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By: Adele Zeiber I


It was late at night on the night of November 27, 1775. Will Knox was finishing getting the artillery ready for delivery to General Washington. Will Knox was an adventurous, hot-blooded 19 year old that was anxious for action and excitement. ”There,” he said, ”all done”. He had prepared for months of harsh weather and brutal adventure, plus, a fresh supply of horses and oxen to pull sleds and artillery. By midnight he had finished preparing and went to bed, unaware of the British invasion plan. The morning of November 28, 1775, Will and his troopers had planned to travel to Albany as their first stop on the way to Boston.” Wait”, Will articulated. “ There is something I have to do before we go, I’ll be back soon” Before they left, Will departed to Worchester to see his brother, Henry’s wife, since she had a message to deliver to Henry, but he left before she could communicate to him. Will had gotten the message and set off. They had traveled for weeks now; the winter weather was slowly creeping up on them, closer and closer by day. They thought about giving up, but they kept moving on. Within 3 more days they made it to Mohawk River. The river was their rest stop for the night. The temperature dropped to an extreme temperature of 27 degrees, the worst within the time they traveled. ”All right men,” Will began to say, “let us get as much firewood as we can carry”. Will had started the fire the way his brother had taught him. “All right men, we have enough firewood for the night”. As the fire was starting to die down, the men and animals found a spot by the fire to sleep by. Then, that night at 12:30 a.m. the British had finally caught up and began to strike. The British had started by taking all of the artillery and hitched the oxen to the sleds to pull the artillery. The British had also planned to capture leader of the group, in this case, Will Knox. As soon as the British had


everything with them, they decided to do one last thing. They had made a fire on the ice, then slowly and carefully placed the men on the ice one by one. Then, with all the artillery and Will, they ducked down in the nearby bushes and watched as the fire would melt through the ice. When the fire melted through, the men had woken up as quick as lightning when they felt the icy water. As the men looked up to see the British riding off while they were floating downstream, floating away from whatever they had left at the campsite. When the British had gotten back to their site, they immediately unloaded the artillery, and put Will in their prisoner room. That morning, Will woke up completely clueless of anything that had happened. “Where am I”, Will questioned. He was confused to find himself imprisoned when he knew that he had done nothing wrong. As he roamed the cell, Will glanced outside and saw that there were two soldiers guarding his cell and it all began to make sense. Will realized that the British had captured him in the night while he was sleeping, so he decided to break out. Within four weeks of being treated terribly by the British, will had finally been able to break out. Before Will had left the site, he had decided to take all of the artillery and animals that the British had taken from his troop at Mohawk River. As soon as Will had gotten everything the British had taken, he rode off on one of the horses with all of the artillery and headed off to Mohawk River. That morning at dawn, Will had finally returned to the spot where he had been last wondering where everyone was. ”Maybe they went downstream,” Will said with curiosity. As Will rode downstream still on his horse, he finally had caught up to his men. When Will had arrived, he had noticed that half of the men had died of Yellow Fever and smallpox, while the rest were struggling to survive. “Men,” Will began


to announce, “let us continue our journey to Cambridge, and defeat the British!” Will and every other man still surviving of his troop had traveled on for six weeks, with possible risk of more men dying off, but they kept moving on. Finally on the morning of March 1, 1776, will and the troopers had finally made it to Cambridge where they met General Washington and Will’s older brother, Colonel Henry Knox. “We have all of the artillery right here,” Will was saying, pleased to announce. “We have everything that we need right here.” “Excellent,” General Washington announced, “We will now be prepared for the British attack.”


It took three days to fully prepare every detail, but on the date of March 4, 1776, they had all finished preparing for the British attack, and were ready to fire. “we couldn’t have been able to survive if you hadn’t led everyone to bring the artillery, Will,” General Washington announced gladly. “Now let’s go and defeat the British!” The British army had finally arrived at Cambridge to fight General Washington and his army. When they saw all of the mortars lined up on the hill, they knew that it was over. “Let us begin Will,” General Washington announced with pride. BOOM!! POW!! CRACK!! The sounds of the muskets were fired repeatedly and the cannons were fired rapidly. The British had thought that they had outsmarted them, but with the result of most of them dead, the British were the ones who were outsmarted, and outgunned.


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