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CO M M U N ICATI ON AN D ITE RAB I LITY

is insisting upon when he states that the ‘unity of the signifying form’ that is ‘required to permit its recognition’ ‘only constitutes itself by virtue of its iterability’ (ibid., p. 10). The point is that something which could not function in the absence of the current presence of an empirically determinable user could not be ‘writing’ – no matter of what kind.12 ‘Writing’ (in Derrida’s ‘no matter of what kind’ sense)13 is, therefore, structurally, for every possible user in general (ibid., p. 8). The space of ‘writing’ is an intrinsically public space through and through. And hence there can be no ‘structurally secret code’, no ‘writing’ which cannot function again and by another (ibid.). Even in the case of a language spoken only by a single human being, the possibility of repeating the marks that is entailed by such behaviour (if it is such behaviour) makes it in principle iterable for another in the radical absence of the first (cp. ibid.). On this account, the factual emergence of writing, the eventual emergence of a relatively permanent mark that can do without the current presence of a determinable sender or recipient, is possible because, in principle, the possibility of this absence is part of the logical structure of any linguistic expression in general; part of the conditions of possibility of any ‘means of communication’ in general. ‘Within every sign already, every mark or every trait, there is distancing . . . what there has to be so that it is legible for another, another than you or me’ (Derrida, 1987b, p. 29; see also ibid., p. 78).14

TRAN S FORM ING TH E TRADITIONAL MODEL OF COM M UN ICATION

The intervention of deconstruction That this structure of distancing is most perspicuous in writing helps the demonstration and provides a strategic raison d’être for a generalisation of the old term. However, according to Derrida, this strategy also ensures the most effective intervention into the instituted field of the traditional model of communication. As we have seen, the traditional model, the model which Condillac inherits and presents, seeks to relegate writing to a position of the (written) representation of a (spoken) representation of signified senses or thought-meanings-to-be-communicated. On this model, the sense of thoughts, pure idealities, are the inner essence, the ‘internalities’, of language which can, in the interiority of a subject’s own mind, do without their ‘externalities’, their material ‘clothing’ – or almost. For conceptions of such interiority have always maintained a residual ‘clothing’ for internal thoughts, namely, as ‘silent’ or ‘inner’ speech. It is with ‘internal speech’ that the sign and signified are supposed to be in the closest possible proximity: one ‘hears oneself’ at the same time as one ‘understands oneself’. If, however, speech is always a kind of ‘writing’, this picture of the ‘inner’ cannot be maintained.15 Anything ‘present in the mind’ which is communicable is constituted as

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Glendinning, simon on being with others heidegger‚ derrida, wittgenstein  
Glendinning, simon on being with others heidegger‚ derrida, wittgenstein  
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