gabor, glued an eye shut when he accidentally grabbed his wife’s nail glue instead of eye drops. “It was stupid,” Von Anhalt said after a doctor at an eye clinic in Beverly Hills, Calif., repaired the damage. Gabor, 93, suffered a similar eye injury years ago, according to her daughter, Francesca Hilton, when she mistakenly used “crazy glue” on her eyelashes. (CNN) PRICE OF DENIAL - A military jury at Fort Meade, Md., sentenced Lt. Col. Terrance Lakin to six months in military prison and dismissal from the Army after he disobeyed orders to deploy to Afghanistan because he doubts whether President Barack Obama was born in the United States and therefore questions his eligibility to be commander in chief. He said he would have gladly deployed if Obama’s original birth certificate were released and proved authentic. (Associated Press)

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ew surfaces are visible in Missoula City Attorney Jim Nugent’s downtown office. A bobble head doll of Mayor John Engen sits behind Nugent, not far from three rolls of duct tape; he uses the tape to reinforce everything from mountain bike accessories to the overstuffed pocket protector jutting out from the balding 62-year-old’s chest pocket. “It’s saved a lot of shirts over the years,” he says, shrugging. With a bit of a paunch, Nugent looks deceptively like a curmudgeon. He’s surrounded by law books tagged with a rainbow of sticky notes, and tall stacks of typewritten papers documenting every imaginable aspect of municipal minutia. The filing system extends from Nugent’s desk to the tops of nearby bookcases, filing cabinets and boxes along the floor. His wife of 39 years, Janice Nugent, wouldn’t approve of such a mess. “My wife’s going to kill me,” he says. Despite the clutter, Nugent knows exactly how to find what he needs. When just about any subject relating to Missoula’s municipal discourse comes up—whether it’s community growth plans, the city’s lawsuit against Mountain Water in the 1980s or architectural diagrams for the new parking structure downtown—he scratches his head and thinks for a moment before reaching down several inches and extracting the relevant document with magicianlike skill. In many ways, the rambling office reflects Nugent’s mind—an untidy, yet comprehensive, encyclopedia of Missoula’s legal, social and institutional history. When asked about, for instance, the rules governing how to replace Ward 2 Councilmember Roy Houseman, who resigned at the end of December, Nugent recites a stream of precedent before offering an extreme example. “Stan Healey made a motion to approve John Toole,” he says, recalling an unusual 1983 council vote, in which none of the people who applied for a vacant mayoral seat were selected. Since appointed city attorney in 1977, Nugent has advised and defended seven mayors and worked alongside 18 different City Council incarnations. He’s overseen the creation of roughly 1,500 of the city’s 3,449 ordinances governing everything from discriminating against gay people to urinating in public. In addition, he’s presented 21 cases to the Montana Supreme Court—suits that reached beyond Missoula law and had an impact on residents across the state. Nugent acknowledges he’s been busy, humbly calling each of his accomplishments “little building blocks” over the years. He speaks in reverential tones about “The City,” but skips past how he

Missoula Independent

In an office that appears to have a life of its own, City Attorney Jim Nugent is somehow organized. “I’ve gone in and asked him for something,” says former Missoula Mayor Mike Kadas. “He thinks for a minute, and then he goes to a pile. And three inches into the pile, he digs his hand in for a minute, and, ‘Ah, it ought to be right about here.”

helped to shape it—the overtime he logs nearly every week, and the vacation days he regularly forfeits or donates. He avoids publicity and deflects any individual praise to accomplishments chalked up by “the team.” The casual observer would have no idea that Nugent, despite not being a politician, has been

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intricately tied to Missoula policies for more than three decades. “There are different people that you meet, particularly in this business,” says Alec Hansen, executive director of the Montana League of Cities and Towns and Nugent’s long-time friend and colleague.

“There are the center-ring kind of guys that like the spotlight, and then there are the guys that do all of the work. He’s one of the guys that does the work. And people like that, generally, would just rather do their work than talk about it. Those are the guys that make things happen. I’m convinced of that.”


passed by the Missoula City Council, the new law forbade students who lived in other areas from parking around campus. As one might expect, UM students weren’t happy about the ordinance. The Associated Students of the University of Montana (ASUM) filed a lawsuit in 1992 to stop the creation of a residential parking district. The case landed in the Montana Supreme Court, where ASUM asserted the ordinance privatized public streets and created a special class of people. The students argued the law should be deemed unconstitutional. “(Missoula) cannot discriminate between residents and non-residents—especially where Montana’s public streets are involved,” read ASUM’s brief. “Nonresidents are treated as second class citizens.” The Montana Supreme Court sided with the city, and the decision reverberated throughout the state. Before long, homeowners around the Capitol in Helena wanted their own residential parking district. “The people here around the Capitol, they see what happened in Missoula and they wanted a similar thing,” Hansen says. “All of these things kind of work together.”

Sr., work as a representative for two terms in the Montana Legislature and on the Missoula City Council. James Nugent Sr. was a World War II pilot and a plumber by trade. Nugent’s mom, Theresa, waited tables before she married Jim Nugent Sr. She later stayed at home with the kids, keeping an eye on all five children while they played in the nearby park. Little McCormick Park actually catalyzed Jim Nugent Sr.’s involvement with city government. At the time, before construction of Interstate 90, Broadway was the Garden City’s primary east-west thoroughfare. Little McCormick Park, just a couple of blocks away, offered travelers a shady and cool spot. But Nugent Sr. didn’t like the fact that the park didn’t have any benches or picnic tables. He felt the city wasn’t being a good host, and it prompted him to lobby Missoula’s Board of Parks and Recreation to install tables. Then he did one better—rather than simply lobby, he filled the board’s vacant seat. In 1963, he moved up the local ranks and was elected to the Missoula City Council, serving there until 1969. Nugent remembers family dinner table conversations full of tales about city politics. Where and

streets and the roads, but even branching out into the urban renewal, the parks and the open space, and even the Currents facilities, and Splash! Montana. Those come from a community and a council, a majority of the council wanting to improve the quality of life. And I think local government, city government, can really assist in providing a better quality of life for the community.” Nugent found his budding social awareness bolstered by the Jesuit priests at Loyola High School in Missoula. His instructors drilled into him a strong sense of social justice that he hasn’t forgotten. “We’re all human beings,” he says. “There’s no basis for discriminating against anyone, whether they’re Native American, whether they’re African American, female, male. In those days, there wasn’t any focus on the gay-lesbian thing, but it would hold over today as well.” Nugent become the first member of his family to graduate from college, in 1971, with a bachelor’s degree in finance. His father died earlier that year at age 47.

Most mornings Nugent wakes up before dawn, runs with his golden retriever, Max, grabs breakfast and then puts on his cycling gear to ride to his Spruce Street office. The cycling gear is hard to miss: a full-body yellowish green rain suit with reflective strips, and a stars and stripes helmet adorned with Evel Knievel’s (factory printed) signature. He says the neighborhood kids call him the “Yellow Man.” He’s a bit like Missoula’s version of a municipal Easy Rider. “The helmet’s part of the mystique,” says Janice Nugent, who purchased the outfit for her husband two years ago. She wanted to find something durable and easy to spot, but also capable of protecting his business suit. “This iteration of the rain suit is my fault,” she says. “I have mixed feelings about it.” That said, Janice Nugent suspects the look is catching on. She’s noticed recently that Bruce Bender, the city’s chief administrative officer, has taken to wearing a yellow rain jacket that looks strikingly similar to her husband’s. “I think Jim kind of inspired Bruce Bender’s suit,” she says. Nugent is an unlikely trendsetter. His office vets nearly every agreement the city signs off on, many of which don’t make headlines: contracts initiating everything from sidewalk and road construction to the tennis lessons provided through Missoula’s Parks and Recreation Department. “I don’t think you realize how boring it can be,” Nugent says. “I’m more a drone.” Despite the monotony of a lot of the work, Nugent’s thoroughness has become legendary—so much that city staffers have coined a verb for it. A document scrutinized by the city attorney is thought of as “Nuginized,” or vetted. It’s considered an accomplishment if a municipal employee receives work back from Nugent unblemished by edits made in red ink. The value of Nugent’s obsessive attention to detail is clear when looking at state law. Montana code governing how cities operate runs more than 1,400 pages. Much of it is contradictory. Many statutes lack clarity or are open to interpretation. Municipal attorneys are allowed a certain amount of flexibility when shaping local laws. For instance, shortly after Nugent moved into the City Attorney’s Office, he was struck by the fact that people caught Janice and Jim Nugent met 40 years ago while attending classes at the University of Montana. “We really had an optimistic feeling for what we urinating in public were cited on public could do and how we could make the world better,” Janice Nugent says. “I think that’s part of who Jim is.” indecency charges. Though a misdemeanor, the stigma associated with a public indecenAround the same time, he started to spend an But it takes someone with Nugent’s vast knowl- how to build Missoula’s City Hall was a controversial cy citation impacted the offender’s long-term edge to help kick-start the process. issue at the time, and constituents often showed up increasing amount of time with Janice Driscoll. The employment and educational opportunities. “Jim is, a, familiar with all of [the precedent-set- at the family’s Westside home to bend his father’s two met at a retreat hosted by Christ the King “You weren’t able to be a teacher. You weren’t ting lawsuits] and b, has been involved with many of ear. Nugent soaked up his father’s progressive ideas Church, and Janice recalls Jim had a full head of hair able to get a federal government job,” Nugent says. them. That definitely gives him a leg up,” says former about what government should be, and those ideals then, as well as bushy sideburns. He was also quick “It just wasn’t appropriate.” to crack a joke. Missoula Mayor Mike Kadas. “I don’t think there’s a linger today. Nugent didn’t think the punishment fit the better city attorney in the state.” “He wasn’t one bit shy,” she recalls. “Governments are, in my opinion, intended to crime and, after brainstorming with then Police On Valentine’s Day in 1971, Nugent presented assist and further the interests of the people, generChief Sabe Psau, helped craft what became the first Janice with a giant cutout cardboard heart, painted red ally,” Nugent says. “Now you don’t please every sinpublic urination ordinance in the state. with white and blue lettering: “Will you be my wife?” Nugent grew up across from Missoula’s Little gle person, obviously. But as a community, as a conAnother precedent-setting, Nugent-shaped ordiShe said yes. nance came at the request of University District McCormick Park in a white, two-story house with a wrap- sensus, or, as a majority, you tend to. And your govJanice Nugent, now a speech therapist completernments can be a very valuable tool in not only proaround porch on the corner of Alder and May. He learned homeowners in the mid-’80s. Authored by Nugent ing a doctorate in special education, has always viding protection like the police and fire or the about the law early on, watching his father, James Nugent and Missoula Parking Commission staffers, and

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acted as her husband’s sounding board. Today, when he comes home late from Monday night City Council meetings, he likes to talk about the evening’s events. She watches the meeting on television so she can keep up with what’s going on. The routine has been basically the same ever since the couple met, with a few exceptions. In the ’70s, when the couple lived in a perennially chilly apartment on the corner of Rawlins and Addison, and Jim was attending law school, they’d often talk local politics. There was no public access television at the time, but there was a set of beaded curtains in the doorway—a mark of the era, Janice says, as was the couple’s idealism. “We really had an optimistic feeling for what we could do and how we could make the world better,” Janice Nugent says. “I think that’s part of who Jim is.”

Within weeks of graduating from UM’s Law School in 1975, a fresh-faced but already balding Nugent was hired as a prosecutor for Missoula’s Municipal Court. His tenure there didn’t last long. In 1977, Mayor William “Bill” Cregg hired the 29-yearold Nugent as city attorney. Of particular concern for Cregg when Nugent assumed his position was the fact that large swatches of densely populated land surrounding the city’s urban core remained un-annexed. Residents of those neighborhoods didn’t pay city taxes, but they used the city’s services. “Mayor Cregg used to call them ‘The Freeloaders,’” Nugent says. Nugent was tasked with creating new legal mechanisms to expand city boundaries and, therefore, its tax base. However, state law at the time made it difficult for cities to annex land. Those challenges prompted Nugent, along with Alec Hansen and the Montana League of Cities and Towns, to push for streamlining annexation laws in the courts and at the legislature. By 1989, the efforts had begun to pan out. That was fortunate timing for Dan Kemmis—a leader who, like Cregg, liked to push the envelope. By the time Kemmis was elected mayor in 1990, Nugent, along with previous Missoula administrators and the League of Cities and Towns, had already begun paving the way for expansion. “Because of the very restrictive nature of Montana annexation law, it was a great challenge to bring in those neighborhoods that clearly were part of the city,” Kemmis says. “They only existed because the city was here, but they lay right next to the city and were not part of it. So, eventually, we began to break through those barriers in the late 1980s and early 1990s. And Jim was absolutely instrumental in that work.” After three Montana Supreme Court cases— Missoula’s Rural Fire District wasn’t exactly happy about losing pieces of its tax base—Missoula’s boundaries grew. The city annexed land between Russell and Reserve streets stretching from Brooks Street to the Clark Fork River. The Wapakia and Bellevue areas were incorporated, as were pieces of the Rattlesnake Valley. New Missoula residents paid taxes, bringing in revenue that helped the city invest in community amenities like water parks, open space and the Riverfront Trail System. Caras Park was built. Bus service expanded. “My approach was always, we need to get as many of us working together as we can,” Kemmis says. “We need to make the city a real city. And I think, in effect, that’s what we did.”

Missoula Independent

Nugent loves seeing Missoula residents enjoy the products of the work he undertook with his colleagues. When he spots people listening to music at Caras Park and exploring open space, the attorney is reminded of why he has dedicated his entire professional life to Missoula. “People are excited,” he says. “You can hear them sometimes having a good time. I think that’s one of the cool things, hearing people having a good time, whether it’s down at Caras Park, or whether it’s over at Splash! Montana, or whether it’s over at the fairgrounds. Those are important to the community’s mental health as well as their physical health.” Nugent, like his progressive father, enjoys being a member of the team responsible for not simply maintaining but actually improving Missoula’s quality of life. “That’s kind of what makes it fun to be in government—public service,” he says. “You have to be somewhat progressive moving forward in society.”

the city approved the Terzo’s adjustment, to ask Nugent to further scrutinize the practice. Ballas says Nugent disregarded his requests. “I got frustrated because there was nobody at the city that would give any contradictory opinions,” Ballas says. “Nugent wouldn’t even go to the attorney general to ask for an attorney general’s opinion, because he didn’t want anybody reviewing his decision, in my opinion.” The Ballases filed a lawsuit. Six years and roughly $40,000 in legal fees later, they won. By the time Missoula’s Fourth Judicial Court handed down its opinion, the city had already changed its boundaryline protocol. Despite the fact that the city was forced to pay his legal costs, Ballas says a primary problem that stemmed from his lawsuit remains: Nugent doesn’t deviate from the administration’s policy, even if it’s legally questionable. “Jim Nugent as city attorney does not represent

Nugent wasn’t allowing locals to have their say. The Erickson-Nugent dust-up started after the Missoula City Council approved last year a civil rights ordinance that now makes it illegal to discriminate against people based on sexual orientation or gender expression. The law passed by a 10–2 vote. Erickson contends the City Council and American Civil Liberties Union snuck the ordinance past voters, despite opposition. “The people didn’t choose it, believe me,” Erickson says. “I think if it went to a vote of the people it would have been thrown out.” After the council vote, Erickson and ally Tei Nash attempted multiple times to initiate a voter referendum that would put the new law to a citywide vote. However, each time NMB and another incarnation of the group, Right to Vote Missoula, filed a petition to initiate a referendum, Nugent found flaws in the request. Erickson says the city attorney intentionally shot

Kids in Nugent’s Lewis and Clark Neighborhood call Missoula’s city attorney the “Yellow Man” because of his flashy commuter outfit. “This iteration of the rain suit is my fault,” says his wife Janice Nugent. “I have mixed feelings about it.”

The nature of Nugent’s job means he makes enemies. Making law can be contentious, emotional and downright unpleasant work. Former Missoula City Councilman Jerry Ballas attests to that. Ballas, who represented Ward 4 between 2000 and 2007, disagreed with Nugent in a high-profile legal battle. In 2003, Ballas and his wife grew alarmed watching their South Avenue neighbors, Jake and Beth Terzo, ask the city for permission to adjust property boundaries on their two-lot parcel. The Terzos wanted to build a second home. Without the boundary line adjustment, however, the second house would not comply with zoning requirements. City officials had been signing off on boundaryline adjustments for years. But Ballas, who’s an architect, suspected the practice violated state law. He says that belief prompted him, before and after

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the citizens of Missoula, and he does not even represent the council,” Ballas says. “He works for the mayor and the city administration. His basic determinations and his law decisions are formulated to protect the city and the administrators.” Despite the fact that Nugent is called upon to serve multiple masters—the mayor, council and the public—Ballas asserts the average person with a legal gripe against the city is simply out of luck. “The only way citizens—whether they’re on the City Council or they’re just ordinary citizens—the only way they have of challenging City Hall is to file a lawsuit,” he says. “Because there’s nobody looking out for their interest or their positions.” Ballas isn’t the only one who accuses Nugent of ignoring certain constituents. Dallas Erickson, cofounder of the group Not My Bathroom (NMB), shared a fair amount of legal correspondence with the city attorney last year, much of it a similar theme:

down the petitions, effectively stifling citizens’ voices. “He intended to stop that petition no matter what,” Erickson says. “And he did.” Missoula’s Fourth Judicial Court ruled in June in favor of the city. Judge Douglas Harkin found that Right to Vote and NMB never complied with legal requirements necessary to put the issue up for vote. Erickson is now working through the Montana Legislature to overturn the ordinance. As for Ballas, he says winning the lawsuit against the city brought little satisfaction. It’s clear from his perspective that the administration needs to make some changes. Specifically, Ballas thinks if Nugent had to face the voters every couple of years, rather than being appointed by the mayor, he would be more responsive to the little guy. “If he faced election once in a while, he would at least feel like there was some obligation,” Ballas says.


Nugent may shun the spotlight, but he’s not bashful about one thing: He likes to win lawsuits. Nugent actually chuckles discussing some of the debate that took place during the contentious antidiscrimination discussion. One woman who testified during the April public hearing first addressed council, then turned her attention to pastor Harris Himes of Big Sky Christian Center in Hamilton. Himes has a history of imprinting his values through the legislative process in communities across the state, and he opposed the ordinance. The woman, apparently, recognized Himes and perceived his Missoula appearance as a challenge. “That was one of the most humorous moments I think I’ve ever seen at a public hearing,” Nugent says. “She was testifying that she doesn’t know what all this stuff about the bathrooms is, because she can’t imagine men wanting to stand in those long lines at the women’s bathrooms. And then, suddenly, she turned on Mr. Himes and says, ‘You’re the one from Darby that was involved in the creationism. We beat you there. And we’re going to beat you here.’” In an unusually boastful disclosure, Nugent admits he’s proud of fending off challenges to Missoula’s anti-discrimination ordinance. Perhaps it’s a lingering remnant of lessons instilled by his Jesuit teachers decades before. “Everyone deserves to be treated equally— everyone. Period,” he says. “Some of that stuck, I guess.”

The case with NMB was cut and dry for Nugent. The group never complied with the law when submitting petitions for referendum. But his job isn’t always so simple, especially when there are rifts on the council, as when Ballas filed his lawsuit. It’s an example of how his mandate to serve multiple masters sometimes puts him in a tough spot. “There’s some inherent conflicts between them,” he says. When friction arises among members of Missoula’s governing body, as is frequently the case, Nugent says he focuses on interpreting law for the majority and steering clear of political posturing. “You just have to realize it’s all part of the political fishbowl you’re in,” he says. “You just can’t let it affect your judgment.” In fact, he says that’s the benefit of having his position be by appointment rather than election. Elected representatives are too vulnerable to political pressure. “I think that’s potentially one of the drawbacks, or flaws, with respect to some of those elected positions,” Nugent says. “I don’t think the legal decision of the community should be subject to political pressures.” Current Missoula Mayor John Engen has worked with Nugent for more than nine years—five as mayor and four as a councilman—and respects Nugent’s perspective on tough political issues. He says one of the most touching professional moments of his time at City Hall was triggered by an e-mail from the city attorney.

“Jim said something to the effect of, ‘I believe you have the potential to be a very good mayor.’” Engen recalls. “It’s Jim’s way of saying, ‘Giddy up, welcome to the team.” It can be tough not to take heated discussions and debates about lawmaking personally, Engen says. But Nugent’s ability to work alongside people with drastically different political affiliations, personality types and philosophical perspectives, while still keeping his own character and principles intact, serves as a model for others in local government. “He’s a constant, and there’s a lot to be said for that,” Engen says. Nugent plans to remain a constant. He has no intention of retir- “The old thing about James Brown being the hardest working ing any time soon. He isn’t ready to man in show business,” says Executive Director of Montana leave, largely because as Nugent League of Cities and Towns Alec Hansen, “Jim Nugent is the helps shape Missoula’s govern- hardest working man in municipal government.” ment, the institution shapes him. tain things that we thought it was important to After more than three decades, the two are deeply accomplish, like making the shape of the city correintertwined. spond to what the city really is. While some of us Former Mayor Dan Kemmis says Missoula is for- have worked hard to do that during our tenure, tunate to have him. nobody has been there as long as Jim. And, there“Whereas mayors have come and gone, and city fore, nobody has had as consistent an influence in councils have come and gone, Jim has been there for shaping the city as Jim has had.” the long haul,” Kemmis says. “And so, some of us, myself included, have come into office, have had cerjmayrer@missoulanews.com

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dish

the

An ode to frozen, tough meat FLASHINTHEPAN July is the best time to kill a grass-fed beef cow, if you ask me. The animal has been fattened on months of neon-green spring forage. Such a cow won’t be as big in July as it would have been in October, but spring grass-finished meat has a cleaner, sweeter taste and is dripping with yummy fat. March, on the other hand, is probably the worst time to slaughter a grass-fed beef cow. At the end of a long winter spent chewing nothing but hay, the animal’s fat content, body weight and spirits are down. The meat is no longer what it was last July, or what it will be again next July. This seasonal variation makes life hard for ranchers attempting to make a living off grass-fed beef, because most Americans are stuck in the habit of buying fresh meat rather than frozen. In order to supply that fresh meat year-round, animals must be slaughtered year-round. In winter, this gives feedlot operations a serious advantage over grass-fed operations, because the feedlots can keep the animals big and fat by controlling diet. The grass-fed cattle, meanwhile, start to waste away in winter. It sounds unpleasant, but it’s natural, and the lifestyle lived by grass-fed cattle is responsible for its superior nutritional profile. If buying frozen meat were more widely accepted, ranchers could run their operations more efficiently and more comfortably. Rather than try to squeeze a steer through a second winter in order to slaughter it for the fresh market in March, the same animal could have been slaughtered and frozen the previous July. That would have resulted in tastier, healthier flesh from an animal that required eight fewer months of tending. This is an example of a better product that’s cheaper and easier to produce. Keeping meat fresh is more labor and energy intensive, and presents more opportunities for errors that could compromise food safety or quality. Nonetheless, consumers readily pay more for fresh meat against their own best interests. Grass-fed beef is an entirely different animal than grain-fed, in terms of nutritional value of the

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Missoula Independent

by ARI LeVAUX

toward frozen meat. But if meat is packaged correctly there will be no loss of quality. Most American butchers will grind about half the animal into burger unless you request otherwise. I prefer to grind very little, because I’m a fan of the tough chunks as they are, with gristle, cartilage, and other connective tissues embedded in the meat. These pieces have the most flavor, if you know how to cook them. I like to put a two-pound hunk of shank, flank, neck, or some other tough piece in a cast iron pan under the broiler, turning it often until it develops a nice brown crust. I often do this with a packet of frozen-solid meat, run under hot water just long enough to unstick it from the bag. After browning the meat all around, I fill the space around it with a 50/50 mix of water and red wine, 5 to 10 bay leaves, a few whole peeled garlic cloves, and some salt and pepper. I braise it, with a lid on, for about four hours at 300, adding water and wine as necessary to keep the meat half-covered. Four hours sounds like an awfully long time to wait, certainly longer than for a hamburger, but the prep Photo by Ari LeVaux time is probably less. Most of those But frozen meat is usually cheaper, and buying four hours roll by effortlessly, interrupted only by the in bulk can drop the price even more. Paying hun- occasional fluid replenishment and sample taking. The soft, moist, creamy meat that emerges from dreds in a single purchase takes a little getting used to, but in the long run getting into the bulk, frozen the oven is a mere starting point for many other dishmeat rhythm is a smart financial decision that will es, but it can also be a finished product. Once it’s pay dividends for years after the freezer is paid for. If fully soft I like to cook it with green chile and garlic. you play your cards right you can end up eating Osso bucco is made in similar fashion. You can go the traditional stew route with the above recipe by, amazing meat for a reasonable price. Researching a bulk purchase can be fun, be it at in the final hour of the braise, adding veggies like your local farmers’ market, at a store with connec- carrots, onions and celery. Anyone can thaw and cook a steak. But only tions to local ranchers, or online. Buy samples of meat from various vendors, decide which you like, when you can cook a foreshank until the connective compare prices, and negotiate a bulk order for the tissue melts into non-fat butter will you be ready to meat you like best. Make sure the price includes cut- make the switch from fresh to frozen. At that point ting and wrapping, and make sure it’s done right. you’ll be able to handle anything your freezer has to Many horror stories of poorly wrapped, freezer- offer. And as you eat well, you can feel happy that burned meat have been told, and such examples you’ve helped improve the quality of life of some might be partly responsible for American skepticism good rancher near you. meat, environmental footprint and the animal’s quality of life. Consumers want to eat grass-fed beef, and ranchers want to raise it. But until American shopping habits change, and consumers are ready to accept frozen meat, grass-fed beef will probably remain a niche market. A change in American shopping habits would have to parallel changes at home. Most families don’t have big chest freezers, and aren’t used to transferring hunks of frozen meat to the fridge, earmarked for tomorrow’s supper.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

Incredibly delicious, surprisingly reasonable. Share the love. And remember, we are warm, cozy and open every day. Xoxo Bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 If you have not tried one of Bernice’s special Valentine treats you are missing out! From February 4th until February 14th Bernice’s will be featuring the sweetest line of lovable goodies: conversation heart cookies, linzer cookies, heart shaped cakes for two, truffles, profiteroles, cupcakes, passion bars, chocolate dipped hearts.

Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and

Page 18 February 3–February 10, 2011

culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Winter Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Seven Days a Week. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $


the Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 The annual exam your dentist performs should include a screening exam for oral cancer. People who use tobacco and drink alcoholic beverages are more likely to get oral cancer. The screening exam for oral cancer is an important part of a regular dental exam. The survival rate of patients with oral cancer is not good. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Delivery hours: M-F 11-2. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Jazz Wednesdays starting at 7pm. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5 - close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Chilly weather is here. Stop in, warm up, & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

dish

HAPPIESTHOUR Packers fans to huddle up at The Despo The place to be: Desperado Sports Tavern—often called “The Despo”—is Missoula’s de facto Green Bay Packers bar, and come Sunday the Garden City’s most devout cheeseheads will belly-up before the bar’s 32 HDTVs to watch their beloved Pack take on the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XLV. What to expect: If the Packers win, absolute pandemonium. If they lose, despair on par with the beginning of prohibition in 1920. Either way, expect lots of beer and chicken wings—the best in town. You may also see long blonde wigs in honor of stud linebacker Clay Matthews, and green-clad men appearing to fasten invisible championship belts around their beer bellies a la quarterback Aaron Rodgers after a touchdown. Why The Despo: Ask Packers fans. Owner Brian Cote never intended for Desperado to be a Packers bar. He says “immigrants from Lambeau” simply took the place over. We’ll see if the Packers dynamic offense can similarly impose its will on the menacing Steelers defense.

Missoula Independent

Photo by Matthew Frank

What about Steelers fans? Anecdotal evidence suggests there are many fewer “Stillers” fans than Packers fans in Missoula. In any case, many will surely watch the Super Bowl at Paradise Falls sports bar on Brooks Street. How to find The Despo: Point your feet, bike or cab driver toward 3101 S. Russell Street, near the YMCA. —Matthew Frank Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Page 19 February 3–February 10, 2011


Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

Februar y

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Peru Dark Roast Shade Grown $10.50/Lb.

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring international & Irish pub fare as well as locally produced specials. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS. $-$$

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic

wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun Wed 8-3pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Burger Shack 205 Main St., Stevensville 777-2370 Come take a bite out of our 1/2 pound big & beefy burgers. The only burger joint in Missoula and the Bitterroot serving 100% Certified Angus Beef, hand pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over a dozen mouth watering specialty burgers to choose from, like the Inside Out, stuffed with creamy gorgonzola cheese and fresh chopped bacon. Or the Philly Cheesesteak made with 100% Certified Angus top sirloin - touted to be the best outside of Philly! It's not just a burger, it's a destination. The Burger Shack is open Monday - Saturday, 11:00am to 8:00pm. Also serving beer & wine. Orders to go 7772370. $-$$ Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton • 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

First Friday Artwalk Featuring Local Artists' Valentine's Collections When we say Not just Sushi! we mean it.

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com Missoula Independent

Page 20 February 3–February 10, 2011


8

Arts & Entertainment listings February 3 – February 10, 2011

days a week

THURSDAY February

03

The YWCA Missoula presents its annual meeting, which features a keynote speech from Luana Ross, president of the Salish Kootenai College, starting with registration at 8:30 AM, followed by the meeting at 9 AM, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. RSVP with Julie by Feb. 3 by calling 543-6691. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Seek out some future adventure during a Peace Corps Information Session, which features a presentation by local representative Tenly Snow and begins at 4 PM in Room 327 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288.

nightlife Missoula families can explore a school that offers children in preschool through the fifth grade a place-based education that values nature, community and academic excellence when Clark Fork School, 2525 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts an open house from 6–7:30 PM. Free. Visit clarkforkschool.org for details or call Sam or Karin at 728-3395. Howl at the indigo moon when Black Mountain Moan plays blues and roots music during the Top Hat’s “Artists-InResidence” family-friendly concert series every Thu. this month from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Families First Parent Educators present the “Adapting Guidance Series,” a program for parents on guidance and discipline strategies that begins at 6:30 PM at Paxson School, 101 Evans Ave. Free. Call 721-7690 or visit familiesfirstmontana.org. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this

Hold on to your hairpiece when New York City’s Sister Monk plays a mix of folk, funk, world beat and pop at the Top Hat Wed., Feb. 9, at 10 PM. $3.

and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Slip into a movie that explores America’s suburban way of life in light of global demand for fossil fuels when the Peace and Justice Film Series presents a screening of The End of Suburbia, starting at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free, with a discussion after the film. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Get awed with stories from a pedaling master when adventure cyclist Willie Weir presents “Any Port in a Storm—Cycling and Wild Camping Through Portugal,” a talk on Weir’s recent travels to the country that begins at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall. Free. (See Mountain High in this issue.) Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night for the layperson, begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes $7 pitchers of Bayern beer,

prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Theater in this issue.) end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 4, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Public Information / Open House Former Blue Mountain Training Area Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study

The Montana Army National Guard has scheduled a public information / open house on

February 10, 2011; 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm at the Missoula Public Library, 301 East Main, Missoula, MT. The open house will include a presentation on the project, review of the draft work plan, schedule for upcoming field work and an opportunity to talk with National Guard and U.S. Forest Service representatives about the project.

For additional information, please contact Dr. Clif Youmans, MTARNG UXO Program Manager, (406) 324-3088 or Ms. Sundi West, Deputy UXO Program Manager, (406) 324-3085.

Fussy nesters appreciate our 100% natural handmade futons. H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Missoula Independent

Page 21 February 3–February 10, 2011


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Bob Wire wants you to leave the body butter where you found it when the honky tonk blogger plays at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Women give a thumbs up to spirits during Ladies’ Night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which features half-off drinks for women and occurs this and every Thu. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. Stop licking that fly swatter and get aurally intoxicated with some rock, Americana and folk rock when Chalfonts, The Box Cutters and Sockeye Sawtooth play the Palace at 9 PM. $3. Beam yourself toward aural ecstasy when The Northern Lights play at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the

Appointments available evenings and Friday and Saturday afternoons every week.

406-552-2968 gardencitypm@gmail.com • www.gardencitypm.com

Saturday, February 12 • 1-7 PM Missoula Mercantile Building 110 North Higgins (Formerly known as Macy’s)

• 30 Winter Beers on Tap Wine Bar, live music & food Must be 21 or older to enter

$10 admission includes glass and 2 tokens For more information call 543.4238

SPONSORED BY:

Missoula Independent

FRIDAY

04

February

Help support programs for women and children in crisis when you shop for shoes, clothing, accessories (excluding jewelry) and books at YWCA’s Secret Seconds thrift stores, which offers 50 percent off those goods today through Sun. Free. The stores are located on 920 Kensington Ave., 1136 Broadway St., and 1221 Helen St. and are open from 10 AM–6 PM Friday and Saturday, and noon–5 PM on Sunday, with the exception of the Helen St. store, which is closed Sunday. Visit ywcaofmissoula.org. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, Blood Diamonds by Greg Campbell. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. Do your part to help run an important cultural festival by becoming a volunteer for the 2011 Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, which occurs Feb. 11–20 at the Wilma

SPOTLIGHT hardened hats

Shake those winter blues...

Octagon Capital Partners, Regent Realty, Territorial Landworks, Kettlehouse Brewing MDA, and Culligan Water

Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations and a bit of karaoke during ladies’ night and live karaoke with Party Trained at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Thu. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing freely when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. Witness a man who really likes to get his squeeze on when Seattle’s Jason Webley performs indie folk with elements of rock, folk punk and gypsy music—using the accordion, guitar and other instruments—at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy Music and online at seafarerentertainment.com. Javier Ryan opens.

To reinvent the popular 1985 lyric from rockers Starship: We built this city not on rock ‘n’ roll, but on blue collar work at mills. If you didn’t grow up here, let me explain. Back in the day, Missoula was a bona fide manufacturing town. Mills and log yards dotted the local and regional landscape. At their height, these factories served as the lifeblood to our local economy. But due to a variety of factors, many of these places went down the tubes, and hundreds of people lost their jobs in the process. The most recent hit came in 2009 when Smurfit-Stone Container’s pulp mill in Frenchtown shuttered, putting 417 people out of work. It was another nail in Missoula’s manufacturing coffin, so to speak. Frenchtown photographer Kathy Eyster documents the mill’s closure in the exhibit Last Shift: Saying Goodbye to Smurfit Stone, which opens this week. It consists of color photos of hardhats and work tools that workers left on a fence at the mill after their last shift. These items surround a banner that thanks the company for its years of community support. The handful of images I’ve seen, like the one pictured, are stark and poignant. They also speak to the sheer impact the closure has had on longtime workers. One

WHAT: Last Shift: Saying Goodbye to Smurfit Stone photo exhibit WHO: Kathy Eyster WHEN: Fri., Feb. 4, from 5–8 PM WHERE: Rocky Mountain School of Photography Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave. HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: Vist rmsp.com or call 543-0171

missouladowntown.com

Page 22 February 3–February 10, 2011

photo in particular stands out. It’s a close-up shot of some of the hats: One features the words “30+ years” scrawled in marker, while another has “20 years” written on it. Eyster, an outdoors photographer and longtime teacher at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, decided to tackle the subject as a memorial to those who worked for years at the mill. It’s an admirable tribute that, in my view, strikes an emotional chord. —Ira Sather-Olson


Theatre. Visit bigskyfilmfest.org/bsdff/ festival/volunteers for a list of volunteer positions, and more info. E-mail volunteer@bigskyfilmfest.org with questions. High schoolers go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Young Adult Writers Group, which meets at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 4–7 PM at the winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Peep some sweet old school works of art and hear some local tunes from soul slap guitarist Dan Dubuque when the Montana Museum of Art and Culture presents a First Friday opening reception for the exhibits Renoir, Magritte, Gauguin and other European Masterpieces from a Private Collection, and Three Centuries of European Prints from the M MAC Permanent Collection, from 4–6 PM in UM’s PARTV Center. Free, with refreshments. Call 243-2019. Flash your eyes over photos by Tyler D. Nielsen when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts a First Friday opening reception for his work from 4:30–6 PM. Free. Call 541-7240.

nightlife Inject some sunshine into your gray day during Interlude, a First Friday exhibit at the Badlander starting at 5 PM that features photo and video pieces by Cassandra James and Jessica Mostad, a poetry reading by Emma Andrus at 5:30, as well as music sets by Tyler Knapp, Sam Brown and Pony Cannon. Free. Immerse yourself in photos that document the closing of the SmurfitStone pulp mill in Frenchtown when the Rocky Mountain School of Photography’s Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave., presents Last Shift: Saying Farewell to SmurfitStone, a collection of photos by Kathy Eyster featured during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 543-0171. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Go ahead and do it again but don’t ask others for help when you check out the Top Hat’s First Friday DIY Bazaar featuring items from a number of local artists, plus on-site screen printing with the Wrongside Printshop Team, starting at 5 PM. Free. Feel the love when the Missoula AIDS Council presents a First Friday opening reception featuring love letters written throughout the ages, along with images of local lovers, starting at 5 PM at the council, 500 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. Visit missoulaaidscouncil.org. Beam yourself over to the Monte Dolack Gallery, 139 W. Front St., to check out a First Friday opening

reception from 5–8 PM featuring a new limited edition print by Dolack titled Flathead Moon. Free. Peep sleek new works, paintings and encaustic prints from a seasoned local artist when Gretel Stoudt presents her work during a First Friday opening reception at the Artsiehorse Studio & Gallery, 137 E. Main St., from 5–8 PM. Free. Put on your party socks when The Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway, celebrates its one year anniversary with a First Friday opening featuring photos and paintings by Mandy Moonbird, from 5–8 PM. Free. Visit centralbarandgrill.com. Get in touch with that lovin’ feeling when Begleiter Photography, 223 W. Front St., hosts a First Friday showing of vintage pin-up photographs of Missoula sweeties starting at 5 PM. Free. Pour some oil into your eager aesthetic engine when Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St., presents oil paintings by Marvie Redmond with a First Friday opening reception from 5–9 PM. Free. Call 541-7100. Dive into a watercolor world when Murphy-Jubb Fine Art, 210 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 300, presents new watercolors by Kendahl Jan Jubb, along with music by Stan Anglen and Friends, during a First Friday opening reception that begins at 5 PM. Free. Bask in the artistic glow of works by Rudy Autio, Edgar Paxson, Jay Rummell, Lee Nye and others, and perhaps bid on a piece to take home, when The Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., presents its “Collectors Resale Show” during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. The show features a silent auction that runs today through Sun., Feb. 6. Call 721-3154. Hang with some tainted saints and absorb their freakishly engrossing art when The Tainted Saints—aka Zombie Tools creators Maxon Zorro McCarter and Wesley Worthen Saint John—present their work during a First Friday opening reception at New West, 415 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 5 PM. Free.

Artistic excitement bubbles over when Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave., presents its fifth collaborative erotic art show, which features pieces made in collaboration between lovers, and is featured during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Leave the scrubs at home when the Institute of Medicine and Humanities at St. Patrick Hospital, 500 W. Broadway St., presents a First Friday reception featuring live music and refreshments, from 5–8 PM in the foyer of its Broadway Building. Free. Bathe your senses with jewelry, sculpture, fabric arts, mixed media work and photography when Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder # 117, presents the First Friday show “Artists of the Light,” which features work by Bev Beck Gluecker t, Hanna Hannan, Andy Smetanka, Karl Stein and others, with a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 549-5329 and visit livingartofmontana.org. Purr with your buddies during “Nine Lives. Mobiles and Monoprints,” a feline-inspired exhibit by local artists Melissa Clark and David Lusk featuring hand sewn felt cats hanging from the ceiling, and cat monoprints on the walls, during a First Friday opening from 5–8 PM at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. Free, with wine and cookies. A portion of proceeds from art sold will go to AniMeals. Art and fashion meet and greet when The Green Light Apparel & Home Decor, 301 N. Higgins Ave., presents a First Friday opening featuring the launch of Green Light’s first clothing line “Green Light Sustainable Apparel,” plus work by artists from Off The Rack 2010, starting at 5 PM. Free. Call 541-0080. Tug your heart over to Frankie’s Mercantile, 223 W. Front St., so you can witness Beeting Hearts, a collection of prints by Trumbly Design featured during a First Friday opening reception starting at 5 PM. Free.

Do You Own Property in Montana? Business owners must complete and return a business equipment reporting form by February 15. If you haven’t reported business equipment in the past or you haven’t received a reporting form in the mail, please contact your local Department of Revenue office. Non-profit, religious or charitable organizations may qualify for a property tax exemption. Applications must be filed annually by March 1 to be considered for the current tax year (those who have received an exemption since 1981 only need to reapply if the property or its use has changed.) Disabled veterans (or surviving spouses) may claim an exemption or reduction of property taxes if the disability is rated at 100%. Applications must be filed annually by April 15 to be considered for the current tax year. Residential property owners may be eligible for reduced property taxes if you meet household income criteria. Applications must be filed annually by April 15 to be considered for the current tax year. For more information please contact your local Department of Revenue office, visit revenue.mt.gov, or call toll free (866) 859-2254 (in Helena 444-6900).

Missoula Independent

Page 23 February 3–February 10, 2011


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Missoula Independent

Page 24 February 3–February 10, 2011

Peruse the works of Missoula’s youngest crop of artists when the Families First Children’s Museum, 225 W. Front St., presents a First Friday opening featuring works by students of Garden City Montessori, from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 541-PLAY. Scope out some strangely attractive and absorbing assemblage art based on the idea of angels when artist Michael deMeng presents the exhibit Strange Angels, a collection of his work featured during a First Friday opening reception at The Brink Gallery, 111 W. Front St., from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 728-5251. Take an aesthetic bite out of some densely layered paintings when artist Marlo Crocifisso presents With My Heart In Your Teeth…, a collection of her work presented during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at The Framing Studio, 411 E. Alder St. Free. Put an art bandage on your wounds when The Artists’ Shop, 304 N. Higgins Ave., presents Rock, Tree, Sky, an exhibit of mixed media work by artist Ria Cody de Neeve that explores personal journeys of healing and transformation, featured during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Freak the winter funk out of your system by checking out illustrations that feature flowers and monsters—created using ink and colored pencil on wooden panels— when local artist Stella Latwinski presents the exhibit Dreams of Spring, during a First Friday opening reception starting at 5 PM at Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W. Free. Peep an array of upcycled and recycled clothing when Redress Clothing, 223 Railroad St. in the Brunswick Building, presents a First Friday open studio reception from 5–8 PM. The shop also plans to give away a pair of handmade wool fingerless gloves during the opening. Free. Check out some photography that represents an affinity for rural abandonment and landscapes when photographer Brian Herbel presents his work during a First

Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at Yellowstone Photo, 321 N. Higgins Ave. Free, with drinks and snacks. Keep your aesthetic buzz going when you check out art by the Killdeer Artisans Guild, which features paintings, photos and other works of art by Jerry McGahan, Joan Mason, Joe Weydt, Marti de Alva and others, with a First Friday reception from 5–8 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. Free. Bring another green pen and an ecologically open mind when author and UM Davidson Honors College dean James McKusick signs copies of his book Green Writing: Romanticism and Ecology, from 5:30–7:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Pore over wicked looking functional art created by over 30 Montana artists when The Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A., presents “The Teapot Show,” a collection of teapots, and teapot-themed drawings, by artists like Nancy Erickson, Hal Mathew, Janet Whaley, Shalene Vlanezuela and others, with a First Friday opening reception from 5:30–9 PM. Free. Call 543-0509 and visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org. Cure your allergies with an art show featuring a flower theme when Stevensville’s River’s Mist Gallery of Fine Art, 317 Main St., presents a “Flower Show” with work by Deborah Goslin, Kiana Fecteau, Carol Hoffnagle, Bobbie McKibbin and others, with a First Friday opening reception from 6–9 PM. Free. Call 777-0520. Go toward the oily light when The Frame Shop & Gallery, 325 Main St. in Hamilton, presents a First Friday opening reception for work by oil painter Katrina Ruhmland, from 6–8 PM. Free. Call 363-6684. Sway your hips and shake your gams to an indie rock band with a British flavor when Ello plays the To p H a t ’ s “ F a m i l y F r i e n d l y Friday” concert from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages.


Don’t feel inadequate when Superadequate plays alternative rock at Stevensville’s North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 777-5061. Sink your fangs into a night of indie folk when Wolf Redboy plays a solo set at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave., from 6–8 PM. Free. Mix roots music with your wine when Bruce Threlkeld plays the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-8703. Wander into an exhibit that explores the role of affectation in visual art and popular culture using digital video, sound, sculpture and installation when FrontierSpace, located next to New West in the alley between Pine and Spruce streets, presents JMH Is My Spirit Guide, an exhibition of work by Benjamin Love featured during a First Friday opening reception from 6–9 PM. Free. Enter from the Pine St. side. (See Scope in this issue.) The harsh realities of global capitalism and union action on climate change rendezvous on the screen during the first night of the sixth annual Missoula Labor Film Festival, which starts at 6:30 PM with a screening of The Red Tail, followed at 8:45 PM with a screening of Time To Tackle Climate Change, all at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $9 both nights/$5 one night. Visit missoula-labor.info. Party it up for winter during Whitefish’s annual Whitefish Winter Carnival Ball, which begins with cocktails and a silent auction at 6:30 PM, followed by dinner and music at 7:30 PM, all at Grouse Mountain Lodge, 2 Fairway Drive in Whitefish. $45. Get tickets at the Whitefish Chamber of Commerce and call 862-3501. Visit whitefishwintercarnival.com to download a complete schedule of events for the weekend. Swing high when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts “First Friday Swing Dance with Brad Dickson,” which begins with instruction with Dickson from 6:30–7:30 PM, and is followed by an open DJ’d dance from 7:30–10:30. $8 for the entire evening/$5 for the open dance only. Call 541-7240. St. Patrick Hospital’s Conference Center, 500 W. Broadway St., hosts “Turning the Tide: Reclaiming Human Health by Restoring the Planet,” a multiday seminar that starts at 7 PM. Cost is determined on a slidingfee scale from $10 to $75, and registration is required. The conference continues on Feb. 5 from 8 AM–5 PM. Visit saintpatrick.org for details. Witness a crew of young performers paying tribute to our fair city when On Center Performing Arts’ Curtain Up! company members present To: Missoula, With

Love, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $13/$10 students. Call 542-0730 for tickets and visit oncenter.biz. Dance off that black tea during an English Country Dance, which features Mitchel Frey calling and runs from 7:30–10:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-5153. Warm up your winter with some hot licks when Alex Cuba plays Latin pop-soul at the O’Shaughnessy Cultural Center in Whitefish, 1 Central Ave, at 7:30 PM. $27. Get tickets online at whitefishtheatreco.org or by calling 862-5371. Prepare to be dazzled by the UM music program’s Fusion II, which features UM’s bands, orchestra, choirs, jazz combos, chamber ensembles and others in “33 snapshot ensembles,” starting at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $10/$5 for students and seniors. The event also includes an encore performance by Soulaphone. Call 243-6880. Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Theater in this issue.) It’s sort of like storytime, but with fermented grape juice, when St. Paul, Minn.’s Storyhill plays folk and folk rock with opener John Floridis at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier, at 8 PM. $15, all ages. Get tickets at all GrizTix outlets or online at griztix.com. Lee Zimmerman plucks and bows you in all the right places when the cellist plays at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but passthe-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. The Fabulous Country Kings teaches you a thing or two about

honky tonk royalty when it plays the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & G r i l l i n Fr e n c h t o w n , 1678 0 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during Combat Karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Jade Body Qigong with Katharina Hirsch The qigong form was brought to the west by Master Liu Dong and focuses on moving qi through the spine. Regular practice will: speed healing • promote detoxification strengthen the immune system • restore emotional equilibrium induce relaxation • enhance creativity • allow clearer thinking Wednesdays, February 23-March 30, 11am-2pm For more information or to register, please contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033 or rwlcmt@gmail.com. For a complete listing of our classes, please visit

www.redwillowlearning.org Sliding scale fee available. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 West Kent Street, Missoula

It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sweet at Karaoke by Figmo at Joker’s Wild Bar and Restaurant, 4829 N. Reserve St., which features “Brain Strain” trivia and “Scaryoke Karaoke” and begins at 9 PM. Free. Let hot beats palpitate your heart as you down $5 fishbowl drink specials when the BassFace Krew presents another Fishbowl Friday, featuring sets of several electronic music styles from Buckaroo Blaster, Illegitimate Children and Feldman, at 9 PM at the Badlander. Free. Don’t even think about trying to show off your version of the barf bag dance when Sick Kids XOXO (a new electro pop outfit featuring members of Victory Smokes and Unicycle Loves You), plays with locals The Turn Offs, The Ax Raccoon and Fiancée, at 9 PM at the Palace. $5.

Missoula Independent

Page 25 February 3–February 10, 2011


Rock out with your party shorts when The Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway, continues its one year anniversary celebration with music from Slowly But Shirley and Cellar Door, starting at 9 PM. $3. Visit centralbarandgrill.com. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center,

1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

Florence, 5341 Hwy. 93 N. Free. Call 273-9992.

Get a boot scootin’ take on the aurora borealis when Northern Lights plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559.

Be a good neighbor and let Bad Neighbor rev you up with their musical power tools when they play classic rock tunes at 9:30 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $2. Call 830-3277.

Party your geriatric pants off when Party Trained plays a variety of tunes at 9:30 PM at the High Spirits Club & Casino in

Cure your pale face with a heavy dose of pop and rock covers when Amanda Garcia and Beyond

the Pale play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Wave that red, white and blue with a drunken smile when America’s Liquor Down plays classic rock at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., at 9 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Colorado’s Emmitt-Nershi Band plucks your strings and sings to you in your dreams when it plays bluegrass at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $15, with advance tickets at Ear Candy Music and online at seafarerentertainment.com.

SATURDAY

05

February

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Missoula Independent

Page 26 February 3–February 10, 2011

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. Game the day away when MisCon and the Missoula Roleplayers’ Club present a “Winter Game Day” from 10 AM–10 PM in Room 330 of the University Center. Free, all ages. Visit miscon.org. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Simple Writing/Creative Phrases” with Lori Mitchell. Free. Donations are appreciated but not expected. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the

mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Travelers’ Rest State Park, one half-mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12, presents a program featuring stories by Kootenai tribal member Vernon Finley starting at 11 AM at the Holt Museum and Visitor Center at the park. $3 per adult/free for children under age 18 and all current Travelers’ Rest Preservation and Heritage Association members. Visit travelersrest.org or call 273-4253. Win a one-year supply of Black Star Beer by bartering something during The Black Star Barter, an event where participants can drop off and register their item to be bartered between 11 AM–1 PM at The Great Northern Brewery, 2 Central Ave. in Whitefish. The barter then begins promptly at 1 PM. Visit blackstarbeer.com/barter for more details. Free. Get your flash on when the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Higgins Ave., hosts an open house, where you can learn about the school’s programs and meet with its staff from 1–4 PM. Free, with refreshments and snacks provided. Visit rmsp.com. Witness a crew of young performers pay tribute to our fair city when On Center Performing Arts’ “Curtain Up!” company members present “To: Missoula, With Love,” with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $13/$10 students. Call 542-0730 for tickets and visit oncenter.biz.

nightlife Keep the aesthetics flowing and support a local art institution during the Missoula Art Museum’s 3 9 th A n n u a l B e n e f i t A r t


Auction, which features silent/live auctions of just over 100 artworks, and dinner/wine paired by Chef Jacob Osborne, starting at 5 PM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $90/$80 members/$750 for a full table. Get your name added to a waiting list for the event by calling 728-0447. Sip on some vino for a good cause when the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts a nonprofit night for the Big Sky High School Speech and Debate Team, starting at 5 PM. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds will be given to the team. Call 549-8702. They’ll be your friends with sudsy benefits. Los Amigos plays a set at Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St., at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Joan Zen leads you toward the truth at the bottom of your barley soda when she plays reggae, jazz and soul at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Witness a crew of young performers pay tribute to our fair city when On Center Performing Arts’ Curtain Up! company members present a g a l a p e r f o r m a n c e o f To : Missoula, With Love, with a cocktail reception at 6:30 PM, fol-

6:30 PM, followed by Harvest of Loneliness: The Bracero Program at 8:45 PM, all at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $5 per night/$9 for both nights. Visit missoula-labor.info. Parents and friends of Sapphire Dance host a night of family friendly dance, music and fun featuring ballet performances, brownie sundaes and an auction, from 6:30–8 PM at the Stevensville Elementary Gym, 300 Park St. $5 per person/$20 families, with proceeds benefiting Sapphire Dance.

Delve into an artistic storm when The Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A, presents The Teapot Show with an opening Fri., Feb. 4, from 5:30–9 PM featuring teapots and teapotthemed drawings. Free. Call 543-0509.

lowed by the performance at 8 PM, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $25. Call 542-0730 for tickets and visit oncenter.biz. Get your rubber appreciation on before others do during the Off the Rack pre-show reception and live auction, which begins at 6:30 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., and includes complimentary beverages and food, a silent auction, as well as a VIP tick-

et for the 8:30 PM show. $50, with tickets available at The Green Light Apparel & Decor and Blue Mountain Clinic. Proceeds go towards the Montana Access P r o j e c t . C a l l 721- 16 4 6 . ( S e e Agenda in this issue.) Films on immigrant workers and the Bracero program hit the screen during the second night of the sixth annual Missoula Labor Film Festival, which features a screening of It’s a Free World at

Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt after a car crash kills her parents when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Theater in this issue.) A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and

under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. Find out how the Emerald Isle’s music impacted America’s musical heritage when award-winning author P.J. Curtis delivers a lecture titled “Bridging the Atlantic,” at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6359. The Fabulous Country Kings teaches you a thing or two about honky tonk royalty when it plays the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Tickle your ribcage and sway those hips when Rio plays contemporary renditions of Brazilian bossa nova music at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Tom Catmull shows you his version of the pancreas shuffle when he plays a solo set at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Breakdancing isn’t a must when the Missoula Folklore Society hosts a contra dance, featuring music by the Sleeping Child String Band and calling by Mitchel Frey, from 8–11 PM at the Union Hall, upstairs at 208 E. Main St. $8/$6 Folklore Society members/free for kids. Visit missoulafolk.org.

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Missoula Independent

Page 27 February 3–February 10, 2011


Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541SING. Condoms become a thing of artistic wonder during Off the Rack 2011, Blue Mountain Clinic’s fourth annual benefit fashion show that features models donning tasteful clothing made of condoms and other materials, plus music by Butter and other performances, starting at 8:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $20, with tickets available at The Green Light Apparel & Decor and Blue Mountain Clinic. Proceeds go toward the Montana Access Project. Call 721-1646 and visit bluemountainclinic.org. (See Agenda in this issue.) DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free, with visuals by V3R. Sing a fast tune or five during Greyhound Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every Sat. at 9 PM. Free. The party clock just don’t stop when The Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway, continues to celebrate its one year anniversary with food and drink specials, plus music by the Dead Hipster DJs, starting at 9 PM. Free.

Bid adieu to a Hellgate Rollergirl by partying down when the Palace hosts a going away party for Brae “Bitty Bitch” Bullard, which features music and revelry, and begins at 9 PM. Free. The Whiskey Rebellion makes your migraine go away with a sweet injection of outlaw country when it plays at 9:15 PM at The Lumberjack Saloon, off Hwy. 12 and one mile up Graves Creek Road near Lolo. Free. Visit lumberjacksaloon.com. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Dance like you have red ants in your socks when a DJ spins dance music at Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., this and every Sat. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. Wave that red, white and blue with a drunken smile when America’s Liquor Down plays classic rock at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., at 9 PM. Free. Dance the soles off your boots when the Roadhouse Band plays at 9:30 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559 Find out what the indigo cleanse is all about when Zeppo MT

rocks your innards with a set of R&B at 9:30 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $2. Call 830-3277.

meeting room of Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

Squeeze through the peephole and into the arms of Russ Nasset and the Revelators when they play country and rockabilly at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

Older men, young men and young women are hereby invited to audition for the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s production of Arsenic & Old Lace, from noon–3 PM, with call-backs at 7 PM, all at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. Participants should bring a humorous monologue if they have one. Those who can’t make it on Sunday can set up an alternate time to audition by calling 239-8627. Free. Visit mtactors.com.

DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Los Angeles’ Nosaj Thing puts a little glitch into your bunny hop when he plays instrumental hip hop with an experimental electronic influence at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $12/$10 advance at Ear Candy and online at seafarerentertainment.com. E-Team opens. (See Noise in this issue.)

SUNDAY

06

February

This is the kind of mass I can really get behind: The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AM–noon at the

Witness a crew of young performers pay tribute to our fair city when On Center Performing Arts’ Curtain Up! company members present To: Missoula, With Love, with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $13/$10 students. Call 542-0730 for tickets and visit oncenter.biz.

nightlife Explore the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during a “Clarity Book Meeting with Great Freedom/Balanced View,” which runs every Sun. at 7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with $4 martinis, plus jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 8 PM. This week: jazz from Josh Farmer, the Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid. Free. I see irie robotic dance moves in your future when Portland, Ore.’s “reggaetronic” group Everyday Prophets plays at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-thehat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Men always get to belt out a slick tune or two during Man Night featuring karaoke, which occurs this and every Sun. starting at 9 PM at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 251-5402.

The most terrifying thing to a wild animal is restraint. When caught in a trap it jumps away from the source of pain, which can sever tendons, dislocate joints and break bones. Tissue caught in the steel jaws is a constant source of extreme pain. The animal breaks teeth attacking the metal and will chew off his/her own foot to escape the pain.

Traps on public lands kill and maim scores of pets every year. Traps make our public lands unsafe. For $29, a trapper can set hundreds of traps, hidden and baited. Please report trap locations to info@footloosemontana.org to post on our map and save lives.

No record is kept of endangered and threatened species, except the lynx, killed in traps. Animals’ nervous systems react the same as humans when we feel pain—rise in blood pressure, dilated pupils, perspiration, screaming and moaning until a drop in blood pressure leads to shock. Trappers call it “napping.”

Missoula Independent

Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free.

Page 28 February 3–February 10, 2011

The steel-jaw foothold trap, banned in 80 countries and 8 states, and condemned as inhumane by the American Veterinary Medical Association, American Animal Hospital Association, The World Veterinary Association and the National Animal Control Association, is the most commonly used trap in the U.S.


Ride the aesthetic pony by checking out works such as this piece by Rudy Autio when the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., presents its 10th annual Collectors Resale Show on Fri., Feb. 4, with a First Friday reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 721-3154.

Enjoy a brew and a moving picture when the Palace hosts a movie night, featuring “the finest of badass cinema” starting at 9 PM. Free. This week features The Neverending Story and The Dark Crystal. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the mic at Karaoke with Whitney at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers free karaoke every Sun. and Mon. night at 9:30 PM. Call 830-3277.

MONDAY

07

February

Child Care Resources, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St., presents “Pre-Orientation for Child Care Providers,” a workshop for those interested in learning more about the requirements of running a child care business, from 9–11 AM at Child Care Resources. Free. Visit childcareresources.org/registration to register and call 728-6446. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. UM’s President’s Lecture Series presents “Long-Term Human Environment Interaction in Amazonia: 11,000 Years Ago to the Present,” a talk with presenter Anna Roosevelt that begins at 3:10 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2311. International students get a chance to hone their dating skills at “Dating 101 for International Students,” a discussion panel starting at 4 PM in Room 331 in the University

Center. Free, with refreshments provided. Call 243-6429.

nightlife Dine out to support a local organization that aims to provide safe, healthy, affordable housing using sustainable methods, among other deeds, during a “dine out” benefit for homeWORD from 5–8:30 PM at Scotty’s Table, 131 S. Higgins Ave. Unit P3. For $15, you will receive a locally produced burger (or veggie burger), plus fries and a local beer. Scotty’s Table will then donate proceeds from this evening to homeWORD. Call 532-HOME. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Build bridges with some fellow Missoulians with an informal game when The Garden City Duplicate Bridge Club hosts bridge lessons and informal games for newcomers and beginners every Mon. at 7 PM at the Bridge Club, 3108 S. Clark St. Call Michael at 890-0743 or e-mail him at Studd_31@hotmail.com for pricing. Chase down a hearty slice of Americana with a glass of wine when Tom Catmull performs from 7–10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. The UM President’s Lecture Series hosts “Human Rights and the CIA: The Case of the Assassination of Patrice Lumumba,” a talk with presenter Anna Roosevelt that begins at 8 PM at the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-2311. Alcohol and bowling go hand over foot during Monday Madness at

F i v e Va l l e y ’ s B o w l , 1515 Dearborn Ave., which features $1 bowling after 9 PM as well as $1.25 Coors Light cans this and every Mon. at the bowling center. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign-up. Swoop into a chill zone with indie folk rock with a dark edge when Columbus, Ohio’s The Black Swans plays at 9 PM at the Badlander. Locals Churchmouse and Stellarondo open. Free. (See Noise in this issue.) Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Monday with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. This week features the program “Missoula Area Dubstep” with sets from DJs Ir8prim8, Giga, KidTraxiom, and the Milkcrate Mechanic. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the mic at Karaoke with Whitney at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers free karaoke every Sun. and Mon. night at 9:30 PM. Call 830-3277. Cure your case of the fun day Mondays with some blues, jam and funk when Los Angeles’ Andy Frasco plays with openers Kung Fu Kongress at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

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TUESDAY

08

February

Find out how to lend a helping hand at the Spring Volunteer Fair, where you can meet representatives from nonprofits and organizations in and around Missoula, starting at 10 AM in the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-5531. UM kicks off the Mansfield Center Spring 2011 Brown Bag Lecture Series with “Sustainable Development in Kamchatka: International Collaboration to Protect Wilderness Resources in the Far East,” a talk with Dr. Alan E. Watson, starting at noon in the Mansfield Conference Center Room, on the fourth floor of the Mansfield Library. Free. Call 243-2988. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at Joseph’s Coat, 116 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-1419. UM presents a “University Council Meeting,” a discussion on campus-wide issues and university initiatives, starting at 2 PM in Room 333 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2311.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 February 3–February 10, 2011


nightlife M i s s o u l a ’ s Y W C A , 1 1 3 0 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, including groups for American Indian women and teens, every Tue. starting with dinner at 5:30 PM, followed by meetings at 6:30 PM. Those with children are asked to arrive at 6:15. Free. Call 5436691 for more info and visit ywcaofmissoula.org/?q=node/57. Bring your axe or other instrument of choice and jam out with your buds when the Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, presents an open jam starting at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. E-mail terillovet@hotmail.com. See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess the answer to something easy or hard during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4152. homeWORD presents the workshop “Get Ready for Home Ownership,” which meets from 6–9 PM tonight, and at the same time Feb. 10, 15 and 17, at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. $10 per person. RSVP and pay online by visiting homeword.org. Childcare vouchers for the Busy Hands Fun Center are also available.

Lessons of Our Land: The Indian Land Tenure Foundation Speaker Series

Feb. 10: Charles Wilkinson, law professor at the University of Colorado. Feb. 23: Marcella Giles, a leading oil and gas attorney. March 2: Narcisse Blood, scholar and former director of Kainai studies at Red Crow Community College in Stand Off, Alberta.

March 9: Cris Stainbrook, president of the Indian Land Tenure Foundation in Little Canada, MN.

March 23: Elouise Cobell, lead plaintiff in the Cobell v. Salazar lawsuit. March 30: Julie Cajune, executive director of the Center for American Indian Policy and Applied Research at Salish Kootenai Collegewill.

All lectures will take place from 4 - 5:15pm in Room 105 of the University of Montana's Payne Family Native American Center. For more information visit

www.buffalosfire.com

Missoula Independent

UM’s Climate Change Studies Program and the Wilderness Institute present the “Conservation and Climate Change Lecture Series,” which continues with the topic “Ice, Wildlife, and Us: What Legacies, What Lessons?,” a talk with UM prof Joel Berger, starting at 7 PM in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher B u s i n e s s B u i l d i n g . Fr e e . C a l l 243-6596. Translate that movie in your head onto paper when the 406 Writers’ Workshop presents “Screenwriting with Catherine Jones,” a workshop that meets for six weeks from 7–9:15 PM at a TBA location in Missoula. $175, with pre-registration required. Visit 406writersworkshop.com to register and for more info. Find out why the Athabasca oil sands in Alberta aren’t such a great thing during “Montana to the Tar Sands: The True Cost of Oil,” a panel discussion with Steve Running and others on the impacts of the tar sands oil development on the environment, human health,

Page 30 February 3–February 10, 2011

native communities and Montana’s economy, starting at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Join the bookworm network when Missoula Public Library’s book group discusses Tracy Kidder’s Strength in What Remains at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Let Fern Glass Boyd pull your musical strings when the cellist plays a faculty and guest artist series recital, starting at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What WWII general was known by the nickname “Old Blood and Guts” ?(Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) You have practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 2739992 to reserve your spot. Measure the funk in terms of its atomic weight when New York City’s Sister Monk plays a mix of folk, funk, world beat and pop at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. Ladies get their drink on and celebrate themselves with $1.50 well drinks during Ladies’ Night at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which runs this and every Tue. starting at 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798.

All the ladies’ in the house can belt out a sweet tune and get a drink special during Ladies’ Night, starting at 9 PM at Larry’s Six Mile Tavern in Huson, 23384 Huson Road. Free. Call 626-5573. Jam the indigo out of your system when Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents Blues Jam and Microbrews night with Kevin Van Dort, where a full blues band plays along with guest artists every Tue. starting at 9:30 PM. Free, with $1 off Microbrews. Contact Kevin at 396-5731 to play. It’ll be everything but aural shock therapy when The Workers play a mix of rock, Americana and country during the Badlander’s “Live and Local” night at 9 PM. Richie Reinholdt opens. Free. Philadelphia’s Conspirator (featuring members of Disco Biscuits and other bands) gives the Illuminati something to dance in a trance about when it plays live electronic music with opener Break Science at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $20/$18 advance with tickets at Ear Candy Music and online at seafarerentertainment.com.

WEDNESDAY

09

February

Find out how to lend a helping hand at the Spring Volunteer Fair, where you can meet representatives from nonprofits and organizations in and around Missoula, starting at 10 AM in the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-5531. Show ‘em who’s boss when the Missoula Businesswomen’s Network hosts a general meeting luncheon at 11:45 AM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free to attend, but lunch is $12. Slack off from your duties and catch a flick during the Missoula Public Library’s afternoon matinee, starting at 2 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Feel free to dress up like Mr. Wizard during UM’s Ecology & Evolution Seminar Series, which begins at 4:10 PM in Room 110 of the Interdisciplinary Sciences Building. Free. Call 243-5122.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Nor thside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of the proceeds


from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. This week’s beneficiary is UM’s Triathlon. Visit kettlehouse.com. Topple the barley soda regime when Tom Catmull and Johnny Two Bones (aka John Sporman) play Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St., at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Pianist Jodi Marshall tickles your senses with her deft piano skills while you munch Chinese food when she performs every Wed. from 6–9 PM at Hong Kong Chef, 2009 Brooks St. Free to attend, with free potstickers. Call 549-6688. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Smooth jazz makes the sake and pad thai go down easy when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents live jazz every Wed. at 7 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3237. Find out what it takes to foster world peace and friendship when REI Missoula, 3275 N. Reserve St. Ste. K-2, hosts a Peace Corps Information Session with UM campus representative Tenly Snow starting at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-2288. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Missoula’s Trivial Beersuit, a trivia night for the layperson, expands its tentacles to the Press Box for four rounds of trivia with sign ups at 8:30 PM, this and every Wed. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St. Free. You can also find clues to every week’s game by befriending “Trivial Beersuit” on Facebook. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The nickname “Old Blood and Guts” belonged to Gen. George S. Patton. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Get a wicked case of “bowling finger” during Five Valley’s Bowl’s

Wicked Wednesday, which features $2 bowling after 9 PM plus $2 cans of Bud Light this and every Wed. at the bowling center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Don’t ever worry about getting into a sing-off during Combat Karaoke, which runs this and every Wed. at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve, 5550 N. Reserve St., starting at 9 PM. Free. Just don’t speak in acronyms during WTF Wednesdays and Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, where drink specials mix with music by The Tallest DJ in America every Wed. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Ever Breath You Take” by The Police (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Play some licks, read your newest haiku, or make others giggle at your jokes during The Craggy Range Open Mic, an open mic night for musicians and other artists that features a number of house instruments for your use, every Wed. starting at 9 PM at The Craggy Range, 10 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Call 862-7550. Get a binary buzz with DJs Pillar, J@cob and a weekly cast of other rotating DJs when they play electro, breaks and progressive electronic tunes every Wed. at 9 PM at The Broadway Bar & Grill, 1609 W. Broadway St. $3. Be someone’s most valuable playa when MVP plays at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free Call 728-1559. Wax nostalgic over some tunes on wax when DJ Brand One and friends play hip hop at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Stop smoking that oregano and get freakishly funky on the dancefloor when New York City’s Sister Monk plays a mixture of folk, funk, world beat and pop at the Top Hat at 10 PM. $3.

Still asking what you can do for your country?

THURSDAY

10

February

Hear about the effects of Alberta’s Athabasca oil sands during the talk “ Ta r S a n d s I m p a c t s o n Indigenous People and Montana Landowners,” a presentation with Marty Cobenais of the Indigenous Environmental Network and others, starting at 9:40 AM in Room 258 of UM’s Social Sciences Building. Free. Show love to your fellow humans when The Artists’ Shop, 304 N. Higgins Ave., presents “Lovefest,” a food and fund drive for the

Discover the benefits of Peace Corps service. Wednesday, February 9 7 to 8:30 p.m. REI Missoula • 3275 N. Reserve St.

800.424.8580 • www.peacecorps.gov Celebrating 50 years of world peace and friendship in 2011

Missoula Independent

Page 31 February 3–February 10, 2011


Missoula Food Bank that offers you the chance to win treats, drawings or gift certificates when you drop off non-perishable food or money to the shop to donate to the food bank. The drive runs each day until Feb. 28. Call 543-6393. The UM Natural Resources and Environmental Policy Forum presents a talk by author Charles Wilkinson on the topic of “Writing Tribal History,” which also features comments from others, starting at noon in the Castles Center, in UM’s School of Law. Free. Copies of Wilkinson’s book “The People are Dancing Again” will be available for purchase. Your chance to mark your artistic territory on a skateboard comes to fruition during a call for artists for On Deck VI, the sixth annual skateboard art auction for the Montana Skatepark Association that occurs in May at the Brink Gallery. Submissions are due Feb. 11, so click over to montanaskatepark.org/ondeck for more info. UM presents “The Indian Land Tenure Foundation Speaker Series” with the topic “Lessons of Our Land,” a talk with guest speaker Charles Wilkinson that begins at 4 PM in Room 105 of the Payne Family Native American Center. Free, with a reception following the talk.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Small business owners are invited to unite with others in order to advance policies good for small business, its employees, and communities, when the Montana Small Business Alliance hosts an informational meeting from 5:30–6:30 PM at the Badlander. Free. E-mail amanda@mainstreetalliance.org. Slip into a talk where the relationship between the faith-based community and sustainability is analyzed when the Sustainable Business Council presents the talk

Missoula Independent

“Sustainability in a Faith Community Context and its Business Implications,” which features comments by pastor Peter Shober, and begins with refreshments at 5:30 PM, followed by the talk at 6, at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. Free. Visit sbcmontana.org and call 824-7336. Howl at the indigo moon when Black Mountain Moan plays blues and roots music during the Top Hat’s “Artists-In-Residence” family-friendly concert series every Thu. this month from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages.

Tap into some artistic history when the Montana Museum of Art & Culture presents “A Good Likeness: Portraiture in the 18th–20th Centuries,” a talk with UM prof Valerie Hedquist that begins at 7 PM at the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. The Paxson and Meloy galleries will also be open for your perusal briefly before and after the lecture. Call 243-2019.

Wet your adventurous mind when paddler Doug Ammons presents “Wildwater–A Love Story,” a presentation with Ammons that features a screening of his award-winning film of the same name, plus comments about his whitewater adventures, starting at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. The talk serves as a fundraiser for Friends of Dolpa, a charity that supports schools in the

Local teens ages 13–18 explore the dynamics of sound when the Missoula Art Museum presents “Teen Open Studio Night with Burke Jam: Sound Art,” which runs from 6–8 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447 or visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Find your external groove in the throes of a funk brigade when New York City’s Sister Monk continues its reign on western Montana by playing a mix of folk, funk, world beat and pop, at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Lick those fingers with joy during the Arlee Community Development Corporation’s annual Chocolate Lovers’ Festival, which raises money for the Jocko Valley Library and youth programs in the area and starts with tasting at 6:30 PM, followed by an auction for treats at 7:30 PM, all at the Brown Building Community Center, 26550 Hwy. 93 N. in Arlee. $5 family/$2 per person. To enter a chocolate dish, get details by calling 726-5550 or e-mail arleecdc@arleemontana.org. Fry something up on your literary grill when author Anders Halverson reads and signs copies of Entirely Synthetic Fish, starting at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Know your rights the next time you encounter the po po when the Peace and Justice Film Series presents a screening of 10 Rules for Dealing with Police, at the University Center Theater at 7 PM. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

Join the holy crowd. The Missoula Art Museum presents its 39th annual Benefit Art Auction where you can bid on over 100 works of art— including this piece by Bob Durden—at the Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park Sat., Feb. 5, at 5 PM. $90/$80 members. Get your name added to a waiting list for the event by calling 728-0447.

Page 32 February 3–February 10, 2011

poorest and most remote part of Nepal. Free. Visit friendsofdolpa.org. Show your lover a little aural variety when Big Productions presents a Valentine’s show with Reno, Nevada’s Colin Ross and Mig O’Hara when they play jazz standards, blues, boogie woogie, swing, rockabilly and Americana, at 7:30 PM at the auditorium at Polson High School, 1712 Second St. W. $14/$12 advance/free age 18 and under. Get tickets at Fiddle Sticks School of Music in Polson, or at True Value Hardware in Ronan. Hang with the slickest country crooner and rhyme slinger you’ll ever see when Sandman The Rappin’ Cowboy plays at 8 PM at Fergie’s Pub in Hot Springs, 213 Main St. $5. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Throw the lease agreement away and cut a rug with the This Sign for Rent Band when it plays at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon and Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Take a bite out of a lyrical sandwich during Wapikiya Hip Hop Night, which features DJ Erock plus performances by MCs Frodie, Overtime, Dice and Koshir, starting at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Folks, please don’t shoot this artistic messenger by sending me stuff late, hoping to “slip it in the calendar.” Rather, hook it up in a timely manner by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 4 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH I f there’s anyone who knows how to get around, it’s Willie Weir. The author, columnist and avid cyclist has, to date, cycled over 60,000 miles across the world. This includes trekking around Turkey, South Africa, India and the Balkans, all on his trusty two-wheeler. The dude is hardcore, to say the least. Most recently, Weir and his wife Kat hit the road to Portugal, where they apparently crossed the country six times, did some “wild camping” and immersed themselves in Portugese culture. Along the way, the couple cycled on country roads, soaked up stunning views and got to grub

on tasty food and wine. According to a post by Kat on the website Yellow Tent Adventures, the coupled biked a total of 1,823.5 miles in the country in just three months. You can hear more about their latest trip this week when Willie Weir visits town to talk about his stories from the road and offer travel tips to get you in the mood to gear up and push your pedals toward adventure. Cyclist Willie Weir hosts the talk “Any Port in a Storm–Cycling and Wild Camping Through Portugal,” on Thu., Feb. 3, at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free.

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Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 3 It’s all about heels up when Montana Snowbowl’s Telemark Evening Race Series begins tonight at the ski hill, 1700 Snowbowl Road. E-mail Gates Watson at g watson@ conservationfund.org for details.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 5 Jam out on your snowboard when Moonlight Basin, 1020 Hwy. 64 in Big Sky, presents the Volcom Peanut Butter and Rail Jam, a free amateur snowboard contest that features prizes for all contestants and starts at 9 AM. Entrance to the competition is on a first-come, first-served basis, and you can sign up at the Madison Village Base Area the day of, or prior to the competition at volcom.com. Visit moonlightbasin.com for info on other events. Hail the goddess of winter during Whitefish’s 2011 Winter Carnival, a multi-day fest that includes a Yeti Snowskate Jam in downtown Whitefish throughout the day starting with warm-ups at 10:30 AM, a torchlight parade and fireworks display at Whitefish Mountain Resort at 7 PM, plus other activities. Visit whitefishwintercarnival.com for a complete schedule of events. Kids ages 5 and up plug into animal tracking when the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) presents its “Saturday Kids’ Activity: Tricky Trackers,” an event where kids learn how to ID common animal tracks starting 2 PM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. $3/$1 MNHC members. Call 327-0405.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 6 Let your little one slide and glide around the Lubrecht Experimental Forest during the Sons of Norway/ Missoula Nordic Ski Club’s seventh annual Barnelopet, a non-competitive cross-country ski event for children aged 12 and under that begins with registration at noon, followed by skiing at 1 PM, all at Lubrecht, off Hwy. 200 at milepost 22.5. Parents can also ski with their children. Free, with raffle prizes and treats after the event. Call Leslie at 273-2815.

Yet another cross-country ski outing vies for your child’s attention when the Missoula Children and Nature Network hosts a free cross-country ski outing for children and their families at the Pattee Canyon Recreation Area,, starting with a 12:30 PM meet-up at Dornblaser Field on the corner of Higgins and South Avenues. Alternately, you can meet at the Pattee Canyon trailhead at 1 PM. Free. You can reserve free cross-country ski gear by calling Ian at 396-9562 by 4 PM on Feb. 4.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 9 Learn how to wax your board and sharpen those edges when UM’s Outdoor Program presents a “Ski and Snowboard Maintenance Class,” which meets at 6 PM in the Outdoor Program, located in UM’s Fitness and Recreation Center. $5. RSVP by Feb. 5 by calling 243-5172. Hang with a cycling mob when Missoulians on Bicycles (MOBI) hosts its monthly club meeting and program starting at 7 PM in the meeting room of Adventure Cycling, 150 E. Pine St. Free. Enter from the left side of the building. Visit missoulabike.org.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 10 Wet your adventurous mind when paddler Doug Ammons presents “Wildwater–A Love Story,” a presentation with Ammons that features a screening of his award-winning film of the same name, plus comments about his whitewater adventures, starting at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. The talk serves as a fundraiser for Friends of Dolpa, a charity that supports schools in the poorest and most remote part of Nepal. Free. Visit friendsofdolpa.org.

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Go deep in a powder porn world when the Montana Backcountry Alliance hosts its annual Backcountry Ski and Snowboard Film Festival, which features screenings of some of the best ski and snowboard films of 2010/2011, starting at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit montanabackcountry.org. for details. calendar@missoulanews.com

www.retrofoam.com Missoula Independent

Page 33 February 3–February 10, 2011


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The wind cries Jimi Benjamin Love explores the mythical powers of Hendrix by Erika Fredrickson

Here’s what you think of when you think of Jimi Hendrix: Jimi with his afro bursting from a bright, silky headband. Jimi with his eyes closed, guitar tilted up as he holds one badass note mid-solo. Jimi with the billowing shirt and flared pants in a spotlight of psychedelic colors singing sassily, “You know you’re a cute little heartbreaker.” These are images stored in the collective consciousness—not of James Marshall Hendrix, the man, but Jimi the rock god who helped define the 1960s and early 1970s in the same way the peace sign or acid or Kent State did. Benjamin Love’s new solo exhibit, JMH Is My Spirit Guide, which opened last week at FrontierSpace, explores the archetypal personality of Jimi Hendrix through various media including digital video, sound art, sculpture and installation. For instance, in the piece “The Transfiguration of JMH,” a video loop demonstrates how Hendrix is trapped forever in that transfiguration of guitar god, just as he is in that collective consciousness. Even though he’s long been dead, he still maintains a living image within our culture.

“We see and can mentally conjure an image of Jimi Hendrix in our mind, as well as hear his guitar without actually hearing it, which is due in large part to the proliferation of his image and music in dominant culture,” says Love. “This gets to the whole name part of the show: Jimi was born James Marshall Hendrix. Fame enveloped his identity in artifice, and eternally trapped James as Jimi.” Contrary to the evidence at hand, Love isn’t particularly obsessed with Jimi Hendrix—just the idea behind him. In JMH is My Spirit Guide, Hendrix serves as placeholder for a certain type of archetypal personality, Love says. He’s what myths are made of. “Orpheus is essentially the same archetype, enacted in an older myth,” Love says. “The counter culture of the ’60s has always intrigued me, and it seems that Jimi best embodies the role of poet, prophet and musician from that time. One of the myths associated with Orpheus is that at his death his head is severed from his body, yet it continues to sing. In a way it’s parallel to the way Jimi and other celebrity identities become fixed, and continue to perform.”

Love grew up in Mountain Home, Idaho, and studied art at Boise State University, the Art Institute of Chicago’s Ox-Bow Summer Program, and at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, in Skowhegan, Maine. His mother, a painter, always had a studio with plenty of supplies available when he was growing up and Love says she encouraged him to explore different ideas and different materials. Not being too tied to one medium or one idea means Love’s art is always shape-shifting from exhibit to exhibit, including in recent shows in Germany, Japan and Philadelphia. The exhibit in Missoula isn’t just focused on the Jimi Hendrix archetypal hero. Some of it seems like a mystical experiment, as with the sound piece, “Ultra Depth Past Life Regression,” which allows listeners to relax and reflect on past life experiences to gain insight into how those experiences affect their current lives. The exhibit is also an exploration of several elements of pop culture: There’s a sculpture made of mass produced objects, for instance, as well as other cultural elements like screen-print T-shirts and the Ram Dass counterculture classic, Be Here Now. For Love, incorporating subject matter from the dominant culture addresses larger questions about authenticity. “The world around us is saturated with affectation,” says Love. “I’m interested in the way affectation functions in art, as it is generally used in art to call the viewers attention to a certain part of the work, saying—or yelling—‘Look here! This is important!’ In dominant culture affect is used for the selling of ideas, and then objects. For me, the place where it becomes interesting is that in art we can examine the way affect functions in dominant culture.” In the case of Hendrix, as with any celebrity of his caliber, dominant culture has had destructive and consumptive impacts. The cult of personality that keeps Hendrix a continuing part of pop culture has its destructive powers, too. “As a culture we consume celebrity,” says Love. “It is interesting that the same creative force that enables a person to emerge into fame is also many times the same force that drives them to self destruction.” For this exhibition, Hendrix serves as a symbol for larger concepts about celebrity worship and myth. Love’s ties to Hendrix, however, are rooted in personal experience listening to his music and playing guitar as a high school kid. “Jimi Hendrix and his music embodied a certain rebellious social sensibility that resonated with me at the time,” says Love. “I don’t listen to Jimi Hendrix anymore, but I can still hear it.” An opening reception for Benjamin Love’s JMH Is My Spirit Guide kicks off at FrontierSpace Friday, February 4, from 6 to 9 PM. Free.

Benjamin Love’s new solo exhibit, JMH Is My Spirit Guide, explores the archetypal personality of Jimi Hendrix through various media including digital video, sound art, sculpture and installation. “As a culture we consume celebrity,” says Love. “It is interesting that the same creative force that enables a person to emerge into fame is also many times the same force that drives them to self destruction.”

Missoula Independent

Page 34 February 3–February 10, 2011

efredrickson@missoulanews.com


February is Radon Action Month!

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The Black Swans Words Are Stupid St. Ives

The animals are out in full force on The Black Swans’ Words Are Stupid and, man, are they ever lethargic. That probably isn’t surprising for fans of the sleepysounding Ohio folk-rockers. But the healthy dose of paranoia manifest in the 10 tracks might raise some eyebrows: It’s potent enough that you can picture the whites of the conjured beasts’ eyes as they search for unseen threats. The Black Swans’ most recent LP—until they release Don’t Blame The Stars in April—is a slow-burning record. Compared to previous efforts, there’s less reliance on strings here. Instead, the album coasts on slow guitar strumming, slow bass plucking, slow drum beating—slow everything. The band has crafted a simple

Nosaj Thing Drift Alpha Pup Records

On his full-length debut, Los Angeles’ Nosaj Thing throws elements of experimental electronic music into a wok, adds some spicy effects and catchy hooks, and comes out with a strand of instrumental hip hop that’s instantly engaging and consistently invigorating. His aesthetic is similar to fellow L.A.cohorts like Flying Lotus, Baths and Take, but it’s distinct enough to stand on its own. I love the standout track “Coat of Arms” because of

Cake Showroom of Compassion Upbeat Records

Very few bands can write a song called “Federal Funding” and make it sound funky. Cake is one of those bands. Showroom of Compassion is the band’s first album in six years, and while it’s true the long wait didn’t yield any surprises, it didn’t yield any disappointments either. The album offers 11 tracks in signature Cake style: spare, driving tunes; half-spoken-half-sung vocals; ironic, narrative lyrics; grungy guitar; horn backup. While this album will sound pretty familiar to fans, there are a few differences in the details. The ethos is a bit less bitter and somewhat more melodic and contemplative. Some tunes are actually bright and sunny, like

The Slants Pageantry self-released

The Slants are the only all-Asian “Chinatown dance rock” band in America. So why do I think Hulk Hogan rather than Mr. Fuji when listening to Pageantry? Is it their dope red and yellow dragon logo? Few looked as good out of the ring as the Hulkster. However, like Hogan’s work in the ring, The Slants brand of 1980s high-hat driven pop featuring hooky guitar licks and whispering, cutie-pie keyboards doesn’t

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sound here, sure, but the songs never seem to require anything more. And what a menagerie thrives within those songs. The album is themed around the deficiencies and misuse of human communication, and the dogs, cats, roosters and monkeys present in the songwriting help drive the message home. By portraying a world where meaningful human communication—and by extension, relationships—are inevitably doomed, the band’s imitated crows and grunts are simultaneously amusing and terribly grim. (Cameron Rasmusson) The Black Swans plays the Badlander Monday, Fe b . 7 , a t 9 P M w i t h C h u rc h m o u s e a n d Stellarondo. Free. its cerebral qualities and haunting strangeness. Underneath a hip-shaking breakbeat, a reverb-drenched vocal sample and synth line ducks in and out of the mix every time the kick drum hits, while a crunchy bass line slithers its way between the beat. It’s a trippy effect that gives me chills each time I hear it. Then, in “IOIO,” a complex rhythm dances with gorgeous minor key motifs that stay in your head for days. Closer “Lords” seals the melodic deal with a number of spliced female choral samples paired against a burbling bass line, danceable beat and shimmering synth sounds. It’s an entrancing and stunning track that, taken as a whole, proves this young beatsmith is at the top of his game. (Ira Sather-Olson) Nosaj Thing plays the Top Hat Saturday, Feb. 5, at 10 PM with E-Team. $12/$10 advance at Ear Candy Music and seafarerentertainment.com.

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“What’s Now is Now” with its cheery lyrics and disco beat. Piano makes an appearance for the first time on a Cake recording, offering a Chopin-esque introduction to the instrumental tune “Teenage Pregnancy.” “Bound Away” delves into the subjects and to some extent the feel of old American folk. Cake already has a well-defined sound. Showroom of Compassion suggests that rather than simply resting on their laurels, however, the band is still fine-tuning that sound, and still maturing philosophically and musically. Ecologically too: The whole album was recorded using only solar power. (Melissa Mylchreest) bring much excitement to the musical match. On “Every Chance I Get” the verse reeks of Green Day but the chorus is the howl of Electric-era Ian Astbury. Aron Moxley’s ability to ape others, including the whiney moan of Morrissey, hints at his karaoke prowess but that only makes me want to jam Kill Uncle and curl up for a cry. The first nine tracks kept me wondering: Is this Orgy? KMFDM? A New Order tribute? It isn’t until “How the Wicked Live” that the band sounds like themselves, dropping spook-tastic nasal keyboards and a sing-a-long butt-rocker of a chorus. So-called experts decried Hogan as all style no substance. He showed them style was enough. In the case of The Slants, style might be enough for some but Mr. Fuji is my guy. (Jason McMackin)

Missoula Independent

Page 35 February 3–February 10, 2011


Affordable, Convenient, Discreet, Local Oldest Dispensary in the Bitterroot!

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Sound of Planes sails on wordplay by Erika Fredrickson

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Page 36 February 3–February 10, 2011

same person. Confusing? It can be at times, but it’s like patiently putting together a big puzzle and, for her part, Schuldberg keeps the overall story cohesive. Melana K. Harker seems like the youngest version of Margaret. She is difficult to hear sometimes through her softer speech, but she absolutely embodies the awkwardness and angst of a young woman just out of her teens who doesn’t yet know her place in the larger world. She’s like an arthouse character in a Hal Hartley film: offbeat, disengaged, a little stiff. Tylyn Carmean is naturally charming as one of the other Margarets. Her chemistry with Tim Larson’s Jonathan is incredible, especially when they first meet at the Seattle coffee shop and, later, when he’s teaching her to drive years after her parents were killed while driving. Their affectionate joking is the best indication of how much they love each other and that alone makes the ending all the more weighty. Ironically, it’s in a scene when Margaret actually tells Jonathan “I love you” a number of times that the sentiment actually feels false and overdone. It’s those over-dramatized moments—and there are a couple of them—when the language of the play and the actors fail to communicate authentic feeling. Sound of Planes has its lulls and its confusing elePhoto by Chad Harder ments. Colton Swibold’s Jan doesn’t feel developed Sound of Planes includes, from left, Melana K. Harker, Tim Larson, beyond a German accent Colton Swibold, Ann Peacock and Samantha Pollington. and a faint interest in poliguage to shape their reality. At times it’s literally about tics, making it difficult to understand why Margaret is not understanding a language—German, in this case. drawn to him. And though Margaret’s aunt Anna, played But it’s also about not having enough words or the right by the very talented Ann Peacock, is an important balance to the play, the dynamic between she and Margaret words to fully describe the depth of love and loss. Sound of Planes, directed by Kaet Morris, follows a could use a more distinct arc between Margaret’s arrival girl named Margaret who goes to Berlin to live with her in Germany and the two characters’ eventual falling out. The play has brilliant moments, too. Samantha aunt after a car crash kills her parents on 9/11. She falls in love with a German boy but moves back to Seattle Pollington gets one of the most dramatic parts as anothwhere she meets her husband who is, eventually, er version of Margaret. In the scene she’s sitting at the deployed to Iraq. While the action of the play is mostly kitchen table and she describes the moment as if she’s focused on Margaret’s personal life, the context of the conjugating verbs in a classroom. “She sweeps. She is political times weaves its way into the dialog and under sweeping. She swept.” It’s a scene that could be utterly the surface of the storyline. That her parents were killed cliché due to the subject matter, but Pollington keeps it on 9/11 but not by terrorists gives her personal tragedy from melodrama, carefully building up the anxiety to its an extra layer of weirdness. When she first arrives in climax. This is the unveil: How language fails us when Germany, the country is warmly sympathetic to the 9/11 the worst happens. But, while words fail the character tragedy, but as the war in Iraq begins, Margaret watches of Margaret in this moment, Schuldberg’s demonstration of that failure is portrayed with an artful underthe mood change. The action of the play is not linear: It flip-flops standing of language—and that’s what makes this play a between Margaret’s time before Germany, in Germany victory. Sound of Planes continues at the Crystal and her days afterward in Seattle. On top of that complexity, three different women play Margaret. At first it’s Theatre Thursday, Feb. 3–Saturday, Feb. 5, at 7:30 easy to assume that each Margaret is just Margaret at a PM nightly. Thursday night: $12/$6 students. Friday different stage in her life, but, after awhile, as each and Saturday nights: $15/7.50$ students. Margaret starts repeating scenes of a previous Margaret, it becomes clear that they’re all different versions of the efredrickson@missoulanews.com In my high school Latin class we learned phrases like, “Vestis virum reddit” (clothes make the man), Julius Caesar’s famous quote, “Veni, vidi vici” (I came, I saw, I conquered) and the always hilarious nerdy Latin joke, “Semper ubi sub ubi,” which literally means, “Always where under where.” Attempting to communicate via Latin phrases and proverbs was, as one might guess, a very difficult lesson in the limitations of language. Writers also deal with language limitations, like how to describe something familiar in a fresh way: the air on a fall afternoon when the sun has warmed the leaves. That moment when sadness finally dissipates. The earthy smell of almonds. In the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s new production Sound of Planes, playwright Larke Schuldberg explores language barriers and the ways in which people use lan-


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Life force Franco makes Oscar gold in 127 Hours by Dave Loos

I’m guessing there is a small segment of the moun- uation. And though Franco never actually utters the taineering and adventure community that resents the words as the days slowly drag on, we are constantly fame and fortune bestowed upon Aron Ralston, espe- aware of the only possible solution to his predicament. cially since that notoriety exists because the 28-year-old And that knife is already bent and dull. Franco is fantastic throughout the film and avid outdoorsman made the very novice mistake of forgetting to tell anyone where he was going when he deserves his Oscar nomination, but he is perhaps at his went out to explore Utah’s Canyonlands in April 2003. best when saying nothing at all. He manages to make But think about it: How many times have you done us feel trapped in that desolate canyon with him, along for a painful ride as it approaches an even more painful the exact same thing? Ralston, who was in fact far more experienced than resolution. From a filmmaking perspective, the greatest stroke the average weekend warrior when he embarked on his solo expedition in one of America’s most remote areas, of luck in telling this story may be that Ralston was actupaid a steep price for his foolery. But his gripping story ally traveling with a camcorder when the accident captivated millions, earning him a seat on David occurred. This gives Franco his only speaking partner Letterman’s couch, a lucrative book deal and now a for five days and nights as he records a video journal, part-time career as motivational speaker, for which he is paid $25,000 per pop. And now an Oscar-winning director has made a film about his five-day ordeal in the high desert of southern Utah. While familiar with Ralston’s story, I was nonetheless surprised when I first heard it was to be adapted into a film. The challenges of making 127 Hours are pretty obvious. Namely, this is a one-character story, and that character spends 80 percent of the film in one setting. Turning Ralston’s tale into a stage production sounds hard enough. You could argue that Danny Boyle—who picked up his Oscar for Slumdog Millionaire two years ago— faced far greater challenges than Robert Zemeckis did in 2000 when he directed Tom Hanks in the wonderful Cast Away, the film with which 127 Hours will almost surely be compared. At least Hanks could move around on his tropical island. Here, Between a rock and a hard place. playing the energetic and affable Ralston, documenting everything from his hallucinations, to James Franco is literally stuck in one place. Somehow, it all works. Not only does it work, it drinking his own urine, to saying his goodbyes to famimesmerizes the audience with perfect pacing, effective ly members. Boyle and Franco are apparently two of a quick cuts and a bounding energy that results in a legit- very small group outside of Ralston’s family to have imately moving and powerful film. It’s impossible to actually watched the real video diary, which probably look away from what feels like a gripping documentary, accounts for the emotional gut punch of these scenes and that includes the scene where—well, you know the that transfers to the big screen. It’s nice to know Boyle didn’t have to take creative license and interject a camscene I’m talking about. Or perhaps you don’t. The title, 127 Hours, refers era when there was none. As a device to increase the to the time Ralston spent with his right arm pinned dialogue, it works far better than, say, Wilson the volleybeneath a boulder following an accident while explor- ball in Cast Away. ing Blue John Canyon near Moab. With very little food Danny Boyle has yet to make a bad film, and while and less than a full Nalgene of water to sustain him, Slumdog Millionaire is actually my least favorite of his and nothing more than some climbing rope, a head movies, there is an energy to 127 Hours that feels very lamp, an empty Camelbak and a $15 utility knife to similar to his Indian fairytale. But here he manages to figure out an exit strategy, the situation is a dire one. harness that energy more effectively, often integrating And of course not a single person in the world knows the triple-split screen that’s become his trademark of where he is. sorts with another brilliant soundtrack by A.R. Boyle plays up the what-ifs throughout the film: Rahman. The end of 127 Hours feels like the end of an Franco flashes back more than once to ignoring a phone epic journey, when in fact you basically never left the call from his mother shortly before leaving, as well as his boulder—and the man determined to escape its crushvague answer when a co-worker asks Ralston where ing weight. he’ll be heading for the weekend. Franco’s eyes and 127 Hours continues at the Carmike 10. facial expressions tell a story of regret and understanding as he comes to terms with the seriousness of the sitarts@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

Page 37 February 3–February 10, 2011


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK BALLET IN CINEMA: CALIGULA Slap on some pointe shoes and get ready for The Paris Opera Ballet’s rendition of Caligula, which follows the life of the Roman Emperor of the same name who was an eccentric with despotic tendencies. Carmike 10: 11:30 AM only on Tue. THE ROOMMATE You ever had a psycho roommate in college? This movie plays on that fear as the story follows Leighton Meester and Minka Kelly, one of whom stops taking her meds and goes violently loco. Village 6: 7:20 and 9:50, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and 4:35. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:15, 4:30, 7 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4, 7 and 9:35. SANCTUM James Cameron showcases his wicked awesome 3-D photography techniques (the ones he used in Avatar) as executive producer in this thriller adventure story about a crew of people who get stuck in an intricate cave system after a flash flood dampens their plans. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 4, 7:05 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

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Connelly, Winona Ryder and Queen Latifah co-star. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:40, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:15, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE FIGHTER Mark Wahlberg is the knockout star of this Rockyesque, biographical sports drama about the life of East Coast boxer “Irish” Micky Ward, who punched his way to the top thanks to expert training from his ex-convict half-brother, played by Christian Bale. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15. THE GREEN HORNET Seth Rogen is a financially well-off son of a newspaper publisher who decides to put bad guys in their place by becoming a masked ass-kicking

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Movie Shorts

LITTLE FOCKERS Your favorite Focker Ben Stiller returns in this third, and last, installment of the comedy series that began with Meet the Parents and Meet the Fockers. This time around, Stiller has to contend with parenthood, a midlife crisis, and his nosierthan-thou father-in-law Robert De Niro. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 7:20 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE MECHANIC The testosterone just oozes out of this remake of the 1972 original: Jason Statham is an ace assassin who teaches Ben Foster the bloody tricks of the trade after Foster’s dad, Donald Sutherland, gets snuffed out. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:20 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 shows on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:40, 5, 7:25 and 9:45, with an

NOW PLAYING 127 HOURS Director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionare, Trainspotting) returns with a film about every hardcore mountaineer’s worst nightmare. It follows the true story of adventurer Aron Ralston—played by James Franco—who decides to head out to Robber’s Roost in Utah to explore canyons, but ends up getting stranded after a gigantic boulder crushes his arm. Carmike 10: 4, 7:30 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:30 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:10, 7:30 and 9:45. Facebooking is totally the new porn. The Roommate opens Friday at the Village 6. BLACK SWAN additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream) delivers yet another psychological head trip with a story crime fighter in this 3-D adaptation of the classic Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:05, 7:10 and 9:30. that pits two ballet dancers, Natalie Portman and 1930s radio program. Michel Gondry (Eternal Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Mila Kunis, against each other as they fight for Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) directs. Carmike Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. stage prominence during a production of Swan 10: 4:30, 7:10 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees Lake. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9, with Sun. at 1:35. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:25 and 10, with NO STRINGS ATTACHED matinees at 1 and 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:55 and 4:50. Stadium 14 Yes, this movie is about gettin’ it on. Ashton 4:15, 6:45 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 and Kutcher and Natalie Portman are old friends who 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, start knocking boots, and then Kutcher realizes show at midnight. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:50, 6:30 and 9:20. he’s got a heart-on for Portman. Village 6: 7 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:35 and 4:15. THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE KING’S SPEECH Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER The third film based on C.S. Lewis’ fantasy trilogy After English aristocrat Colin Firth gets crowned matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 gets a little 3-D love in a story that centers around King George VI of England, he tries to rid himself in Kalispell: 1, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:35, with an addiEdmund Pevensie and company venturing to the of a nasty stammer so he can give good speech- tional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. end of the world in a ship, and features lots of eye es to his fellow Brits, who are on the brink of World candy like eerily glowing swords and shapeshifting War II. The film received 12 Oscar nominations. SEASON OF THE WITCH th humans. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:30 and 9:55, with Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with a 7 only Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman are 14 century show on Sat., and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. crusaders given the not-so-fun task of transportSat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium 14 Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with ing a witch—who allegedly caused the black in Kalispell: 1:10 and 3:55. Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on plague—to a monastery, in the hopes her powSun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, ers of pestilence will be destroyed. Along the THE DILEMMA Vince Vaughn witnesses the wife of his 3:50, 6:50 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. way, some evil things start to happen. Stadium coworker/best friend smooching another guy, and show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:50, 6:50 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 5 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and has to figure out the most dude-friendly way to and 9:30. Mon.–Thu. at 4:05 and 9:30. break the bad news to his buddy. Jennifer

Missoula Independent

Page 38 February 3–February 10, 2011

TANGLED The Rapunzel fairy tale gets a 3-D makeover in this “action-packed” animated version starring the voice of Mandy Moore as the girl with really long hair. Carmike 10 in 2-D: 4:20, 7:20 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:20, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and 4:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:20 and 4:40, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25 and 4:10. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9. THE RITE A young priest with doubts about faith has a change of heart after he becomes an apprentice for exorcist Anthony Hopkins and notices that people are starting to act a little, well, evil. Village 6: 7:05 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20 and 4:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 4, 7:10 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer Cinema in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:20. TRON: LEGACY This 3-D sequel to the 1982 classic ought to make your inner sci-fi freak scream with delight. It follows Garrett Hedlund as he plugs into a digital world—filled with flashy costumes and awesome looking spaceships— so he can find Jeff Bridges and return him back to reality. Carmike 10: 7 and 9:50. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 6:40 and 9:25. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. TRUE GRIT The Coen brothers offer up their stylish adaptation of the 1968 novel, and 1969 movie, of the same name. Jeff Bridges is a booze-loving U.S. Marshal, enlisted by a 14-year-old girl to track down shady drifter Josh Brolin, after Brolin kills the girl’s dad. Matt Damon costars. Carmike 10: 4:15, 6:30, 7, 9 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1, 1:30 and 3:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 3:45, 7:10 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. YOGI BEAR This 3-D flick features Dan Aykroyd getting his bear on as the voice of Yogi Bear, who, with his pal Boo Boo, voiced by Justin Timberlake, must save Jellystone Park from getting bought and cut down by loggers. Carmike 10: 4 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 2:50 and 7:15, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30 and 6:55. Capsule reviews by Skylar Browning and Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Feb. 4. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 Meow! Come down to Betty's Divine February 4th for a feline-themed First Friday art show by Melissa Clark and David Lusk entitled "Nine Lives. Mobiles and Monoprints." Handsewn felt cats will hang from the ceiling (mobile-style) and cat monoprints will grace the walls. A portion of the proceeds from sold art will go to AniMeals. There will also be an AniMeals donation jar, so bring some spare change for the homeless kitty cats! Wine, cookies, and canned cat food. 5-8pm. BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Join us at Butterfly Herbs for our February First Friday celebration where we will feature a 5th Collaborative Erotic Art Show... art pieces made in collaboration between lovers. All orientations are welcome. 5–8 PM. CLAY STUDIO 1106 Hawthorne Unit A, 543-0509 This Teapot Show features ceramic works from over two dozen established and emerging ceramic artists currently living in Montana, as well as teapot-themed drawings by the Pattee Canyon Ladies’ Salon. This show runs February 4-25, with a reception on Friday, February 4. MONTANA MUSEUM OF ART & CULTURE Meloy and Paxson Galeries at the UM PARTV Center 406-243-2019 www.umt.edu/montanamuseum Welcome Back UM Students & Faculty. Join Us for a First Friday Celebration February 4th, 4-6pm. Giveaways, discounted items and other special treats. Three Centuries of European Prints from the MMAC Permanent Collection and Renoir, Magritte, Gauguin and other European Masterpieces from a Private Collection. ONE ELEVEN 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 Please join us at One Eleven for our February First Friday event featuring art by Hannah Halland. Reception 5-8 pm.

Welcome Back UM Students & Faculty

Join Us for a First Friday Celebration February 4th, 4- 6pm

<

Giveaways, discounted items and other special treats! Sponsored in part by:

GALLERY HOURS: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday: 12-3pm Thursday and Friday: 12- 6pm

Three Centuries of European Prints from the MMAC Permanent Collection and Renoir, Magritte, Gauguin and other European Masterpieces from a Private Collection Meloy and Paxson Galleries at the UM PARTV Center 406.243.2019 | www.umt.edu/montanamuseum

Get in touch with your inner artist

First Friday Gallery Walks! Missoula Independent

Page 39 February 3–February 10, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

February 3 - February 10, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30, groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children.

1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information. WANTED: Donated household items in good condition to sell online to benefit local family agency. Tax deductible donation. Call Bob 370-0650

LOST & FOUND LOST black/white male cat Last seen evening of January 27th. Escaped from

our home at 2105 Trail St.(Behind Emma Dickenson School). “Tuck” is 17 lbs, black with white running from forehead, down nose, throat thru belly with white on all 4 paws. Could be headed to our old house (we moved just a month ago) at 2120 Inverness. Reward. 406-546-5188 small red sheeba inu spayed female, 15 years old. Curled tail. lost higgins and broadway 1/23/11 10pm. 970708-7133 or 334-590-1518

127 N. Higgins, Suite 307 532-4663 www.homeword.org Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

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CIRCLE SQUARE Recycling Missoula’s apartments since 1969

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TO GIVE AWAY 2 mating cockatiel birds to give away for free. Come with cage and food. Call 493-5466.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE

Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-5326546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com

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classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Dokey is a majestic white Guinea Pig. This little guy is legendary for his beautiful singing voice and is sure to always chirp a pleasant little tune whenever people walk by his cage. Guinea Pigs typically sing when they are happy and overall make excellent pets. Even Queen Elizabeth I had a pet Guinea Pig. Dokey would make an excellent companion for any person or family. Dokey’s favorite things include; apple slices, lettuce and good conversationalists. HSWM 5493934


ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

TRIUMPH OF THE WILLY When you gave advice to the woman complaining about her husband surfing the Internet for porn and swimsuit photos of Serena Williams, you seemed to have missed a word in her question. That word is “husband.” I doubt people get married with it being okay for another man or woman to be involved in their marriage. Pornography causes great harm to marriages. It’s not okay. It’s not normal. It’s a selfish and destructive choice. —Appalled Wife

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

MISC. GOODS

ELECTRONICS

11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721-(PAWN)7296.

FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-9043558

WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multi-cord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-244-4255 or 406-5460587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long.

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

MUSIC

Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multi-cord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-244-4255 or 406-5460587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long.

GUITAR WANTED! Local musician will pay up to $12,500 for pre1975 Gibson, Fender, Martin, Rickenbaker and Gretsch guitars. Fender amplifiers also. Call tollfree! 1-(800)995-1217

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

MORGENROTH MUSIC Inventory Clearance to make way for new products coming from NAMM, our annual buying show! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

PETS & ANIMALS CATS: #9414 Brit short HairX, Blk/Tan Tabby, SF; #0243 Brown Tabby, Am Long Hair, SF, 3yr; #0330 Black/brown tabby, SF, Am Long Hair, Adult; #0358 Brown Tabby, Main Coon X, Diabetic, SF, 2yrs; #0362 Grey/brown tabby, Am Short Hair, NM, 4yr #0465 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF, 5 yr; #0588 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF; #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #0644 Black/white, SF, Manx X, 9 mo; #0802 Black, Long Hair, NM; #1059 Black/white, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #1065 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 2 yrs; #1067 White, ASH, SF, 3 yrs; #1119 Black, AMH, NM; #1160 Grey/Black, Tabby, ASH, SF, 2 yrs; #1162 Black/white, DMH, SF, 1 yr; #1163 Black/white, SF, DSH, 1yr; #1220 White/grey, ASH, SF, 5 yrs; #1230 White/Grey Tabby, ALH, SF, 9 yrs; #1254 Orange, NM, ASH, 2yr; #1255 Tuxedo, DLH, SF, 2 yrs; #1276 Grey Tabby, Siamese

X, SF, 3yrs; #1298 Grey, Tabby, ASH, SF; #1301 Black/white, DLH, SF, 6 mo; #1302 Black, DLH, SF, 6 mo; #1307 White/Seal Pt, Siamese, SF, 1yr; #1308 Grey/white, ASH, SF, 7 yr; #1309 Dilute Calico, Brittish Short Hair X, SF. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #1057 Grey, Weimaraner, NM, Adult; #1071 Tri, GSD/Husky X, NM, 6 yrs; #1113 Red/White, Aussie, NM, 6yrs; #1194 Black, Lab, SF, 8yrs; #1219 Black, McNabb Blue Heeler X, NM, 2yrs; #1223 Yellow, Lab, NM, 5 yrs; #1277 Black, Shar Pei X, NM, 6yrs; #1312 Mastiff/Hound X, SF; #1314 Terrier X, Tan/Black, NM, 5yrs; #1316 Tan/Black, Great Dane/Pitt, NM, 3yrs; #1317 Lab/Hound X, Black, SF, 4yr; #1319 Border Collie/Heeler, Grey/black, SF, 11 mo; #1322 Brindle, Hound, SF, 2 yrs; #1323 Black, Lab X, NM, 4yrs; #1327 Tan, Border Collie, Heeler, SF 1 yr . For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Outlaw Music Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

It’s hard to have a rational conversation about porn because people’s first reaction is so often knee-jerk hysteria. I got a lot of that in response to this particular column; for example, as one guy wrote, “Porn focuses on body parts, not on sex. This is how bestiality develops.” Yes, we see that all the time: One week, a guy’s surfing the net for busty blondes; the next, he’s got the hots for the neighbor’s Labradoodle. While you seem to be under the mistaken impression that I missed the word “husband” in the woman’s question, you seem to have missed most of the words in my answer. Serena Williams isn’t “involved” in this couple’s marriage; the guy was just using pictures of her to ring some doorbell in his brain. As I explained in that column, “Seeing pictures of hot women activates the ‘reward centers’ in men’s brains—the parts that go ‘Yeah, baby!’ to stuff like drugs, beer and money.” Just as the guy isn’t connecting emotionally with a can of Bud, he isn’t emotionally involved with Serena, who “might as well be a big, tennis-playing ham sandwich.” Not only is it “normal” for men to look at porn, so many men look at it that what would qualify as deviant behavior would be not looking at it. Men also ogle hot women on the street and everywhere they go, but a man’s forehead doesn’t come with a browser history. If it did, it would likely reflect what one female reader wrote: “My husband once told me that he thinks about having sex with every woman he sees. That’s Every. Single. One.” She keeps this in perspective: “I have absolutely no doubt that he has been completely faithful to me. None. I don’t care (about these thoughts), just like I don’t care that he watches porn on the Internet. My only request is that he keep his anti-virus software up to date.” Sure, porn can pose problems in a marriage or relationship—when used to

excess. The same goes for golf clubs, credit cards and Hostess Ding Dongs. Of course, when there are problems, people love to blame the thing being used instead of the person doing the using. This thinking is fed by the damaging contention that addiction is “a disease.” Multiple sclerosis is a disease. You can’t decide to not have multiple sclerosis. You can decide to stop engaging in some behavior. You might not want to stop, it might be terribly hard to stop, but if the stakes are high enough, you will. Just ask some guy who tells you he can’t stop looking at porn. Sorry, but if his house catches fire, he’s not going to sit there at the computer simultaneously getting off and getting crispy. The hysteria about porn is reminiscent of the hysteria surrounding pot from early on, ever since the propaganda classic “Reefer Madness” depicted it as a demon weed that causes rape, murder, suicide, crazed piano playing and hit-and-run driving. Of course, if you know any potheads, you know the stuff is far more likely to cause them to lie on a beanbag chair polishing off the collected works of Sara Lee. Similarly, shrill ravings about porn keep the facts about it from being heard, keeping people from being able to differentiate between porn as a problem and porn as a pastime. This woman’s husband hadn’t stopped showering, going to work, or having sex with her to lock himself in a room with the naked sex workers of the World Wide Web. In fact, she described him as a sweet, loving, “deeply caring” man who only watches porn when she’s out and he’s bored. The actual problem in her marriage was her unfounded fears about his porn consumption— which led to her feeling resentful and shutting down between the sheets. This sort of sex and affection strike can compel even a man who wants to be faithful to expand his horizons from sightseeing in the virtual world to getting naked with co-workers and rent-a-booty in the real one. So, as I advised this woman, no man “only has eyes for you,” but if you’d like keep the rest of your husband’s body parts from wandering, you should see to it that your bedroom isn’t the one place in the world that he can’t get sex.

MARKETPLACE

INVENTORY CLEARANCE TO MAKE WAY FOR NEW PRODUCTS COMING FROM NAMM, OUR ANNUAL BUYING SHOW!

GRIZ CARD DISCOUNTS 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

MORGENROTH MUSIC 1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 montanamusic.com

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BIOLOGICAL TECHNICIAN. Sort and count aquatic invertebrates found in lab samples according to relevant protocols. Knowledge of, or an interest in, biology preferred. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills and the ability to work with precision. Will be using a microscope and compiling sample labels and associated paperwork. Applicant should have good communication skills and positive energy. Schedule: 40 hours per week Monday through Friday. Starting wage is $8.50/hour with benefits and opportunity for increase available after a 6 month probationary period. #9950327 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 February 3 – February 10, 2011

FLEXIBLE BENEFITS CUSTOMER SERVICE REP. Very strong customer service skills, fast & accurate typing & computer skills. Must be highly motivated, able to take initiative and deal effectively with emotional callers. Highly demanding, fastpaced work environment. Duties include answering calls from plan participants regarding flexible benefit claims. Will record all calls, meet with clients to explain benefits, log faxed claims, assist with other duties. Requires High School Diploma or GED. Must be proficient in Windows applications and Word. Allow up to one hour to take the following testing prior to submitting company application: Call Center Customer Service Skills (Audio), 3 Minute Typing (45 WPM net), and Writing a Thank You letter. Pay is DOE. #2978972 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FRAC SAND HAULERS - Tons of runs in Texas! Come to where

the weather is warm, pay is great and the land is flat. 817769-7621, 817-769-7713 Full Time Landscaper PositionExperience in all facets of landscaping preferred, including irrigation repair and maintenance, planting and plant maintenance, weeding and lawn care, all with an organic approach. Willing to assist with any and all additional ranch duties including equipment maintenance, cleaning and repair, snow removal, light housekeeping and general labor. Looking for an individual with high integrity and strong work ethic. Expect to work hard long days. Most tasks to be completed outdoors. Option of housing provided. Possible opportunity for a couple. Salary DOE. This position is full time and year round. Please send resumes to PO Box 609 Stevensville, Mt 59870.

MAIL & SCANNING CLERK. Processing of incoming company mail, sorting incoming checks by category, and scanning them into the electronic treasury database. Requires a high school diploma or GED and a valid MT state driver’s license. Oral and written communication skills are required. Experience with mail systems preferred. Must have PC skills, including Windows, Word and Excel. Requires testing at Job Service prior to submitting company application: 3-minute Typing Test and Thank You Letter. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. Mail is processed Monday-Saturday. Weekend and holiday work may be required. Overtime may be required as mail volume necessitates. #2978969 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PRODUCTION WORKER to perform bench or line assembly operations to mass-produce dental instruments. Operate


QUADRIPLEGIC NEEDS HELP: Monday-Friday 7:00-9:00 a.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m. 9:00-10:00 p.m. Weekends 7:00-9:30 a.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m. 9:00-10:00 p.m. $10.95/hour. Call Dan 721-9265

SAWMILLS-Band/Chainsaw-Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In Stock ready to ship. From $4090.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N 1-800-661-7747 SECRETARY with 12 months experience. Must be familiar with Microsoft Office, Word & Excel. Duties include phone work, greeting walk-in customers, typing, filing, some light bookkeeping and other duties as necessary. Must be neatly groomed. Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm & will include some Saturdays. Somewhat flexible hours depending on situation. $8.00/hr DOE. Open until filled. #9950393 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 UNARMED SECURITY GUARD. Part-time to do security monitoring in Missoula area. Will be checking vehicles for authorization to be on site. Ability to pass background check and drug testing. Must have valid Drivers License and a vehicle. Wage is $9.00 per hour. Work days and shifts will vary. Security experience is needed. Employer provides radio, shirt & cap. #2978966 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR APPLICATOR/DRIVER WANTED FOR custom spraying and fertilizer application. Must be willing to

ASE CERTIFIED AUTO TECH. Previous experience required, able to pass drug and background screen, and provide good work references. Pay is DOE. Position is full time. Ideal candidate will be a team player, have good customer service skills, be productive, and communicate well with others. If you are interested in applying for this position please email a resume to Kara Nelson-knelson@nelsonpersonnel.com, along with the job title. Interviews will be scheduled accordingly. #9950362 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

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LARGE NORTHEAST MONTANA NEW HOLLAND FARM EQUIPMENT DEALERSHIP has an immediate full-time opening for a parts person. Pay depends on experience. Company participates in health insurance, uniforms, sick leave, vacation and 401(K). Parts and computer experience required. Call Galen Zerbe 1-800-228-5393. SALES PERSON to sell steel buildings. Requires a minimum of 24 months previous sales experience. Employer will train on job specifics. Wage is $7.35 per hour plus commission. This is an exceptional opportunity with a generous commission rates. #2978962 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

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Ranch Worker Position- Need someone willing to perform all tasks of manual labor including tree removal, moving irrigation pipe, fencing, landscape and lawn care, pulling and mowing weeds, equipment repair and maintenance, general clean up and labor. Some experience running heavy equipment preferred. Expect long hours and physical work. Looking for an individual with high integrity and strong work ethic. Most tasks to be completed outdoors. Option of housing provided. Possible opportunity for a couple. Salary DOE. This position is full time and year round. Please send resumes to PO Box 609 Stevensville, Mt 59870.

work flexible hours during application season. CDL preferred or ability to get one. Both full and seasonal part-time positions available. Full-time includes health ins, pension, 401K. Wages based on experience. To apply, contact Richard Liesener, Ray Farmers Union Elevator, Ray, ND. 701-5683343 office or 701-648-9712 Cell

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BACKHOE OPERATOR to dig around live underground utilities. Must have 2 plus years backhoe experience. Must have a valid CDL A1 drivers license & be able to pass a drug test. Pay DOE. #2978971 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TREE CLIMBER & TRIMMER WITH OWN GEAR. Operate bucket truck, work around power lines and other barriers, operate tools which involve machine-driven blades. MUST have experience trimming trees to maintain tree health. NO TRAINEES. Need to have valid driver’s license and clean MVR. CDL a plus. Job is seasonal and very busy in fall, spring, and summer. Position starts at parttime and will increase to fulltime beginning in March. Monday-Friday and hours can be discussed at time of interview, as employer has some flexibility. Wage starts at $10$12 an hour DOE. #2978967 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 February 3 – February 10, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Now and then, members of other astrological signs complain that I seem to favor you Aries above them. If that’s true, I’m certainly not aware of it. As far as I know, I love all the signs equally. I will say this, however: Due to the idiosyncrasies of my own personal horoscope, I have been working for years to get more skilled at expressing qualities that your tribe tends to excel at: being direct, acting fearless, knowing exactly what you want, cultivating a willingness to change, and leading by example. All these assets are especially needed by the people in your life right now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’ve found that even when people are successful in dealing with a long-term, intractable problem, they rarely zap it out of existence in one epic swoop. Generally they chip away at it, dismantling it little by little; they gradually break its hold with incremental bursts of unspectacular heroism. Judging from the astrological omens, though, I’d say that you Tauruses are ripe for a large surge of dismantling. An obstacle you’ve been hammering away at for months or even years may be primed to crumble dramatically. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): My brother Tom and I used to be on a softball team in Santa Cruz. I played third base and he was the pitcher. For one game he showed up with a new glove that still had the price tag dangling. I asked him if he was going to snip it off. “Nope,” he said. “It’ll subtly distract the batters and give me an advantage.” That day he pitched one of his best games ever. His pitches seemed to have extra mojo that kept the hitters off balance. Were they even aware they were being messed with? I don’t think so. In fact, my theory is that because Tom’s trick was so innocuous, no one on the opposing team registered the fact that it was affecting their concentration. I suggest you try a similar strategy, Gemini



CANCER (June 21-July 22): A famous atheist named Edwin Kagin has incorporated performance art into his crusade against religious believers. Wielding a hairdryer, he “de-baptizes” exchurch-goers who want to reverse the effects of the baptism they experienced as children. The stream of hot air that Kagin blows against their foreheads is meant to exorcise the holy water daubed there way back when. Could you benefit from a similar ritual, Cancerian? If you have any inclinations to free yourself from early imprints, religious or otherwise, you’re in a favorable phase to do so.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In an old “Star Trek” episode, a woman visits the starship’s medical facility seeking chemicals she needs to start a hydroponic garden. The chief doctor, who has a high sense of self-worth and a gruff bedside manner, scowls at her. Why is she bothering him with such a trivial request? “Now I know how Hippocrates felt,” he complains, “when the King needed him to trim a hangnail.” (Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates is referred to as the “Father of Medicine” because of his seminal influence on the healing professions.) I suspect that sometime soon, Leo, you will be in a position similar to the ship’s doctor. Unlike him, however, you should carry out the assignment with consummate grace. It’ll pay off for you in the long run—probably in ways you can’t imagine right now.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In Leonard Cohen’s song “Anthem,” he sings, “There is a crack in everything / That’s how the light gets in.” From what I can tell, Virgo, the week ahead will be one of the best times all year for welcoming the light that comes through the cracks. In fact, I urge you to consider widening the cracks a little—maybe even splitting open a few new cracks—so that the wildly healing light can pour down on you in profusion.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When was the last time you created a masterpiece, Libra? I’m not necessarily talking about a work of art; it might have been an exquisite dinner you prepared for people you love…or a temporary alliance you forged that allowed you to accomplish the impossible…or a scary-fun adventure you risked that turned you into a riper human being with a more authoritative standing. Whether your last tour de force happened seven weeks ago or seven months ago, my sense is that you’re due for another one. The cosmic rhythms are conspiring to make you act like an artful genius.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Herbs and Kids Herbalist and Mom Jessica Maisel discusses creative ways to get your kids using and loving medicinal herbs to achieve and maintain optimum health. Wednesday, February 9, 79 pm, Cost: $20. Local Medicinal Herbs Herbalist and wildcrafter Jessica Maisel takes us on an indepth exploration of 10 useful and abundant medicinal herbs local to the Missoula area including arnica, balsam root, red root, hawthorn, horsetail, yarrow, St. John’s Wort, poplar, monarda and oregon grape. Thursday, February 17, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Spring Cleansing for the Body Series Spring is the perfect time to do a cleanse. Join Herbalist Jessica Maisel and learn how to effectively cleanse and purify your body in a safe and nourishing way from the inside out. This three part series will cover the reasons we need to actively cleanse our bodies, which herbs and sup-

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The renegade spiritual sect known as the Church of the Subgenius values one treasure above all others: not salvation, not enlightenment, not holiness, but rather Slack. And what is Slack? It is a state of being in which everything flows smoothly—a frame of mind so unfettered and at ease that the entire universe just naturally cooperates with you. When you’ve got abundant reserves of Slack, you don’t strain and struggle to make desired events unfold, and you don’t crave things you don’t really need. You’re surrendered to the greater intelligence that guides your life, and it provides you with a knack for attracting only what’s truly satisfying. Happy Slack Week, Aquarius! I suspect you will have loads of that good stuff, which means your freedom to be your authentic self will be at a peak.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Stand-up comedian Arj Barker says that when he writes each of his jokes, he’s thinking that all he needs to do is make it funny enough to get at least three people in the audience to laugh at it. More than three is gravy, and he hopes he does get more. But if he can just get those three, he believes, he will always get a lot of work in his chosen profession. In accordance with the astrological rhythms, Capricorn, I urge you to adopt a similar approach. To be successful in the coming days, you don’t need an approval rating of 80 percent.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I saw ex-Poet Laureate Robert Hass read and discuss his poem “Etymology.” He said that while many of the fluids of the human body are named with English words, at least one isn’t: the moisture of a woman who is sexually aroused. The AngloSaxons did have a word for it, he noted: silm, which also referred to the look of moonlight on the water. “Poor language,” Hass concluded, bemoaning a vocabulary that ignores such an important part of human experience. Your assignment, Sagittarius, is to correct for any problems caused by poor language in your own sphere. If you’ve been lazy about articulating your meaning or needs, then please activate your deeper intelligence. If there’s a situation in your life that’s suffering from a sloppy use of words, reframe its contours with crisper speech. You could even coin some new words or borrow good ones from foreign tongues.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Why is everything so eerily quiescent right now? Should you be worried? Has the momentum been sucked out of your life? Have you lost your way? Personally, I think you’re doing better than you realize. The dormancy is a temporary illusion. To help give you the perspective you need, I offer you this haiku-like poem by Imma von Bodmershof, translated by Petra Engelbert: “The great river is silent / only sometimes it sounds quietly / deep under the ice.”

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense,” said writer Gertrude Stein many decades ago. Isn’t that about a thousand times truer in 2011? It takes rigorous concentration not to be inundated with data. But that’s exactly your assignment, Pisces. It’s absolutely crucial for you to be a beacon of common sense in the coming days. To meet your dates with destiny, you will have to be earthy, uncluttered, well-grounded, and in close touch with your body’s intuition. If that requires you to cut back dramatically on the volume of information you take in, so be it.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 February 3 – February 10, 2011

542-2147 • 2204 Dixon


PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: A portion of Woodville Avenue, located in the southeast corner of Section 27, Township 12N, Range 17W, being that portion more specifically described in “Lund-JamisonWheatley Agreement for Abandonment of a portion of Woodville Avenue in Clinton, Montana” (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula MT.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The portion of the road to be abandoned is not needed for any public purpose, nor can it be reasonably be anticipated to be useful for any public purpose in the future; 2. The abandonment will be in the public interest by allowing for an optimal placement of a wastewater treatment system on the Lund property; 3. All conditions of the Agreement attached as Exhibit A have been satisfied; 4. Adequate access to all affected properties will be preserved, as provided for in the Agreement attached as Exhibit A. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 9, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 2583241 Date: January 3, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to relocate a public utility and drainage easement specifically described as: The twenty (20) foot wide utility easement located along the northerly boundary of Spring Meadows Addition, Lot 53 located in NW _ Section 22, T14N, R20W From the entire easement area within the boundaries of Lot 53 And further described in the Spring Meadows Addition subdivision plat as: A 20 foot public utility and drainage easement (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula MT.) The relocation of this public utility and drainage easement is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The previous owners of Lot 53 constructed the home, deck and septic system partially within this easement. The current property owners of Lot 53 are performing an amended subdivision plat in conjunction with the neighboring property owners which will replace the existing public utility and drainage easement with a revised replacement easement. 2. The Missoula City/County Health Department fully supports the repositioning of this easement. Although the septic system was permitted by Missoula County, It is a violation of the health code to have a septic system located within a utility and drainage easement. 3. No utilities exist within the current easement location and all affected utility companies and agencies have agreed to the repositioning of the utility and drainage easement as depicted on the amended subdivision plat. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested relocation

will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 16, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula MT. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By /s/ Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder Date: January 11, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY INVITATION FOR BIDS The Missoula County Facilities Management Department is currently soliciting sealed bids for a water cooled centrifugal chiller for the Missoula County Detention Center located at 2340 Mullan Rd, Missoula, MT. Bids will be accepted until 3:00PM, Wednesday, February 9, 2011 by the Office of the County Auditor at which time bids will be opened and read. All work is to be performed in accordance with Invitation for Bid specifications posted on the Missoula County website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.ht m. Bid specifications are also available through the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N Russell, Missoula, MT 59801, 406-5495002. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the amount bid and must be in a form specified in MCA 18-1-201 thru 206. The security is subject to forfeiture if the successful bidder does not enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Interested parties may contact Bob Schieder, Systems Engineer, (406 )531 -0377 or bschiede@co.missoula.mt.us for additional information. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Invitation for Bid – Detention Center Chiller” and 4 copies submitted to: Barbara Berens, County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF FEES RELATING TO PETITIONS FOR ROADS AND SPECIAL DISTRICTS The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing to consider adoption of fees for processing petitions for roads and special districts. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Public Meeting on February 16, 2011, at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor. DATED THIS 25th DAY OF JANUARY, 2011 /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING Private Road Name Change MISSOULA The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on changing the private road name known as Crawford Court to Aubrey Ann Court. This subdivision was platted as

Crawford Addition with the private access named as Crawford Court. The new owners of Crawford Addition request a road name change through the road naming change process, and that special conditions exist. When Crawford Court was named, Mr. Crawford was the land developer. Mr. Crawford has since sold the subdivision development and the new owners are requesting a road name change to Aubrey Ann Court to reflect the new ownership. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Public Meeting on Wednesday, February 16, 2011 at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Deb Evison, Missoula County Public Works, at (406) 258-3702 or by e-mail at devison@co.missoula.mt.us BY ORDER OF THE MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DATED THIS 12TH DAY OF JANUARY, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY The Seeley Lake sewer district is issuing a Request for Proposal (RFP) from interested manufacture and suppliers of a (SBR) sequential batch reactor or a (MBR) Membrane bioreactor systems and equipment, for a new waste water treatment plant. Completed proposals will be accepted at Great West Engineering, PO Box 4817 Helena Mt. 59604 until February 24th 2011 and will be publicly opened. Interested manufactures should contact Craig Pozega for a full copy of the PRP at 406-4498627. Do not contact the district regarding the RFP. MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT INVITATION TO BID AIRPORT IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MISSOULA, MONTANA Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received and publicly opened at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, February 17, 2011 by the Missoula County Airport Authority at the Airport Terminal Conference Room for the construction of “Airport Improvements” to include the following: Terminal Building Entrance Sidewalk Rehabilitation Project This work is to include all tools, equipment, materials and labor to complete this project. Bids must be sealed and delivered: Missoula County Airport Authority 5225 Highway 10 West Missoula, MT 59808 at or before 2:00 p.m., local time on Thursday, February 17, 2011, and marked “Bid for Airport Improvements at the Missoula International Airport.” The bidder’s name, address and state Contractor’s Registration Number shall appear in the lower left hand corner of the envelope. All bids must be accompanied by lawful monies of the United States or a Cashier’s Check, a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Bank Money Order or Bank Draft, drawn and issued by a National Banking Association located in the State of Montana, or by any Banking Corporation incorporated under the Laws of the State of Montana, in an amount equal to not less than ten (10) percent of the total bid, payable to the order of the Missoula County Airport Authority as liquidated damages in the event said successful bidder shall fail or refuse to execute the contract in accordance with the terms of his bid. After a contract is awarded, the successful bidder will be required to furnish a separate Performance and Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract. Plans, specifications, bidding and contract forms may be inspected at the Airport Director’s Office – Missoula International Airport, or at offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at 1 Engineering Place, Helena, Montana; 315 N. 25th Street, Suite 102, Billings, Montana; 2880 Technology Blvd West., Bozeman, Montana; 1321 8th Avenue North, Suite 104, Great Falls, Montana; or 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana. Copies of these documents may be

obtained from the office of MorrisonMaierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59803 – Phone: (406) 542-8880, on the payment of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) nonrefundable, for each complete set. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive irregularities. The Contractor will be required to comply with the wage and labor requirements and to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedule of wage rates established by the United States Department of Labor as referenced in the Contract. Contractors and any subcontractors doing work on this project will require registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Avenue, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800-556-6694. Contractors are required to have been registered with the Department of Labor and Industry prior to bidding on this project. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the bid documents and specifications. The Bidder is required to submit a Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities (included in the Proposal form). A Contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in these specifications. The proposed contract is under subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. This contract will be funded by revenue generated through the Airport’s PFC program. Bidders may not withdraw Proposals for a period of sixty (60) days after the bid opening date. The pre-bid conference is hereby established at 2:00 p.m. (local time) Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at the Airport Terminal Conference Room, Missoula International Airport. A tour of the work site at the Missoula International Airport will be conducted following the pre-bid conference. Signed: /s/ Cris Jensen Airport Director Missoula County Airport Authority IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, -vs- Laramie Loewen Defendant. )))))))Cause No.

CV2010 - 31131-LT SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT LARAMIE LOEWEN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within ten (10) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an eviction and subsequent possession upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 11, ALL OF LOTS 12, 13, 14 AND THE EAST 25 FEET OF LOT 15 IN BLOCK 66 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 199 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 2284 WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 29th day of December, 2010. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Karen A. Orzech Justice Court Judge Dated this 23rd day of December, 2010. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 MT BAR ID#2429 By: /s/ Charles J. Peterson Charles J. Peterson, Attorney Attorney for the Plaintiff Please be advised that Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information you provide will be used for that purpose. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP 11 12 NOTICE

RESOLUTION NUMBER 2011 - 005 A RESOLUTION OF INTENT TO ZONE UNZONED PROPERTY LEGALLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 3 OF WESTFIELD CENTER, LOCATED IN SECTION 21 OF TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., IN MISSOULA COUNTY (SEE MAP K), ALSO KNOWN AS 8448 HWY 10 W, TO C-C2 (GENERAL COMMERCIAL). WHEREAS, 76-2-201 M.C.A. authorizes the Board of County Commissioners to adopt zoning regulations; and, WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners did adopt zoning regulations for Missoula County through the passage of County Resolution 76-113, as amended; and, WHEREAS, 76-2-202 M.C.A. provides for the establishment and revision of zoning districts; and, WHEREAS, a request to rezone the property legally described above was reviewed by the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board at a public hearing held January 4, 2011; and, WHEREAS, a notice of public hearing was advertised in the Independent on December 16, 2010 and December 23, 2010; and, WHEREAS, a hearing was held by the County Commissioners of Missoula County on January 19, 2011, in order to give the public an opportunity to be heard regarding the proposed amendments to the zoning district; and, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County will receive written protest for a period of thirty (30) days after publication of this notice on January 27, 2011, from persons owning real property within the contiguous boundaries of the C-C2 (General Commercial) zoning district. FURTHER, copies of the C-C2 zoning district are available for inspection at the office of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder and the Office of Planning and Grants PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 24TH DAY OF JANUARY 2011 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ATTEST: MISSOULA COUNTY Vickie Zeier, Clerk and Recorder. Jean Curtiss, Chair. APPROVED AS TO FORM: Bill Carey, Commissioner. James McCubbin, Deputy County Attorney. Michele Landquist, Commissioner

TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KARRIE LEE FIMBRES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Co—Personal Representatives of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BONNIE ACEVES and MANUEL FIMBRES, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 14th day of January, 2011. /s/ Bonnie Aceves, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Manuel

MULLAN MINI STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for units 140, 192, 228 and 236. Units contain office furniture, household furniture and miscellaneous. These units may be viewed starting Feb. 14, 2011 by appointment only by calling 7218710. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 2855 Mullan Road, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to Feb. 16, 2011, 3:30 p.m. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered for sale. Only cash will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales final.

Fimbres, Co-Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-11-4 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS, AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTA-

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA CITY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, February 23, 2011, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following items: 1. A request by Morgan and Rhianna Hirshenberger, represented by Wade Hoyt of Hoyt Homes, for a variance to allow a 2nd story balcony to encroach into the side setback for a house located at 405 N. Grove, and zoned RT10. SEE MAP L

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 15, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request – 217 & 235 Catlin St., 1715 Trail St A request from Steven Sann, represented by Ken Jenkins of Montana Northwest Company, to rezone property located at 217 & 235 Catlin Street and 1715 Trail Street from RM2.7 (Residential multi-dwelling, 16 dwellings per acre) to RM1-45 (Residential multi-dwelling, 43 dwellings per acre). See Map F.

2. A request for a public forum by the YMCA for a wall sign that is not in compliance with the zoning regulations of the OP3 zoning district, located at 3000 S. Russell. SEE MAP R

3. A request by the Clark Fork City Church for a variance to not have to screen the roof mounted mechanical equipment for the building located at 2811 Latimer, zoned M1R-2/EC. SEE MAP S

The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on this item at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March 7, 2011, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Missoula Office of Planning & Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Hilary Schoendorf at the same number or email hschoendorf@co.missoula.mt.us.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 February 3 – February 10, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES TIVE IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARCIA JEAN STRAILE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lisa Bomberger has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Marcia Jean Straile, deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, and for the appointment of Lisa Bomberger as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the courthouse at Missoula, Montana on the 9th day of February, 2011 at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m. at which time all interested persons may appear and object. Dated this 14th day of January, 2011. /s/ Lisa Bomberger MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-10-1069 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. BRIAN SALONEN, Plaintiff, vs. NUTEC COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. d/b/a ROCKY MOUNTAIN COMMUNICATIONS, Inc., MONTANA 5— MINERAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, GOLD CREEK CELLULAR OF MONTANA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claims any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS; Nutec Communications, Inc. d/b/a Rocky Mountain Communications, Inc.; all all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’ title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent. YOU ARE HEREBY Summoned to answer to the Complaint in this action as filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs’ attorneys within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana and described as follows: A tract of land located in the Southwest one-quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian Montana, Missoula County, Montana, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the South one-quarter corner of Section 10; thence S.88º21’06”W., along the South line of said Section 10 a distance of 909.50 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing S.88º21’06”W., along the South line of said Section 10 a distance of 675.00 feet to a point in the centerline of an existing road; thence the following three courses along the centerline of said existing road: N.15º46’58”W., 92.1 feet; thence N.13º38’11”E., 268.23 feet; thence N.03º14’36”E., 145.00 feet; thence leaving the centerline of said road and running N.39º07’13”E., 976.92 feet to a point on a compound curve, said point being in the centerline of an existing road, thence Southeasterly along the centerline of said road and along said compound curve being concave to the Northeast and having a radius of 157.44 feet a distance of 169.90 feet to the point of compound curvature; thence continuing Southeasterly along said compound curve being concave to the North and having a radius of 539.43 feet a distance of 97.61 feet; thence leaving the centerline of said road and running S.07º40’E., 706.56 feet; thence S.35º03’30”W., 548.78 feet to the true point of beginning. WITNESS my hand this 20th day of January, 2011. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 1 Cause No.: DV-09-1091 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, Plaintiff, -vs- DANIEL ARNEY and SALLY ARNEY, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS DANIEL ARNEY AND SALLY ARNEY: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed with the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought to collect a debt owed by the Defendants to Plaintiff. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL this 21st day of January, 2011. SHIRLEY E. FAUST, Clerk of Court /s/ Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-63 Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps III Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Derek Burchartz, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Derek Christopher L. Burchartz to Derek Christopher L. Moree’. The heariing will be on March 1, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED January 20, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Dawn M. Duffy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-11-25 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Adam Russell Luce, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Adam Russell Luce to Adam Russell Freeman. The hearing will be on February 22, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated January 6, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By Cori Ollin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-10-1564 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Shayne Dean Dicks, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Shayne Dean Dicks to Shayne Dean Spence. The hearing will be on March 3, 2011 at 9:00 a.m.. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED January 27, 2011. /s/ Judge John W. Larson, District Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-10-1649 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION ETRADA CO., LLC, Plaintiff vs. MOUNTAIN WEST BANK, N.A.; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; LeROY TRIPP; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS AND TO ALL OTHER PERSONS UNKNOWN: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorneys within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to the land situated in Missoula County, Montana, legally described as follows: An Undivided one-half interest in and to Lot 2 of RASER COMMERCIAL TRACTS NO. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 19 of Plats at Page 78. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 21st day of January, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Susie Wall Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-11-14 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VIOLET H. QUIRIN, a/k/a VI QUIRIN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kristine Fankell, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at Dye & Moe, P.L.L.P., PO Box 9198, 216 West Main, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. Dated: January 18, 2011 /s/ Kristine Fankell, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-10-198 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MAURICE J. AHERN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will b forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PATRICIA L. AHERN, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103

South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2010. /s/ Patricia L. Ahern, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-11-15 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF STANLEY T. RING, a/k/a STANLEY THOMAS RING, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LINDA WOLFE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 27705 Blixit Creek Road, Bonner, Montana 59823 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 18th day of January. 2011 /s/ Linda Wolfe, Personal Representative 27705 Blixit Creek Road, Bonner, MT 59823 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Tuesday, the 8th day of March, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at the front door of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligations set out below, has been directed to sell and has elected to sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time of sale, and without warranty or covenant, express or implied as to title, possession, encumbrances, condition, or otherwise, the interest of the Successor Trustee, Martin S. King, and of the Grantor LINDA J. SNYDER in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula, Montana, to wit: A tract of land located in and being a portion of the NE 1/4 of Section 14, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, and being more particularly described as Parcel 2 of COS 5692. Said sale will be made in accordance with the statutes of the State of Montana, and the terms and provisions of: that certain Trust Indenture dated January 19, 2007, and recorded January 19, 2007, in Book 790 at Page 1109 as Document No. 200701571 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, wherein LINDA J. SNYDER is Grantor, EARL M. PRUYN is the named Beneficiary, and STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. is the named Trustee; that certain Appointment of Successor Trustee dated March 5, 2009, and recorded March 27, 2009, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana, in Book 836 at page 268 as Document No. 200906833, wherein the Beneficiary substituted Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. with Martin S. King, attorney at law, as Successor Trustee. This foreclosure is made because the Grantor, LINDA J. SNYDER, and her successors in interest, have defaulted in the terms of said Trust Indenture and the corresponding Promissory Note in that she has failed to pay the monthly payments and pursuant to the terms of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised his option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. That on the date of sale, presuming no other payments are made and that the sale is not postponed, there will be due and owing the principal sum of One Hundred Fifty Thousand Four Hundred Eighty and No/100 ($152,000.00), plus interest at a rate of Ten Percent (10%) per annum totaling Forty-four Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-two and 45/100 Dollars ($44,452.45), real property taxes of Ten Thousand Three Hundred Sixty-eight and No/100 Dollars ($10,368.00), Six Thousand One Hundred Twenty-two and 33/100 Dollars ($6,122.33) in attorney fees and foreclosure costs through October 25, 2010, for a total amount due of Two Hundred Twelve Thousand Nine Hundred Forty-two and 78/100 Dollars ($212,942.78), together with costs and expenses of foreclosure and related trustee fees, costs and attorney fees allowable by law. DATED this 28th day of October, 2010. /s/ Martin S. King, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA):ss. County of Missoula) On this 28th day of October, 2010, before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Sale of Real Property Under a Deed of Trust as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula My commission expires: January 24, 2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain

trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $475,664.21. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 14, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/29/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200615934, Bk. 777, Pg. 1307, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert Che Garrard, Tonia D. Garrard was Grantor, Community Bank-Missoula, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12-17 Inclusive in Block 7 of Frenchtown Townsites according to the official plat thereof and recorded in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana excepting a portion thereof conveyed to the State of Montana on May 5, 1955 by deed recorded in Book 189 at Page 266 deed records of Missoula County, Montana as retraced by Certificate of Survey No. 5442. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $260,747.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $251,769.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 February 3 – February 10, 2011

any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 11, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.72582) 1002.179340-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200714367, Bk 798, Pg 1453, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marcus M. Stenslie, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 2 of Meadow Hill Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $244,050.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $233,379.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.90439) 1002.179551-FEI NOTICE

OF

TRUSTEE’S

SALE

Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/30/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200926473, Bk 850, Pg 322, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert C. Garrard and Tonia D. Garrard, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common) and to the survivor of said named joint tenants, and to their heirs and assigns of such survivor, who acquired title as Robert Che Garrard and Tonia D. Garrard, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common) husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and None Specified was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded None Specified as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE1/4 of Section 4, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract B-7 of Certificate of Survey No. 2310. Together with a road easement through the S1/2 of Section 4, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana and further described as follows: Beginning at the most Northwesterly corner of Tract “B”, Certificate of Survey No. 2172; thence S. 89 degrees 26’ 18’’ E., 1008.05 feet which line described the Northerly boundary of a thirty (30) foot wide private road easement; thence the next two (2) courses along the center line of a thirty (30) foot wide private road easement being fifteen (15) either side of the described line; thence S. 00 degrees 32’ 57’’ E., 655.75 feet along the North South mid section line; thence S. 89 degrees 20’ 48’’ E., 631.29 feet to the Westerly boundary of Tract B-6 and B-7 of Certificate of Survey No. 2310. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 9, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $317,231.28. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $310,603.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 20, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91081) 1002.180483-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/15/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200803721, Bk 813, pg 816, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Camson N. Adenuga, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit E-4 of Grandvue Village, according to the Declaration under the Unit Ownership Act recorded as Document No. 443148 on March 27,

1979, located on Lots 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, Block 2, Hillside Homes No. 1, according to the official plat thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office, Missoula County, Montana. Together with an undivided 1/20 interest in the common elements appertaining to the above described unit and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto as set forth in the Declaration. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 14, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $149,180.32. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $139,268.44, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 25, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72609) 1002.152802-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/04/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200526489, Bk 761, Pg 1259, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Justin Kelly, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 28 of Wallace Creek Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 20, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $234,540.44. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $217,782.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid


PUBLIC NOTICES money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72908) 1002.153589-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/14/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200429576, Bk 741, Pg 1164, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John T. Vein and Kimberly A. Vein, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 of Traveler’s Rest Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 11, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $262,723.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $254,306.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 25, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.90174) 1002.180705-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200928678, Bk 851, Pg 1128, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Todd Hoose and Tracie Hoose, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common), and to the survivor of them, and to the heirs and assigns of such survivor married was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel 20B2 of Certificate of

Survey No. 2665, located in the SE1/4 of Section 27, Township 14 North, Range 23 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 14, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $225,642.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $219,417.80, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 25, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91238) 1002.180737-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/13/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200330476, Bk 715, Pg 225, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David M. Huerta and Georgie A. Huerta, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 33, of Pleasant View Homes, Phase III, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 10, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $113,760.21. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $107,105.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91146) 1002.180637-FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/09/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SCOTT DEAN JOHNSON, AND MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/23/2006 and recorded 06/30/2006, in document No. 200616003 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 778 at Page Number 63 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 5 OF BITTERROOT HOMES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 809 DIXON AVE, MISSOULA, MT 59801-8619 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,614.96 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.125% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 12/22/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr., TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO 10-0164695 FEI NO 1006.123570 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following

described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which BONNIE M BRIGGS, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/21/2008 and recorded 08/29/2008, in document No. 200820235 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 825 at Page Number 818 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 41 OF SHELBY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 12961 KIMWOOD DR, Lolo, MT 59847-9519. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2010 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $146,122.21 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 10/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/29/10 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO 10-0166687 FEI NO 1006.124432 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 4/4/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT,59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LARRY STOLLE and DAWN STOLLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/01/2009 and recorded 07/13/2009, in document No. 200917156 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 843 at Page Number 798 In the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN THE

COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, THE E 1/2 SE 1/4 SE 1/4 NW 1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 2O WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 4287 E CARLTON CREEK RD, Florence, MT 59833-6161. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $169,289.54 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.50% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 11/19/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO. 10-0151973 FEI NO. 1006.119979 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 18, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 40 OF SUNNY MEADOWS NO. 2. A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Keith A Walt and Michelle L Walt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community BankMissoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 16, 2005 and Recorded on December 21, 2005 under Document # 200533821, in Bk-766, Pg469. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. as successor in interest to ABN Amro Mortgage Group Inc., f/k/a ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana.The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,406.22, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October, 30 2010 is $185,616.75 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $11,787.15, late charges in the amount of $1,474.92, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2627.96, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.42 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents

d s

"Yee-Haw!"–riding across six answers.

by Matt Jones

AC ROSS 1 One who likes to talk 7 Does some unwanted yard redecoration? 10 Feature of some high-tech cell phones 13 Company hawked by Catherine Zeta-Jones 14 "___ you kidding?" 15 Necklace given upon deplanings 16 Another term for it is "elver" 17 He wrote about Mowgli 19 "___ Out of Control" (Tony Danza movie) 20 Morrissey video compilation that translates to "Listen, Steven" 22 "Top Chef" host Lakshmi 24 Joltin' Joe's other nickname 25 Addis ___, Ethiopia 28 Actress Summer of "The Cape" 32 Nine-to-five friends 38 "___ been a bad boy" 39 Beatnik interjection 40 River island 41 1977 role for George Burns 42 It's heard while leaving a group 46 Unit of loudness 47 R&B group Bell Biv ___ 48 Throw back in 52 "Dynasty" actress Emma 56 Grain byproduct used in alternative medicines 61 Modern waltz violinist Andre 62 Square-shaped flyer 63 It usually involves reading letters 65 Suffix for "cyan" 66 "The Girl You Lost to Cocaine" singer 67 Pre-show acts

Last week’s solution

68 Spider egg container 69 Network advertising "the greatest motion pictures of all time" 70 Cliff Huxtable's oldest

DOWN 1 Mutual of ___ 2 Like Supreme Court judges 3 Lower than low 4 One may attempt to break it 5 Spread across the Eastern seaboard? 6 Depend (on) 7 George of "Star Trek" 8 Rainbow maker 9 Places for some nose piercings, technically 10 Silver-tongued 11 Actress Elizabeth in "The Incredibles" 12 Part of ASL 13 Abbr. in a recipe 18 Like pin-up models 21 Cheese in a red rind 23 Mushroom cloud maker 26 Out of the office 27 "Molto ___" ("very good," in Verona) 29 Interlockable toy 30 "___ Flux" 31 Arne Duncan's employer, for short 32 Newton fillers 33 Rachael Ray acronym 34 Kings of ___ 35 Fix some potholes 36 "Salt" actor Schreiber 37 Others, in Spanish 43 Leader of The Dominos 44 Old Icelandic saga 45 Like some auto clearance sales 49 Be 50 Upper story 51 It might involve flying or unfamiliar situations 53 Social dance 54 Ben Stiller's mom Anne 55 Total packages? 56 Diamond stat, incorrectly but commonly 57 Talks like this he does 58 Business big shot 59 Business big shots 60 Wrong letter? 64 Suffix for "velvet" ©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 February 3 – February 10, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default.The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 8, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 8, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V. Walt 41926.723 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND, BEING A CONDOMINIUM DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: UNIT 209, AS SHOWN AND DEFINED IN THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS FOR THE LYNNWOOD, A RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH ITS EXHIBITS AS RECORDED IN BOOK 170 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 581, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED .0261508918 INTEREST IN AND TO TRACT 1, BLOCK 2, HAMMOND ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF (REFERENCE: CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 255), TOGETHER WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON. TOGETHER WITH AN EXCLUSIVE USE AREA OR LIMITED COMMON AREA AS THOSE TERMS ARE DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION AND AS DESCRIBED IN THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ATTACHED THERETO AS BEING A STORAGE SPACE S-26, TOGETHER WITH THEIR APPURTENANCES. APN 5849375 WITH THE APPURTENANCES THERETO. APN: 5849375 Dale L Garberding and Roberta C Garberding, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 27, 2007 and recorded August 7, 2007 in Book 803, Page 266, under Document No. 200720401. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $690.57, beginning May 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 07, 2010 is $105,813.95 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5000% now totaling $4,125.18, late charges in the amount of $207.12, and other fees and expenses advanced of $274.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent,

unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 11, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 11, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Garberding 42011.040 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF SCOTT MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Carl R. Crisp and Susan S. Crisp, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Guaranty Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 1, 2006 and recorded on August 7, 2006 in Book 780, Page 720 under Document No. 200619828. The beneficial interest is currently held by One West Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,059.63, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 26, 2010 is $325,477.17 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $10,066.68, late charges in the amount of $1,123.98, escrow advances of $824.60, and other fees and expenses advanced of $283.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.85 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid

immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 10, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On November 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest V. Crisp 41969.547 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA IN THE STATE OF MT: LOT 4 OF MODERIE LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jack C. Westre, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Source, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 27, 2007 and recorded on February 15, 2007 in Book 792, Page 28 as Document No. 200703753. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for GSR Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-OA1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-OA1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,666.96, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 28, 2010 is $457,500.61 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $22,531.35, late charges in the amount of $1,693.98, escrow advances of $2,680.70, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2811.24, plus accruing interest at the rate of $83.04 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmen-

tal or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Litton V. Westre 41462.822 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 4 OF K/O ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDINGTO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. John T. Oberg and Christine E. Oberg, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Montana First Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 13, 2007 and recorded April 16, 2007 in Book 795, Page 581, under Document No. 200708886. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,990.43, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 19, 2010 is $364,393.79 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $6,863.59, escrow advances of $123.83 and other fees and expenses advanced of $548.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $62.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 February 3 – February 10, 2011

may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Phh V Oberg 41392.707 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 22, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Ruth Addition, a platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 19 of Plats at Page 43 CHRISTIAN HUGHES AND DUSTIN L HUGHES, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 1, 2006 and recorded in Book 773, Page 658 under Document No. 200609909. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,534.94, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 01, 2010 is $177,841.55 principal, interest at the rate of 6.3750% now totaling $4,723.90, late charges in the amount of $1,056.49, escrow advances of $166.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $284.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.06 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 12, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 12, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Hughes 42011.125

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN AND BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE N1/4 CORNER OF SECTION 8; THENCE S.18°19’10” E., 2104.57 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 465.73 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE EAST, 792.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF WAY LINE OF MILWAUKEE RAILROAD; THENCE S.33°00’ E. ALONG SAID RIGHT- OF- WAY LINE , A DISTANCE OF 192.94 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIN ; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT -OFWAY LINE RUNNING WEST, 897.37 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIN; THENCE NORTH, 161.81 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 34 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1666. NOTE: ANY CONVEYANCE OR SECURITY INSTRUMENT MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT AS DESCRIBED IN DEED FROM DONALD K. MEECH AND DORIS K. MEECH, HIS WIFE, SIMMS, MONTANA DATED JULY 1, 1969, TO GRANTORS AND GRANTEES HEREIN. John C Ruyle and Cindy S Ruyle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to David R Chisholm, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust recorded May 16, 2005 in Book 752 Page 694 under Document No.200511393. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank National Association. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,564.80, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 1, 2010 is $244,376.04 principal, interest at the rate of 5.9500% now totaling $6,058.50, late charges in the amount of $312.96, escrow advances of $964.55, and other fees and expenses advanced of $84.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $39.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 19, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Us Bank V. Ruyle/john C. 41810.384

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 38 of Hawthorn Springs, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Russ L. Allaway and Kathy Allaway, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bitterroot Valley Bank, d/b/a Clark Fork Valley Bank, as original Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated June 5, 2008, and recorded as Document No. 200812624, Book 820, Page 202, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, which Montana Trust Indenture was modified on June 5, 2009, and a Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded June 9, 2009 as Document No. 200913839, Book 841, Page 279, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, and was further modified on February 18, 2010, and which Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded February 19, 2010, as Document No. 201003394, Book 855, Page 877, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The Beneficiary’s Interest in the Montana Trust Indenture was assigned to Gravely Mountain Investments, LLC on or about December 30, 2010, by Assignment recorded January 4, 2011, in Book 872, Page 242, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $202,996.47, plus interest at a rate of 5.5% totaling $4,129.45, for a total amount due of $207,125.92, as of December 20, 2010, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 7th day of January, 2011. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula) On this 7th day of January, 2011, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 Request for qualifications Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for Montana manufacturers online database update and enhancement: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to update and enhance a database which provides information about Montana’s manufacturers. Up to $9,500 is available for this project. Proposals due February 4, 2011. Access the RFQ at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org or 406-2583423 with questions. Request for qualifications The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to develop an Economic Gardening Strategic Plan for Mineral, Missoula and Ravalli Counties. Proposals are due February 11, 2011. Up to a total of $50,000 is available for this project. The entire Request for Qualifications can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org with questions. Request for Qualifications to develop and present Green Manufacturing Workshops in Montana: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to BREDD to research, develop and conduct workshops for regional building products manufacturers, teaching skills to become competitive in green markets. Up to $30,000 is available for this project. Proposals due Feb 25, 2011. Access the RFQ at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org or 406-258-3423 with questions.


VALENTINE’S DAY SERVICES GENERAL Valentines Day Sale CONTRACTORS Friday Feb. 11th – Monday Feb. 14th 40% off all bead Buy 1 get 1 free strands and on all jewelry, single beads rocks, and fossils

Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 7285642

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Passivhaus Designs • Smaller Homes • Additions/Remodels • 369-0940 OR 642-6863 • www.naturalhousebuilder.net

CHILDCARE

The CRYSTAL LIMIT

Little Monkey Day Care Openings for ages 1-6. 1st Aid/CPR certified, RMA. Conveniently located on HWY 200 in Bonner. Contact Amanda for rates or questions at 406207-3900

1920 Brooks St. • 406.549.1729 • crystallimit.com

HANDYMAN Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

MISCELLANEOUS

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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DRUM LESSONS & BEYOND MICKI SINGER is available for drum instruction. Any style or age; beginners or advanced: acoustic or electric; call E.S.P.or 406.493.8237 for appointment!

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The Plumber, Inc. "When Quality Matters" New Construction •Service Remodels • Boiler Radiant Heating

RECYCLING I.E. Recycling CURBSIDE RECYCLING U District, Rose Park, and Riverfront areas 4 pickups per month ONLY 2.50! GLASS bottles and jars, plastics, aluminum, tin cans, junk mail, magazines/newspaper, phone books. Call for more info! (406)396-5317

John Ricker, Owner 40 Years Exp. 4007 US Hwy 200 E • Missoula

251-3744 or 880-2976

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HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building

RENTALS w/d hookups, covered patio/deck, gas hot water heat. Apply this week and receive your application fee free! Contact PPM for more details. 721-8990

RENTALS APARTMENTS APARTMENTS FOR RENT 1 & 2 Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished apartments. UTILITIES PAID. Close to U & downtown. 549-7711. Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com 118 West Alder- Historic Park Place Hotel at the heart of downtown –Secured entry, Studio units now offering newly remod-

eled loft style living with great views, coin-ops and flat rate for gas heat. Rent $525-$595. Contact PPM for rent specials. 721-8990 1215 6th: 1-bedroom, storage, central, $100 Costco gift card & 1- year membership! $495, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpmmt.com

DUPLEXES

1610 12th: 3-bedroom, 2-baths, 2-kitchens, den, double garage, pets welcome!, $100 Costco gift card & 1- year membership! $1,095, GCPM, 5496106 gcpm-mt.com

2 bed/1 bath, W/D Hookups, single garage, fenced backyard. No smoking/no pets $660/month, $500/deposit. 721-7720

House for Rent: 3bd/3ba with bonus room built in 2003. D/W, washer & dryer, 2 car garage and large fenced back yard. Convenient 7th St. location. $1200/ mo. Contact Lily 396-0997.

FIDELITY

218 Barclay St. – B 1bd/1ba Lolo rental….$525 Everything included! Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

220 South Ave. Duplex near U., hardwood floors, fenced yard, all utilities included ... $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1 BD APT 113 N. Johnson $465/mo.

4104 Hillview Way - 1/2 month rent free-see PPM for details. Located on the corner of 39th and Russell. 2bd/2ba, gas fireplace, single car garage, DW,

2 BD APT Uncle Robert Ln. $605-$620/mo.

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website!

2 BD APT 1309 Cooper $600/mo.

Price Reduced! Large 4 bed/3 bath w/ great views on nearly 6 acres set up for horses. Attached sunroom w/ deck & hot tub pad. Kitchen opens to living and dining room. $255,000 • MLS # 10006316. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

SEEKING HOUSEMATE. Sweet deal. 2 bedroom with own furnished living area. $460. 3703225

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COMMERCIAL Downtown Studio office storage warehouse space available, various sizes & prices. Contact 239-2206.

ROOMMATES

251- 4707

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

HOUSES

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MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

ROOMMATE NEEDED. Single or couple. W/D. Garden. Share bath. $400/month + 1/2 utilities. 880-1540

1225 34th St 1 BR/ $550 55+ or disabled persons only $575 deposit/heat paid 149 W. Broadway 1 BR $450 $500 deposit/heat paid

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Jane's Place Montana... A Vacation Rental Hot Springs, MT $45 & up Big Fork / Flathead Lake 406-546-0404 www.airbnb.com/rooms/24722

2 BD DUPLEX 111N. Johnson $575/mo.

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Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

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No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 February 3 – February 10, 2011


RENTALS

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Property Management

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422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $124,900. MLS#906610. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 3 bed, 1 bath with large living room, a new bathroom & new flooring throughout bathroom & kitchen, new siding, and windows as well as a new roof. Convenient location. 2402 McDonald $148,000 MLS # 10006235 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Master bed w/ closet/office area, Large storage shed, new deck & underground sprinklers $220,000 • MLS # 10007009. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

Condo Along the River -Close to the U, one-of-a-kind 2br Edgewater Condo, highly desirable, hardwood floors, lots of character, fantastic location. 521 Hartman #2, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garage, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #5 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS HIDDEN TRAIL TOWN HOME JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN MIS-

4 bed, 2 bath, 1 car garage. Centrally located home, large living room & family room in daylight basement • $174,900 MLS # 10004809. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED UNIVERSITY DISTRICT HOME. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath home in a prime University District location. Gorgeous hardwood floors, builtins, french doors, bright, sunny kitchen, great yard, and much more. $399,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Classic University Home, Great floor plan, fireplace, hardwood floors, Nice sized rooms, Lots of Bonus Rooms downstairs w/kitchenette, well maintained, oversized 2 car garage, 116 E. Sussex. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000 SQ FT LOT. Beautifully

updated and maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Lolo area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room and family room, great kitchen with breakfast bar & dining area, master bedroom and more. $269,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com NEWER HIDDEN TRAIL HOME JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN MISSOULA. 3 Bdr/2 Baths, Great open floor plan, lots of natural light, laundry room, Dbl garage, easy access to trails. $199,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @

239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Price Reduced! 5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $209,900 MLS#906641. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! 55+ COMMUNITY 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room. Homeowners fee is $370/mo. includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage, land lease, snow

removal & lawn care. $129,900 • MLS#10006023. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 327-8787 porticorealestate.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or

Flathead Lake Views $169,000 Nice 2+acre property between Elmo and Dayton with views of Flathead Lake and Chief Cliff. Property has shared well and septic approval.

Downtown Sweetheart

514 W. Spruce St. • $269,000 1920’s era house has been revamped while retaining all of its original charm. Updated electrical, plumbing, handicapped accessible bath, security alarm, offstreet parking, underground sprinklers, and air conditioning in harmony with original bullseye woodwork, mahogany flooring, high ceilings, and all right downtown on West Spruce. Zoned B2-2 for a variety of commercial or residential uses. MLS#10001940

5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $265,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

SOULA. 2 Bdr/1.5 Baths, Sngl Garage. End unit with a great open floor plan, lots of natural light, laundry, hardwood & tile floors, easy access to trails. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy0 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

204 C Heritage St, Stevensville

$115,000

Move-in ready 2 bedroom townhouse, walking distance to downtown Stevensville. Great quiet locale with views! Tiled kitchen and entries, large walk-in master closet, fresh interior paint, & garage. Fenced private backyard w/ access to common area. Should go FHA, RD. MLS#10003149

912 Defoe • $169,900 RICE TEAM

riceteam@bigsky.net Robin Rice Janet Rice missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 240-3932 NEW LISTING • 3 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage • 2 main floor masters • Heated tile floor & jacuzzi in master bath • Large shed for extra storage • $359,900 • MLS # 20110410 GET READY TO BUILD • Beautiful 1+ acre in country setting west of Missoula • Close to fishing, golf course and shopping • Purchaser must drill private well • $95,000 • 20110548

2014 29th Ave - new listing price reduced • 4 Bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • Large deck over looks yard • Lots of room & basement • New furnace & water heater • $239,900 • 20110384

3 bedroom two full bath home with GIGANTIC shop/garage. Brand new carpet just installed. Come take a look! Across from the Northside Trail System. MLS #20110354

435 Mount • $199,000 Right across from lovely Rose Park. This home has had many upgrades including remodeled kitchen featuring Hickory Cabinets, Brazilian Hickory laminate flooring throughout, all new stainless steel appliances. Call Mary Marry for a showing today. MLS # 20110323.

NEWER HOME • 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • 32435 Bible Lane, Alberton • Deck in private backyard • Close to river & outdoor recreation • $174,900 • MLS#10004303

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 February 3 – February 10, 2011

Mary Mar ry

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

406-544-2125 Missoula Properties

Grant Creek Log home 26+ private acres

BEST DEAL IN POTOMAC ON 20 ACRES

$419,000

$215,000

Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula! The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! MLS#10001348 www.11815benchroad.com

2002 Atlantic home w upgraded energy package. Over 1700 sq. ft. of living space. Very nice floor plan. Large detached 28 x 40 heated shop with water, easy access. All on 20 treed acres with views! MLS#10005731.

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SOUTH HILLS HOME LESS THAN 1 BLOCK FROM CHIEF CHARLO SCHOOL . 4 Bdr/2 Bath, deck, double car garage, family room, laundry/utility room, great views, and much more. $175,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1995 28x40 PATRIOT DOUBLEWIDE HOME. 2 Bedrooms / 2 Bathrooms, Kitchen appliances included. Great condition! $36,900. Setup & Delivery included within 75 miles of Billings. Call 406-651-4500 or 406-855-2279

LAND FOR SALE

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula. com OR call 550-3077

Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City

sewer stubbed to the property line. $84,900. MLS# 10007449. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Beautiful wooded 3.69 acres with 550 feet of Twin Creeks frontage. Easy access from Hwy 200 on well maintained county road. Modulars or manufactured homes on a permanent foundation are allowed. Seller will carry contract with $50,000 down at 7 % interest. $219,900. MLS#10005586. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and easy commute. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING

IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $135,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)999-4809 www.CreativeFinance.com

ONLY 9 LEFT IN THE UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE AT UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900 #103 ADA (HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE UNIT) OPEN HOUSE SAT 11-2PM

Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 February 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 10, 2011


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