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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

English III Honors Seminar

Department: English

English III students interested in the challenge of earning an honors distinction must apply in the late fall for a semester-long honors seminar. To join the honors seminar, which will consist of extensive independent work and a group component, students will propose a project to the English department. Throughout the second semester, students will meet with their instructor in one-on-one meetings that focus on independent work, and the honors cohort will meet as a group once a week outside of the MHS daily schedule. In the weekly meetings, the group will report on progress, problems, and successes, engage with core theoretical texts, and pursue site-based enrichment experiences that may relate to independent projects (e.g. archives, libraries, experts, historical sites). Individually, students will pursue self-designed projects that must include:

English I Students in English I study a range of classic, foundational texts. Sophocles’s Oedipus Rex and William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet serve as anchor texts, supported by stories from Greek mythology and a selection of short fiction, poetry, and graphic novels. Class work focuses on developing skills in literary analysis through varying writing assignments, multi-genre projects, and class discussion. Students learn basic research skills and become familiar with library resources. Developing organizational skills and learning to use one’s voice are also integral pieces of the English I curriculum. (1 credit; full year)

English II

Extensive reading of literary texts A research component Consultation of experts A series of process reflections A final written component A final product for publication/presentation (which may be the written component)

Landscape and Place: Writing and Art in New England Students in English II will read a range of literature that looks at landscape in its symbolic and literal forms. We will examine authors such as H.D.Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Donna Tartt, Karen Shepherd, Edith Wharton, Herman Melville, Andrea Barrett, E.B. White, and others. Through reading, writing, and discussion, we will consider questions such as: how can location and landscape influence writing and art? How can landscape be the physical terrain and topography in which the author exists, but also a metaphor for political, religious, philosophic and economic contexts? We will build on the foundational writing skills established in English I as we move through more challenging literary content and deeper discussions. Through class participation, presentations, and projects, students become more confident in their voices and the course progresses towards an increasingly student-led discussion format. Students also grow in their research skills and deepen their engagement with library resources. (1 credit full year)

The semester will culminate in the publication of the written components of each project and a public presentation of each student’s work. P/F - P=Honors Designation

Eng. IV: Shakespeare on Desire Shakespeare was an incredibly gifted poet and playwright, whose works sustain their relevancy four hundred years after publication. But much to some students’ surprise, his plays were full of desire, transgression, and trickery. In this class, we will read, analyze, discuss, and perform poems and passages from the Bard’s work, examining the author as both lover and lunatic. We will also watch films and discuss relationships among Shakespeare’s sonnets, comedies, and dramas. Texts will include the author’s sonnets, and a sampling of his plays including The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, and Twelfth Night. 1/2 credit, first semester)

English III Modern and Contemporary Global Voices English III provides the opportunity for students to deepen the complexity, depth and sophistication of their reading practice, writing process, and research skills in an environment of increasing independence. To support this growth, English III follows a model of “flex teaching” in which two sections meet at the same time and share the expertise of two teachers. This arrangement allows for or flexible grouping and collaborations among both students and teachers. It also enables students to choose among differing levels of challenge at different times of the year. The English III curriculum includes literature of all genres and emphasizes a diversity of global voices. Texts may include The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga, Waiting for the Barbarians by J.M. Coetzee, Waiting by Ha Jin, and Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Classes begin with a daily poetry circle and students gain increasing charge of Harkness-style discussions. The first semester includes a sequenced, comprehensive research unit. (1 credit; full year)

Eng. IV: The Body in Society In what ways does the public dictate the value of our bodies? In what spaces are our bodies allowed and not allowed? Are our bodies and ourselves one in the same? This course explores gender, race, size, body image, public health, and other issues regarding the physical self in society. Readings include contemporary work by Eula Biss, Claudia Rankine, and Maggie Nelson, as well as historical texts across genres. Additionally, media covering current social issues informs students’ inquiry into myriad topics and concerns as we explore what Biss means when she claims that “we owe each other our bodies.” (1/2 credit; first semester)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Eng. IV: Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex: gender, genetics, and Greek Drama

Eng. IV: History & Cultural Legacy of the Brothers Grimm

Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex was published in 2002 to great acclaim. New York Times reviewer Laura Miller labeled the novel “a colossal act of curiosity, of imagination and of love.” With an intersex protagonist who transitions from female to male, one might reduce the book simply to a lesson on gender identity, but the text invites a much closer analysis. The tightly-woven text delves into the science of genetic mutations and topics of genocide, immigration, race in America, gender stereotypes, sexual orientation, Greek theater, ethics, prejudice, fate, and more. As we move through this primary text in our class, we will read nonfiction essays, poems, and scientific research to deepen our discussions. (1/2 credit; first semester)

A child’s first exposure to story often begins with a fairy tale. From Little Red Riding Hood to Hansel and Gretel, fairy tales still delight young children who fear the cunning wolf or dream of the candycovered cottage. But where did these tales come from? Who were they for and how have they changed? What purpose do they serve in our contemporary, global society? This course examines the history and cultural legacy of these stories that seem so simple at first glance. We will explore many versions of popular fairy tales across time periods and cultures, including a close look at the popular Grimm brothers and their original, non-Disney-fied tales; we will also read scholars’ critical essays and watch contemporary film adaptations to understand the significance of these tales. (1/2 credit; second semester)

Eng. IV: Translations Eng. IV: From Apocalypse to Zombies: Dystopian Literature in the 20th and 21st centuries

This one-semester course capitalizes on the cultural and linguistic richness of the Miss Hall’s School community. The class will read English-language translations of novels, short fiction, and poetry originally written in languages spoken by members of the class or languages of cultural significance or interest to class members. The syllabus is, therefore, a flexible and collaborative product of the students and their teachers. The class will focus on close readings of these texts while also engaging in broader thinking about the nature of language and cross cultural communication. Students will complete independent projects of their own design, which may include original translations, research-based investigations into the process and art of translations which could present opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborations with the Foreign Language Department. Texts may include Why Translation Matters and other readings in the theory of translation, In Other Words (trans. from Italian), Memories of Peking (trans. from Chinese), The Queue (trans. from Arabic), and The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly (trans. from Korean) (1/2 credit; first semester)

Dystopian literature -- fictions that present frightening visions of the future of our world -- have been surprisingly popular throughout the last century or so; (think of Orwell's 1984, or more recently, The Hunger Games or the Divergent series). Why have so many writers devoted their talents to producing such dark visions? And perhaps even more curiously, why have those visions proven to be so popular? To what extent do they predict the future, or, in some cases, describe the present? In this course, we will study some of the most important examples of modern dystopian fiction, including film and television versions. Possible texts include: George Orwell's 1984; Cormac McCarthy’s The Road; Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale; the landmark films “Brazil” (Terry Gilliam) and “Blade Runner” ( Ridley Scott); and episodes from the acclaimed Netflix series “Black Mirror.” (1/2 credit; second semester)

Eng. IV: From Page to Screen: Stories and Film Adaptations

Eng. IV: Hearing Voices (1/2 credit; second semester)

Is the book really always better? What can happen in a film that cannot happen on the page? What gets lost in translation when a book is made into a movie? This course explores the always exciting, if sometimes awkward or even disastrous, transformation of text into film. Students work with a vast range of texts that may include Wild, by Cheryl Strayed, Jesus’ Son, by Denis Johnson, Matilda, by Roald Dahl, Brokeback Mountain, by Annie Proulx, Housekeeping, by Marilyn Robinson, The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins, Wonder Boys, by Michael Douglas, and others. In addition to critical reading and writing, students will experiment with making their own adaptations of a text of their choosing. (1/2 credit; second semester)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

AP English

Department: Language

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition engages students in careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone, all of which prepares them for taking the AP Literature exam. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Readings may include Hamlet, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and Oedipus Rex. Students engage in individualized writing instruction with attention to the development of a strong writing process and narrative voice. The class utilizes a seminar format, wherein students are empowered to set the agenda for discussions of the work at hand and carry out those discussions with support but minimal interference from the instructor. Grade Level: 12 (1 credit; full year)

French I In this introductory course, students become familiar with basic grammatical patterns, vocabulary, and structures. They learn to comprehend, read, and write paragraphs in French. Through direct questions and answers, games, and class discussions, students also develop strong conversational skills. Throughout the year, students learn to talk about family, food, hobbies, clothes, school life, travel plans, and culinary tastes, among other things. In addition, they discover various aspects of French culture through discussions and articles. Overall, they acquire a solid foundation for any future study of French. (1 credit; full year)

French II This course builds upon the foundations of French I with further emphasis on oral work and improvement of writing skills. Students acquire significant vocabulary, study new tenses, and learn to write more complex sentences. In addition, they have the opportunity to enhance their conversational skills on a daily basis through real-life conversations, role plays, and games. They also start to read and analyze literary excerpts, newspaper articles, and short stories from Le Petit Nicolas by René Goscinny, through which they discover many cultural facts about France and the francophone world. (1 credit; full year)

Introduction to Creative Writing This one-semester course prompts students to explore and further develop their authentic voices through the study and writing of poems, short stories, and creative non-fiction. Students read short pieces in each genre, investigating strategies for achieving greater expressiveness in their own work. While students present brief, critical responses to assigned texts, their focus is on generating creative work, on developing as literary artists. Each student writes across genres, engaging different traditions and applying a variety of techniques. Each prepares at least one piece to submit to Sol, Miss Hall’s literary and art magazine. This course is offered both semesters. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; 1st or 2nd semester)

French III The goals of this course are to develop writing, reading, and conversational skills while studying the refinements of grammar, style, and pronunciation. Throughout the year, there is a great emphasis on speaking and listening activities through everyday conversations along with thorough grammar and vocabulary activities. Students also continue to discover and discuss elements of French society and francophone cultures on a regular basis, and consequently, develop their logical and critical thinking. Finally, students progressively move from excerpted literature to the novel Le Petit Prince. (1 credit; full year)

Advanced Study in Creative Writing Advanced Study in Creative Writing is open to students who complete Intro to Creative Writing. This one-semester course both introduces and builds on creative skills and practices, asking students to delve deeper into craft across genres. Additionally, it requires students to further develop leadership in the classroom. Advanced creative writing students must produce a portfolio and submit at least one piece for publication in Sol, Miss Hall’s literary and art magazine. Prerequisite: Intro Creative Writing Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; 1st or 2nd semester)

French IV This course is designed to increase oral and written proficiency, provide an introduction to the study of French literature, and promote the development of a critical sensibility. There is still a great emphasis on grammar and vocabulary acquisition as students enhance their knowledge and learn new concepts. They improve their speaking and listening skills through daily, real-life conversations, and many peer activities. Students also read and analyze many literature excerpts throughout the year in addition to one novel per semester: L'étranger by Camus and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme by Molière. (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Spanish I

Spanish IV

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the Spanish language, literature, and culture, and to acquaint them with extensive, practical vocabulary and the present, simple past, and near future verb tenses. Students learn to carry on simple conversations, to answer questions, to read short poems and stories, and to write and understand basic conversational Spanish. Students listen to recorded materials and watch short videos related to class themes. At the end of the year, each student writes and presents a story book for children. (1 credit; full year)

Students continue to develop their skills in the use of grammar, speaking, writing and understanding Spanish while deepening their understanding of the culture and context of the Spanish language. This course offers an interesting and challenging study of modern Hispanic literature with selections that include many of the best Spanish and Latin American writers: Isabel Allende, Jorge Luis Borges, Laura Esquivel, Gabriel García Márquez, and others. These readings enhance the acquisition of vocabulary and present topics that stimulate students to express themselves. The course includes an intensive study and review of advanced grammar with exercises that provide practice in all areas. Students are expected to speak and understand the language well enough to use it exclusively in class. Class participation, simulated conversations, and written and oral presentations are core components of the class. (1 credit; full year)

Spanish II In Spanish II, students continue to develop and improve listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension of spoken Spanish; a variety of activities incorporate vocabulary and grammar structures. Students are introduced to culture and literature through the use of media and adapted readings. Each student improves her conversational skills through class conversations, oral presentations, film, and listening comprehension exercises with audio recordings. Emphasis is placed on increasing a student’s knowledge of vocabulary and on enhancing her speaking skills. Another important aspect of this course is to develop intermediate-level reading and writing skills. The students study verb tenses such as the imperfect, the future, and conditional. Frequent, daily class participation is expected to build confidence in speaking and comprehension. (1 credit; full year)

Spanish V In this full-year course, students will read Julia Alvarez’s How the García Girls Lost their Accent. This exciting novel presents the different stories of three sisters and their parents before and after they move to the United States from their beloved country, the Dominican Republic, during the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo. One of the main themes of this novel is the struggle of living between two cultures. Our study gives students the opportunity to discuss cultural differences not only in the text but in their own lives. Additionally, we review advanced grammar and vocabulary. Students will make frequent oral presentations and will write weekly topical essays. Because the class is conducted entirely in Spanish, students are expected to participate actively in order to enhance their proficiency in all areas of the language. (1 credit; full year)

Spanish III The objectives of this course are to develop and improve four important skills of a language: speaking, writing, listening, and reading. Advanced grammar concepts are taught, reinforcing the skills developed in Spanish I and II. Students make oral presentations on world news, Spanish culture, geography and history, and topics which they choose to research. Written exercises and short essays help them to improve their writing. Students listen to CDs and watch selected films about Spanish culture. Literature is introduced; students read and discuss short pieces and memorize poems. (1 credit; full year)

Latin I This is an introductory course designed for the beginning student. The syllabus is based on the Cambridge Latin Course, which carries two main objectives: 1. To teach comprehension of the Latin language through practice in reading it. 2. To develop students’ understanding of the social and political history of the Romans, particularly during the first century A.D. The story line begins in Pompeii and follows the life of Caecilius, a successful businessman. As Unit I draws to an end, the students learn about the fate of Pompeii with the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Unit II brings us to Roman Britain and Alexandria, which simultaneously expands the students’ cultural knowledge as well as provides a platform for honing their translation skills. In addition to completing Units I & II of the Cambridge system, students will use additional materials to further their study of Roman culture and mythology. (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Latin II

Latin IV: Roman Religion

The students in Latin II continue with the Cambridge Latin series, which employs the inductive method of learning Latin. In this reading method, students not only gain proficiency in reading Latin passages but also acquire a considerable amount of cultural information. Unit III finds us in Roman Britain in the year 83 A.D., and we continue to follow Quintus, a young man from Pompeii, whom we first met in Unit I. The story line involves military exploits and political struggles, with tales of loyalty and treachery that tie in well with background readings on myriad cultural topics and historical events. More complex grammatical constructions are also introduced in Unit III, and students are well on their way to making the transition from reading stories to unaltered Latin texts. The study of mythology in Latin II focuses on the hero paradigm. After studying the major Greek heroes, students present, in the second semester, a modern reincarnation of the hero from a movie, television series, or book of their choice. (1 credit; full year)

Roman religion was not just a single religion but encompassed a vast collection of gods and deities from all corners of the Roman Empire. The Romans themselves discussed the nature and meaning of their religious practices, such as divination, and questioned the value of religion itself. We will read a wide range of thinkers on these topics, from philosophical works to poetry from religious festivals to comedies and novels. Our study of this polytheistic world will provide us with a comparative viewpoint from which to look at the role of religion in the world today. (1/2 credit; second semester)

Chinese Language and Culture This is a beginning course in Mandarin Chinese. The students learn all the elements of the language, memorizing over 300 characters and learning the pronunciation and tone for each word. Students participate numerous times a day as they work together on projects and dialogues. The class uses various games to empower students to speak Chinese and have fun communicating with each other. Students will be able to introduce themselves, their friends, and family members. They will also learn to discuss their hobbies, school, dates, time, and food. The class combines language learning with exploration of the culture. The students are exposed to music, food, ancient games, historical events, holidays, and traditions as well as current topics impacting China and Chinese speaking countries. The class will view several movies that depict females as concubines or as young girls with bound feet in the past, as martial artists, and as modern women in Shanghai. By combining the study of language and culture, the students gain an understanding of an important part of the global community. Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

Latin III Unit IV of the Cambridge Latin Course brings us back to Rome in the year 83 A.D., and we see the continuous storyline, which began in Unit I, come to a dramatic close. Students are now poised to make the transition from stories to literature and do so by reading and analyzing selections from various authors, including Pliny, Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, Tacitus, Martial, and Cicero. The study of mythology in Latin III focuses on Greek drama. Students read five of the most important and influential dramas of classical Athens, including Oedipus Rex, Medea, and the Oresteia. (1 credit; full year)

Latin IV: The Myths of Rome This one-semester course will examine the stories that Romans of the early Empire told about the origins, peoples, and gods of early Rome. We begin with Livy’s history of Rome, ab urbe condita, which recounts the myths surrounding Rome’s early beginnings, including its founding. From Livy we move to Propertius, who, though wellknown for his love elegies, moves into the realm of myth at the end of his career, retelling many stories of early Rome. Finally, we read Ovid, who wrote two masterpieces during the Augustan period, Fasti and Metamorphoses, the former full of myths of early Rome, and the later incorporating Julius Caesar and Augustus into the world of myth. Throughout, we will ask what the difference between history and myth was for the Romans and what it is for us today. (1/2 credit; first semester)

ESL Small in size, this class is designed to provide intensive support for the international student whose English language skills need strengthening. Great emphasis is placed on oral comprehension, a crucial skill for all other classes and for a healthy adjustment to the Miss Hall's community. Grammar, vocabulary, reading comprehension, writing, and understanding elements of American culture are included in this year-long course. This class is usually offered to ninth grade students. (1 credit; full year)

Advanced ESL This year-long course is structured to increase international students' confidence in their ability to read academic material with solid comprehension and increasing speed. Readings from current events, psychology, government, the natural sciences and literature, as examples, are used for discussions, collaborative projects, and writing prompts. Advanced grammar studies and vocabulary exercises support the curriculum. (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

English Language and Culture

Advanced Algebra I

English Language and Culture is the most challenging level of language support offered at Miss Hall's. Unless exempt by departmental decision, all international students are required to pass this course in order to graduate. Students refine their skills in public speaking and academic writing. College-level readings about American culture and other advanced materials are used to prompt discussions, interviews, and projects. A large portion of this year-long course is devoted to the language areas tested by the SAT and iBT: listening and reading comprehension, grammar, speaking, vocabulary, and writing. Upon completion of this course, a student should feel confident about her ability to negotiate life in the United States, having conscientiously identified and compared her values to those frequently presented by American culture. (1 credit; full year)

In Advanced Algebra I students begin the year reviewing and exploring functions, sets, number line concepts, order of operations, proportions, properties of exponents, scientific notation, polynomial and rational expressions, and factoring. They study the basic skills involved in solving linear equations and inequalities and then move on to more complex equations such as quadratic, rational, and radical equations. Throughout the year, students use their skills to model and solve real world problems with the goal of developing strong critical thinking skills. Students will also explore the relationship between the algebraic and the graphical representations of functions. Grade Level: 9-10 (1 credit; full year)

Geometry There are several ideas that intertwine in geometry: the study of properties of geometric figures (such as lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles); the maturation of inductive and deductive logical skills; the development of area and volume concepts; and the exploration of the beautiful interaction between geometry and algebra. Grade Level: 9-10 (1 credit; full year)

Department: Math Calculator Requirements All students at Miss Hall’s School are expected to own a TI-nspire CX CAS calculator. Appropriate use of this calculator will be part of all math classes. Students should expect their command of this technology to expand during each of their years studying math at MHS.

Geometry Honors There are several ideas that intertwine in geometry: the study of properties of geometric figures (such as lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles); the maturation of inductive and deductive logical skills; the development of area and volume concepts; and the exploration of the beautiful interaction between geometry and algebra. The Honors section more deeply explores the rigors of mathematical proof. Geometer's Sketchpad is used to give students extensive hands-on experience with mathematical concepts and to encourage experimentation. Placement in Geometry Honors requires permission from the Department. Grade Level: 9-10 (1 credit; full year)

Algebra I Algebra involves the representation and manipulation of mathematical information using variables. One theme of Algebra I is the development of tools needed to work with a wide variety of mathematical expressions. To this end, we explore functions, sets, number line concepts, order of operations, percents, ratios, radicals, properties of exponents, scientific notation, polynomial and rational expressions, and factoring. A second theme is the introduction of basic tools for solving equations and inequalities. Central to this task is the study of the addition and multiplication properties of equality. Finally, students must develop the wisdom to differentiate between simplifying expressions and solving equations. A thorough study of lines helps to illustrate the interconnections among themes. Algebra I is a prerequisite for further study in mathematics. Grade Level: 9-10 (1 credit; full year)

Algebra II Developing the concepts introduced in Algebra I, Algebra II emphasizes techniques for solving a much wider variety of equations, inequalities, and systems. The course is designed for students who need individual attention and dedicated time to reinforce and strengthen their algebraic skills. Many types of functions are studied, including quadratic, higher order polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, and periodic. A central theme is the relationship between numerical, algebraic and the graphical representations of functions; the graphing calculator is used extensively in exploring this interplay. Grade Level: 9-11 (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Advanced Algebra II

Differential Calculus

Developing the concepts introduced in Algebra I, Algebra II emphasizes techniques for solving a much wider variety of equations, inequalities, and systems. Many types of functions are studied, including quadratic, higher order polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, and periodic. A central theme is the relationship between numerical, algebraic, and the graphical representations of functions; the graphing calculator is used extensively in exploring this interplay. Grade Levels: 9-11 (1 credit; full year)

This year-long course has two goals and is designed for those students who have finished precalculus but are not ready to move on to AP Calculus AB. The first goal is a thorough review of the more advanced topics associated with the student’s work in precalculus. Once this has been completed, the course will move into a detailed study of limits, continuity, and derivatives. While working toward these two goals throughout the year, students should expect to reach mastery commensurate with any differential calculus course, and students will be prepared to move into the study of integral calculus in subsequent courses. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

Algebra II Honors Developing the concepts introduced in Algebra I, Algebra II emphasizes techniques for solving a much wider variety of equations, inequalities, and systems. Many types of functions are studied, including quadratic, higher order polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic. A central theme is the relationship between the algebraic and the graphical representations of functions; the graphing calculator is used extensively in exploring this interplay. The Honors section encourages more creative, critical, and in-depth study of these topics. Placement in Algebra II Honors requires the support of the Department. Grade Level: 9-11 (1 credit; full year)

AP Calculus AB This year-long course covers, at a minimum, the topics outlined by The College Board as necessary for students planning to take the AB Calculus exam in May. The ideas of limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals are explored at a depth of understanding consistent with college-level study. Broad concepts and widely applicable methods are emphasized rather than memorization of particular problem types. The graphing calculator is used as an aid in understanding, estimating, and confirming results. Placement in AB Calculus requires successful completion of Honors Precalculus and permission from the Department. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

Precalculus Precalculus continues to develop the set of skills needed for success in calculus. Students become fluent in the language of functions, and many applications of functions are explored. A large component of the course focuses on trigonometry and the interconnections of the unit circle and right triangle viewpoints. Completion of Algebra II and permission from the Mathematics Department are prerequisites for enrollment. Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

AP Calculus BC This year-long course seeks to build on the foundation developed in AB Calculus. Because all students enrolled in BC Calculus have completed AB Calculus, the topics covered in this course will, at a minimum, cover those topics presented in the BC course outline, but work will be extended to include the study of delta-epsilon proofs, advanced techniques of integration, extended work with polar functions and vector functions, and a detailed study of sequences and series. As time and interest permit, additional topics will be incorporated as the course develops each year. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Precalculus Honors Precalculus continues to develop the set of skills needed for success in calculus. Students become fluent in the language of functions, and many applications of functions are explored. A large component of the course focuses on trigonometry and the interconnections of the unit circle and right triangle viewpoints. The Honors section encourages more creative, critical, and in-depth study of these topics. Completion of Algebra II and permission from the Mathematics Department are prerequisites for enrollment. Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

AP Statistics Advanced Placement Statistics is an elective, year-long course for students who have completed Algebra II and who wish to continue the study of mathematics with a rigorous alternative to Precalculus or AP Calculus. Students study descriptive statistics, experimental design, probability, and inferential statistics. This course is very contextual in nature and also quite rigorous mathematically. The TI-Nspire CX CAS calculator is used extensively. Departmental permission is required and, for ESL students, successful completion of our ESL requirements is necessary. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year) Page 7


MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Topics in Modern Mathematics

Intro Physics: Light & Sound

This one-semester course is an elective for students who have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II and wish to continue the study of mathematics with an alternative course to Precalculus. Students explore life experiences as varied as the spirals in a sunflower head (Fibonacci numbers), the probability of winning the lottery, election theory, management science, and the Four-Color Theorem. In the process, students develop skills in applying complex algorithms to solve real-world problems. Topics in Modern Mathematics is an excellent skill-building and confidence-enhancing course. Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Students will explore the transfer of energy as modeled by waves. The physics basis of the course will be wave motion including concepts of resonance, interference, and energy transfer in both sound and light. Experience constructing a musical instrument and a pinhole camera will serve as capstone projects. Students will be expected to work easily with algebraic and geometric tools. Numerical and verbally-based evidence and arguments will be used freely Grade Level: 9. (1/2 credit; second semester)

Intro Physics: Energy & Society Students will explore the energy needs of a technologically driven society. The physics basis of the course will include study of motion, Newton’s Laws, current electricity, and work-energy concepts including thermal energy and the concept of efficiency of energy conversion processes. Experience constructing simple vehicles that run on stored energy will form the basis for examining the harvesting and distribution of energy sources for the needs of a technological society. As time permits, ramifications of the processes of harvesting, using, and disposing of exhausted energy resources will be considered. Students will be expected to work easily with Algebra I concepts and tools, including graphing and interpretation of functions. Numerical and verbally based evidence and arguments will be used freely. Grade Level: 9 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Introduction to Statistics This one-semester course is an elective for students who have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II and wish to continue the study of mathematics with an alternative course to Precalculus. Students study techniques for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data in the context of real-world applications. Introduction to Statistics is an opportunity for students to strengthen their critical thinking skills and to use technology in a collaborative setting. Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Department: Science Intro Physics: Life in Motion

Chemistry

Students will explore the concepts of motion and force with a focus on the physics of driving. Topics will include scalar and vector quantities of the metric system, velocity, acceleration, inertia, Newton’s Laws, impulse, momentum, and pressure. These topics will be studied around the concepts of response times, starting and stopping moving objects, seatbelts, airbags, driving on curves, and how to know whether to stop or go at a yellow light. This course is activity based and students should have a minimum math prerequisite of a pre-algebra course. Grade Level: 9 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Students taking this year-long course study the topics of chemistry in a way that makes this science real and relevant to their lives. Topics include the study of the history of chemistry, atoms, periodicity, bonding, molecules, energy and forces, chemical reactions, and introductory stoichiometry, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Labs are an integral part of this course, and students will gain experience in using the standard equipment of a working chemistry laboratory. Students will partake in multiple projects meant to enrich their learning of the subject. Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra I. Grade Level: 10 (1 credit; full year)

Intro Physics: Robotics Students will discover in this course the joys and frustrations of the engineering process through the building and programing of Lego EV3 robots. Tutorials soon become challenges that will require good cooperative skills, problem solving, and perseverance. Part of the charge of this course is to begin to teach these qualities as a life skill. This course is fun and active and encourages students to plan and design programs that will perform the desired task. Some outside reading about robots in our society should be expected. Grade Level: 9 (1/2 credit; second semester)

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Chemistry Honors

Bio: Animal and Plant Form and Function

This accelerated year-long course studies Introductory Chemistry at an investigative and mathematical level. Particular attention is paid to the mathematics of formulas and equations. Major topics include atomic structure, reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, and all the governing laws of the different phases of matter. Laboratory exercises are an integral part of this course and guided-inquiry investigations are introduced. This course is for students who are interested in science, willing to study material in preparation for class, and eager to approach problem solving from the perspective of experimental design. A strong performance in Algebra I is required for enrollment. Grade Level: 10 (1 credit; full year)

This is a one-semester course that will concentrate on the anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, including humans. Subject matter will include biochemistry, cell diversity, and cell processes, but the main focus will be on corresponding systems in plants and animals: tissues, transport, sensory systems and signaling, homeostasis, matter and electrolyte balance, nutrition, immune and endocrine systems, and reproduction. Students can expect to be involved in several independent investigations. Grade Level: 11 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Bio: Evolution & History of Life on Earth This is a one-semester course that will concentrate on the last 3.5 billion years of life on Earth: the development of organic molecules and cells, and the process of evolution of bacteria, archaea, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. The interactions between living and nonliving factors on Earth will be explored in detail. Topics necessary to thoroughly understand these principles will be included as needed, including geography, atmospheric science, genetics, and biochemistry. Grade Level: 11 (1/2 credit; second semester)

AP Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry is the equivalent of a first year college chemistry course and students are expected to demonstrate significant independence and responsibility both in and out of the classroom. In this course students revisit introductory chemistry topics at much greater depth and with significant mathematical analysis, as well as delve into topics not covered in the first year course at Miss Hall's. Laboratory is focused on the guided-inquiry approach in which students investigate one or more chemical systems after participating in an introductory investigation. Designed for those considering a major in chemistry or engineering in college, this class requires students to spend and average of one to two hours on homework, studying, reading, and lab reports for each period spent in class. Students taking AP Chemistry as a junior must complete a biology course as a senior to satisfy graduation requirements. Prerequisites: completion of the three-year science requirement, strong performance in Algebra II, and permission of the science department chair. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Bio: Ecology & Environmental Science This is a one-semester course which explores the relationship between living organisms and their environment. This course focuses on the following key principles affecting natural systems: energy flow, evolution, biogeochemical cycles, biodiversity, species interactions, population dynamics, and climate. Students will be expected to critically review and discuss environmental issues faced at the local, national, and global level with particular emphasis on the positive and negative effects humans have had and still have on our planet. A field study of local ponds, rivers, and lakes will be conducted comparing water quality and biodiversity. The analysis of aquatic ecosystems will give students hands-on practical experience in which to reinforce the concepts learned in the classroom and foster an appreciation for the natural capital our planet offers. Grade Level: 11 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Bio: Anatomy and Physiology This is a one-semester biology course choice designed for those students whose main interests lie in the structure and function of the human body. Topics will include cells and tissues, and various organ systems including but not limited to immune, endocrine, nervous, reproductive, circulatory, and digestive systems. Both healthy and diseased states of these systems will be addressed as well as ethical and moral considerations. Dissections may be required but digital substitutions are available. Grade Level: 11 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Biology Honors Students enrolled in Honors Biology are introduced to the contemporary and historical concepts that define this discipline. Topics include cellular physiology, molecular genetics, Mendelian, or classical genetics, evolution of biological diversity, ecology, and, comparative plant and animal physiology. Special emphasis is placed on empirical learning through laboratory and field investigation. This course is recommended to students interested in preparing for an APlevel science course, considering an undergraduate major in science or a related field of study, or wanting to experience a more in-depth understanding of biology. Grade Level: 11 (1 credit; full year) Page 9


MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

AP Biology

Department: Engineering/Technology

This year-long senior elective follows the standard collegiate biology curriculum in preparation for the AP Biology Exam. Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites. In some cases, outstanding juniors may take this course as an alternative to the standard Biology course. AP Biology meets for an additional class and lab period each week. AP Biology students should be prepared to work during the summer and School vacations, work independently, and study complex materials in great depth. A strong performance in previous science and math courses and permission of the Science Department Chair are required for enrollment. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Introduction to Computer Science This one-semester course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of computer science and programming. While exploring languages such as java script and HTML, students will develop computational thinking skills to critically approach and solve problems. Further, course content will be applied to student-led projects promoting social awareness and curiosity about global issues. Prerequisite: Algebra I Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Computers & Programming

AP Environmental Science

This one-semester course provides deeper understanding of the field of computer science by surveying key features of programming (including loops, conditionals, functions, and data handling). Students will be introduced to object-oriented programming languages such as C++, Java, and Python. Students will be assessed on their knowledge of programming languages and developing programs to address a topic or issue selected by the class. Additionally, students will explore the connections among computing, design, ethics, and societal needs. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science Grade levels: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course. The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following are just a few that provide the foundation of the AP Environmental Science course. First, science is an ongoing process. Second, humans alter the natural systems of our planet, and our health and well-being depends on the continued development of sustainable practices. Third, environmental problems have a profound cultural and social context. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Engineering & Society This one-semester course explores the fundamentals of the engineering design process and its application to societal issues, ethics, and social responsibilities. Over the course of the semester, students will work collaboratively to model and develop technologies that address real world, local, regional, and global issues. Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Physics with Algebra Students in this full year, algebra-based physics course will learn to apply the fundamental tools of Classical Physics to analyze physical events in the world of their experience. During the first semester, topics of study include Measurement and Data Representation, Linear and Rotational Kinematics, Newtonian Dynamics, Energy, and Momentum. During second semester, topics of study will include Gravitation, Static Electricity, Circuits, Magnetism, Optics, and Fluids. Students will engage in group work, class presentations, readings, experiment, and projects to generate a wide-range of experiences informing their understanding. Students must have a TINspire calculator. Pre-Requisites: Completion of Geometry and Chemistry with a C or better. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Engineering Principles & Projects Engineering Principles and Projects builds off of the design skills and societal issues explored in Engineering and Society. This onesemester course offers greater exploration of the design process while looking in detail at topics such as force, mechanical advantage, electrical systems, and materials. Students will design group projects and take a lead in their own learning by conducting research on a selected topic and testing solutions. Additionally, we will focus on a variety of fields within engineering (e.g.: mechanical, chemical, etc.) Prerequisite: Engineering & Society Grades: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

STEAM

US History

In this year-long course, we will extend our knowledge on core concepts by exploring the intersection of these five disciplines; Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math. Drawing from the scientific practices, the engineering design process, mathematical problem solving, and the creative process, students will develop skills to apply their knowledge while creating, exploring, and developing technologies that enhance their understanding of the natural and human-made world. Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Traditionally taken during the sophomore year, US History exposes students to many themes, ideas, and experiences that have shaped the country. Chronological in format, this course surveys many topics, including the country's beginnings and early character, the Constitution, sectionalism, the Civil War, and the Gilded Age. Twentieth century subjects include Progressivism, the Depression, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Sixties. Diverse methodologies, many different text sources, writing development, and new technologies serve to provide a meaningful look at the American experience and to develop historical thinking skills. Completion of a term-long research paper is part of the course’s many challenges. Grade Level: 10-11 (1 credit; full year) required course

Robotics II In this one-semester course, students will draw from their experience and knowledge from science and engineering courses to apply them to robotic design, programming, and ethics. Members of this course will engage in a combination of projects, instruction, and research to complete assigned work. This course will enable student teams to develop and implement solutions to presented challenges through engineering design and computer programming. Students will be assessed through their development of projects throughout the course by working with Lego Mindstorm and Tetrix systems. Prerequisite: Intro Physics: Robotics, Engineering and Society, or Introduction to Computer Science Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

AP European History This year-long course is designed to offer committed students the opportunity to study history at a level commensurate with a college survey, examining the European past from the Renaissance to the present. A rigorous pace and increased study expectations make this a demanding but intellectually rewarding course as students prepare for the annual Advanced Placement examination. In addition to a sophisticated text, the course relies on primary and interpretive readings, document-based-question essays, presentations, videos, and computing to build a solid understanding of the political, social, cultural, and intellectual dimensions of European history. This is the only AP history course available to sophomores. Recommendation required. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

Department: History World History This core class, traditionally taken in the ninth grade, spans more than 8,000 years of history and examines civilizations around the world. Students will learn how to take notes efficiently, read critically, research successfully, study effectively, and write eloquently. Over the year, they will have opportunities to demonstrate their understanding of history through individual and collaborative activities, which include seminars, debates, projects, presentations, simulations, and essays. History will come alive during a day of experiential learning on Ancient Greece first semester and Europe second semester. In sum, this class intellectually and academically prepares young students to handle the increasingly challenging courses at Miss Hall's and in the world beyond. Grade Level: 9-10 (1 credit; full year) required course

AP US History This intensive, year-long, college-level course has two primary and equal purposes: first, to provide students with comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the key events, ideas, and issues of United States History from pre-colonial times to the present; and second, to thoroughly prepare students to do well on the annual Advanced Placement examination in May. The course encompasses political, social, economic diplomatic, and cultural history. Through frequent essay writing, practice tests, document analysis, and content quizzes, students will develop both their content mastery and their historical skills in critical reading, writing, analysis, and synthesis. Students should be prepared for a rigorous pace, challenging readings, a substantial workload, and higher expectations. Students will be expected to read multiple textbook chapters and a 300-page monograph over the summer to prepare for this course in addition to significant writing. Recommendation required. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

AP Human Geography

Renaissance in Italy

This full-year course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Geographic concepts emphasized throughout the course are location, space, place, scale, pattern, regionalization, and globalization. These concepts are basic to students’ understanding of spatial interaction and spatial behavior, the dynamics of human population growth and movement, patterns of culture, economic activities, political organization of space, and human settlement patterns, particularly urbanization. A significant outcome of the course is students’ awareness of the relevance of academic geography to everyday life and decision making. This combination of the academic and the applied gives students a sophisticated view of the world in the context of domestic/foreign policy and international relations. All students earning course credit take the national Advanced Placement Examination in May. Recommendation required. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

This is a one-semester course about the rebirth of republican government in the 13th century, the explosion of trade, wealth, and art in the 14th and 15th centuries, and the family that has come to define the period: the Medici. Along the way, we will spend time in Florence, Venice, and a place near and dear to me, Padua. We will visit the elite in their palaces but also see what it meant for average people to get married (and to see those marriages fall apart) by reading a classic microhistory by one of the giants in the field (Gene Brucker) and by taking a look at my dissertation research from the Paduan archives. In addition to in-class tests, students will write an extended historiographical essay and complete a culminating group project in May. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Tudor and Stuart England In some ways, this one-semester course is the story of two families: the Tudors and the Stuarts. During the Tudor dynasty, the religious world of England was blown apart by Henry VIII in the name of

Nazis and the Holocaust

finding a male heir. In 1603, Henry's last daughter Elizabeth died

This one-semester course is not about World War II but rather focuses exclusively on National Socialism in Germany, from its origins in the aftermath of the Great War and ending with the destruction of the Third Reich in 1945. This will be an extremely dark class as we examine in minute detail the tenets of Hitler’s Nazi ideology and the way in which that racial world-view led to murdered millions upon millions of innocents in occupied Europe. We will be reading selections from Richard J. Evans' monumental and groundbreaking study of National Socialism and the Nazi regime, in addition to Primo Levi's heart-wrenching account of his time in Auschwitz. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

childless, and the throne passed to the Stuart family. The Stuarts were not as successful as their Tudor predecessors: one would be decapitated in front of his palace (Charles I), another would endure eleven years of exile in Antwerp (Charles II), and the last (James II) would lose his throne because his Parliament invited his son-inlaw, William of Orange, to invade and remove the Catholic “tyrant.” And therein lies the other great issue of this course: religion. The Tudors would rule over a century of religious upheaval between Protestants and Catholics, while the Stuart kingdom was torn apart by fighting between rival interpretations of Protestantism. We will approach this dramatic story by reading a variety of historians, by writing an extended historiographical essay, and through a culminating group project presentation in May. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Modern Middle East This is a one-semester course that will help you to understand, with nuance and depth, what is happening right now in the Middle East, from Syria to ISIS to Iraq. We begin with the Ottoman Empire's disastrous decision to enter World War One, and end with the fight against ISIS. Along the way, we will spend a great deal of time looking at Israel and its bloody conflicts with its Arab neighbors, including the Palestinians. In addition, we will come face-to-face with American intervention in the region, first in Afghanistan in the wake of 9/11, and then in Iraq two years later. This is often a dark class, but studying the history of the last century in this region is critical to understanding the challenges that the world faces today. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Introduction to Law

Historical Bioarchaeology

This one-semester elective is a survey of the field of law. The course focuses on many aspects of the subject, beginning with its roots in philosophy, the Constitution, and governmental principles. The course provides an overview of many facets of law, including individual rights, litigation, property law, contracts, tort law, and civil and criminal procedures. The course will also examine important court cases, look at law enforcement and the criminal justice system, and offer opportunities to exercise legal principles and understanding in simulations and writings. Documentaries and numerous interactions with local figures in the world of law round out the course. A mock trial is often used as the final project in this remarkably interesting look at the law that shapes all of our lives in such powerful ways. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

This one-semester course is a unique combination of history, science, and technology that will examine the human remains of past civilizations. The course will explore the prehistory of early human ancestors through the fossil record, and will span the major time periods in history including Egypt, China, Inca, Vikings, and North American colonization, to name a few—all through the lens of the bones they left behind. One component of this course will therefore be a strong focus on human anatomy. What can the bones tell us about the burial practices and religion in that time period? The diet? The lifestyle? The diseases? All of these aspects of human life manifest themselves on the bones—the key is learning to read the bones like one reads a book. Research methods in archaeology will also be considered by examining the role of technology in deciphering this history of bones. Students will evaluate the use of different imaging techniques and chemical testing that allow historians to arrive at their knowledge of the past using the greatest primary source of all—the human remains. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Current Events This one-semester course takes many of the present day’s issues and challenges as fodder for both understanding the present day and for becoming stronger consumers of media information. Current hot topics to be examined include the environment, the economy, problems in the Middle East and Asia, the growth of Asia, America’s political scene, and current hot topics such as globalization and climate change. Newspaper and magazine subscriptions will supplement other texts and news sources. Discussion, research, debate, and presentations are among the vehicles by which we’ll make sense of the present in order to become better students of the future. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Department: Expressive Arts Studio Art I Studio Art I is a year-long offering and functions as a foundation course in art, helping students establish creative confidence and preparing them for further course work in the Expressive Arts. Students gain a solid understanding of the formal elements and principles of art while learning about the many ways in which to infuse their work with meaning and personal vision. The development of strong observational drawing skills is emphasized through the exploration of various media such as pencil, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, and acrylic paint. Assignments include historical and contemporary approaches to color theory and two-dimensional design. Students are encouraged to analyze and discuss how artists from different time periods and cultures approach problems and questions relating to the visual world. Students keep a daily sketchbook, participate in group projects and critiques, venture out on fieldtrips, and complete individual projects throughout the year. Studio Art I emphasizes success and progress at the individual level, allowing students to find inspiration in the world around them and to communicate their stories visually. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

Cultural Anthropology Cultural anthropology attempts to make sense of the way people live in different cultures around the world by taking a comparative and global approach. This one-semester elective involves investigating how cultural practices differ through the lens of various perspectives and authors within the discipline. The course will explore key aspects of societies including gender roles and relations, identity, language, religion, marriage practices, and diverse types of economic exchanges that exist all over the world from Papua New Guinea to Indonesia, the Middle East, Brazil, and even New York City. This reading-intensive course will help you to not only understand the customs of the most distant tribes of the world but also to make sense of your own cultural values and practices. Prerequisites: World History and US History Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Studio Art II

AP Art

Students in Studio Art II continue to develop skills and techniques for the studio, while also strengthening their artistic voice and creative confidence. Students paint and draw subject matter such as still-life, portraiture, landscape, perspective, gesture, and abstract. Familiar and new media are explored such as charcoal, ink, watercolor, acrylic, oil, pastels, spray paint, printmaking, and collage. Graphic and fashion design is also studied. Historical and contemporary examples of art help bring perspective to class work. A sketchbook serves as a key component of the course and is used on a weekly basis for planning projects, experimenting with new techniques, and practicing skills. Field trips complement the curriculum as the class explores the local art community and seeks out inspiration. Through a combination of directed assignments, collaborative projects, group critiques, and independent pieces, students learn new skills, techniques, and concepts to find success as developing artists. Prerequisite: Studio Art I or equivalent experience. Students who have not taken Studio Art I must have instructor's approval based on 5 examples of relevant work. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

This full year course is intended for the student who is seriously committed to the study of the visual arts including painting, drawing, photography, and sculpture. Students work at a rigorous pace to complete either the AP Drawing Portfolio, 2-D Design Portfolio, or 3D Design Portfolio requirements. Work produced in this course is expected to be both well-crafted and conceptually strong. In the fall, directed assignments and independent projects help students develop expertise in drawing, painting, and 2-D or 3-D media to complete the Breadth Section of the AP portfolio. In the winter and spring, the students create a body of work centered on a theme as the Concentration Section of the AP portfolio. The underlying objective of the course is to guide the student to work at a college level and create a portfolio of work that meets the standards of evaluation by the College Board's AP Program. Prerequisite: Studio Art II or equivalent experience; students must apply and be accepted into this course based on an established set of criteria. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Independent Study in the Arts Studio Art III

This semester-long course is designed for students who have completed all the available sections applicable to their focus in art. An independent project/study will be developed in collaboration with the instructor connected to a specific medium or area of interest; areas include Studio Art, Photography, Ceramics, or combined media. Students wishing to enroll in this section may do so with prior approval of the instructor with whom they wish to work. Students must also be able to present a project proposal, set their own goals, and have demonstrated that they are able to work in a focused and self-directed manner. This course gives advanced art students the opportunity to explore areas of interest in more depth with the guidance of an instructor during an existing scheduled class time. Students are encouraged to follow emergent ideas but are also expected to present a cohesive and accomplished exhibition at the end of each semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Grade Level: 12 (1 credit; full year)

Studio Art III is for students who flourish when working independently on projects they have designed. Students propose projects for themselves in areas of studio art that challenge and interest them while also keeping them engaged at a rigorous pace. Some directed assignments are given to help expand students' skill sets and understanding of art. A sketchbook serves as a key component of the course and is used on a weekly basis for planning projects, experimenting with new techniques, and practicing skills. Field trips with students at other levels complement the curriculum as the class explores the local art community and seeks out inspiration. Students complete the course with a strong set of pieces to add to their portfolios. Prerequisite: Studio Art II or equivalent experience. Students who have not taken Studio Art II must have instructor's approval based on 5 examples of relevant work. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Photography I

Photography III

This year-long course introduces students to the concept of the photograph as a means of visual communication and as a path to creative confidence. Students encounter photography through traditional wet darkroom processes, digital techniques, and alternative methods. This foundational course familiarizes students with elements of design and composition, helping them develop their critical thinking skills. Photography I involves students with the basic mechanics of the 35mm film camera and the darkroom through correct exposure, film processing, and printing techniques. Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop Elements are used to digitally edit, manipulate, and produce archival digital prints. Students are encouraged to explore subject matter of interest to them, including portraiture, landscape, and nature photography as well as documentary and abstract approaches. Through a combination of darkroom and digital work, group projects and critiques, fieldtrips, and demonstrations, students gain confidence in their ability to communicate strong visual messages with their images. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

This year-long course offering is for motivated students who wish to pursue an individual area of interest to create a portfolio of personal images. Students work independently at the advanced level and select from an array of topics that have been introduced and explored in Photography I and II. Although students create independent projects, they are part of a larger group that participates in critiques, fieldtrips, and demonstrations on technique. This is an ideal course for a student who has discovered a love of photography and wishes to explore further in an area of interest that is unique to her. At the end of this course, each student has created a portfolio that consists of analog or digital prints in a presentation book, a CD, and an artist's statement. Prerequisite: Photography II or equivalent experience. Students who have not taken Photography II must have instructor’s approval based on 5 examples of relevant work. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

Ceramics I This year-long course is designed to introduce the student to the processes and techniques involved in the production of ceramic art, including construction methods, glazing, and firing of work. Students will learn numerous hand-building techniques (pinch, coil, slab, etc.), as well as gain an introductory experience in the use of the potter’s wheel. Additionally, students will be exposed to a variety of historical and contemporary ceramic artworks, including the socio-political issues which have shaped the history and development of this medium’s long and diverse history. Along with developing an understanding of the historic and aesthetic accomplishments of the past, and the formative influences on the contemporary ceramic artist, students will also be exposed to the diverse cross-cultural solutions to humanity’s need for utilitarian and sculptural expression. Emphasis will be placed on developing a functional understanding and employment of the formal elements and concepts of threedimensional design. All this is intended to build a vocabulary of technical and aesthetic skills necessary for the development of individual expression. Formal group critiques of finished works will provide each student with the opportunity to: form and articulate an aesthetic opinion; give and receive constructive criticism; and further the development and exchange of creative ideas. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

Photography II This year-long course is designed to continue where Photography I ends by building on the knowledge gained in the first year’s study of photography. Rigorous film and digital coursework encourages students to challenge themselves and expand beyond their comfort zone in this ever-changing medium. During this yearlong course, topics such as advanced portraiture, studio lighting, large format, and alternative methods are covered and regular class critiques keep members of the class involved with students at varying levels of photography coursework. In the lively environment of the photography lab, students begin to view their photographs objectively, to exchange ideas and criticisms, and to learn about the broader historical, social, and contemporary contexts of photography. During the second half of the year, students enrolled in Photography II are strongly encouraged to design dynamic and personal photographic projects that build upon areas they have explored in the past, and to continue developing their personal, creative vision. Prerequisite: Photography I or equivalent experience. Students who have not taken Photography I must have instructor’s approval based on 5 examples of relevant work. Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

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492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Ceramics II

Ceramics III

This year-long course is designed to build upon existing skills acquired in Ceramics I. Students will further explore hand building techniques (pinch, coil, slab, etc.), as well as the use of the potter’s wheel. Students will be expected to be more self-motivated and directed as they respond to class assignments. Additionally, students will be exposed to a variety of historical and contemporary ceramic artworks, including the socio-political issues which have shaped the history and development of this medium’s long and diverse history. Along with developing an understanding of the historic and aesthetic accomplishments of the past, and the formative influences on the contemporary ceramic artist, students will also be exposed to the diverse cross cultural solutions to humanities need for utilitarian and sculptural expression. Emphasis will be placed on developing a functional understanding and employment of the formal elements and concepts of three dimensional design. All this is intended to build a vocabulary of technical and aesthetic skills necessary for the development of individual expression. Formal group critiques of finished works will provide each student with the opportunity to form and articulate an aesthetic opinion, give and receive constructive criticism, and further the development and exchange of creative ideas. Prerequisites: Ceramics I Grade Level: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

This year-long course represents the highest level of class offerings in this study area at Miss Hall’s. As such, students have been prepared to engage in more self-directed objectives and avenues of aesthetic exploration. By working and consulting with the instructor, students will set goals for themselves as they pursue their interests in both content and methods of fabrication/construction. Students will be encouraged and expected to engage in establishing greater facility with the medium, deeper understanding of the principles and concepts of 3-dimensional design, and more purposeful exploration of their aesthetic ideas. Additionally, students will continue to be exposed to a variety of historical and contemporary ceramic artworks, including the socio-political issues which have shaped the history and development of this medium’s long and diverse history. Along with further developing an understanding of the historic and aesthetic accomplishments of the past, and the formative influences on the contemporary ceramic artist, students will also be exposed to the diverse cross cultural solutions to humanity’s need for utilitarian and sculptural expression. Emphasis will be placed on further developing and displaying a functional understanding and employment of the formal elements and concepts of three dimensional design. All this is intended to further build and test the vocabulary of technical and aesthetic skills necessary for the development of individual expression. Formal group critiques of finished works will provide each student with the opportunity to form and articulate an aesthetic opinion, give and receive constructive criticism, and further the development and exchange of creative ideas. Prerequisite: Ceramics II or permission of the instructor Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Drama and Performance I This year-long course is designed to give students experience in the art and craft of acting on the stage and to deepen their knowledge and understanding of theater. Exercises, improvisations, and work on texts will help students free their imaginations, develop flexibility and expressiveness in both voice and movement, and explore the emotions necessary to bring life to a role. Students engage in intensive play and scene study, role analysis, character development and improvisation. Through extended study of plays from different periods, they gain knowledge of theater history and an awareness of various theater styles. The final exam consists of a presentation of scenes and monologues. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Drama and Performance II

Storytelling Live!

This year-long course is designed to give students experience in the art and craft of acting on the stage and to deepen their knowledge and understanding of theater. Exercises, improvisations and work on texts will help students free their imaginations, develop flexibility and expressiveness in both voice and movement, and explore the emotions necessary to bring life to a role. Students will engage in intensive play and scene study, role analysis, character development and improvisation. Through extended study of plays from different periods, they will gain knowledge of theater history and an awareness of various theater styles. The final exam will consist of a presentation of scenes and monologues. Prerequisite: Drama and Performance I or permission of instructor Grade Level: 9-12 (1 credit; full year)

From Homer to Rap, storytelling has been one of the most vital elements of human interaction. In this one-semester, performancebased class we will invent our own stories and explore all the tricks of the trade that storytellers use to take listeners on their journey. Movement, spoken word, sound and rhythm, visual imagery, and choral parts are some of the techniques we will explore as we look for new ways to spin our tales. Prerequisite: Drama and Performance I or permission of instructor Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Garment and Textile Design

This year-long course is designed to provide continued study in theater for the more experienced Drama student. The focus is on selfdirected study and performance as well as the opportunity to model for the Drama and Performance I & II students as a Teacher's Assistant. Prerequisite: Drama and Performance II or permission of instructor. Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

This one-semester course introduces students to the fashion industry. The history of clothing and fashion is studied together with contemporary designers and trends, and students gain an understanding of the greater cultural and global context in which everyday clothing is created. The course includes basic sewing skills and knowledge of sewing machines as well as more theoretical design and draping concepts. Students create mood boards, critique each other, and venture off campus on various field trips. Prerequisite: completion of one credit in a studio art (art, ceramics, or photo) or with department recommendation Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Theater Here and Now

Music Theory

This one-semester course will give students the opportunity to create two theater pieces inspired by things that are happening right now. The first will be a variety show based on that most beloved and theatrical of holidays, Halloween. Students will use all the theater’s tricks of illusion and mystery –music, masks, magic, storytelling, improvisation, and even a ghost show -- to create vignettes, scenes and skits to thrill and chill.

A semester-long, team taught course designed to teach at the individual student’s level. The fundamentals of music theory will be introduced through piano keyboard use, dictation, ear-training, and sight-singing. Reading treble and bass clefs, study of rhythm, learning how to notate a melody through dictation, and developing skill in singing with solfeggio are a few of the skills students will study. In this course, each individual student will progress as her mastery of skill allows with the potential to study chord and harmonic structure, musical analysis, and composition. Each student would express a goal/s for their personal interest in taking this course, and a final project would be geared towards that interest. At the end of the semester, a student may choose to sign up for another semester and continue on at her level of achievement. Students who are not able to take the course in the fall may sign up in the spring and start at the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; first and/or second semesters)

Advanced Drama

During the second half of the semester, students will pick a subject or event of local concern, research it and create a theatrical event to bring it to life. In this section they will apply some of the theatrical techniques learned in the first half of the semester. Freed from the limits of a written text with acts and scenes, they will seek theatrical ways to convey new and developing ideas. We will invite our MHS community as well as our local Berkshire community to enjoy both of these productions. Prerequisite: Drama and Performance I or permission of instructor Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Filmmaking

Contemporary Music History: 1880s-present

In this yearlong course, students will encounter and investigate the basics of film creation, from beginning to end, by looking at classic films and iconic filmmakers’ directing styles and by learning the vocabulary and genres associated with this medium. As they work toward making their own films, students will practice script writing and story boarding and will create shot lists and field logs. Using DSLRs, students will learn the basics of production including basic camera functions, lighting, shot types, and sound editing. In postproduction, students will use industry-standard video editing software to edit their footage and create final short films ready for film festival submission. Prerequisite: Any Expressive Arts course or permission of instructor Grades: 10-12 (1 credit; full year)

From Ragtime to Rihanna, students will explore the evolutionary roots and progression of popular music forms over the past 100 plus years in this one-semester course. Students will explore various musical genres and movements throughout history including jazz and blues, country, folk, early rock n roll, r & b, soul, reggae, latin, disco, hard rock, rap, hip-hop, heavy metal, punk, new wave, glam, grunge, electronic, and pop. Students will gain an understanding of the components of modern popular music, the types of instrumentation used, and its historical roots as well as its cultural, political, and social context plus the significance of given movements. Course work will include readings, films, music videos, albums, and project-based research, design, and presentations on topics of individual interest. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

Gallery & Arts Administration Songwriting

Students will learn about the business side of the art world in this onesemester, project-based class. We will visit galleries and museums to learn about curation, gallerists, arts management, grant writing, and selling of art. Students will work as a team to establish a mission statement for our pop-up gallery, identify a space to curate a show, serve as the jury for the selections, and host the show in the gallery as a final semester project. Prerequisite: application and instructor approval Grade Level: 11-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

The goal of this one-semester course is for the student to develop the ability to express her voice through the process of creative song writing. Students will explore many different song arrangement formats and will practice writing, editing, and revising drafts of songs through making demo recordings and listening back in analysis. Students will keep a production process journal to track revisions, techniques, and progress. Students must already be proficient with an intermediate ability on their instrument of choice or have basic piano skills. Prerequisite: none Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

Designing with Glass This one-semester course will focus on understanding the qualities and properties of working with fused and slumped glass forms. Students will engage with some of the chemistry and physics of the material, gather experience in producing molds (to slump fire their work) while being challenged to explore the effect of composition, color theory, and overall design. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; second semester)

History of Art In this one-semester survey of global cultures’ visual expression, emphasis will be placed on recognizing the religious, social, political, economic, intellectual, and technological influences that have fueled cultural evolution. Students will examine the history of art from prehistoric cave painting through contemporary sculpture, painting, photography and architecture. Art from around the globe is studied from Europe to Asia, from Africa to the US and South America. Several field trips to local museums will provide opportunities to directly experience examples of what has been studied in the classroom. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 10-12 (1/2 credit; first semester)

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Music Ensemble

Theater Ensemble

Music Ensembles Student musicians have the opportunity to perform in Music Ensembles organized by the Music Department. These ensembles include Instrumental Ensembles, The Vocal Ensemble, and The Grace Notes. With a full year's participation in a Music Ensemble, students have the opportunity to earn one-half academic credit. Music Ensembles may be taken as a credit bearing course only in addition to the normal student course load. (1/2 credit for full year participation for any of the following.)

Two major productions are presented each year, usually a musical in late February and a drama or comedy during the Spring Family Weekend. Auditions are open to all students interested in acting, regardless of prior acting experience. The plays stress commitment to a group project, especially the importance of ensemble theater, rather than the "star system." One-half academic credit is given for a fullyear's commitment. Prerequisite: audition Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; participation in both productions)

Instrumental Music Ensemble The exact nature of the instrumental ensemble is determined by the temperaments, inclinations, and abilities of the various players plus the size and instrumentation of the group. The ensembles perform in the school's concert series and on other special occasions. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Grade Level: 9-12

Technical Theater Students are given the opportunity to work in a variety of production capacities to learn by doing such activities as set and lighting design, painting. costume production and stage managing. Students learn the technique and craft necessary to realize the scenery of the two dramatic productions presented each school year plus a chance to learn lifetime skills. Technical Theater provides a great opportunity for women to acquire confidence and training in the use of power and hand tools. One-half academic credit is given for a full year's commitment. Prerequisite: none Grade Level: 9-12 (1/2 credit; participation in both productions)

Vocal Ensemble This ensemble is offered for all students who wish to participate in the experience of group singing. The group studies the principles of vocal music: breathing, tone production, fundamentals of articulation and diction. The group performs in the school's concert series, during the co-ordinate concerts with other schools, and on other special occasions. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12

Private Music Instruction Private instruction in voice, instruments, and music technology is available to students. The lesson fees vary with the instructor. A signed parental permission slip is required for all students taking lessons. The student has the option of taking the lesson as a credit course. Private music instruction for credit must be taken in addition to the normal student course load. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9-12 (1/4 credit; one semester participation) (1/2 credit; year-long participation)

The Grace Notes The Grace Notes singing group is a student-led a cappella ensemble that is assisted by the school's vocal music director. Membership is selected by audition in the spring semester. In order to be eligible to audition a student must have attended at least one year at Miss Hall’s. The group performs in the school's concert series, during the coordinate concerts with other schools, and on other special occasions. The Grace Notes often function as ambassadors for the school. Prerequisite: Audition Grade Level: 10-12

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MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

Course Catalog 2017-2018

492 HOLMES ROAD • PITTSFIELD, MA 01202-1166 • PHONE 413.443.6401 • FAX 413.448.2994 • www.misshalls.org

Department: Research/Design

Department: Academic Skills Center

Digital Storytelling

ASC

This class will examine and document girls' perspectives on relevant and current topics of girlhood: race, body image, gender and sexuality, education, etc. In order to create a foundation and context for understanding these issues, girls will research and listen to a variety of audio media, learn about the art of interviewing, and read contemporary nonfiction work on the topic. Students will then go through the design process to produce a series of digital audio narratives that vocalize what girls have to say about important topics. Throughout the first semester, girls will use their voice, vision, interpersonal efficacy, and gumption to take the lead in the classroom; ultimately, the students will collaborate, interview, write, produce and curate a digital exhibition for the MHS community and beyond. This course will count as a credit and as a Horizons placement. Requires application/proposal Grade Level: 11-12 (1 credit; full year)

Most students entering high school or an independent school for the first time notice a larger volume of work and a higher academic expectation than they experienced in their former schools. It is important in a college-preparatory program, therefore, to have resources available so all students can successfully manage their work. One of the most sophisticated resources available at MHS is the Academic Skills Center (ASC), a program that began more than 20 years ago. The ASC was modeled after a program with the same name at Dartmouth College. The ASC’s primary goal is to enable students, through individualized academic support, to be successful and independent within the Miss Hall's School curriculum. In this way, students develop their own learning strategies. Learning Specialists in the ASC assist girls in a variety of ways by: o Offering short-term help to any student on a drop-in basis in such areas as editing papers, preparing for tests, budgeting time, and refining study skills. o Providing specialized strategy-based support beyond what is offered by classroom teachers, while encouraging girls to seek help from their teachers as well. o Working with students who may have a learning difference or AD/HD and need more intensive one-on-one assistance in developing learning and organizational strategies. o Supporting students who have executive function difficulties by “coaching” them to take ownership and initiative.

Department: Online Courses Online Courses through Online School for Girls OSG is part of a nonprofit consortium of leading independent schools from around the world now under the umbrella of “One Schoolhouse.” The mission of The Online School for Girls is to replicate in online classrooms the intellectually rigorous programs and excellent teaching that are hallmarks of its member schools; to foster new and effective ways, through best practices in online education, for students to learn; and to promote students’ global awareness and understanding by creating global, online schoolroom communities. Students should be aware that online courses require careful time management and students are expected to manage their workload and time effectively to support the asynchronous nature of the courses. Students wishing to take an online course through OSG should submit an application. Enrollment is by permission of the student’s advisor, the department chair for the course requested, and The Dean of Academics and Faculty. Application required. Grade Level: 11-12

With all girls, ASC learning specialists work in partnership to promote independence and self-advocacy. Students discover and describe their own learning styles at key points in their MHS careers, such as transitioning into Miss Hall’s School and preparing for college. The ASC staff is well informed on brain research into cognitive functioning and adolescent learning. Learning specialists keep current so that girls will benefit from the most up to date learning theories. ASC also shares insights with MHS teachers and is an important resource to students and faculty. The ASC is a welcoming and productive place for all members of the MHS community.

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Miss Hall's School 2017-2018 Course Catalog  
Miss Hall's School 2017-2018 Course Catalog  
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