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CONTENTS

MISSISSIPPI FARM COUNTRY Volume 87 Number 1 January/February 2011

Features

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SOLVE THE MYSTERY Which Calhoun County town grew up around the sawmills of the early 20th century? This town’s slogan is: “Where Money Grows in Trees.” Residents are busy putting together a forestry museum, which will open sometime in the near future. Read the clues and make your guess.

EDITOR Glynda Phillips Graphic Arts Coordinator Danielle Ginn Department Assistant/Ad Sales Rep. Angela Thompson

FARM BUREAU OFFICERS

President - Randy Knight Vice President - Donald Gant Vice President - Ted Kendall Vice President - Reggie Magee Treasurer - Billy Davis Corporate Secretary - Ilene Sumrall

FARM BUREAU DIRECTORS

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WOMEN’S AG TOUR

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STATE CONVENTION

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In October, Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Women took an ag tour across South Mississippi. Participants learned about the area’s agricultural enterprises and were able to compare modern-day pursuits with farming operations of yesteryear. Come with us as we learn more.

Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) elected the organization’s ninth president during the 89th MFBF Annual Meeting in Jackson. Inside, we look back at state convention activities through photographs and articles.

SAYING GOODBYE In recent months, Farm Bureau members and staff began saying goodbye to longtime Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation President David Waide and his wife Sandra. We expressed our heartfelt thanks and wished them well in the years to come. See the photographs inside.

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Commodity Update: Swine Commodity Update: Aquaculture MFBF Convention Photos

ABOUT THE COVER Pelahatchie farmer Randy Knight was elected president of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation during state convention activities in December. He and wife Mary V. are pictured on their Rankin County farm. Read about the Knights inside. 3

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Dr. Jim Perkins, Iuka Mike Graves, Ripley B.A. Teague, New Albany Bill Ryan Tabb, Cleveland Coley L. Bailey, Jr., Coffeeville Neal Huskison, Pontotoc Jeffrey R. Tabb, Walthall Bobby Moody, Louisville Wanda Hill, Isola James Foy, Canton William Jones, Meridian James Brewer, Shubuta Stanley Williams, Mt. Olive Lonnie Fortner, Port Gibson Moody Davis, Brookhaven Mike McCormick, Union Church D.P. O’Quinn, Purvis Gerald Moore, Petal Clifton Hicks, Leakesville Ken Mallette, Vancleave Betty Mills, Winona Noble Guedon, Natchez

HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS Louis J. Breaux, David H. Bennett, and Warren Oakley Mississippi Farm Country (ISSN 1529-9600) magazine is published bimonthly by the *Mississippi Farm Bureau® Federation. EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS OFFICES 6311 Ridgewood Road Jackson, MS 39211 TELEPHONE 601.977.4153 ADVERTISING (National) Paul Hurst 1.800.397.8908 (Southeastern U.S.) Angela Thompson 1.800.227.8244 ext. 4242 Farm Bureau members receive this publication as part of their membership benefit. Periodicals postage is paid at Jackson, MS, and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to P. O. Box 1972, Jackson, MS 39215.

*FARM BUREAU®, FB® and all Farm Bureau Logos used in this magazine are registered service marks owned by the American Farm Bureau Federation. They may not be used in any commercial manner without the prior written consent of the American Farm Bureau Federation. Material in this publication is based on what the editor believes to be reliable information. Neither Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation nor those individuals or organizations contributing to the MFBF publication assume any liability for errors that might go undetected in the publication - this includes statements in articles or advertisements that could lead to erroneous personal or business management decisions.

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COMMODITY UPDATE

Jim Blissard

Samantha Webb

SWINE

Swine Farmers Are Dedicated to Animal Care by Jim Blissard, MFBF Swine Advisory Committee Chair Samantha Cawthorn, MFBF Commodity Coordinator for Swine

From Mississippi’s small-scale independent pork producers to the more sizeable integrated pork growers, swine farmers all over Mississippi are fully committed to practicing proper animal care in their farming operations. By employing professional judgment, first-hand experience, and educational training, pork producers in our state and producers nationwide are dedicated to sustaining and advancing the quality of pork production in the United States for generations to come. Although the swine industry, like most other industries, has changed over time, swine growers and producers have continually worked to meet their ultimate goal – humanely producing safe, healthy and affordable pork products for consumers worldwide. Swine farmers and industry professionals have worked tirelessly and responsibly to implement safeguards and enhance best management practices for production to help ensure the viability of the pork industry for years to come. Today, our nation’s pork industry is more superior than ever before, efficiently producing the highest quality, safest pork products in the world. This has been accomplished as a result of responsible practices and persistent loyalty to industry advancements on the part of pork producers nationwide. Our swine growers and producers here in Mississippi are no different. Mississippi’s swine industry has maintained an outstanding track record on animal care and food safety issues. Our state’s pork producers, more than anyone else, truly understand and care about their animals’ wellbeing because this industry is their livelihood. They work with their animals on a daily basis to be certain that their pigs are healthy, safe and content. Similar to other food animal production industries nationwide, the pork industry is constantly confronted with challenges that threaten to alter the way swine farmers conduct their businesses and drastically change the economics of the industry. Unfavorable crop conditions, feed accessibility, rising energy costs, the economy, limited market opportunities, and alternative energy sources are just a few of the issues that may potentially have severe and far-reaching negative impacts on the swine industry. However, in addition to these challenges, the industry must also occasionally defend its practices against criticism from animal advocacy groups who seek to advance their own agendas. In these instances, pork producers stand proud in knowing that they manage their swine operations using best management practices that are based on sound science to maintain the health, comfort and overall 4

wellbeing of their swine herds. For many years before the industry was challenged with these issues, swine farmers recognized the importance of setting the bar high for judicious animal care practices and for food safety and quality assurance. Swine producers have upheld these high standards well while retaining a relentless commitment to improvement. Mississippi pork growers and producers constantly demonstrate their care and concern for their animals’ welfare and their commitment to ensuring their animals are well cared for and are treated humanely. Any swine farmer would readily convey that, not only is this the ethical way to operate, but that anything less would be self-defeating. Pigs that are well cared for grow faster and are healthier. Pork producers are dependent upon the profits they make from their swine operations to provide for their families, and they know that a poorly-cared-for, unhealthy animal will not yield a profit. Swine farmers take care of their animals because their animals take care of them. They do this by providing well-maintained facilities to shelter pigs from the weather with adequate space to allow pigs to move safely and humanely, providing access to clean water and nutritionally-balanced diets, securing veterinary guidance to develop effective herd health programs, providing prompt veterinary medical care when required, maintaining proper biosecurity on their farms to protect herd health, and by arranging safe transportation that allows for proper handling during loading and unloading and that prevents undue stress due to overcrowding and excess transit time. Ultimately, it is evident that in Mississippi and across the nation swine farmers as well as industry professionals take their responsibility to provide outstanding animal care seriously in order to help ensure that the food products they produce are safe, healthy and affordable for consumers worldwide. When it comes to ethical, conscientious animal production and management, no one stands to lose more than swine farmers themselves. Their love of the industry, their integrity and ethical standards, and their dedication to meeting the needs of the customers they serve have helped to make the swine industry smarter and more accountable than ever before. The information in this article was adapted from the following sources: National Pork Checkoff: www.pork.org and Texas Pork Producers Association: www.texaspork.org.

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COMMODITY UPDATE

AQUACULTURE Wayne Hill

Paul Chamblee

Programs Help Catfish Producers Wayne Hill, MFBF Aquaculture Advisory Committee Chair Paul Chamblee, MFBF Commodity Coordinator for Aquaculture

The U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish Industry continues to struggle due to cheap imports and rising production costs. Mississippi catfish acreage has fallen to 64,000 acres, a 45 percent drop from the high in 2001. Two new programs are helping farmers adjust to these increasing pressures. The USDA Foreign Agricultural Service has determined that catfish producers were adversely affected by imports based upon a petition by the Catfish Farmers of America. Consequently, producers were able to apply for technical assistance and cash payments under the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) for Farmers program. Producers established eligibility by submitting an application at their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) Service Center. The program seeks to help producers improve yield and marketability and determine the feasibility and desirability of substituting one or more alternative agricultural commodities. It also offers advice and assistance on how to adjust to import competition. One unique aspect to this program is that both spouses are eligible for benefits and training. Over 380 Mississippi farmers and spouses have applied for TAA benefits The technical assistance is being provided to Mississippi producers by the Mississippi State University Extension Service. An initial orientation session explains how the program works and explains the timetables for participation. A producer who completes the orientation is eligible to participate in Intensive Technical Assistance, which is a series of workshops on marketing and production strategies, financial and business management, and alternative enterprises and business plan development. This training will prepare producers to develop an initial business plan and a long-term business adjustment plan to improve their competitiveness. Upon FSA’s approval of the initial business plan, the producer is eligible to receive a cash payment to implement his or her plan or to further develop a long-term business adjustment plan. Long-term business adjustment plan training provides individual assistance to complete and implement a long-term business plan. Producers who complete a long-term plan are eligible to receive an additional cash payment. The second program that is helping catfish producers is the 2009 Aquaculture Grant Program. The U.S. Department of Agriculture authorized up to $20 million to provide economic assistance for aquaculture producers who experienced high feed input costs JANUARY/FEBRUARY

during the 2009 calendar year. USDA’s Farm Service Agency provided a block grant to the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce to provide assistance to eligible Mississippi aquaculture producers. To be eligible for the 2009 Aquaculture Grant Program, aquaculture producers had to meet the following criteria: • Aquaculture producers must have been in production during calendar year 2009 and actively engaged in production in 2010. • Eligible producers must verify that their feed costs during 2009 represented at least 25 percent of their total input costs. • The 2009 price of feed paid for by eligible producers must be at least 25 percent greater than the state’s five-year average (2003 - 2007) for each aquaculture species. Eligible producers will receive a cash payment equivalent to the difference between what they paid per ton for 2009 and the five-year average. Although the U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish Industry is currently undergoing tough times, it is widely felt that the industry will survive and eventually begin a slow, steady recovery. U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish is still the sixth most-often consumed seafood in the United States, indicating that consumers still choose this product despite an increasing array of available fish and other protein products. Mississippi continues to have a strong infrastructure in place and is best-suited to adjust to the current contraction of production acres. Mississippi State University will continue to work with Farm Bureau and commodity organizations to support catfish producers through research, extension, lobbying efforts, and legislation. This article was written by Dr. Jimmy Avery, Extension Aquaculture Leader, National Warmwater Aquaculture Center, Mississippi State University.

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Working Together We Will Succeed By Glynda Phillips

ntegrity and a tireless work ethic best characterize Randy Knight, the new man at the helm of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation. This third generation Rankin County farmer also possesses many new and interesting ideas for our organization. “As I begin serving as your president, I know that I will have big shoes to fill,” he said. “David Waide’s accomplishments are great. I plan to build upon the strong foundation he has helped to set in place, but I will also bring new ideas to the table.” 6

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For starters, Randy wants to strengthen lines of communication. “We have done a good job of communicating in the past, but I want more input from our county leaders and state officers,” he said. “These are intelligent, caring people who have an interest in what is going on within our organization. I want to hear what they have to say. We are all in this together.” A longtime cattle and dairy farmer who also manages multiple acres of pasture and timberland, Randy well understands the challenges that exist within today’s farming industry. As a veteran Farm Bureau leader, he is also familiar with opportunities that exist to support the efforts of our farmers and rural communities.

“We have done a good job of communicating in the past, but I want more input from our county leaders and state officers,” he said. “These are intelligent, caring people who have an interest in what is going on within our organization. I want to hear what they have to say. We are all in this together.” “I want to place more of an emphasis on our Ag in the Classroom program,” he said. “We must reach our children at an early age with agriculture’s story. One exciting new way we plan to do this is by taking the Ag in the Classroom program on the road with a mobile ag unit. This unit will give our school children a hands-on opportunity to learn about our industry. “I will continue to support our Farm Families of Mississippi campaign because it has proven to be an effective means of educating consumers about agriculture,” he said. “The survey numbers after our initial effort in the Jackson area proved that our television commercials, billboards, radio spots and special events definitely made a difference in the attitudes and perceptions that consumers hold toward Mississippi agriculture. “I want to strengthen our Young Farmers and Ranchers program,” he said. “We will hold media training sessions so that our young farmers can JANUARY/FEBRUARY

Randy Knight

Randy Knight, 48, is a Pelahatchie farmer who operates a dairy in partnership with his father Lee. He also runs 400 head of stocker calves and manages timberland and pastureland. Randy is a graduate of Hinds Junior College with a degree in farm management and attended Mississippi State University, where he studied dairy science. Randy participated in Rankin County Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers activities and has served on the Rankin County Farm Bureau Board of Directors for 15 years. Randy served as president of the Rankin County Farm Bureau for three years and as Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) Central Region Vice President for four years. He has served on numerous MFBF study committees and participates in the MFBF Ag Challenges Initiative program, which teaches farmers how to effectively tell their story to the media and general public. As an Ag Challenges Initiative participant, he has presented programs around the state. Randy has served on the board of directors of Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Company for four years. He is a member of Dairy Farmers of America and the Mississippi Cattlemen’s Association. He serves on the boards of Grazing Land Management for the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Southeastern United Dairy Association and the Neshoba County Gin Association. He is an active member of Shiloh United Methodist Church. He and his wife Mary have two daughters, Christina, 20, and Rachel, 18. M I S S I S S I P P I FA R M C O U N T RY

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participate in our Ag Challenges Initiative effort. I want them to have an opportunity to tell agriculture’s story to the media and the general public. We will also make available more leadership training opportunities because today’s young adults are tomorrow’s agricultural leaders.” Randy says he plans to further strengthen Farm Bureau’s already strong presence in the Mississippi Legislature and regulatory field. “We must maintain the close relationships we have developed in these two very important arenas,” he said. “This will help to ensure that the rules and regulations that govern our operations are based upon sound scientific principles and that goals are realistic and obtainable.” Randy says he is optimistic about the future of farming in Mississippi, but we can not rest. “We must continue to work together to strengthen our programs and to carry our message to the consuming public,” he said. “Agriculture is our state’s most important industry. As a nation of consumers, we can’t afford to lose our ag industry to another country.” Randy says he and Mary V. covet your prayers during this time of transition. He wants you to know that his door is always open. “I promise that I will listen,” he said. “Working together, we will ensure that our organization remains a strong voice for Mississippi agriculture. Working together, I know that we will succeed.”

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Cowboy Beef Stew Warm up with

Ingredients: 2-1/2 pounds beef for stew, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 package (12 to 14 ounces) dried bean soup mix with seasoning packet (not quick cooking) 2 cans (14-1/2 ounces each) diced tomatoes with green peppers and onion 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 can (14 to 14-1/2 ounces) beef broth 3 cups frozen diced or hash-brown potatoes (optional) Salt and pepper

Instructions: 1. Soak beans in water overnight in refrigerator according to package directions. Reserve seasoning packet. 2. Coat beef with seasoning from reserved packet. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown 1/3 of beef; remove from stockpot. Repeat twice with remaining oil and beef, adding additional oil as needed. 3. Pour off drippings; return beef to stockpot. Drain beans; discard water. Add beans, tomatoes and beef broth to stockpot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly and simmer 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 hours, or until beef is fork tender. 4. Stir in potatoes, if desired; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; continue simmering, uncovered, 5 to 7 minutes or until potatoes are tender, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Total Recipe Time: 2-1/4 hours to 3 hours • Makes 6 servings Nutrition information per serving: 509 calories; 16 g fat (4 g saturated fat; 6 g monounsaturated fat); 91 mg cholesterol; 898 mg sodium; 46 g carbohydrate; 2.2 g fiber; 47 g protein; 6.3 mg niacin; 0.4 mg vitamin B6; 2.8 mcg vitamin B12; 8.2 mg iron; 22.6 mcg selenium; 7.2 mg zinc.

For great BEEF recipes and nutrition information go to:

www.msbeef.org

For the latest beef recipes contact the Mississippi Beef Council 680 Monroe St. Suite A • Jackson, MS 39202 (601) 353-4520 • www.msbeef.org Sponsored by Mississippi’s Beef Producers through the Beef Checkoff Program


SOLVE THE MYSTERY

This Calhoun County town was incorporated in 1927 as a sawmill town. It is named for the largest sawmill to operate in the area at the turn of the century. In more recent years, the editor of the Calhoun County Journal came up with a slogan for the town: “Where Money Grows in Trees.” This slogan reflects the importance of the lumber industry here. Weyerhaeuser, one of the largest pulp and paper companies in the world, operates in the town today. Residents say the company mills around 150 loads of pine logs a day into finished lumber that is shipped all over the nation. Wood chips are sold and made into processed wood. The town is also home to Haworth Inc., a company which makes chairs. Local agriculture is important to this town. Farmers raise cattle and grow cotton, soybeans, corn, and sweet potatoes. The county also boasts some dairies and approximately 300,000 acres of timberland. At the turn of the 20th century, our mystery town built a square expecting the county courthouse to be located there. Neighboring Calhoun City did the same. Pittsboro, located between the two towns, was ultimately named the county seat (as a compromise some say). Today, many family-owned businesses can be found on the square with very few empty buildings. According to City Hall records, this town boasts 2,097 citizens, many of them descendents of the original settlers. This community is close-knit and church-going. Local folks organized and built a children’s playground, providing the labor themselves. The local high school football team was named 2A State Champions in 1996. Our mystery town is the home of Bubba T. Chickenbone’s Family Smokehouse Inc. It is also the home of Bollinger Family Theater, which seats about 300 people. The Bollingers and friends entertain here each year, presenting shows that have been described as “a little bit of Branson in the heart of North Mississippi.” Folks come from all over the state and nation to attend, especially during the holidays. For more information, call 1.800.530.7047. Our mystery town has a weekly newspaper named the Calhoun 10

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County Journal and a local TV Station, WO7BN TV7. This town hosts a Sawmill Festival each July. Our mystery town will soon open a 9,000-square-foot forestry museum. The museum, which will also be used as a town meeting center, is located in a building constructed at the turn of the 20th century by the owners of the mill from which the town takes its name. The original writing remains on the front of the building. This museum already boasts an eight-wheel Lindsey Log Wagon. The frame was restored by renowned Mississippi craftsman Greg Harkins and the wheels were restored by a Williamsburg, Virginia, craftsman. The museum will also exhibit the old steam engine used to run the original sawmill. The museum is almost finished. Except for some grant money, citizens have raised all funds used thus far for restoration purposes. Belinda Stewart Architects, P.A., of Eupora is overseeing the restoration. Name this town CORRECT GUESSES Mail guesses to Solve the Mystery, Mississippi Farm Country, P. O. Box 1972, Jackson, MS 39215. You may also e-mail your guesses to FarmCountry@MSFB.org. Please remember to include your name and address on the entry. Visit our Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Web site at www.msfb.org. When all correct guesses have been received, we will randomly draw 20 names. These 20 names will receive a prize and will be placed in the hat twice. At the end of the year, a winner will be drawn from all correct submissions. The winner will receive a Weekend Bed and Breakfast Trip, courtesy of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation. Families may submit only one entry. Federation staff members and their families are ineligible to participate in this contest. The deadline for submitting your entry is January 31. NOVEMBER/DECEMBER The correct answer for the November/December Solve the Mystery is Meadville. The 2010 Weekend Bed and Breakfast Trip winner is Kathryn Henderson of Union County.

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WOMEN’S AG TOUR

Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Women toured agritourism businesses, including Landrum’s Homestead and Village in Jones County, upper left photo, and Mitchell Farms near Collins, lower left photo. Women also toured, the 2,000-acre campus of The Pine Woods School near Braxton, upper right photo.

In October, Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) Women enjoyed a two-day agricultural tour of South Mississippi, including the Gulf Coast region of the state. The tour compared yesterday’s farming operations with today’s agricultural enterprises and looked at the many ways that agritourism businesses are helping to make farms profitable even during bad crop seasons. “This tour gave us the tools an agricultural family needs in order to make it in the farming business today even when times get hard!” said Betty Mills, who serves as chair of the State Women’s Committee and is a row crop and beef cattle farmer. MFBF Women would like to thank Jones, Covington, Harrison and Jackson counties for their financial support of the tour.

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SWINDOLL COMPLETES BOOT CAMP Region 1 Women’s Chair Deniese Swindoll of DeSoto County recently completed a two-day Farm Bureau Women’s Communications Boot Camp training session in Washington, D.C. She is shown here with American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) President Bob Stallman and AFBF Women’s Chair Terry Gilbert. The Farm Bureau Women’s Communications Boot Camp is an intensive training session that provides participants with the skills necessary to communicate on behalf of agriculture and Farm Bureau. Session topics include working with the media, public speaking, testifying before lawmakers, and seeking elected office. Deniese, along with Jeannie Leach, a past boot camp graduate, conducted an interesting and uplifting program during state convention entitled “Can We Talk?”

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Jan. 9-12

AFBF Annual Meeting Atlanta, GA

Jan. 14-16 YF&R Leadership Conference Natchez

In today’s economy, wise purchases are more important than ever. With the skyrocketing price of fossil fuels, homeowners around the world have found that WaterFurnace is a smart choice. WaterFurnace geothermal comfort systems operate at a fraction of the cost of ordinary systems, saving you money every month. That’s because WaterFurnace geothermal systems use the clean, renewable energy in your own backyard to provide savings up to 70% on heating, cooling and hot water. For more information and an analysis of savings potential, contact your local WaterFurnace dealer. It’s money in the bank. CONTACT YOUR LOCAL WATERFURNACE DEALER

Belzoni Donahoo Htg & Cooling Service (662) 247-3579 Carthage Carthage Htg & Cooling (601) 267-4611

Corinth Harbin Htg & A/C, Inc. (662) 287-6809 Gulf Coast Adolph Bourdin (228) 255-3859

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Gulfport Woods Htg & A/C Service, Inc. (228) 832-8945 Hattiesburg B.C.’s Htg, AIr & Sheet Metal Works, Inc. (877) 909-2918 (601) 731-1743

Meridian Sanders Htg & A/C (601) 693-4054

Ocean Springs Vaughan Htg & Cooling (228) 875-9961

Helbon Htg & Cooling (601) 483-8156

Pearl Comfort Designs, Inc. (601) 932-7555

Olive Branch Air & Heat Services Co., Inc. (662) 838-8088

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Jan. 20

Winter Commodity Conf. Livestock and Forestry Jackson

Jan. 20

Legislative Reception Jackson

Jan. 21

Winter Commodity Conf. Row Crops and Aquaculture Jackson

Jan. 26-28 Washington D. C. Trip Feb. 21-23 AFBF Food Check-Out Visit Feb. 22

Women’s Day at Capitol

March 3

Ag Day at the Capitol

May 6

Women’s Leadership Conference MFBF Building Jackson

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An Old-Timey

Windmill By Glynda Phillips

Windmills have been around since our nation’s early years. In fact, American farmers and ranchers could not have easily settled certain areas of this country without water-pumping windmills giving them a ready access to water.

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D

oss Brodnax, a longtime collector of agricultural antiques and artifacts, always wanted a windmill and finally got around to buying one this past summer. “Back in the early 1970s, on the north side of Highway 82 as I traveled between Starkville and Columbus, I would notice an old-timey windmill,” he said. “Whenever I would see it, I would always wish that I owned it.” In more recent years, when Doss became friends with a community of Amish farmers in Pontotoc County, he noticed they used windmills to pump their water. When he learned where they had purchased the mills, he made some phone calls. Doss’ windmill stands 33 feet high and the mill part is eight feet in diameter. The windmill boasts a tower-top gearbox and crankshaft and a rod and pump cylinder. Doss set the mill up on his farm in October as soon as the weather cooled off a bit, and he plans to have it pumping water just as soon as he can hook up the rest of the equipment. Doss enjoys this addition to his 400-acre farm, which also boasts cows, timber, llamas, mules, horses, goats, hogs, antique tractors and other old farm equipment. Doss also owns a small store that sells Amish goods. For more information, call him at 662.418.0802. Doss is a retired longtime director of the Mississippi State University Extension Service’s Southern Rural Development Center. He is also a former MSU ag economics specialist. He is president of Oktibbeha County Farm Bureau, and he just completed a two-year term of service on the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors.

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89TH ANNUAL MEETING

“Let's Talk” participants were divided into groups to learn effective public speaking techniques for telling the farmer's story. The workshop was led by Region 1 Women's Chair Deniese Swindoll and Newton County Women's Chair Jeannie Leach, both graduates of the Farm Bureau Women’s Communications Boot Camp in Washington, D.C.

All regional Young Farmers and Ranchers Achievement Award winners received $500 from Mississippi Land Bank and Southern AgCredit. Pictured with state winners Pepper and Crystal Roberts of Belzoni and their family members is Joe Hayman, CEO of Southern AgCredit. As state winners, the Roberts also received a cash award from Dodge.

Simpson and Forrest counties were recipients of the Mike Blankenship Outstanding County Safety Award for South Mississippi.

Winner of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Ambassador Contest was Mattie Carter of Rolling Fork, right. Contest finalist was Courtney Brown of Yazoo City. 16

Walthall County Farm Bureau received the President’s Award as the Most Outstanding County program for 2010.

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Smith and Neshoba counties received the Mike Blankenship Outstanding County Safety Award for Central Mississippi.

Young Farmers and Ranchers State Achievement Award winners Pepper and Crystal Roberts of Belzoni will receive 100 hours use of a John Deere tractor. Making the presentation is Bob Dyar of John Deere.

Santa Bag donations were presented to Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children by State Women's Committee members. Child Life Coordinator Tishawn Thames accepted on behalf of the hospital.

The Gary Chittom and J. K. Simpson awards were presented to Humphreys County. Pictured are Humphreys County Farm Bureau Federation Secretary Judy Kelly and Region 8 Women's Chair Wanda Hill. JANUARY/FEBRUARY

Nationally known agricultural advocate Trent Loos addressed the opening General Session, encouraging farmers to tell their story to the consuming public.

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Young Farmers and Ranchers State Achievement Award winners Pepper and Crystal Roberts of Belzoni will receive 250 hours use of a Kubota tractor. Making the presentation is Cheri Parker of Kubota Tractor.

Mississippi Pennies donations were presented this year to the House of Hope of Mississippi. Accepting on behalf of the program were Kasha and Ricky Cox. They are pictured with State Women's Committee members.

Young Farmers and Ranchers State Achievement Award winners Pepper and Crystal Roberts of Belzoni won a new pickup truck, compliments of Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Company. They are pictured with Jack Williams.

Regional Outstanding County Award recipients include, from left, Humphreys, Jackson, Leake, Walthall, Montgomery, Simpson, Union and Bolivar.

Outstanding Women’s Programs include, from left, Reg. 2 - Marshall County, Estelle Gadd, chair; Reg. 6 - Lauderdale County, Rachel Jones, chair; Reg. 3 - Scott County, Anita Webb, chair; Reg. 5 - Amite County, Betty Edwards, chair; Reg. 7 - Pearl River County, Melba Smith, chair; and Reg. 1 - DeSoto County, Deniese Swindoll, chair. Not pictured is Reg. 8 - Humphreys County, Crystal Roberts, chair and Reg. 4 -Montgomery County, Georgie Caffey, chair.

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Young Farmers and Ranchers State Discussion Meet winner Daniel Martin of Water Valley received a cash award, compliments of Mississippi Land Bank and Southern AgCredit. Making the presentation is Joe Hayman, CEO of Southern AgCredit. Martin also received a cash award from Dodge.

Receiving the Women's Volunteer Award for Youth Safety is Sue Rogers, Smith County chair; Community Service, Dott Arthur, Leake County vice chair and Nancy Jones, chair (not pictured); Agriculture in the Classroom, Debbie Hackler, Jackson County chair and Naomi Rouse, vice chair (not pictured.) Not pictured is Bolivar County chair Lil Gant, who received the award for Information, Organization and Government Relations.

Special awards were given to, from left, Sen. Buck Clarke, Friend of Agriculture; Eddie Myrtle Moore, Excellence in Leadership; David Waide, Distinguished Service; Hembree Brandon, Ag Ambassador; and Rep. Greg Ward, Friend of Agriculture.

Marsha Purcell, American Farm Bureau Federation Director of Women’s Programs, addressed the Women's Breakfast.

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Dr. Bob Nichols, Senior Director of Agricultural Research for Cotton Inc., presided over the Cotton Inc. Briefing Session.

The Miracles, a nationally recognized choir from The Baddour Center in Senatobia, were featured during the Sunday morning worship service. The Miracles’ ministry is to praise God through music, bridge attitude barriers that may exist toward persons with intellectual disabilities, and share the mission of The Baddour Center.

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Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Safety Specialist Trey Pope presented a program on CPR during the Safety Conference/First Aid for the Home and Rural Mississippi Conference.

Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet winner Daniel Martin of Water Valley received a 4-wheeler ATV, compliments of Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company. He is pictured with Joey Stroble.

The General Store raises funds for the Berta White Scholarship, which is presented each year by the Women’s Program to two deserving female college students.

Shannon Mirus, Staff Attorney, National Agricultural Law Center, addressed the Utilizing Your Land Conference.

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The Young Farmers and Ranchers (YF&R) program holds live and silent auctions to raise funds for the YF&R Scholarship Foundation. Lane and Luke Huerkamp are shown with a John Deere Gator for children, one of the items in the Live Auction.

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2011 MFBF BOARD OF DIRECTORS

2010 STATE CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS Rankin County cattle and dairy farmer Randy Knight of Pelahatchie has been elected to serve as the ninth president of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF). Knight had previously served for four years as MFBF Central Mississippi Vice President. Ted Kendall IV of Bolton was elected to serve his first term as MFBF Central Mississippi Vice President. Long active in Farm Bureau on the county and state levels, Kendall and his family own The Gaddis Farms, a row crop, beef cattle and timber operation. The family also owns and operates a cotton gin. Re-elected were Reggie Magee of Jeff Davis County, MFBF South Mississippi Vice President, and Donald Gant of Bolivar County, MFBF North Mississippi Vice President. Newly-elected or re-elected directors include Mike Graves, Ripley; Bill Ryan Tabb, Cleveland; Neal Huskison, Pontotoc; Bobby Moody, Louisville; James Foy, Canton; James Brewer, Shubuta; Lonnie Fortner, Port Gibson; Mike McCormick, Union Church: Gerald Moore, Petal; and Ken Mallette, Vancleave. Prior to convention, Noble Guedon of Natchez was elected to chair the Young Farmers and Ranchers State Committee. In this capacity, Guedon will also sit on the state board of directors as will Betty Mills of Winona, who chairs the State Women’s Committee. Humphreys County row crop farmers Pepper and Crystal Roberts of Belzoni were selected Young Farmers and Ranchers State Achievement Award winners. Daniel Martin of Water Valley won the State Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet. Our organization’s highest award, the MFBF Distinguished Service Award, was presented to David Waide, a Clay County cattle and row crop farmer who recently retired after having served as our organization’s eighth president for 14 years. The Excellence in Leadership Award went to Eddie Myrtle Moore of Rankin County for her many years of dedicated service to agriculture, Farm Bureau, and the Farm Bureau Women’s Program. Hembree Brandon of Starkville was presented the Ag Ambassador Award for his work in promoting agriculture and Mississippi. Brandon is the Editorial Director for the Delta Farm Press and has been writing about agriculture in the mid-South since 1973. The Friend of Agriculture Award went this year to Sen. Buck Clarke of Washington County and Rep. Greg Ward of Tippah County, who were cited for their support of agriculture and Farm Bureau in the Mississippi Legislature. Sen. Clarke chairs the Senate JANUARY/FEBRUARY

Insurance Committee, is vice-chair of the Senate Finance Committee, and is a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee. He represents District 22. Representative Ward chairs the House Agriculture Committee. He represents District 4. In other meeting activities, Mattie Carter of Rolling Fork was chosen Mississippi Farm Bureau Ambassador, and Courtney Brown of Yazoo City was selected her alternate. Both are students at Mississippi State University. The winner receives a $2,000 scholarship, and the alternate receives a $1,000 scholarship.

KENDALL ELECTED VICE PRESIDENT Ted Kendall IV, 50, of Bolton has been elected to serve as the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Central Mississippi Vice President. Kendall is a farmer and co-owner of The Gaddis Farms in west-central Hinds County, a familyowned operation that produces beef cattle, cotton, corn, soybeans and timber. He and his family also own and operate a cotton gin. Kendall has been active in Farm Bureau since graduating from Mississippi State University in 1982 with a degree in Agricultural Economics. He currently serves as a Hinds County director and is a past county president. On the state level, he was a State Discussion Meet finalist and went on to serve as a member and as chair of the Young Farmers and Ranchers State Committee. Kendall has served on the MFBF Board of Directors and was chair of the MFBF Wheat and Feed Grains Committee. He is currently serving on the MFBF Beef Committee and the MFBF Risk Management Committee. Kendall served as president of the Mississippi Cattlemen’s Association, chaired the Mississippi State Board of Animal Health and was a member of the USDA Farm Service Agency’s State Committee for eight years. He and his wife Libby have two children, Anna, 23, and Whit, 16. The family attends Memorial United Methodist Church in Bolton, where he is a youth Sunday School teacher and chairs the Finance Committee.

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CIVIC CLUB PROGRAMS AVAILABLE FOR 2011 Letting the general public know what goes on down on the farm is the objective of the Ag Challenges Initiative. This program trains farmers to tell the story of their livestock operations to civic groups and creates an understanding between city dwellers and the farming population. Nine livestock producers have been traveling the state with the story of why they farm, what the challenges are, and why it’s important that the public appreciate the products that they provide. Bob Power, a hog producer from Choctaw County, says that providing the nation’s food supply is of the utmost importance.

Russell Jolly, president of Chickasaw County Farm Bureau, served as chair of the 2010 Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation State Resolutions Committee.

Bob Power

“Whoever controls my stomach controls me,” said Power. “A nation that cannot feed itself is at the mercy of the nation that feeds it. It’s important that the public realize what a critical service the farmers of this state and country provide.” These 20-minute programs are geared to give the audience a taste of what goes on in the daily life of the livestock farmer, how he takes care of his animals, and the benefits that the public gets from the farmer’s efficiency and diligence. “We’ve had a great response all over the state from these programs,” said Greg Gibson, Director, Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Member Services Department. “The public really likes to hear what the farmers have to say and what they do on a day-to-day basis.” To schedule a program in your area, call Angela Thompson at 601.977.4242. 22

The Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation State Resolutions Committee met in November with 131 people in attendance. Each year, this committee issues a report on county resolutions to voting delegates at state convention. Resolutions approved at state convention become Farm Bureau’s official policy.

Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation recently received recognition from the National Guard Association of Mississippi Patriot Partnership Program.

M I S S I S S I P P I FA R M C O U N T RY

JANUARY/FEBRUARY


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Saying Goodbye

Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) members and staff said goodbye in recent weeks to retiring MFBF President David Waide and his wife Sandra after 14 years of service to the organization. Among the many gifts he received were a saddle from the MFBF Executive Committee and Board of Directors, a rifle from the MFBF Young Farmers and Ranchers (YF&R) program, a photo album of memories compiled by the MFBF Women’s Program and his photo included in the Ag Museum’s Agricultural Hall of Fame. A David Waide Scholarship was also established under the umbrella of the YF&R Scholarship Foundation. In addition, David and Sandra were honored with two receptions.

24

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY


The cake, pictured above, is a colorful depiction of the busy schedule of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) president during his tenure at the helm of our organization. In the remaining photos, clockwise, David Waide receives a framed reminder that Farm Bureau was successful in gathering enough signatures to have an eminent domain initiative placed on the 2011 ballot; the Waides visit with guests during a reception at state convention; and Sandra Waide was presented a St. Francis of Assisi statue by the MFBF Executive Committee and Board of Directors JANUARY/FEBRUARY

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