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The Photographic Process of the Beaded Sachet (page 1 of 5) (An accompaniment to the Beaded Sachet tutorial available at http://mirkwooddesigns.blogspot.com/2010/02/podcast-011-mardi-gras.html)

Here are the supplies I used (except for the potpourri, which I forgot to put in the photo). Feel free to use beads in the color of your choice. Remember that you can use any sort of potpourri, dried flowers such as lavender or rosebuds, or just fiberfill if you don’t want to use potpourri.

These are the front and back pieces sewn to the batting. You can see the light line drawing on the front piece. I used a light box to trace the pattern, but you can easily hold it up to the window during the day. Works great!

Here I’ve begun the lattice stitch. Note that all of the large beads are sewn on with the holes in the same direction.

Copyright 2010 by Ruthann Logsdon Zaroff for Mirkwood Designs. This pattern is for personal use only and may not be sold or otherwise distributed without this copyright information. MirkwoodDesigns.com


The Photographic Process of the Beaded Sachet (page 2 of 5)

This is the lattice stitch continued. Note that I do not go through the fabric at all during this part unless I need to start a new thread. The small beads are strung between the large beads.

This is a good close-up of the lattice stitch. Again, notice that the small beads are strung between the large beads, and I don’t take the needle back through the fabric unless I need to begin a new thread. Also note that depending on the size of your beads, you may need to use fewer or more small beads between each bead.

This is the line stitch. Bring your needle up through the fabric and string five small beads. Go back down through the fabric close to the last bead. Come back up going backward to the second-last bead and run your thread through the last two beads. This is a good, secure way to make a line of beads. After you have made the line, you can run a thread through the entire line, which not only strengthens the beads, but also helps straighten them. Copyright 2010 by Ruthann Logsdon Zaroff for Mirkwood Designs. This pattern is for personal use only and may not be sold or otherwise distributed without this copyright information. MirkwoodDesigns.com


The Photographic Process of the Beaded Sachet (page 3 of 5) Here I’ve begun the 12 bead stacks that will become the stacked flower. The base of the bead stack is always a large bead. When I sew them in the circle I think of a clock, and I sew the stacks at 12, 3, 6, and 9 first. Then I sew the two “hours” in between. That helps with the spacing. Note that there must be enough beads in each stack so that if laid down they come just past the center point of the circle. This is a fun stitch to experiment with – try using slightly taller stacks to get a taller flower. You can also make a spiral of the finished stacks and tack it down to make a different looking flower.

The 12 stacks are done, and I’ve begun bringing them together. After you’ve made the last stack, bring your needle back up through a stack then take it through the top bead on each stack, drawing them all together in the center. Take your needle back down through a stack and make a knot under the fabric.

Here I’m making the flower bud, which is really easy. Although, in looking at this photo I realize that I changed my mind about how I did it in the finished sachet. You can make it like this, or the other way, which is to string two green, two purple, a gold, and two purple. Then run the needle back through the first two green and into the fabric where you first came up. That makes a stem. Lay the bud in the direction you like, then bring your needle up next to and through the gold bead, and then back down through the fabric. Make a knot. Copyright 2010 by Ruthann Logsdon Zaroff for Mirkwood Designs. This pattern is for personal use only and may not be sold or otherwise distributed without this copyright information. MirkwoodDesigns.com


The Photographic Process of the Beaded Sachet (page 4 of 5)

This photo shows the back of the beaded fabric. I’ve sewn the front and the back together leaving a 2½ -inch opening or so. I’ve also trimmed the corners close to the stitching (to remove bulk. Note that turning the sachet right-side out is a delicate process!

Here is the sachet turned right-side out. I used a bone folder to help push the corners out – carefully!

I made a cone out of printer paper to help pour the lavender buds into the sachet. Remember that you can use dried rosebuds or potpourri, or even just fiberfill.

Copyright 2010 by Ruthann Logsdon Zaroff for Mirkwood Designs. This pattern is for personal use only and may not be sold or otherwise distributed without this copyright information. MirkwoodDesigns.com


The Photographic Process of the Beaded Sachet (page 5 of 5)

Use a small stitch to sew the opening closed. A ladder stitch works best, but an overhand stitch works, too. Also, this photo shows the flower bud I ended up making (rather than the one in the previous photo). I like the way the green beads make a stem.

The 5-bead picot stitch is just the right finishing touch. I alternated purple and green, but do what you like. I sewed the edging to the top fabric, but very close to the seam. This nearly conceals the seam and looks very pretty. The picot stitch would look really lovely on the collar of a blouse, don’t you think?

And here is the finished beaded sachet. No, I didn’t frame it. It sits on my nightstand next to my bed. Lavender is supposed to be a calming scent, and I love smelling it before I fall asleep.

Copyright 2010 by Ruthann Logsdon Zaroff for Mirkwood Designs. This pattern is for personal use only and may not be sold or otherwise distributed without this copyright information. MirkwoodDesigns.com

Mirkwood Designs Beaded Sachet Process Photos  

Process photos to make the Beaded Sachet from Mirkwood Designs - Adventures in Creativity podcast #011.

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