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CONTENTS

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Well-known Peterborough couple is filled to the brim with gratitude Bob and Jacquie Jameson

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Local Algonquin woman seeks status registration Dr. Lynn Gehl, Ph.D.

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Treat insulin resistance — Naturally Dr. Dana Marshall N.D.

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Recipe

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Pursuit of answers drives local neurology specialist Dr. Olga Finlayson

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Peri-menopause — A natural process Erin Bell, RNCP,R.

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Victims become survivors Mary Waters

Perfect Pumpkin Muffins

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Moving Pictures™ Terri Catlin

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Juju doctor ministers to Newson’s star energy Patricia Newson

Like Us On Facebook Discovering Women Magazine @discoveringW

www.Discovering-Women.com Managing Editor/Copy Editor/Writer: Linda Doran Viscardis Editorial: linda@discovering-women.com Publisher: Miryam Buchahim Design / Photography: MB Graphics & Events Writer: Melodie McCullough Advertising Inquiries: miryam@discovering-women.com Office: 705-768-1035

Local doctor embraces holistic approach to geriatric care Jennifer Ingram DW CHANNEL

www.discoveringwomenmagazine.com Contributors: Jacquie Jameson (on the cover) Dr. Olga Finlayson Mary Waters Jennifer Ingram Louise Racine Paul Lavergne Pat Newson Dr. Dana Marshall N.D. Erin Bell Terri Catlin Dr.Lynn Gehi, Ph.D. Sally Chivers Rosanna Haroutounian

Discovering Women Magazine and its logotype is a registered name. The publication is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced by any means without permission of the publisher. Discovering Women Magazine is produced and distributed four times a year. Subscriptions: Telephone 705-768-1035 Four issues for $24 plus taxes. Canada only. The publisher cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or visual material. Story submissions, letters to the editor, press releases and promotional material in whole or in part or in any medium may be used, reproduced, published, stored or archived without compensation of any sort. This does not apply to materials, pitches, photography and illustrations submitted in accordance with known industry practices. Discovering Women Magazine will not be held liable for opinions expressed by authors. or damages or losses however sustained as a result of any information, opinions or products within its pages or its Website. Publication of ads does not indicate endorsement of advertisers’ products.

2014 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue#7

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To Our Readers, from the Editorial Team The Discovering Women team is thrilled with our community’s favourable response to the magazine. It is a privilege to meet the women who are the heart and soul of Peterborough and surrounding area, and it is an honour to present them to you. We also appreciate the support of our advertisers. Without you, the magazine would not reach our readers, who enjoy finding the latest issue in their neighbourhood gathering place. This edition focuses on healthy aging and issues relating to women of a certain age. We are grateful for the women who have shared their stories with you in this issue. On the news side of things, the team would like to introduce the new Discovering Women Channel on YouTube. This light-hearted talk show sees Erin Bell, Evelyne Derkinderen and Miryam Buchahim talking about issues related to nutrition, fashion and everyday life, and, in future, will see special guests as well. Visit www.youtube.com and search for Discovering Women Magazine. The team would also like our readers to be aware of the upcoming Crystal Project event, which raises money to fill shoe boxes for women in shelters, at Christmastime. A “Discovering Women Award” will be presented at the event. The Project’s sponsors, Terri Ashwin, Debbie Brown, Pat Dunk and Miryam Buchahim, are looking for nominations of women, to be recognized at the Project’s November event, for their community involvement. If you know women whose community service should be recognized, we invite you to contact us at info@discoveringwomen.com. While I’m talking about recognition ... I would like to acknowledge Miryam Buchahim, the heart and soul of Discovering Women, who was recently nominated, by the Peterborough Examiner, for the Women in Business Award. The Award was presented to Kerri Davies, from C.M.H.A. Although Miryam did not win the award, she was deeply moved by and grateful for the nomination. Most recently, Miryam received notice that Peterborough City Council has approved a Civic Award nomination in her honour for Community Betterment. The Discovering Women team is just so proud of Miryam, for all she does to help others in our community. 4

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And, talking about nominations ... we are so grateful for the nominations we have received for this and previous issues. Without our readers pointing out amazing women in our community, we would have no stories to tell. So, we encourage you to think of two women, right now, whom you consider to be women whose stories simply must be told. These will be women who have made an impact in your life in some way, who have made a difference in the community, who have shown strength in facing challenging circumstances, who have achieved something that others would never have expected ... these are the women you admire most. Contact us at info@discovering-women. com to let us know who should be featured in the next issue.

www.Discovering-Women.com

Welcome to all regular Discovering Women readers, and to visitors new to the magazine. Thank you for taking the time to sit with us for a few minutes, to discover our latest group of women.

And, lastly, it is with sadness that I announce that this is my final issue as editor and writer for Discovering Women. It has been a remarkable two years, being there from the beginning, watching the magazine grow, seeing the impact it is making in our community. I have enjoyed the experience, and I hope I have brought some small measure of myself to this project, which has found a very special place in my heart. I have enjoyed getting to know the amazing women whose stories we’ve told, and the people we have brought on board as regular contributors and writers. I have especially appreciated working in partnership with Miryam – I certainly have been blessed. I wish Miryam and the rest of the Discovering Women team every success, as I leave to focus my attention on my growing Isagenix business. It is all about nurturing strong, healthy community for me – so I’m quite sure our paths will cross on a regular basis.

One final note as I leave the magazine. We have often been told that this magazine makes a difference. I encourage you to let Miryam know about anyone you know who would like to support the magazine with their advertising dollars. Without partnerships with advertisers, our community will never receive the blessing of getting to know some pretty amazing, and often unknown, women in Peterborough and area.

Miryam Buchahim Publisher / Art Director

Linda Viscardis Managing Editor / Writer


Bob and Jacquie Jameson –Well-known Peterborough couple is filled to the brim with gratitude By Melodie McCullough

Bob golfs four times a week, and goes to the gym on his “days off.” Jacquie golfs three times a week, takes in aqua fit classes, plays bridge and Mah Jongg, and enjoys crosswords. Her favourite hobby is knitting, and she does it every evening. Back in Peterborough, Bob is the longest active golfing member of the Peterborough Golf and Country Club. He has volunteered with a number of non-profit organizations and clubs, as well as chairing several national business organizations during his career.

In Photo: Patricia, Bob, Jacquie and Robert Larose Photo by: MB Graphics & Events

“Blessed” is a word that comes up often in a conversation with Bob and Jacquie Jameson. The long-time and well-known Peterborough residents, both 80, say they have much to be thankful for as they have gracefully grown old together, not least the love and support they have for each other. They have been “blessed with good health, and you have everything if you have good health,” says Bob, who retired in 2001 as owner of Peterborough Paper Converters. He attributes their well-being to following a regular routine – up at 6:30 a.m. every morning, eating three nutritious meals together, and in bed by 11 p.m.

Jacquie worked as a nurse at Civic Hospital before her children were born. She, too, has volunteered extensively, serving Meals on Wheels for over 40 years. Long-time residents of the north end, they regularly attend Northminster United Church, and take in the lacrosse games in the summer and Petes’ hockey games when they can in the winter. The couple loves to travel, and has been all over the world. Just two years ago at the age of 78, Bob and Jacquie took an around-the-world plane trip, covering four continents and 12 stops in 30 days. Added to all this are the strong and numerous friendships they have made across Canada and the United States. Plus they are non-smokers, drink socially, “. . . and we don’t do drugs,” jokes Bob.

They spend their winters in Florida, returning for Christmas to be with family – a son, daughter and four grandchildren, all living in Peterborough. Staying active, physically and mentally, is a big part of their lives, and it all adds up to healthy aging. “It’s hard to track us down. We’re busy people,” says Jacquie, while Bob quips, “It’s like a floating crap game when people are looking for either of us.” 58-year marriage has usual ups and downs...19 2014 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #7

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CONTACT PHONE LIST Name

Tel#

Emergency .................................................................................................................911 Police (non-emergency) ................................................................................................705-876-1122 Hospital ................................................................................................705-743-2121 Activity Haven Seniors’Centre ................................................................................................705-876-1670 Alcoholics Anonymous ................................................................................................705-745-6111 Bereaved Families of Ontario - Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-7233 Big Brothers Big Sisters of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-6100 Canadian Mental Health Association ............................................................................................1-866-990-9956 Children’s Aid Society ................................................................................................705-743-9751 City of Peterborough Municiple Police Victim Services Unit ................................................................................................705-743-8922 Community Care ................................................................................................705-742-7067 Community Counselling Resource Centre ................................................................................................705-743-6976 Community Living Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-2411 Community Race Relations Committee ................................................................................................705-742-9658 Elizabeth Frye Society of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-749-6809 Family Counselling Service and Volunteer Information ................................................................................................705-742-4258 Five Counties Children’s Centre ................................................................................................705-748-2221 Good Neighbours Care Centre ................................................................................................705-742-9800 Greater Peterborough Area Economic Development Corporation Business Advisory Centre....................................................................705-743-0777 Hospice Peterborough  ............................................................................................... 705-742-4042 Kawartha Community Midwives ................................................................................................705-745-7640 Kawartha Food Share ................................................................................................705-745-5377 Kawartha Participation Projects ................................................................................................705-745-4122 Kinark Child and Family Services ................................................................................................705-742-3803 Labour Ready Inc ................................................................................................705-760-9111 Legal Aid Ontario ................................................................................................705-743-5430 Literacy Ontario Central South ................................................................................................705-749-0675 Mapleridge Seniors Recreation Centre ................................................................................................705-742-1481 Niijkiwendidaa Anishnaabe-Kwewag ................................................................................................705-741-0900 Ontario Disability Support Program ................................................................................................705-742-9292 Ontario Early Years Centre - Peterborough ................................................................................................705-748-9144 Ontario Works ................................................................................................705-742-9292 Peterborough Access Centre ................................................................................................705-743-2212 Peterborough Chamber of Commerce ................................................................................................705-748-9771 Peterborough Community Legal Centre ................................................................................................705-749-9355 Peterborough County - Children’s Services Division ................................................................................................705-748-8830 Peterborough County - City Health Unit ................................................................................................705-743-1000 Peterborough Family Resource Centre ................................................................................................705-748-9144 Peterborough Public Library ................................................................................................705-745-5560 Peterborough Sport and Wellness Centre ................................................................................................705-742-0050 Peterborough Pregnancy Support Services ................................................................................................705-742-4015 The Learning Disabilities Association of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-748-9455 Tri-County Community Support Services ...............................................................................................705-876-9245 Victim Services Peterborough Northumberland ............................................................................................1-888-822-7729 YWCA Crossroads Shelter ................................................................................................705-743-4135

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Local Algonquin woman seeks status registration By Linda Viscardis

In Photo: Dr. Lynn Gehl, Ph.D.

atic in that, now, if a father’s signature is not on a birth certificate, Aboriginal Affairs assumes he is a non-Indian, and through this assumption children are potentially denied who they are and their treaty rights.

Picture, if you will, the face of strength and courage, of a person who has advocated tirelessly for almost three decades. That face would belong to Dr. Lynn Gehl, an Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe from the Ottawa River Valley, currently living in Peterborough. Lynn, a self-described learner-researcher, thinker, writer, Black Face blogger, and Indigenous human rights advocate, has undertaken a Section 15 Charter challenge – a challenge that began 28 years ago. Canada’s Constitution, patriated in 1982, includes the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Section 15 of the Charter guarantees the right to live free from sex discrimination. In 1985, the Indian Act was amended through Bill C-31, purportedly to bring it in line with the Charter.  Many Indigenous women and their descendants, once “enfranchised” for marrying nonIndian men, were then reinstated as status Indians, and their children were registered as status Indians for the first time. With registration, they also became entitled to their treaty rights.  “While the amendment removed some of the sex discrimination, it created more,” says Lynn. “Provisions that protected children of unstated or unknown paternity were removed from the Indian Act. This is really problem-

“There are many reasons why a father’s signature is lacking on a birth certificate, such as sexual violence,” says Lynn. “In this case, mothers do not want the father’s signature, and in some cases they do not know who the father is. In addition, sometimes the father refuses to sign as a means to avoid child support payments.” This is where Lynn’s challenge arises. “In my case, it became an issue,” says Lynn, who does not know who her grandfather was or possibly is. “Because my grandfather did not sign my birth certificate, I have been denied Indian status, as well as my treaty rights. This is sex discrimination.” It was in 1985 that Lynn became aware of how the amended Indian Act was impacting her. Since then, Lynn has been advocating for the rights that come with status registration. Despite another amendment to the Indian Act in 2011 through Bill C-3, her issue of unstated paternity keeps her from having status. So, her fight continues. And where does the strength to continue come from? “It comes from me being denied who I am – my grandmother and father being denied their identity,” says Lynn. “Most people are allowed to celebrate their heritage, but they criminalized our culture and tied our heritage into the Indian Act. “It comes from the injustice,” she continues. “When the injustice is rooted in your heart, you are motivated to do something about it.” Although exhausted by the lack of resolution, Lynn says she is still as committed today as she has ever been, as there are many Indigenous mothers and babies being denied through Aboriginal Affairs’ sexist policy. Lynn invites Discovering Women’s readers to learn more about the issue of unknown and unstated paternity and her book, Anishinaabeg Stories: Featuring Petroglyphs, Petrographs, and Wampum Belts, by visiting her web site at www.lynngehl.com. Her new book, The Truth that Wampum Tells: My Debwewin on the Algonquin Land Claims Process, is also available by visiting her web site.

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Treat insulin resistance — Naturally

Dr. Dana Marshall

Photo by: MB Graphics & Events

By Dr. Dana Marshall, N.D. The good news is that Insulin Resistance is reversible with diet and lifestyle, and when properly addressed, these changes can prevent other chronic disease as we age. Natural Treatments for Insulin Resistance:

When most people think of foods that can cause

high cholesterol, heart disease, and obesity, they often think of one word: fat. But current research shows the type of food most likely to contribute to the epidemic of obesity and its related conditions is actually the sweet stuff — that’s right, sugar and refined carbohydrates. Insulin is a hormone our body produces to help transfer glucose (sugar) into our cells for energy production. Insulin Resistance (also known as Metabolic Syndrome) occurs when our cells no longer respond to insulin the way they should. The more insulin produced, the more our cells become desensitized to it. Untreated, this can lead to Diabetes. Signs and Symptoms Relating to Insulin Resistance: • Excess weight (especially around the midsection) and inability to lose weight • Increased Insulin, elevated levels of Triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels • Hypertension • Fatigue • Low blood sugar before meals - mood swings, dizziness, shakiness, irritability and confusion • Increased inflammation, excess clotting • Premature aging 88 Issue #7 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2014

• Eliminate refined sugar - it is the worst kind of carbohydrate. • Reduce total carbohydrate intake to allow your body to rest and repair from sugar and Insulin overload. • Include protein in each meal and snack. • Ensure you are consuming good quality fats including Omega 3s (flax, hemp, fish etc.) and avoiding trans fats (soy, corn or other generic “vegetable” oil). • Consider chromium and magnesium nutritional supplements which can improve Insulin’s effectiveness at the cellular level. • Exercise!! Cardiovascular and strength training can dramatically improve Insulin Resistance because your body learns to burn additional carbohydrates, rather than trying to store them in your cells. • Consider formulas containing the herbs Gymnema sylvestre (gymnema), Trigonella Foenum-grae cum (fenugreek) and Momordica charantia (bitter melon) to help stabilize and correct blood sugar levels.

The first line therapy for Insulin Resistance is to reduce refined carbohydrates; however, a strict avoidance of all grains and additional treatment protocols may be required in some individuals. It is important to work with your Naturopathic Doctor or other health care practitioner in order to review your overall risk assessment. At Healthy Foundations Naturopathic Clinic, we explore all aspects of our patients’ health that may be contributing to these concerns. We find that testing for relevant “biomarkers” is an important tool in helping treat and prevent Insulin Resistance. Feel free to contact us. We would love to help! Visit www.healthyfoundations.ca.


Perfect Pumpkin Muffins Ingredients: 1/2 cup coconut flour 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 3/4 cup pumpkin purée 1/2 cup coconut oil, melted 6 eggs 2 teaspoons organic vanilla 1/4 cup raw honey, melted 3 tablespoons walnuts, chopped Copyright: <a href=’http://www.123rf.com/profile_rawlik’>rawlik / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

Directions: Preheat the oven to 400°F. Sift the coconut flour, pumpkin pie spice, and baking powder together.

In a separate bowl, mix all remaining ingredients, except for the walnuts, until well blended. Add the sifted flour mixture to the pumpkin purée mixture, and mix well until smooth. Divide the batter between muffin pans, and sprinkle with walnuts. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until done. YIELD: 12 muffins NUTRITION per serving (approximately): 274 Calories; Fat (g) 23.1 (17.3 saturated, 1 polyunsaturated, 2 monounsaturated, 0 trans); Cholesterol (mg) 97.5; Sodium (mg) 52.9; Potassium (mg) 76.1; Carbs (g) 11.5 (2.7 fibre, 7.4 sugar); Protein (g) 4.6; Vitamin A (%) 52.7; Vitamin C (%) 1.2; Calcium (%) 2.9; Iron (%) 4.8

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MOVING PICTURES ™ #4 I KNOW WHERE I’M GOING! By Terri Catlin Buried amidst my Ukrainian, French, English and Irish heritage, there must lie some hidden Scottish blood. I don’t know how else to explain the familiarity, comfort, longing and joy I feel when I watch the harsh and breathtaking scenery of the Hebridean Islands, and feel the passion and expressiveness of people speaking Gaelic, singing folk songs and dancing to bag pipes at a local cèilidh. Of course, it could just be that the 1945 UK feature, I Know Where I’m Going!, is a really great film. Despite its age, this is a perfectly modern tale with a timeless message. It is the story of a confident, ambitious, young woman who knows exactly what she wants in life and is determined to get it. She is set to marry her boss, a wealthy oil magnate. He has rented a castle on a remote island in northern Scotland, where the two will be married. Her itinerary for making the journey up from London is, like the rest of her life, meticulously planned, and only a force as great as nature could possibly get in her way. And so it does. When she arrives in the town where the final leg of her journey is to be made by boat, a terrible storm with gale force winds has ground any vessels from making the short trip to her island destination. There is nothing she can do but wait. It is here where she meets a handsome and charming man. And this, of course, is where her plans fall apart - and where reality inserts itself into this fantasy. In photo: Terri Catlin

The greatest lesson of I Know Where I’m Going! is this: If you’re looking for love, you have to be willing to let go of what you think it looks like. The fact is, love finds us. And it is not convenient, tidy, predictable or controllable. This is the lovely paradox our heroine must grapple with. It’s a great reminder of our own humanity, in all areas of life. In a culture of goals, game-plans and strategy, it’s important to also allow for wonder, surprise and serendipity. Terri Catlin is an actor, writer and director. www.terricatlin.com/writer

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Juju doctor ministers to Newson’s star energy By Pat Newson, Foreign Correspondent

The

setting of today’s visit to the juju doctor is magnificent. We sit under an outdoor thatched roof space. Strips of cloth, bird nests and unfamiliar what’s-its hang from the rafters. Each of these fetishes, I’m told, “has its own secret, own work, own spirit. They all have purpose.”

daughters prepares the mucky muck; he adds in the magical properties.

Red powder lies in strips before the bench where I sit. To the left, in front of me, is a mermaid carving draped with native beads and splattered with red and grey powder. A small African figure, flanked by two small totem-polelike carvings and wax candle remnants, rests at the base of this strange goddess. Beyond this shrine is a small enclosed room full of unusual things.

But my star energy is not clear enough for him to hydrate. answer. I must bathe to cleanse and brighten my star light.

Eventually he asks what I seek. “To know where life will take me next.” “Ah,” he nods knowingly.

“Then, you come back to me,” says the doctor. He will go to market to purchase the ingredients for this ritual bath, but needs N20,000. “I cannot pay that. I am just a volunteer. I do not have such money.” “Okay, then N10,000.” (Sorry. Ain’t gonna happen.)

The doctor busies himself with a thick mixture resembling mud. He works it with his hands, adding secret this-and-thats, forming small balls in a manner that elicits memories of my Italian grandmother making meatballs. “Cleansing soap,” he explains, pointing to a printed poster extolling the magical properties of Hindu’s Good Luck Soap. Hindu is his working nickname. One of his 12

In Photo: Pat Newson

This masterful magician (methinks a lot of money disappears from the pockets of believing clients) goes to the back room returning with a gourd flask and a small plastic bottle filled with clear liquid. He uncorks the flask, sprinkles black sooty something into his palm, taps it into a glass, adds the liquid, gives it a swirl, takes a sip to prove it’s okay and passes it on. This concoction is supposed to energize but quickly subdues. The taste is that of pure alcohol and ash. A burning sensation moves down the gullet. Some 45 minutes and N2,000 ($13

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Cdn) later, I thank Hindu for sharing his time. I leave, not any the wiser. The professor who accompanied me shares that he followed the bathing ritual. “And?” “I’ve millions in the bank and more beautiful women than I can manage.” Not … although there may be something to be said about millions of Naira in the bank (1M Naira = $6666 USD) and an inexhaustible supply of Nigerian women seeking the status and company of this oyibo man.


Pursuit of answers drives local neurology specialist By Melodie McCullough in a patient. Sometimes neurological symptoms could be the first manifestation of various conditions, such as cancer or infection.”

In Photo: Dr. Olga Finlayson

Patients are referred to a neurologist for diagnosis and treatment for a variety of illnesses and health issues, including epilepsy, stroke, and migraines, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis or concussion.

For the

“Many of these conditions become more prevalent with increasing age, so a considerable proportion of my caseload is elderly,” says Olga. Dr. Olga Finlayson, it’s quest that captivates her.

Like a detective solving a case, the neurologist probes, explores and examines the symptoms of her patients to discover the answers she needs, enjoying the pursuit as much as the outcome. Hired in August 2013 by the Peterborough Regional Health Centre, Olga fills a much-needed new role as the hospital-based neurology specialist doing inpatient and eight to 10 outpatient consultations, referred by family doctors, daily. “I made neurology my choice many, many years ago back in Russia. It’s an area that involves a lot of thinking and analysis with very interesting cases as well,” she says. “I also enjoy the process of localization of the lesion, when patient’s neurological deficits allow one to precisely predict what part of the nervous system is affected. I like to investigate, run tests, and find out what could cause neurological symptoms

ralysis similar to one that could be caused by stroke or other neurological conditions. But the test results do not reveal any abnormality on multiple occasions, and a psychogenic origin of the symptoms comes into question. Such patients usually are not easy to manage, especially those who do not have an insight into the stress-induced nature of their symptoms. However, if a patient is receptive to the diagnosis, underlying anxiety and depression could be successfully treated and the symptoms that brought a patient to the Neurologist’s attention may resolve.”

Dr. Finlayson, originally from St. Neurology is not the most rewardPetersburg, obtained her medical ing specialty in Medicine in terms degree in Russia in 1999 and came of treatment options and outcomes, to Canada in 2005, as her husband she continues, and this is challengis Canadian. In June 2013, she ing. Many conditions are chronic completed a University of Toronto and progressive with no effective adult neurology residency program, disease-modifying therapy availallowing her to practice in Canada. able at this point. What she can provide is symptom management, such as seizure control, headache prophylaxis, or achieve alleviation of some parkinsonian symptoms, as well as advise on stroke prevention, and counsel patients and families on the nature of their conditions and the ways to cope with them. Coun- In photo Kathleen Wild seling is also provided to women of child-bearing age with epilepsy, as well as to seniors as fitness to drive becomes a public safety issue. One more challenging area in Olga’s practice is patients with stress-related symptoms. “It is hard to believe what stress can do to our system,” she says. “Some patients present with stress-related seizures that closely resemble epileptic seizures. Others have pa2014 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #7

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Peri-menopause — A natural process Testing is highly advisable By Erin Bell, RNCP, R. BIE

In Photo: Erin Bell Photography by: MB Graphics & Events

Nutritional Notes

toms, usually indicated by irregular cycles going from having seemingly nothing, then having perhaps a “month from hell.” It may be accompanied by the usual (or unusual) mood swings, food cravings, headaches, body aches and cramps, heavy cycles with excessive bleeding or the annoyance of continuous spotting without actually experiencing a cycle. Ok, altogether maddening. The cause is lowering levels of the female sex hormones, primarily progesterone and estrogen. These hormones respond quite Photofaby: MB Graphics & Events vourably and very quickly to nutrition in Heather Wasson In photo: order to help balance the levels and reduce side effects of fluctuating hormone levels.

For centuries, women have tracked their monthly cycles and used these cyclical patterns as partial indicators of their health. We don’t know for certain how women dealt with menstrual issues hundreds and thousands of years ago, except to say, that they probably didn’t enjoy “that time of the month” any more than women today. And so much for privacy issues way back when, as in Biblical Old Testament times, women were forced to stay out of the camp during the “period of menses” hence, it was like…go over there for a week and come back when it’s over.

Testing for nutritional intolerances and food and chemical sensitivities is highly advised when experiencing peri-menopause, as symptoms can be greatly reduced once hormonal balance is restored with the correct nutrition. A diet rich in dark, leafy green vegetables, lean meats, yogurt and fermented foods, fresh fruits, nuts and seeds, and cruciferous vegetables that are high in indoles (compounds that help normalize hormones), as well as minerals like calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamins like D and E will help. A good quality omega-3 supplement will also help reduce inflammation. Hydrating adequately with 8 glasses of water per day will also provide much relief to flush toxins and restore hormonal balance.

Today, modern times allow women to experience this natural, biological process without being forced into the woods for a week. However, hormones haven’t changed much in that time. Women continue to experience what is called, peri-menopause. Peri-menopause has myriad symp14 14

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PLACES & EVENTS

Peterborough and Surroundings JUNE Angels Among Us June 1, 2014 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM Cost $80 459 George St. N Peterborough, Ontario Discover purpose and intention in relationships with family, friends and others. thehealinghouseschool.com 705-741-2440 Stories of Sacrifice: Peterborough Remembers World War One. March 30, 2014 - June 08, 2014 300 Hunter Street East Peterborough, Ontario peterboroughmuseumandarchives.ca 705-743-5180 Women Empowering Women Network Dinner June 25, 2014 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Swiss Chalet at Towerhil 491 Towerhill Road Peterborough (Call to RSVP) discovering-women.com 705-768-1035 Makeup and Mimosas Beauty WORKSHOP June 26, 2014 7:00 PM Cost $25 at the door STRUTT Beauty and Kristine Hannah Boudoir 412 Chamber St. Peterborough, Ontario RSVP kristinehannahphotography@gmail.com 705-875-7219

JULY

AUG-SEPT

Celebrate Canada Day at Del Crary Park! July 01 2014

Delicious Mexican Food 1 Rink St, Peterborough lamesitacatering@gmail.com 705 -875-2505

Peterborough Musicfest – Motor City Music July 01, 2014 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM 1 Rink St, Peterborough, ON ptbomusicfest.ca 1-800-461-6424 Strawberry Festival July 01, 2014 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM 2191 16th Line of Smith Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield, Ontario mcleanberryfarm.com 705-657-2134 Family photo Event MB Graphics Photography July 13, 2014 10:30 AM - 2:00 PM Cost $50 15-20 photos on CD 2 5x7 prints Millenium Park (Call to RSVP) mbgraphicsevents@yahoo.com 705-768-1035

Women Empowering Women Network Dinner July 22, 2014 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Pot luck dinner at Sharla Smith Trudell’s 1675 Forster ave(Call to RSVP) discovering-women.com 705-768-1035

Peterborough Farmers Market Aug 02, 2014 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM Morrow Building George Street and Lansdowne Street Peterborough, Ontario peterboroughfarmersmarket.com 705-536-1134 KidzFirst @ The Zoo! Aug 25, 26, 2013 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Day camp for ages 6-9 Cost $150 1300 Water St. Peterborough, Ontario www.facebook.com/pages/ KidzFirst/160908937324766 705-761-4178 Women Empowering Women Network Dinner Aug 20, 2014 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Marty Moos 2205 Keene Rd, Otonabee-South (Call to RSVP) discovering-women.com 705-768-1035 PPSS’ Annual Banquet “ASHES TO BEAUTY” September 19, 2014 6 pm (punch) Dinner at 6:30 pm Calvary Pentecostal Church 1421 Lansdowne St. W Peterborough, Ontario Heather Gemmen-Wilson’s story: My Journey from Rape to Restoration www.mypregnancycentre.org 705 8752505

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Victims become survivors By Rosanna Haroutounian Cases of “rape chants” are highlighting the prevalence of a culture of sexism and non-consent at two universities on Canada’s east and west coasts, and Peterborough is not immune to its effects. Mary Waters dedicates her work as a sexual assault nurse examiner at the Peterborough Regional Health Centre (PRHC) towards ensuring sexual assault and violence against women are better understood. “With domestic violence, they say, ‘Well it couldn’t be that bad,’ or ‘Why didn’t she just leave?’” says Waters. “The focus should be, ‘Why doesn’t he just stop?’” Waters says victims are often afraid or embarrassed to report rape. She says she must be patient to help them feel calm and safe. “Our job is not to tell them what to do,” she says. “Our job is to believe them, support them, and give them the information they need to make choices that are best for them.” Waters says she has overcome her own biases and learned new skills since joining the Women’s Health Care Centre at PRHC. A self-proclaimed “Peterborough Girl,” Waters became head nurse of Emergency in 1987, at what was then the Peterborough Civic Hospital. When the hospital amalgamated with St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Waters took up a clinical practice with the sexual assault team. She became a sexual assault nurse examiner in 2003, when their services expanded. “It’s taught me a lot about equality, a lot about respect,” says Waters. “It’s allowed me to grow professionally, even in my physical exam skills. Every day, I walk away and I feel like I’ve learned something different.” Services provided by the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program are free and confidential. Waters says the only time she must report a rape to police is when the victim has gunshot wounds. “You see them first as victims, and then you’re able to be part of the process where they develop themselves into becoming survivors,” says Waters. “They’re very brave and it’s very motivating to have a part in that process.” 16 Issue #7 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2014

In Photo: Mary Waters

The Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Response Team is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The program can be reached by phone at 705-743-4132 during the day at the Women’s Health Care Centre, or 705-743-2121, extension 0 (switchboard) after business hours. More information about the program is available on the PRHC website, www.prhc.on.ca.


Dr. Jennifer Ingram embraces holistic approach to geriatric care By Melodie McCullough Helping families convey “the true expression of love” is the best part of Dr. Jennifer Ingram’s work. “My favourite part of my job is the family conference,” says the geriatric specialist, who focuses her downtown Peterborough practice on seniors with cognitive disorders. “I love having the family come together and start to see the issues collaboratively. After the conference, they usually commit to techniques, roles and visiting schedules that make sense for Mom and Dad.” As a side benefit, she says, the families of her elderly patients become closer and stronger. “You begin to see the true expression of love. These are gifts of time that are not hollow, and they feel by the end of the journey they’ve done everything they could.” Dr. Ingram never anticipated that dementia as an illness would become her life’s work. After graduation in 1980, she worked at an intensive care unit in an Oakville hospital, but didn’t enjoy it. She had begun to work with staff on geriatric programs, and realized the specialty allowed a more holistic approach. “I wanted care, the

to

embrace the patient, the family, the environment.”

She completed a geriatric specialty in 1986.

The mother of three and grandmother of two came to Peterborough when her husband, Alan Ingram, was appointed a judge in 1987. For five years, she did health care consulting across Canada. She has also successfully trained family physicians and nurses to assess cognition, to strengthen the patient and family physician bond.

In Photo: Jennifer Ingram

In research, Dr. Ingram participates in many international clinical trials for people with Alzheimer’s – mild, moderate and severe – and medications are now available for persons with memory concerns but no dementia (mild cognitive impairment). Anyone interested in participating in research should contact Kawartha Regional Memory Clinic 705-749-5410 / 705-749-3906. Her motivation comes from both her husband — who implemented a system of representation of children in divorce that changed the process in Ontario — and her mother, Dr. Vera Peters, an internationally known radiation oncologist, who changed the practice of medicine for breast cancer and Hodgkin’s disease. Dr. Ingram recalls her mother making time for every patient despite long line-ups at her clinic; Dr. Ingram does, too. The doctor’s prescription for healthy aging is straightforward: don’t smoke, don’t drink, get lots of sleep, exercise regularly, stay connected with friends, world events and social activities — and stop worrying.

2014 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #7 17 2013 | 4ww.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #6 7 17


Is good sex possible for over-60 crowd? By Paul Lavergne Good sex is possible at any age, but there are some unique challenges to those entering the “Golden Years.” Some

of

the

challenges

are:

Emotional obstacles – Anxieties, worries and the normal demands of life can distract us emotionally from having a fulfilling sex life. Body Image – there are inevitable physical effects to aging: grey hair, loss of muscle mass, cellulite, wrinkles and “saggy” body parts. This is normal and natural. It’s natural to not feel as “sexy” as when you were younger, but don’t let that hold you back. Low Self-Esteem – retirement can bring about a loss of identity and self-esteem. Moving into the “Golden Years” can require a period of mental and emotional adjustment — give yourself that time. Worrying about “performance” – being stressed about being able to “perform” or whether you are still sexually attractive to your partner can lead to erectile dysfunction in men or lack or arousal or orgasm in women. Many couples face these issues for the first time as they enter their 50’s and 60’s. How can these challenges be overcome? Firstly, changing your definition of “sex” is useful, even necessary.

touching, eye contact, snuggling, sensory pleasure, and foreplay. Second, accept the natural changes that are happening for you. You and your partner’s sexual needs and preferences will change as you age. Having less intercourse doesn’t necessarily mean less love and closeness. Remember, sex is not about recreating the experiences of your youth. It’s about discovering what works for you now. In Photo: Paul Lavergne Try these tips: *Start with sharing a few feelings from your day and two or three things you appreciate about your partner. *Change your routine – try lovemaking in the morning or afternoon when you have the most energy. *Be playful and creative – tease, tickle, joke around and laugh together. Relax. Have fun. *Start early creating the mood or scene for sexual activity earlier in the day, and build up to it. Following these guidelines can help you enjoy sexual intimacy with your partner long into your old age. Paul Lavergne is a therapist based in Peterborough, Ontario. He pursued post-graduate studies at Yorkville University where he received his Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology degree. Paul is also a certified Sex Recovery Therapist, certified from the American Association of Sex Addiction Therapists. He can be reached at turningpoint4me.com.

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Sex tion and sive and

should really be about connecand intimacy, not just orgasm intercourse. A more expanview of sex includes talking non-verbal communication,

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Continued from page...5

58-year marriage has usual ups and downs Bob worked in the paper industry for 47 years, first with Nashua Corp. in Peterborough, responsible for all operations of the U.S. company. In 1984, the company decided to sell its Peterborough assets. As president and CEO at the time, Bob bought the operation — a business that had operated in Peterborough since 1929 — along with four minor partners, changing the name to Peterborough Paper Converters, and keeping jobs in the city. He “wound it down” when he retired. Their son, Robert, is the father of two boys and a successful Peterborough businessman, owning Canadian Instrumentation Services Group, which he bought about 16 years ago from General Electric. Their daughter, Patricia Larose, works at the Royal Bank on Lansdowne Street and is a mother of two. When asked about their 58-year marriage, they admit to the usual ups and downs.

“Some would say Jacquie deserves a medal,” says Bob. “She’s laid-back and I’m a type-A personality. Maybe that’s what makes it work.” “The younger generation coming up today, they’re not healthy-eating people” he says. “Everything is fast food and on-the-run. We like to sit down together and have a chat over breakfast, lunch and dinner. It adds to the companionship of our marriage.” After 58 years, they’re a bit of a rare breed, and somewhat dismayed at the young people in marriages today. “If the other one doesn’t part their hair the right way, they give up,” says Bob. Are they still in love? Jacquie calmly says, “Well, we’re very supportive of each other and we take care of each other.” But Bob says, “No doubt about it. After 58 years there’s nothing better. Why look further if you get a good one to begin with?” Yes, blessed indeed.

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Blogging is easy,focus accessible - Just write what Local professor’s on healthy aging benefits know,and staySociety focused Trent Centreyou for Aging By Melodie McCullough

A book led Sally Chivers down her grandmother who lived to be 101, theWhy path. would anyone want to molded focus Sally’s academic start atheblog? life would take – aging. She is now a to one associate self-described aunt, TheAccording Trent University pro- proud member of thedonewly-created Centre it-yourself crafter and poverty activist, web logs, fessor of English read The Stone for Aging and Society at Trent, has commonly knownLaurence as blogs, allow written communities of broadly on aging, Angel by Margaret at age and taught people to share ideas on topics of shared interest. 17. It’s the story of aging Hagar and is interested in the creative role Shipley who grew up proud and in- of seniors in theatre and literature. “Blogs provide a wonderful opportunity to dependent in the 1930s and faces the discuss what you are working on and thinking lossabout,” of thatsays independence at age 90. whose “Whenown I read The Stone Angel, it Laura Vanderherberg, blog Thefocuses book, plus her relationship withsocial made me issues. think about my grandon family, crafting and justice mother and what it must have like to be Still fairly new to blogging, Laurabeen is grateful to in her body, and have been introduced to the pastime her by rolea infriend. the world,” says Sally. She has authored three books. The “She helped me a lot when I got started,” latest,says TheLaura. Silvering Screen, re“She taught me it was okay to ask a friend for help, and,looks at films from leased in 2011, once I got started, that I should give my blog a focus.” the last 20 years, such as Sarah Polley’s, from Her, featuring Just as important, as your focus, is Away disciplinolder actors in ing yourself to stay on topic, according to Laura. central roles, and themes about care-giving and aging.

In Photo: Sally Chivers

“Find up to three topic areas by making a long list of Trent Centre brings together things you know about, and that The you might want to write about, then choose your top three,” a multi-disciplinary group of facsays Laura. “Write only on ulty those topics.” with the common interest of

studying aging, but from differ-

Once you have decided what you willent write about,and it’s sharing results of angles, just a matter of opening a blog account and getting their community-based research. started.

show what seniors offer society, and culture and counter-act the negative and limiting images often portrayed in the media — the looming health-care crisis of baby-boomers and ensuing economic burden. “It’s not as though the only thing that happens when you age happens to do with your physical bodies,” she says. The Centre is researching the health benefits of a “performer-created” seniors’ theatre group in Edmonton, whose members create plays by interviewing each other and developing stories from their past. “I would love to start something like that in Peterborough, and we have such a large arts community already,” said Sally. Another hopeful outcome of their research would be to transform long-term care “imaginatively,” using research from around the world and importing it into the community, says Sally.

hope totoconcentrate on the “I’ve observed that there are very They few barriers side oftoaging, says Sally, to getting started,” says Laura. “Blogs positive are accessible virtually anyone because of such low- or no-cost resources as BloggerTM and WordPressTM. And, if you can type, you can blog.” Laura Vanderherberg lives in Peterborough. She invites the readers of Discovering Women to visit her blog at www.lauraannv.blogspot.ca, and to contact her by email (laura.vanderherberg@gmail.com), if they would like to discuss how to get their own blog started.

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Discovering Women Magazine Spring 2014  

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