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Virtual Environments Module 4: Reflection Misato Inoue Student No. 637052 Semester 2/2013


MODULE 1: IDEATION

Photos by Inoue 2013


MODULE 1 - IDEATION

Design brief: To create a volumetric second skin which addresses the question of personal space and creates a spatial or emotional effect, made from a choice of 4 types of materials (paper, fabric, plastic, ready made object) (Lecture 1)

Material System: Skin and bone - Umbrella

Measuring the object: A referencing point, as mentioned in lecture 1, is determined before measuring an object (Image 1) in order to make it easier to obtain all the necessary measurements by measuring everything from the same point.

A tape measure was used to measure the curved plastic surfaces of the umbrella, as well as the flat surfaces of the metal rod. Image 1


Figure 1

Figure 2

Measured drawings: Figure 1 shows the section of the umbrella and provides the more detailed measurements and explanations of the function of each element Figure 2 shows the plan of the umbrella; the general shape of an umbrella (ie has 8 rods to support and create the shape of the umbrella) Figure 3 shows the elevation and the general measurements of the umbrella Figure 3 Sketches by Inoue 2013


Analytical sketches: Figures 4, 5, and 6 are analytical sketches of the movement of the hinges and their functions. Figure 4

Figure 6

System analysis:

Figure 5

Sketches by Inoue 2013

The main mechanical movements of the umbrella is the expansion and contraction of the ‘arms’ made possible by the movement of the hinges, which get locked into place by a rider latch. This enables the umbrella to keeps its shape and structure when opened up to fulfill its purpose as a form of protection from rain and sunlight. The folding and expansion of the arms allows a small surface to become larger by helping the skin to be stretched outwards as far as possible. Of course the rider locks create a parameter for how far out the arms can extend.


Skin and Bone: I looked at the structure and asked why there were specifically 8 ‘arms’ on an umbrella. Will it change anything if there were only 4? How will it change the shape of the umbrella? How does it affect the user? What can I do to this model so that it can continue to achieve its purpose? These were the questions I asked myself as I made this prototype.

Having 8 arms allows the curved shape of the umbrella and is enough to comfortably cover and protect a person’s head and upper body from the rain/sunlight. If there were only 4 arms however, the shape of the canopy would be more straight and will not be able to fully achieve its purpose of providing shelter from rain and sunlight.

Photos by Inoue 2013


Idea development: Analogy: Birds can display personal space by the expansion of their wings (could be also intimidation, which can also be related to personal space)

Anything/ material that encloses or can wrap around the body for privacy and be extended to a certain length can measure one’s personal space


Design ideas (1):

Design 1

Design 1) An ‘umbrella’ of some sort that protects you from the rain/sunlight that can surround you and give you a sense of privacy. Two arms with one being longer than the other can allow the skin of the umbrella to curve around the body.

Sketches by Inoue 2013

Design 2

Design 2) Cloak-like second skin that covers your entire back and has flowing material to allow flexibility . Similarly to an umbrella, the arms will extend from a reference point and will have solid bone structure to allow the cloak to maintain its shape and not move around.

Design 3

Design 3) Wings that can be extended from your ‘back’ and moved around so that it can cover your front and back, as well as stretch out to create personal space. The arms will be of different lengths and will also have hinges to allow the ‘wing’ to fold and unfold, just like an umbrella


MODULE 2: DESIGN

Photo by Inoue 2013


MODULE 2 - DESIGN Defining Personal Space:

My definition of personal space is the area of relatively close range around an individual which evokes a feeling of discomfort or threat when intruded. This space could be protected by means of intimidation , where one's personal space does not have to have a physical barrier, but rather the appearance of a feared object or form can prevent people from entering your private space. Alex McQueen - Savage Beauty

Alex McQueen - Savage Beauty


Mapping out personal space: Personal space varies between individuals, but there is certainly the shared instinct that there is a space in which each individual will consider as ‘too close’ for their comfort, and will instinctively feel guarded or uncomfortable. These spaces however can be distorted or controlled if the individual is in a crowded area. (Lecture 3)

Personal space sketch (Inoue, 2013)

Personal space within the upper half of your body, especially the head will have a wider zone as it is directly in the field of vision. (Lecture 3)

Personal space sketch (Inoue, 2013)


Design Idea (2):

The following sketches have the general measurements for one of my designs of the second skin.

Figure 7 Sketches by Inoue 2013

This second skin consists of a cape-like structure that is made up of 7 pieces of ‘bones’ that are able to extend and contract as the person wearing this skin desires. This contraction and extension of the cloak can be achieved by the movement of the arms which will force the cloak to move along in the same direction as the arm, and will be able to bend with the help of the numerous joints structured on each arm (as shown in figure 7).

Figure 8


Digitization:

Elevation

The standing mesh model of Tracy was created using the 123D software.

123D Model made by Inoue 2013

Side

The reason why her arms are out is because we wanted to see how each of our models will look when the extension of the arm is taken into account in the design of out second skin.

Axonometric


Rhino Model:

Models made by Inoue 2013

Plan

Axonometric

Elevation

Side

This design consists of 7 bone structures, each of which are the same length and with the same joint movements, which create the shape of the cape and hood. Although it is very symmetrical on Rhino, the actual material will be more flexible and will therefore not allow the second skin to have a rigid structure and be symmetrical.


Precedents:

Anouk Wipprecht

Spider dress: Dutch high tech fashion designer Anouk Wipprecht collaborated with Austrian software developer Daniel Schatzmayr to design and create this dress for women, which evokes a sense of uneasiness from surrounding people as the six ‘spider legs’ twitch every time someone gets too close. I liked this idea as the ‘legs’ do not keep intruders of personal space away physically, but rather visually, as the twitching and eerie movement of the spider legs will come across as some sort of warning for those who get too close. Anouk Wipprecht – Spider Dress


Design sketches (1): Using previous knowledge from the umbrella’s skin and bone system, I was able to create a diagram of the movement of these bone structures to see how they affect the skin visually (ie: from smooth surface to folded, sometimes crinkled surface when compressed) On the diagram on the right, the red arms show the wing when it is folded up, the blue when the wing is half folded, and the black when it is completely extended.

Wing sketch (Inoue, 2013)

The materials which make up the wing will be flexible enough for it to be able to be pulled forwards to cover the side of your arms completely in a way that encases your arm.

Wing sketch (Inoue, 2013)


Effects: The wings will be attached to the back, and will be able to open and close it as you like by pulling the upper side of the wing and extending it till the bones of the wings are fully extended. The wings will have a pattern similar to those on the wings of a moth, and will be able to move rapidly (like the opening of an umbrella) to serve the purpose of startling those around you by the sudden movement.

Model made by Inoue 2013

Io Moth

Model made by Inoue 2013


Prototyping the wings:

Photos and prototypes by Inoue 2013


MODULE 3: FABRICATION

Photo by Elefterijadis 2013


MODULE 3 - FABRICATION Precedents:

Alexandar McQueen's 'Savage Beauty' collection was the main inspiration for not only the aesthetic design of our second skin, but also for our spines and ribs that the claws are supported by. McQueen's exoskeleton design prompted us to recreate a spine and ribs design that will allow the claws to stay above the head and be able to open and close using a pully system.

Alex McQueen - Savage Beauty


Precedents: Iris Van Herpen Capriole: by incorporating Van Herpen's unique and dark design of spikes and dark colours with Anouk Wipprecht's spider dress design, we were able to come up with a different kind of design compared to the previous ones. This design really incorporated the visual aspect of intimidation with the shape, size, and colour.

Iris Van Herpen - Capriole

Iris Van Herpen - Capriole

Anouk Wipprecht – Spider Dress


Precedents:

Furne One Another fashion designer we briefly looked at was Furne One, whose designs were quirky and intimidating. Most of One's design for this particular concept had large shoulder s and something covering the mouth and nose. We noted that many 'intimidating' designs had large shoulders that we thought we could use in our design for expressing one's comfort zone.

Furne One

Furne One


Design sketches (2): The following are sketches of the ‘second skin’ after receiving feedback from the tutors for module 2, and after forming a group with Marta. As my previous designs were narrowed down to a wing-like structure and an enveloping case which flexibly surrounds the body, I decided to steer away from that concept a little and focus on the folding and unfolding mechanics of the umbrella. As a result of looking at all those precedents, I had reached a design which looked similar to a large hand or claw which comes out of the back.

Sketches by Inoue 2013


Above is the mechanics of the arms to show how a reflective surface will fall down as the arms are opened. On the right is the paneling design for the skin – the spikes all around the surface area creates an intimidating look

Sketches by Inoue 2013


Prototypes: Arms and Spine

1

4

2

3

5

6 Photo and prototype 1 by Inoue 2013 Photos and prototypes 2,3,4,5 and 6 by Elefterijadis 2013


Prototypes: Skin and Pully system

1 The idea was to create a skin that could serve a purpose in the intimidation effect – thus the idea of spikes .

4

2 No. 3 shows the final fold of the skin for one panel, where there will be 4 panels joined together to create the canopy like structure on the claw.

5

3 No.4 shows how the skin would look with the arms once 4 panels are joined together.

6

Photos and prototypes by Inoue 2013


Rhino modeling:

Closed Open

Rhino models: Spine and ribs by Elefterijadis Claws by Inoue 2013

Side

Front

Axonometric


Final model:

1

2

4

5

3

6

Photos by Inoue 2013 Model by Elefterijadis


Reflection:

The past 12 weeks has allowed me to expand my views and knowledge of what design really is, as I had initially thought that designing was fundamentally for the purpose of solving problems as well as self satisfaction. But throughout the semester, I was able to see that designing is also a way of representing the different ways in which people perceive things, attract and allow people who have the same interest to connect as well as seeing how anything can inspire and motivate an individual’s creative mind. By looking at my final design, I can see how much my ideas have changed and grown throughout the semester. As Thomas Heatherwick mentioned in the TED talks video (2011), he says to focus on the way something works rather than what is, which is what I, at the start, struggled to do. As I look back at my initial designs, I can see that they had a very similar function to that of an umbrella – to protect oneself from the rain or sunlight. There was also the analogy of a bird which led me to design something that looked like a wing structure. It was clear to me that I would have to think outside the box. In weeks 4 and 5’s lectures (2013), Paul Loh discussed the effects that different things can create, whether it is visually or psychologically, and this prompted me to think about how people would feel when their personal space was invaded, thus coming up with the intimidation effect to keep these intruders out. The 123D catch software allowed me to create a 3D model of myself and my group member so we could design the second skin according to our measurements, which would mean that the second skin will be a unique and custom made one fit for only us. Being able to use this software and reading “Lost in parameter space?” (Scheurer & Stehling 2011) helped me to understand the key differences between ‘abstraction’ and ‘reduction’ and how we can utilize either of these methods to create measured objects and surfaces. The thing I found most difficult for this course was using the 3D software Rhinoceros, as I rarely use computer software, and this was probably the first time I used anything like it. Though after attending a couple of tech sessions, I somehow got the hang of it and was able to create a Rhino Model which resembled my design idea relatively well. As for the fabrication process, the technology available now has helped Marta and I to recreate and represent our design in a 1:1 3D model. With the help of these models and prototypes, as well as the feedback we received throughout the design process, we were able to identify the problems and potential problems in our design and allowed us to fix them for the final design presentation. Having a 3D model not only helps in the visual sense, but also physically (Iwamoto 2009), as we were able to see and work out how the arms for the final design were going to fold and expand, and how the skin will be affected by these movements. Overall I’m happy with the final design, which I can see reflects the procedures and changes that occurred throughout the design process, and I feel that this subject sought active participation and commitment from me, as it was very fast paced and had detailed steps that had to be completed in order to move onto the next stage.


References: Initial ideas

• •

Heatherwick, T (March 2011) Thomas Heatherwick: Building the Seed Cathedral [Video file] retrieved from <http://www.ted.com/talks/thomas_heatherwick.ht ml> Iwamoto, L 2009, Digital fabrications: architectural and material techniques, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, Selected Extracts Paul Loh (2013) Week 6 Making: Power of Making, Melbourne: University of Melbourne. Scheurer, F, Stehling, H 2011, “Lost in Parameter Space?” AD: Architectural Design, vol 81 pp. 70-79

McQueen. A (2009). Savage Beauty retrieved from <http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/article/TMG843306 0/First-look-at-Alexander-McQueen-SavageBeauty.html> One, F (2011). retrieved from <http://www.fashionablyours.net/tags/dubaifashion-week/> Van Herpen, I (July 2011). CAPRIOLE retrieved from <http://www.yatzer.com/Capriole-by-Iris-VanHerpen> Wipprecht, A (2013). Spider dress retrieved from <http://www.fashioningtech.com/profiles/blogs/rob otic-couture>

End product

2013_Reflection_Student Journal 4  

Module 4 Submission Virtual Environments University of Melbourne

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