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e-Tsayn e-Voice is a publication of

The Diocese of the Armenian Church (Eastern) Archbishop Khajag Barsamian, Primate Department of Mission Parishes Rev. Fr. Tateos R. Abdalian, Director www.armenianchurch.net Diocesan Office: 212.686.0710

Email: dertateos@ armeniandiocese.org

 

The Easter Message of The Primate  

ARCHBISHOP  KHAJAG  BARSAMIAN   Primate  of  the  Eastern  Diocese  of  the  Armenian  Church  of  America  

    Light  of  the  World  

THE  ROMAN  EMPIRE  OF  THE  FIRST  CENTURY  was  an  entity  of  many  glories:  arguably  mankind’s  greatest  political   achievement  to  that  time.    Yet  when  we  remember  it  today,  we  are  transfixed  by  its  cruelty  and  disregard  for  life;   its  mask  of  civility  hiding  a  darker  truth.   Ordinarily,  this  truth  would  have  been  left  in  the  shadows  of  history.    But  something  exposed  it,  illuminated  it.     What  could  have  shined  this  light  of  truth?   The  unexpected  answer  is  this:  The  sufferings  of  an  innocent  person—and  the  miraculous  event  that  followed.    But   most  important  of  all,  the  source  of  both  the  miracle  and  the  light  was  love:  God’s  love,  embodied  in  the  person  of   Jesus  Christ.   Such  thoughts  seem  deeply  present  among  us  this  Easter.    For  this  year  we  are  reminded  again  of  how  another   empire  meted  out  suffering  to  innocent  souls.    As  in  our  Lord’s  case,  for  those  innocents—our  own  parents  and   grandparents—their  suffering  was  not  an  end,  but  rather  a  passage  to  something  else:  for  the  departed,  enduring   memory  in  our  community;  for  the  survivors,  continued  lives  of  goodness,  kindness  and,  miraculously,  love.   Now,  ninety-­‐five  years  after  the  Genocide,  nearly  all  who  endured  it  have  been  gathered  to  our  Lord;  the  last   precious  survivors  are  those  who  witnessed  the  cataclysm  as  children  or  infants.    But  this  is  another  point  of   contact  with  our  Lord  Jesus.    For  we  cannot  forget  that  he,  too,  was  marked  for  extinction  in  his  infancy.    He  too   began  life  as  the  survivor  of  an  attempt  to  wipe  out  an  entire  class  of  human  beings.    Such  memories  must  have  left   their  impression  on  him.    Was  our  Lord’s  tenderness  towards  children—so  rare  for  that  day—a  reflection  of  the   burdensome  knowledge  he  carried,  that  infants  in  Bethlehem  had  died,  while  he  had  lived?   Throughout  his  ministry  our  Lord  showed  the  greatest  love  for  those  who  most  acutely  felt  man’s  essential   neediness:  our  vulnerability  to  the  abuses  of  the  world;  our  incompleteness  without  God.    “Blessed  are  the  poor  in  


spirit,”  he  preached  in  the  Sermon  on  the  Mount  (Mt  5:1-­‐16).    “Blessed  are  the  mourners,  the  meek,  the  pure  in   heart.”    His  blessings  flowed  to  those  who  had  felt  the  sting  of  persecution,  and  the  absence  of  mercy;  who  craved   peace,  and  hungered  for  the  world  to  be  set  aright.    A  portrait  emerges  of  those  who  are  touched  by  God:  not  the   powerful,  but  those  aware  of  the  illusion  of  human  power;  its  tendency  to  turn  against  others,  to  reduce  and   dehumanize  them.   Jesus  did  not  utter  these  things  out  of  some  romantic  idealization  of  defeat;  nor  out  of  commiseration,  or  pity.    To   the  contrary,  he  taught  that  it  is  in  the  forge  of  such  bitter  experience  that  one  could  see  the  reality  of  the  human   condition,  and  the  reality  of  God,  with  the  greatest  clarity.    The  experience  of  suffering  and  loss,  bravely  and   faithfully  endured,  would  be  a  beacon  of  truth,  to  illuminate  mankind.   “You  are  the  light  of  the  world,”  he  told  his  careworn  friends.    “A  city  set  on  a  hill  cannot  be  hid;  neither  do  men  light  a   candle  to  cover  it,  but  they  put  it  on  a  candlestick—to  give  light  to  all  in  the  house.    Let  your  light  so  shine  before  men,   that  they  may  see  your  good  works,  and  glorify  your  Father  in  heaven.”   In  such  words,  Christ  subtly  anticipated  the  meaning  of  Easter:  the  uncanny  miracle  that  drew  life  out  of  death,   victory  out  of  defeat,  truth  out  of  a  deceitful  world.    Above  all,  it  was  a  miracle  of  love:  God’s  love  for  mankind,  his   willingness  to  sacrifice  his  only  Son  on  our  behalf.    When,  in  the  hours  prior  to  his  own  suffering,  our  Lord  said,  “I   am  the  light  of  the  world”  (Jn  8:12),  he  was  assuring  us  that  he  would  always  stand  with  those  who  testified  to  the   truth  through  their  affliction.   And  so  Christ  stood  with  our  elders  who  endured  the  Genocide:  for  they  too  have  testified  to  the  truth—against  the   powerful,  the  persecutors,  the  deniers  of  our  own  age.    Their  victory—the  lives  of  love,  grace,  and  dignity  the   survivors  went  on  to  lead—was  of  a  piece  with  the  Resurrection:  not  entirely  a  supernatural  miracle,  to  be  sure,   but  an  affirmation  of  the  meaning  of  Christ’s  sacrifice.    In  the  deepest  sense,  each  of  their  million-­‐and-­‐more  stories   was  a  recapitulation,  a  memory,  a  revelation,  of  the  story  of  Easter.   As  we  say  farewell  to  that  generation—both  in  public  as  a  community,  and  in  the  most  personal  ways,  as  through   the  loss  of  a  father—we  should  hail  them  in  the  loving  manner  of  our  Lord:  “You  were  the  light  of  the  world:  In  life,   you  would  not  be  hidden;  and  you  brought  light  to  everyone  in  our  house.”   And  we  pray  that  from  their  rest  in  God’s  kingdom,  the  souls  of  our  heroic  generation  may  reply  to  us:  “Now  you   must  be  that  light.    Let  your  light  so  shine  before  men,  that  they  may  see  your  good  works—our  good  works—and   glorify  our  Father  in  heaven.”   Let  that  thought  be  in  our  hearts,  as  on  our  lips  we  pronounce  the  Easter  greeting  that  has  always  held  such  depth   of  meaning  for  our  people:   Krisdos  haryav  ee  merelotz!    Orhnyal  eh  harootiunun  Krisdosee!   Christ  is  risen  from  the  dead!    Blessed  is  the  resurrection  of  Christ!   Easter  2010    

   

   


a few words from der tateos . . . Christ is Risen! Filled with joy were the mouths of the Myrrh-Bearing women as they brought the good news from the empty tomb to the disciples, "Christ is Risen!" With this same great joy, we have repeated over and over again this proclamation of the most important event in the history of mankind and in the life of every person: "Christ is Risen." This event has become for us as the faithful children of the Church, a form of salutation, for the pronouncement is a matter of deepest joy. It is not, like most salutations, a mere wish. It is an actual event; it is a reality. Christ is risen and death is abolished. Death is abolished, for Christ resurrects with Himself all the faithful who, inasmuch as they believe in Him, do not taste death, but pass from death unto life. We, as part of today's society, being unable by our own power to face the inevitable reality of death, has repressed this fact into the depths of our subconscious. We do everything we can to prolong the natural life of our bodies; and when the inescapable end arrives, we make cosmetic improvements to the situation to conceal the manifestations of death. We hide what has happened so that those who are left may continue with their natural life as if the specter of death did not threaten it. But the natural cessation of the bodily existence of humanity is unavoidable, and futile is the effort of modern man to ignore this reality. We, those who believe and accept Jesus Christ as the Savior, face the fear of death, not by refusing to think about or deal with it, but rather through our faith in the Resurrection of Christ, which entails also the expectation of our own resurrection. Having risen from the dead, Christ became the First-born of the dead, and He is ready to bestow resurrection - the passage from death to life, unto every person who entrusts his life to Him. These are the gladsome tidings that we proclaim to the whole world, crying out, "Christ is Risen!" The joy of the resurrection and of the abolition of death inundates our hearts. We do not deem it sufficient simply to wish for life for our fellow human beings. Christ came to earth, Christ became incarnate, Christ was crucified and resurrected so that we might have life, and have it more abundantly. Therefore, we do not wish simply for resurrection. The Church reassures all that Christ is Risen and death is abolished. We invite all to the joy of eternal life, which begins in the present life. For our anticipation of the resurrection is not merely a hope: it is a reality inherent in the Resurrection of Christ. In this sense, our wish is also a reality, and this reality replaces the wish.   Christ is Risen! And every person is called to rise together with Him. Christ is Risen! And every person has the potential to rise together with Him. Christ is Risen! And in effect every person has already risen together with Him. Two preconditions are required for our participation in Christ's Resurrection: faith and love for Him, and all that these entail. But today we celebrate the Resurrection, we proclaim the fact, and we rejoice in saying "Christ is Risen." This is not a fiction, it is not a lie. It is a truth confessed by the myriads of Saints who loved Christ and fully trusted Him, and who are now alive with Him and appear unto many. The Resurrection, thanks to Christ, is a reality, and it is offered unto all. Christ is risen from the dead! He trampled down death by death. And by his resurrection he granted life unto us. Glory unto him for all ages. Amen


Through His grace and mercy may we all participate in His Resurrection and His life.

Good Christian faithful rejoice. Kreesdos Haryav ee Merelotz! Christ is Risen from the Dead! Easter 2010

A.C.Y.O.A.    News       The  ACYOA  Central  Council  is  proud  to  announce     the  2011  publication  of...   The  First-­Ever  Commemorative  Memory  Book!   The  Memory  Book  Committee's  regional  liaisons  are  looking  for   photos,  stories,  and  other  A.C.Y.O.A.    memories.     We  encourage  all  Mission  Parishes  and  generations  to  share!   If  you  would  like  to  contribute,  please  email:   acyoayearbook@gmail.com   You  can  also  call:   Megan  Karanfil   443.  622.  4742   Ara  Janigian   401.  486.  8495  

SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM AT THE EASTERN DIOCESE This summer the Eastern Diocese will once again partner with the AGBU Summer Intern Program to offer an eight-week internship at the Diocesan Center from June 13 to August 7. The program is open to young adults between the ages of 20 and 26. According to individual career goals, interns may choose to work in areas such as accounting, development, public relations, education, music ministry, or in the Krikor and Clara Zohrab Information Center. Diocesan interns will be housed with other AGBU interns in New York University dormitories, and will engage in various AGBU-sponsored educational, cultural, and social activities. There is no cost to participate in the program. The application deadline is May 1, 2010. For information or to receive an application, contact Nancy Basmajian at acyoa@armeniandiocese.org, or (212) 686-0710, ext. 143.


SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATION IS UNDERWAY Hye Camp applications are online. Visit www.armenianchurch.net/hyecamp to download the application packet for campers, CITs, staff, and volunteers. CIT and staff training begins on August 4; the Hye Camp session will take place August 7–14. Register for St. Vartan Camp at www.armenianchurch.net/stvartancamp. The deadline for CIT applications was March 15, and staff applications are due April 1. All staff will gather at the Ararat Center prior to camper arrival for staff training, beginning June 23. St. Vartan Camp offers three two-week sessions: Session A, June 27–July 10; Session B, July 11–24; and Session C, July 25–August 7. Contact Jennifer Morris, Diocesan Youth Outreach coordinator, for questions about either camp program at jenniferm@armeniandiocese.org.

received in der hayr's email box . . . Two Stories for our Catholic Cousins THREE NUNS WERE ATTENDING A YANKEE BASEBALL GAME. THREE MEN WERE SITTING DIRECTLY BEHIND. BECAUSE THEIR HABITS WERE PARTIALLY BLOCKING THE VIEW, THE MEN DECIDED TO BADGER THE NUNS HOPING THAT THEY'D GET ANNOYED ENOUGH TO MOVE TO ANOTHER AREA. (N.B. Red Sox fans would never do such a thing!) IN A VERY LOUD VOICE, THE FIRST GUY SAID, "I THINK I'M GOING TO MOVE TO UTAH. THERE ARE ONLY 100 NUNS LIVING THERE." THEN THE SECOND GUY SPOKE UP AND SAID, "I WANT TO GO TO MONTANA. THERE ARE ONLY 5O NUNS LIVING THERE." THE THIRD GUY SAID, "I WANT TO GO TO IDAHO. THERE ARE ONLY 25 NUNS LIVING THERE." THE MOTHER SUPERIOR TURNED AROUND, LOOKED AT THE MEN, AND IN A VERY SWEET AND CALM VOICE SAID, "WHY DON'T YOU GO TO HELL... THERE AREN'T ANY NUNS THERE

The IRISH Confessional   An Irishman goes into the confessional box after years of being away from the Church. There's a fully equipped bar with Guinness on tap. On the other wall is a dazzling array of the finest cigars and chocolates. Then the priest comes in. "Father, forgive me, for it's been a very long time since I've been to confession, but I must first admit that the confessional box is much more inviting than it used to be."


The priest replies: "Get out. You're on my side."    

Seen on a Church Sign              

58eTsayn4.4.10


eTsayn April 4, 2010  

eTsayn April 4, 2010

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