Page 1

M IR A NDA L E E

U NIV E R SIT Y OF OR E G ON

2014


BÁRA AN U RBAN ARTIST COLONY

Miranda G. Lee

COM PRE HE NS IVE PROJ EC T

Inter i o r A rchi tec tu re Pro g r a m De p a r tm ent o f A rchi tec tu re U ni ver si ty o f O reg o n, E u g ene, O reg o n

SU B M IT T E D F O R C O M PL E T I O N O F A MASTE RS O F I N T E R I O R A RC H IT E C T U R E DE GR E E , JU N E 2 0 1 4

_______________________________

M i r a n d a G l or ia Lee

FA L L T E R M COM P R E H E NSIV E P R OJ E C T P R E PA R ATION A ND P L AN N I N G A l i s o n Snyder W INT E R T E R M ST U D IO D E SIG N P R OF E SSOR L i n d a Zimmer SP R ING T E R M ST U D IO D E SIG N P R OF E SSOR A l i s o n Snyder


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S FINAL WORK

Abstract & Project Statement Resea rch Bibliog raphy Final Presentation

PROJECT ELEMENTS

Short Prog ram Adjacency Diag ram Long Annotated Prog ram Existing Site & Building Documentation Code Study HVAC A pproach

RESEARCH ARCHIVE Interviews Precedents & Case Studies

DESIGN AND PROCESS ARCHIVE WINTER TERM Existing Building Conditions Midter m Review - Eugene, Oregon Final Review - Eugene, Oregon SPRING TERM Design Process Documentation T hree-Quarter Review - Portland, Oregon Final Review - Eugene, Oregon


FIN AL

WOR K


F I N A L WOR K

ABSTRACT

BÁRA, the first urban artist colony on the United States’ West Coast, takes the traditional idea of the rural artist retreat and reevaluates how it can perform in a metropolitan setting. For the last two decades, Portland, Oregon has been a welcoming destination and home for creatives, making it an ideal location for a formal artist colony. BÁRA offers a three to twelve month artist-in-residence fellowship where artists are provided with a shared studio space and their own apartment. BÁRA’s studios cater to four main art disciplines: graphic design, painting, sculpting, and furniture design. The mixture of fields is t o encourage an interdisciplinary exchange of verbal, visual and interactive collaborations. This project primarily investigates how design can shape the relationship between artists and the city, as well as, analyzes how interior architecture influences the interactions between the artists themselves. BÁRA explores how to preserve the atmosphere of a retreat while engaging Portland’s local community. Fur thermore, this project examines how to personalize short-term stays while still accommodating for the various needs of each artist. By addressing Portland’s need for a formal artist colony, BÁRA provides the city with an environment geared toward helping artists focus, collaborate, and ultimately, make art.


PROJ ECT

STATEME NT

“…their sole qualification being that they have done, are doing, or give promise of doing good and earnest work” - Yaddo


BRIEF INTRODUCTION In Alain de Botton’s Wall Street Journal article, Art for Life’s Sake, he states that “art enjoys such…cultural prestige that it’s easy to forget what it’s really for.” The production of art, art making and artists themselves are so widespread around us that sometimes we forget the benefits they provide. As a result, “questions like ‘What is this painting about? Or Why should this old sculpture matter to me?’” (Botton 2013) often arise in our hearts while walking through “white-walled galleries” (Botton 2013). Yet, art has always been critical to our history and culture. On a civic level, art gives communities their identities, and also provides a means to express a city’s cultural values. (National Endowment for the Arts, Jackson 2008). The mere presence of art inspires “civic renewal” and adds vitality to any public space (Jackson 2008). In Robert D. Putnam’s book, Making Democracy Work, he cites a compelling finding that there was a “strong relationship” between the connection of art and “the effectiveness of government institutions” (Seminar). This, of course, is not insinuating that the paint on a canvas is directly linked to better healthcare, but that the communities with more interactions with art actually “better achieve the government they desire” (Seminar). This energy then serves as a catalyst for “civic participation and a strong democracy” (National Assembly of State Arts Agencies). Economically, research has shown that the greater the presence of art is in a city, the more alluring that city becomes for families and businesses (Americans for the Arts). Lastly, art has proven therapeutic for individuals. Due to art’s “ability to… communicate beyond the limits of language,” it allows everyone to participate (Seminar 2000). Furthermore, art and artists help people cope with “our fear of the unknown, our longing for love, [and] our need for hope.” (Botton 2013). For both the maker and the observer, art serves as a means for invigorating the mind. Undeniably, the benefits of art are widespread and all encompassing. Thus, if art

is truly as beneficial as the research states, then, the pursuit of proliferating art and enabling artists is a worthy goal. An influential and successful means of encouraging art production can be found in artist colonies. Historically, artist colonies have been a major contributor to the art scene. Whether the art colony is located in the secluded acres of a forest or in a city – ingenuity thrives in artist collaboration. Through the marriage of physical artist-to-artist proximity and their interdisciplinary dialogue - fantastic artistic creativity occurs. Such environments have become a creative womb that has brought about the likes of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Auguste Renoir, and Claude Monet

PROPOSAL BÁRA, situated in downtown Portland, Oregon, is the first Urban Artist Colony on the United States’ West Coast. BÁRA offers artists of various disciplines to come to the Pacific Northwest to spend a three to twelve month fellowship at the art colony. Here, the artists are able to focus intensely on their work. To stimulate the artists and provide an inspiring atmosphere, BÁRA houses four different art types: Graphic Design, Painting, Sculpting and Furniture Making. The verbal, visual, and interactive contributions from diverse artists makes BÁRA a place for rich interdisciplinary dialogue and idea exchanges that are unparalleled. While artist colonies are typically located in remote naturalistic locations, BÁRA is unique in its intentional metropolitan placement. Here in Portland, visiting artists can remain isolated in the anonymity of a large city while still be surrounded by nature. Furthermore, the presence of BÁRA in downtown Portland only strengthens the region’s growing and supportive artistic community. BÁRA’s physical accessibility to Portland citizens allows it to be a catalyst in invigorating the town’s experience, participation and knowledge of art.


SITE & BUILDING SELECTION In the United States, there are several prominent of art colonies. Prestigious colonies such as MacDowell and Yaddo have also generated an impressive pedigree of artists and works such as Jacob Lawrence, Clyfford Still, and Anne Truitt. This is not surprising as the admission process is comprehensive and elite. Applicants are to send in work samples, references, and proof that they are apt in collaborative discussions and work. This careful selection of candidates ensures that artists will have rich exchanges at the colony. Of the thirty-seven notable artist colonies in the U.S., twenty-one of them are located on the East Coast, eight in the Midwest, three in the South, and only three on the West Coast – all located in California (Greer). Thus, Portland, Oregon is a promising location for the establishment of a new artist colony. Not only does Portland already have an established community appreciative of the arts, but it has also become the budding grounds for developing artists. As a result, BÁRA has chosen the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple (AOUW) building in Downtown Portland as its home. The selection of this building was meant to present an impression of prominence but also give a sense of security to the building’s inhabitants. After the Portland Freemasons disbanded, this building was converted into an apartment complex and then altered again into various restaurant and club establishments. The unique and funky history of the AOUW is fitting for BÁRA’s own uses. The building offers protection for the artists while displaying a prominent face to the city.

S TAT E M E N T O F I N T E N T While artist colonies are typically located in remote natural landscapes, BÁRA is unique in its intentional metropolitan placement in Downtown Portland. In this increasingly global society, inspiration can come from the most

unexpected places in the most unusual ways. The city is where these occurrences frequently happen. Thus, the artists’ interactions with the city are seen as a positive force. The three main driving questions that drove the design decisions regarding BÁRA are as follows: 1) What is the relationship between the artist and the city? 2) What is the relationship between individual artists? 3) What is the relationship between the artists and their workspace? Two major elements that contribute to the success of art colonies are the artist’s isolation from outside people and distractions, as well as, the collaboration they experience with fellow colony dwellers. As a result, this was the primary driving force for the conceptual design organization, or parti for BÁRA. The parti is a sectional parti where the heart of the colony is seen on Floors 2-5. These are the floors where the artists live (Floors 2 & 3) and work (Floors 4 & 5). Thus, these floors are also where the most amount of privacy is needed. Contrastingly, the ground floor and the top floor (6th floor) are catered primarily to the Portland community. These are the public floors that draw in and educate the community on the developments of art. With the utmost care of consideration for BÁRA artists, the vertical circulation through the building is zoned and designed for their benefit. Here, the architecture partially responds to the question of the relationship between artist and the city through the egress. Artists are provided a separate entry and elevator/stair so that they are able to traverse the building without ever running into a colony outsider. On the other hand, the public showcase stair is available for the artists who choose to engage with visitors and BÁRA enthusiasts. With the physical separation of


public to private, the artists are protected from any outside distractions while still allowing visitors to engage with BÁRA. The interior architecture of BÁRA addresses my second and third design questions: the relationship between individual artists, as well as, the relationship between artists and their workspace. The design of the apartment floors and studios are to accommodate artists’ various and unique ways of working. Firstly, the studio floors follow an open plan form and are always shared by two artist disciplines. The wide floors allow for broad sight lines so that the artists can see what others are making. This enhances not only the artists’ own work but encourages collaborations to happen. Yet, for smaller gatherings or work units, each studio floor has “work pods” that allow artists to retreat to work more privately. Contrastingly, on the residential floors, artists are given much more privacy. The rooms are comfortable, spacious, and all contain a small kitchenette. Furthermore, there are five apartment layouts to accommodate a wide variety of lifestyles. However, shared amenities such as the gym and laundry are purposefully placed by the entry so that artists are sure to engage with one another. In addition, “artist salons” are located on each residential floor for the traditional evening discussions.

FINISHES + FURNITURE The overall design atmosphere at BÁRA is to inspire and frame the artists’ work. The finishes chosen for BÁRA are primarily neutral in tone with the exception of the public floors. This design decision is to establish the art made in BÁRA. The interior architecture at BÁRA takes on a peripheral role so that it can act as a frame for the art that is produced within. Nevertheless, the neutral palette takes on interesting forms in its application on the walls and ceilings to highlight the creative energy that exists in BÁRA. On the other hand, for the public first and sixth floor, pops of color

are used to engage the viewers and entice the people of Portland to come visit BÁRA. The furniture and lighting specified are especially interesting and beautiful. As any designer would undoubtedly say, well-designed, aesthetically pleasing fixtures and products often help in the creative process and help inspire artists in their own pursuits. Therefore, many notable, elite, and famous furniture pieces can be found on the BÁRA grounds.

CONCLUSION BÁRA is an urban artist colony that is designed to help artists succeed in making meaningful creations. Its mission is to foster the resident artists’ visions by providing a space and a lifestyle that will allow them to work uninhibited. Artists from different disciplines are all invited to come live in the BÁRA residencies. C.P. Snow was famously quoted that “The clashing point of two subjects, two disciplines, two cultures…ought to produce creative chances. In the history of mental activity that has been where some of the breakthrough came.” BÁRA strives to be at the epicenter of these interdisciplinary clashes. With art disciplines specifically chosen in response to the existing or growing presence in Portland, - the opportunities to crosspollinate are endless. By providing an inspiring environment that is geared toward helping artists focus, BÁRA is the breeding grounds for interdisciplinary dialogue and idea exchanges.


A RT C U LT U R E

Botton, Alain De. “Art for Life’s Sake.” Editorial. Wall Street Journal 2-3 Nov. 2013: C1-C13. Print. Jackson, Maria R. “Progress in Arts and Culture Research: A Perspective.” Urban Institute (2008): n. pag. Urban Institute. Urban Institute, 17 Dec. 2008. Web. 21 Nov. 2013. Myers, Nicole. “Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History.” The Lure of Montmartre, 1880–1900. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Oct. 2007. Web. 22 Nov. 2013. National Assembly of State Arts Agencies. Publication. National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2010. Web. 21 Nov. 2013. Peterson, Richard A., Pamela C. Hull, and Roger M. Kern. “Age and Arts Participation.” Research Division Report 42 (2000): n. pag. Arts.gov. Web. 21 Nov. 2013. <http://arts.gov/sites/default/files/ ResearchReport42.pdf>. “Publications.” National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works, n.d. Web. 21 Nov. 2013. Seminar, Saguaro. “The Arts and Social Capital.” Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. (2000): 1-9. Web. 21 Nov. 2013 ARTIST COLONIES

Greer, Laura. Artist Colonies. New York City: Center for Arts Information, 1982. Print. Jacobs, Michael. The Good and Simple Life: Artist Colonies in Europe and America. Oxford: Phaidon, 1985. Print. Kostelanetz, Richard. Soho: The Rise and Fall of an Artists’ Colony. New York: Routledge, 2003. Print. Larkin, Susan G. The Cos Cob Art Colony: The Impressionists on the Connecticut Shore. New York: National Academy of Design, 2001. Print.


Montgazon, Emanuelle De. L’Accueil D’artistes En Résidence Temporaire Dans Le Monde = Guide of Host Facilities for Artists on Short-term Stay in the World. Paris: Association Française D’action Artistique, 1995. Print. Shipp, Steve. American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America’s Original Art Colonies and Their Artists. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 1996. Print. Spahr, P. Andrew., William Nathaniel. Banks, Robert Storr, and Tom Wolf. Community of Creativity: A Century of MacDowell Colony Artists. Manchester, NH: Currier Gallery of Art, 1996. Print. INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

Brand, Steward. How Buildings Learn: What Happens after They’re Built. Harmondsworth [u.a.: Penguin, 1995. Print. Harmon, Sharon Koomen. The Codes Guidebook for Interiors. New York: J. Wiley & Sons, 1994. Print. Meuser, Philipp. Accessible Architecture. Berlin: DOM, 2012. Print. Schildt, Göran, and Alvar Aalto. Alvar Aalto: The Complete Catalogue of Architecture, Design, and Art. New York: Rizzoli, 1994. Print.. WORK HABITS & RESIDENCY

Currey, Mason, and Mason Currey. Daily Rituals How Artists Work. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013. Print. Dolden, Mary E., and Robertson Ward, Jr. The Architectural Research Centers Consortium Workshop on The Impact of The Work Environment on Productivity. New York: Architectural Research Centers Consortium, 1985. Print Harris, Craig. Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-In-Residence Program. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1999. Print.


M IRANDA LEE | COM PREHENSIVE PROJECT |

EXISTING

SPRING 2014 | ALISON SNYDER

CONDITIONS

ANCIENT Order of united Workmen temple 9 1 5 S W S e c o n d Av e n u e , P o r t l a n d , O r e g o n 9 7 2 1 9

P o r t l a n d, O r eg o n

D i s t r i b u t i o n o f N o ta b l e A r t i s t C o l o n i e s i n t h e U n i t e d S tat e s o f A m e r i c a

3

13 1

10

9

2

5

11

7 6 8 4 12

14

n e a r by a r t i s t i c at t r ac t i o n s i n p o r t l a n d, O r eg o n 1 . M u s e u m o f C o n t e m p o r a ry C r a f t 2 . C h i n atow n G at e 3 . C l a s s i c a l C h i n e s e G a r d e n 4 . P o r t l a n d B u i l d i n g & P o r t l a n d i a 5. P i o n e e r C o u r t h o u s e S q ua r e 6. P o r t l a n d c e n t e r p e r f o r m i n g a r t s 7. N o r t h w e s t f i l m c e n t e r 8 . P o r t l a n d A r t M u s e u m 9. D i r ec to r Pa r k 1 0. Da T u n g E l e p h a n t S c u l p t u r e 1 1 . G ov. To m M c C a l l Wat e r f r o n t Pa r k 1 2 . S a l m o n S t S P r i n g s 1 3 . Ja pa n e s e - A m e r i c a n H i s to r i c a l P l a z a 1 4 . K e l l e r F o u n ta i n Pa r k

BÁR A

ADA ACCESSIBLE APARTM ENT

OF F IC ES

WON

S O U T H W E S T

ARTIST P R IVAT E EN TRY

K ITC HEN DRY

STORAGE

DOOR

MAIN PUBLIC CIRCUL ATION

STREET VIEW

B Á R A

B ui l di ng not es

R E S T A U R A N T

BÁRA FRONT DESK

A A R T I S T

G I F T

A RTI ST

S A LON

ARTIST

APARTM ENT ARTIST

SUITE

S T R E E T

N a m e s : A n c i e n t O r d e r o f U n i t e d Wo r k m e n Te m p l e , To u r n y A p a r t m e n t s NEIGHBORHO OD: S o u t h w e s t Po r t l a n d / D o w n t o w n Po r t l a n d Construction: 1892 - 1893 A r c h i t e c t : Ju s t u s L . K r u m b e i n S t y l e : Ri c h a r d s o n i a n R o m a n e s qu e Width: 97-0’ Length: 76-0’ Height: 89-0’ S q ua r e f o o tag e : 4 4 , 2 3 2 s q . f e e t N o. o f l e v e l s : B a s e m e n t + 6 S t o r i e s

GYM

PRIVATE WORKSPACE

T A Y L O R

Site Plan

ARTIST “JACK & JILL” WORKSPACE

B O U T I Q U E

FUTURE SCULPTURE GARDEN

H i s t o ry 915 SW Second Av e n u e was o r i g i n al l y b u i l t a s a m e e t i n g p l a c e a n d p u b l i c h al l fo r t h e A n c i e n t O r d e r o f U n i t e d Wo r k m e n . T h e b u i l d i n g w a s l at e r a p p r o p r i at e l y nicknamed AOUW (Ancient Order o f U n i t e d Wo r k m e n Te m p l e ) . Ye a r s l at e r , t h e b u i l d i n g w a s c o n v e r t e d into an apartment complex known a s t h e To u r n y A p a r t m e n t s . I n t h e l a s t d e c ad e , t h e b u i l d i n g ’ s fi r s t , s e c o n d , a n d s i x t h fl o o r h a v e b e e n re-purposed to serve as a night c l u b a s w e l l a s a r e s t au r a n t . I t i s c u r r e n t l y va c a n t .

S O U T H W E S T

2 N D

A V E N U E

F ROST E D GL ASS M A R K E R BOA R D

POG GE N POH L A LU M I N U M H A N D L E STR I P S W I T H L E D L IGH TI NG

B ow s t r i n g t r u s s e s

3 / 4 ” P LY WOOD S H E L F F i r e s ta i r w e l l

Existing freight e l e vato r a n d s ta i r core

H E W I COM B I SYST E M 1 6 2 STA I N L E SS ST E E L P U L L H A N D L E ¹ Steel c olumns

Plumbing core

B A LBBAAANLLCAA INNNCCGI I NN GG C O C LC LO OA LLBLLOAA RBB AO OTRRI AO A TTNI I O O&NN I &S& O I I LSS AO OTLLI AO A TTNI I O O NN

A T TAAETTNTTTEEI NN OTTNI I O OT NNO TTPO O R I PVP RAR I C I VVYAA CC YY

Z O NZZ IO ON NNGI I NN GG

P R I VAT E

B U I LT- I N DO U B L E D R AW E R R E F R I D GE R ATOR STA I N L E SS ST E E L ²

3 / 4 ” P ly wo o d f lo o r i n g o n 2 x6 to n g u e & g r o ov e s u b f lo o r SCULPT

Existing Light Well o n F lo o r s 2 - 6

ARTIST A PA RT M E N T S

OFFICES BUILD

ARTIST DINING

R E S T RAR EUE SRS TATAN A UTU R R AA NN TT & G A&& L L GEG ARA LY L L L E E R R Y Y

RESIDENT ARTIST

P R I V PA P RRT I IEVV AA TT EE

M a s o n ry c o l u m n s

GALLERY

GRAPHIC DESIGN

S C U L SPS CTC UUU LRL PEP TT U U R R E E & F U &R& N FI F T U U RUR N RNEI I TT U U R R E E

[ c o m m u n a l ]

A P A R ATA PMPAA E RNR TT MM S E E NN TT S S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

1 1

1 2 B A R A

A P A R ATA PMPAA E RNR TT MM S E E NN TT S S V I S I T O R

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

1 1

O F F I C E S G I F T

S H O P

G A L L E R I E S

GARDEN GALLERY R E S TA U R A N T

A RTI ST A PA RT M E N T K I TC H E N 3/4” = 1’-0”

S T U D I O S

A R T I S T 1 2

ARTIST BOUTIQUE

BÁRA EMPLOYEE

S C U L SPS CTC UUU LRL PEP TT U U R R E E & F U &R& N FI F T U U RUR N RNEI I TT U U R R E E

LOBBY

P U B LP PI UC U BB L L I I CC

V I S I TOR

R E S T A U R A N T

G A L L GEG ARA LY L L, L E EGR RIY YF, , T GG I I F F TT S H O P S,S HH& OO P PA, , D &M & I ANA DD MM I I NN P R O G R A M

PUBLIC

B r i c k m a s o n ry wa l l s

[ c o m m u n a l ]

[ d e l i v e r e d ]

L I B R A R Y

PA I N T

Existing Central s ta i r way

D I N N E R

L U N C H

B R E A K F A S T

PA S S E R B Y

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I s o l a I tIs isoool nlaatati io nod nn a panr ni dvd apc pr yri iv viasacca yy ik ises yaa i knkegeyry ei id nng i ger rneetddi tieo ennttt ht teoo t thhee s ucce s susuc s ccc oee f s ssas roo t fi f s atar rct tiois sl tot ncci oeol sloo . nni iees s. . T h u s , TThthhuue s s, , et tg hhe r ee e s esggri re s es szs so i nis se zdzootnnoeedd m tatoion m tm aaa i ininnt&taai rinne s&& p er recest sppeecct t t h e rtethhseied rereens sti iddaeernnt tit s atasr r.t ti Ais str tst s.i . s AtAsr rt tai isrstets s aaabr rel ee aat bobl lee t r tatoo v et tlr raav veel l f r o m f frf ro l oomm o r f fl tloooorfr l totooo r f fl w looioo t rhr owwui ti thhbooeuui tnt gbbee di inns gtg r d adicis stt ter ra dacct teedd f r o m f frt rohoe mm gt te hhe nee grgaeelnneperuraa bl l i pcpu. ubbl li icc. .

T I M L I N E

B A R Á B’ BsAARf RiÁÁ r ’ s’s st f fai irnrs sdt t a s ai nxndtdh s sif ixl xo t thoh r f fl alooroo er r zaa or rneee zdzoofnnoeerdd t fhfoe or r t thhee p u b l i pcpu. ubbTl lihicec. s. eTThhfelesoseoe r f sfl loo coor rns st a cco io nnntttahai einn at trhhtee gaaar rlt lt egrgai ael l s le, er ri iees s, , t h e rtethhsete ar rueers a st tnaatuu, r raaannntdt, , a t ahnnedd gt tihhf ete g s ghi ifoft tp .s shhFoo lo pp.o. rFFs l loo 2oor-rs s 522 - - 55 a r e rae ar sree rr vreees sdeer rfv voeerdd t fhfoe or r at trhhteei s atasr rt toi isnst tl sys . oonnl lyy. .

1

2 H E W I COM B I SYST E M SYST E M 1 6 2 F I N I S H : STA I N STA I N L E SS ST E E L

M A RV E L B U I LT- I N DO U B L E D R AW E R R E F R I D GE R ATOR F I N I S H : STA I N L E SS ST E E L 24.3” x 23.9“ x 33.8”

3

4 KOH L E R P U R I ST 8 ” P U L LO U T S PO U T F I N I S H : POL I S H E D C H ROM E

KOH L E R R I V E R BY TOP MO U N T K I TC H E N S I N K 33” x 22” x 9-5/8” FINISH: WHITE


M A RV E L B L E D R AW E R R E F R I D GE R ATOR S H : STA I N L E SS ST E E L 3” x 23.9“ x 33.8”

Final Presentation Layout f o r a m o r e d e t a ile d lo o k o n f inal d r a w i n g s, ple a se se e Se ct io n : SP R ING T E R M : F IN AL RE VI E W

STORAGE

GA L L ERY

LIGH T

PHOTOGR A PHY

CAF E

SCUL PTU R E

TA B LE

STAGE

WOR K

DISP L AY

STA IR STOR AGE

LOUNGE

CL AY

SCU LPT U RE

ROOM WORK

LOU NGE

STORAGE

ARTI ST

S HOP

GYM

“JACK & J I LL” WORKSPACE

TA B LE

AV

ARTI ST

VAC P IVOTING DISPL AY WAL LS

SAW

ROOM M ITR E

SALON

SAW

STONE

JOINTER

SI NK

STATION STEEL

WOOD & TOOL STORAGE

PL A NER

PRI VATE WORKSPACE

G R A P H I C

D E S I G N

P A I N T E R ’ S

S T U D I O

S T U D I O

F U R N I T U R E

14”

DOW NDRAFT SANDING TABLE D R AF TI NG

ARTI ST

A R EA

S C U L P T U R E

C IRC LE

SAW

SC ROLL

SAW

R E A D I N G

G A L L E R Y

R O O M

W O O D S H O P

P I N- UP & R EVI EW SPACE

A RTIST

SCU LPT U RE SPACE

SAW

15” 12”

D ISC

BA ND

D ISC

SAW

SA ND ER

17”

BA ND

SAW

S C U L P T O R ’ S

A R T

S T U D I O

G A L L E R Y

A R T I S T S ’

C O M M U N A L

D I N I N G

SA ND ER

APARTM ENT ARTI ST

LOFT

SU I TE B ELT

M ILLING

SA ND ER

COV E L IGH TI NG

MAC HINE

D U ST COLLECTOR & COM PR ESSOR

ASSEM BLY & GLU E-U P TABLES

3” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL ANGLE 5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

S L I D I NG C A B I N E T DOORS W I T H F ROST E D GL ASS PA N E L

SCULPTURE

READING ROOM

GALLERY

ARTIST GALLERY

3/4” PLYWOOD 2” X 1” X 1/4” ST EEL U CH ANNEL W ELDED TO ST EEL T UBE WOODSHOP & SCULPTURE STUDIO

INDUSTRIAL F ELT 10’ X 6’ X 1”

WA R D ROB E C LOS E T

C 17032 COOPER LIGHTING, BL AC K ALUM INUM F INISH

6 ” S P IC E S H E L F

3/4” GYP. WALL BOAR D 1” IND USTR IAL F ELT

K I TC H E N S I N K FAU C E T

3/4” PLY WOOD SHEATHING 3/4” QUIETRO C K GYPBOAR D GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO

3/4” AR MSTRONG ACO USTIC AL BAM BOO PANEL 24 “X 48”

PAINTING STUDIO

1 . 5 ” CONC R E T E CO U N T E RTOP S L A B KOH L E R TOP MO U N T K I TC H E N S I N K

4

4’ X 10’ X 3/4” PR EF INISHED MAPLE PANEL

MAPLE PREFAB. PANEL 3/4” GYP. BOARD 1” INDUSTRIAL FELT

M A P L E WOOD D R AW E R PA N E L

ARTIST APARTMENTS

ARTIST APARTMENTS

5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

LOBBY ENTRANCE

3” X 3” STEEL ANGLE CLIP BOLTED TO STEAL BEAM AND FLOOR 2” X 1” X 1/4” ST EEL U CH ANNEL W ELDED TO ST EEL T UBE

3

SECTION

3” X 3” STEEL ANGLE C LIP

4 KOH L E R P U R I ST 8 ” P U L LO U T S PO U T F I N I S H : POL I S H E D C H ROM E

KOH L E R R I V E R BY TOP MO U N T K I TC H E N S I N K 33” x 22” x 9-5/8” FINISH: WHITE

SCALE: 1/2” = 1’0

A

SCALE 1/8” = 1’-0”


P ROJ E C T

E LE MEN T S


SHORT PROGRAM

SPACE

QTY. SIZE

[sq ft.]

USERS

ACTIVITIES & M ISC. COM M ENTS

artificial - ambient, decorative & natural artificial - ambient, spotlighting, natural

For artist check-in/check-out, infor mation desk for visitors point of sale of artists’ work, display of art, draws visitors into the building dining: eating, drinking, and serving of food and beverages preparing, cooking, cleaning dishes managerial, office work, copying, mail storage

BÁRA Lobby

1

400 sq ft

BÁRA Boutique Store

1

1210 sq ft

1-20

B ÁRA Restaurant

1

2250 sq ft

2-100

ambient, spot lighting, decorative

Kitchen

1

580 sq ft

2-6

B ÁRA Offices +

1

500 sq ft

5-8

overall electric, task lighting overall electric, task lighting

Apartment

16

330-450 sq ft

1

Personal Workspace

8

80-200 sq ft

1-2

Artist Lounge

2

270 sq ft

1-8

Artist Gym

1

400 sq ft

1-8

Artist Laundromat

1

400 sq ft

1-8

Graphic Design Studio

1

2100 sq ft

1-6

Painting Studio

1

2400 sq ft

1-6

AV Room

1

320 sq ft

1-2

Wood shop

1

3700 sq ft

1-4

Sculpture Studio

1

1280 sq ft

1-6

Work Lounge

2

250 sq ft

2-8

copy/mail room

1-10

L IGHTING

natural light, sleeping, light cooking, and ambient, task lighting occasional work electric, task lighting

space for specific making/ designing task lighting, wall infor mal communal wash electric lighting, gatherings, social natural conversations ambient lighting, work-out equipment, yoga, natural light pilates ambient lighting, washer & dryer, ironing natural light ambient,task lighting, computer graphic natural light designing, critique reviews, photographing work ambient, task watercolor, charcoal, oil, lighting, natural light acrylic painting and drawing, critique reviews task, spot lighting, theatre, projection, high wall wash lighting perfor mance audio and visual room fluorescent, electric cutting, sawing, planing, and lighting, natural light sanding natural light, task clay and stone sculptures, lighting natural lighting, rest area for artists, lounge, ambient, task lighting small kitchenette for breaks


SPACE

QTY. SIZE

[sq ft.]

USERS

L IGHTING

ACTIVITIES & M ISC. COM M ENTS

artificial: museum lighting, task, wall wash sconces, decorative; natural light, skylight ambient, task lighting, natural lighting artificial: task, ambient; natural lighting, skylight

general meandering through the gallery, browsing, occasional sketching and resting on the benches provided heating, serving coffee and pastries, light kitchen, small step seating on the side general reading room for the public during open hours, private dining for artists at night

Art + Sculpture Gallery

1

4600 sq ft

5-150

Gallery Cafe

1

350 sq ft

2-15

Reading Room/ Artists Communal Dining Room

1

600 sq ft

2-16

Restrooms

12

80-120 sq ft

1-4

artificial, ambient, natural light

Ancillary Rooms

6

100-350 sq ft

1-2

artificial, ambient overhead lighting

SUBTOTAL (SF) 20% Circulation TOTAL SF Gross Available Total Occupancy Estimate

31,850 6,370 38,220 38,500

sq sq sq sq

ft ft ft ft

350 People


P ROGRA MMING

DIAGR AMS

STUDIOS

ARTIST APARTMENT 800

800

1000

800

800

1500

PAINT/DRAWING

800

800

1500

PAINT/DRAWING

800

800

1500

DRAFTING

800

800

1500

WOODSHOP

COMPUTER RM

SCULPTING

2000

SERVICE SPACE GALLERY 1400

ARTIST LOBBY CHECK IN KITCHEN

1500 500

STORAGE

1000

2D GALLERY RM

1000

2D GALLERY RM 3D GALLERY RM

2000

LIBRARY

2500

RESTROOMS 400

400

400

400

OFFICES 500 500

1000 800

DINING ROOM ART STORE

250

250

250

“BROWN SHEET” MIRANDA LEE 1/15/2014

Initial “BROWN SHEET” Assessment of Program


P R I VAT E

SCULPT ARTIST A PA RT M E N T S

OFFICES BUILD

ARTIST DINING

RESIDENT ARTIST GALLERY

GRAPHIC DESIGN PA I N T ARTIST BOUTIQUE

BÁRA EMPLOYEE

GARDEN GALLERY R E S TA U R A N T

LOBBY

V I S I TOR

PUBLIC

PA S S E R B Y

Adjacency Diagram


B R E A K F A S T [ c o m m u n a l ]

S T U D

A R T I S T 1 2

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

1 1

V I S I T O R

P R O G R A M

T I


D I N N E R

L U N C H

T

[ c o m m u n a l ]

[ d e l i v e r e d ]

S T U D I O S 1 0

1 1

1 2 B A R A

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

O F F I C E S G I F T

B O U T I Q U E

G A L L E R I E S C A F E R E S T A U R A N T

R O G R A M

T I M E L I N E

Building Timeline Diagram

1 1


LO NG

ANN OTAT E D

P ROGRAM


LOBBY

ARTIST BOUTIQUE

FLOOR AREA: +/-960 s.f. (~ 30’ x 32’) OCCUPANTS: visitors, artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES: The Lobby functions as an information center to check-in new BÁRA resident artists, to greet casual visitors and formal guests, and to supervise and sell art gallery tickets

FLOOR AREA: +/-900 s.f. (~ 20’ x 30’) OCCUPANTS: visitors, artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES: The Artist Boutique will sell artist work and other related products.

DURATION: Short ( 5 – 10 minutes). The lobby will be mostly a pass through space. FAMILIARITY: Newcomers should be instantly cued on the purpose of the space since most people are familiar with the typical lobby. ZONE: Public ADJACENCIES: Main Building Egress/Circulation to inform incoming visitors where to go. DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The lobby space is almost always makes the first impression. The Lobby should display the BÁRA design brand. The space should feel professional, but not cold and unapproachable. The lounge furniture nearby should be movable and can naturally act as a common meeting spot. FF&E: Main lobby desk to accommodate 2-3 staff workers, filing storage cabinet, trashcans, ergonomic chairs, printers, computers, “display” element for flyers and other signage, potentially a place for small conversations to start. FINISH REQUIREMENTS: existing conditions, high traffic, durable materials LIGHTING: Ambient, Task lighting is sufficient. VIEW: Sight lines into the gallery spaces & other public rooms. SAFETY & SECURITY: Those working at the lobby will function as the security. The lobby desk, however, should be able to be locked and secured after hours. ACOUSTICS: No specific acoustical needs SPECIAL NEEDS / CODE RESTRICTIONS: ADA Accessible

DURATION: Medium ( 15 – 30 minutes). FAMILIARITY: Space should be self-explanatory and simple to understand. ZONE: Public ADJACENCIES: Lobby DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The Gift Shop is the artists’ boutique. It is small and quaint, but houses a lot of items. FF&E: Tables, Wall Tapestry holders, bookcases to showcase on sale goods. Display cases for pricier items. Cashier desk for 2, cashier, and trashcan. FINISH REQUIREMENTS: Wood shelving to compliment the brick walls, polished concrete floors or linoleum floors for good acoustics and a hightraffic area. LIGHTING: Ambient and task lighting VIEW: Large Curtain Wall to views of the outside. SAFETY & SECURITY: The BÁRA workers at the lobby will be in charge of keeping an eye on the merchandise. ACOUSTICS: Acoustic treatment from outside city street noise.


GALLERY

A RT I S T A PA RT M E N T

FLOOR AREA: +/-9260 s.f. OCCUPANTS: visitors, artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES:

FLOOR AREA: +/-504 s.f. (~18’ x 28’) OCCUPANTS: artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES: The Artist Apartment serves as both the living quarters for the artist but also as a private workspace.

The Galleries house and display the resident artists’ work. This can include anything from paintings to sculptures. The Galleries are also BÁRA’s most versatile rooms. There are semi-frequent changes to the display and interior form of the galleries.

DURATION: Medium (15 min – 30min). FAMILIARITY: New ZONE: Public during open hours, Private during closed hours. ADJACENCIES: • Cafe • Possibly a boutique DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The Galleries are to showcase the hard work of the resident artists and to educate the general public about the arts. Since each of the galleries is relatively small, it should feel welcoming and intimate. The space should feel formal and present the artists’ work respectfully, but there should be a sense of familiarity and closeness. Way finding and signage are important to direct the visitors around the building and into other rooms. FF&E: Seating for about 3 people in each large room for people to stop and rest. FINISH REQUIREMENTS: Hardwood floors, Gypsum Board walls, Possibly a dropped ceiling LIGHTING: Task Lighting will be very important. VIEW: Views to the outdoors are not necessary since the focus will be on the works themselves. However, views into other rooms will help with way finding. SAFETY & SECURITY: Internal security issues should be considered & art safety is of prime importance. ACOUSTICS: Acoustics sheltering from the restaurant is important. Acoustical treatment will be needed to absorb adjacent room noise, as well as, to keep the galleries quiet and respectful. PRECEDENT: Faaborg Museum SPECIAL NEEDS / CODE RESTRICTIONS: ADA Accessible

DURATION: Long FAMILIARITY: Very Familiar ZONE: Private ADJACENCIES: • Other Apartments • Communal Gathering Space DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The Artist Apartment is the most customizable space in BÁRA. Each room is malleable to fit the artist. There is a work area – where the artist is able to do his/her work, a sleeping quarter, and a personal ADA bathroom & washer and dryer. FF&E: Stacked Washer and Dryer, Desk, Lamp, Full Bed FINISH REQUIREMENTS: Concrete Floor or Linoleum Floor, Carpet, Tile in the bathrooms. Gypsum Board Walls LIGHTING: Natural light and task lighting. VIEW: Views out into the city from the personal rooms are a priority. SAFETY & SECURITY: Door Code/Key Card access to main living floors, individual keys to personal rooms. ACOUSTICS: Acoustic quality will be extra important in the artist residences. Special precautions must be taken to ensure that each room will be undisturbed from the next. In addition, acoustical treatment may be needed to shield the majority of the city street noise from entering into the rooms. SPECIAL NEEDS / CODE RESTRICTIONS: ADA Accessible Bathrooms


GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO

PA I N T I N G S T U D I O

FLOOR AREA: +/-2700 s.f. (~45’ x 60’) OCCUPANTS: artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES: The Graphic Design Studio serves the graphic artists who do most of their work with computers. This studio space is for the graphic artists to test their ideas in a large area and also to work collaboratively with others.

FLOOR AREA: +/-2700 s.f. (~45’ x 60’) OCCUPANTS: artists DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES: The Painting Studio is a workplace for small to largescale art pieces – individually and collectively.

DURATION: Long ( multiple hours ) FAMILIARITY: accustomed ZONE: Private ADJACENCIES: • Bathroom • Painting Studio DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The Painting Studio is for the BÁRA painters to spread out and use the space for to enhance their creativity and increase ease of use. In addition, the large communal studio space is the prime location for the painters to collaborate. The studio atmosphere should be relaxing, yet bustling with energy. Artists should be able to feel a sense of ownership over the studio while also being respectful of it being a communal space. The painting studio should feel malleable and customizable. FF&E: Desktop Computers, Ample open shelving storage, Closed Storage Space ( 3 -11.5’ x 4’ Storage Units), ~4 large worktables (8’ x 4’), ~ 5 smaller personal work tables (5’ x 3’), Movable Pin-up Board space. FINISH REQUIREMENTS: Concrete floors, Walls that are easy to clean LIGHTING: Task light and overall ambient lighting will be important. VIEW: Cross-Studio views will be important to garner visual interest from other artists that could inspire collaboration. SAFETY & SECURITY: Door Code/Key Card access ACOUSTICS: Acoustics sheltering studio from studio will be important. Acoustical treatment is needed to prevent the space from getting distractingly loud. SPECIAL NEEDS / CODE RESTRICTIONS: ADA Accessible Bathroom

DURATION: Long ( multiple hours ) FAMILIARITY: accustomed ZONE: Private ADJACENCIES: • Bathroom • Graphic Design Studio DESIGN & USE QUALITIES: The Painting Studio is for the BÁRA painters to spread out and use the space for to enhance their creativity and increase ease of use. In addition, the large communal studio space is the prime location for the painters to collaborate. The studio atmosphere should be relaxing, yet bustling with energy. Artists should be able to feel a sense of ownership over the studio while also being respectful of it being a communal space. The painting studio should feel malleable and customizable. FF&E: Approximately 10 painting easels of various sizes, Ample open shelving storage, Closed Storage Space ( 3 -11.5’ x 4’ Storage Units), ~4 large worktables (8’ x 4’), ~ 5 smaller personal work tables (5’ x 3’), Movable Pin-up Board space. FINISH REQUIREMENTS: Concrete floors, Walls that are easy to clean LIGHTING: Daylight and Natural light is important to accurately render color. At night, consistent lighting is desired. VIEW: Cross-Studio views will be important to garner visual interest from other artists that could inspire collaboration. SAFETY & SECURITY: Door Code/Key Card access ACOUSTICS: Acoustics sheltering the painting studio from the graphic studio will be important. Acoustical treatment is needed to prevent the space from getting distractingly loud. SPECIAL NEEDS / CODE RESTRICTIONS: ADA Accessible Bathroom


E XISTING

SIT E

&

B UILD ING

DOC UME N TAT I O N :

A n c i e n t O r d e r o f U n i t e d Wo r k m e n Te m p l e 9 1 5 S W S E C O N D AV E N U E ,

PORTLAND, OREGON 97219


on load-bearing T RU UC C TTUU RA EM S TS R RLASLYSST Y STEM

2 n d f lo o r

od on Floor Joists Ashlar & M ry i c: k C oanssotn ru c tB i orn T y p e I I I M a s o r y.n : C o n s t r u c t ino Timber Beams & Columns on all .c. T y p efl oI oI rIs M e x caesp o t tnhre y. t h i r d fl o o r. h eb3er dr flBoe o rahm a ss b & e e nCr o e ilnu f om r cn e ds woi tn h sat el le l T iTm girders and columns. fl o o r s e x c e p t t h e t h i r d fl o o r. Bowstring Trusses on load-bearing The 3 wr a ldl s fl o o r h a s b e e n r e i n f o r c e d w i t h s t e e l Flo o r s : 3e/ 4r”sP a l yn wd o oc do on l o on r sJo. i s t s gird l uF m Wa l l s : R o c k F a c e d A s h l a r & M a s o n r y B r i c k BC o e iw l isntgr:i 1n2 g ’ -T 2 5r‘u s s e s o n l o a d - b e a r i n g B ays w : 18 o.c. a’SlcIlXosTl uH mF nL Os O R F l o o r s : 3 / 4 ” P l y w o o d o n F l o o r Jo i s t s Wa l l s : R o c k Fa c e d A s h l a r & M a s o n r y B r i c k Ceiling: 12’ - 25‘ B ays : 1 8 ’ c o l u m n s o . c .

1 s t f lo o r

6 t h f lo o r

EG R ES S 6 t h f lo o r

5 t h f lo o r

E l e vat o r : 1 F r e i g h t E l e v a t o r S ta i r s : 2 F i r e S t a i r s , 1 Exterior Fire Escape 5 t h f lo o r

4 t h f lo o r

3 r d f lo o r

4 t h f lo o r

2 n d f lo o r

3 r d f lo o r

1 s t f lo o r

2 n d f lo o r

2 ’6 ”

SHORT SECTION

89’

F IFTH F LOOR 2 2 ’6 ”

2 2 ’6 ”

LONG SECTION

89’

THIRD - F IFTH F LOOR 2 2 ’6 ”

SECOND F LOOR

GROUND F LOOR

1 s t f lo o r


C ODE

RESEARCH

ZONING

BASE ZONING: Central Commercial (CX) with a Design Overlay Zone CX - “intended to provide for commercial development within Portland’s most urban and intense areas. A broad range of uses is allowed to reflect 1 Portland’s role as a commercial, cultural and governmental center. ” •Eligible for “Development Opportunity Area” PROJECT TYPE ZONING: Assembly, Residential SPECIAL REGULATIONS/ INDUSTRY SPECIFIC REGULATIONS: LEED Regulations

O C C U PA N C I E S / O C C U PA N T L OA D OCCUPANCY GROUPS: Assembly (A-3) – art galleries, library, lecture halls Residential (R-2) – apartment houses OCCUPA NCY

ARE A

AR E A/ O C C UPAN T

O C C U PA NT LOA D

Gallery Space

3000

50

60

Apartment

8000

200

40

Library

2500

50

50

Kitchens, Commercial

1500

200

7

TOTAL OCCUPA NT LOAD :

157

CONSTRUCTION TYPE:

EXISTING: • TYPE IV – Heavy Timber (602.4) • Existing Floor 1 & Floor 2 – Sprinklered FINISH CLASS RATING (803.9): OCCUPANCY

SPRINKLERED

NON-SPRINKLERED

EXIT/EXIT PASSAGEWAYS

CORRIDORS

RMS

EXIT/EXIT PASSAGEWAYS

CORRIDORS

RMS

A-3

B

B

C

A

A

B

R-2

C

C

C

B

B

C

MEZZANINE: MAX AGGREGATE AREA: Not exceed 1/3 of floor area of that room /space in which they are located. (505.2) HEAD HEIGHT: Above & Below should not be less than 7’. (505.1) 1

“The City of Portland, Oregon.” 915 SW 2ND AVE. Planning and Sustainability, n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.


PLUMBING: OC C U PANC Y

WC

L AVATOR Y

D RI N KI N G FO U N TA I N S

SHOWERS

A-3

M: 1 per 125; F: 1 per 65

1 per 200

1 on each floor unless Occupant Load is <30

-

R-2 (40)

1 per person

1 per dwelling unit

-

1 per dwelling unit

DRINKING FOUNTAIN – 1 drinking fountain should comply with required for people using a wheelchair & one drinking fountain shall comply with required for standing persons. (1109.5.1) LAVATORY – At least 5% but not less than 1 should be accessible (1109.3). WATER CLOSET – at least one of each type of fixture, element, control or dispenser in each accessible toilet room and bathing room should be accessible. (1109.2)

E G R E S S & F I R E R AT I N G

MOVEMENT: MAX TRAVEL DIST. TO AN EXIT FOR A SPRINKLED SPACE: 200’ for both A & R Occupancies (1016.1) MAX TRAVEL DIST. TO AN EXIT FOR AN UNSPRINKLED SPACE: 250’ for both A & R Occupancies (1016.1) DEAD END CORRIDOR LENGTH LIMITS: • No dead end corridors more than 20’ (1018.4) • In R-2 occupancy, where the building has an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 – dead end corridor should not exceed 50’ (1018.4). EGRESS: MIN EGRESS WIDTH: Total Occupant Load served by means of egress x .3” per occupant for stairways & .2” per occupant for other egress components. (1005.1) Approx: 157 x .3” + 157 x .2” = 78.5” MIN # OF EXITS FOR THIS TYPE OF OCCUPANCY: (1014.3) R-2: 1 EXIT A-3: 2 EXITS – Due to an occupancy load >49 (Table 1015.1) MIN CLEAR WIDTH FOR EGRESS DOORS: 32” (1008.1.1) For R-2 Dwelling Units – restriction of door swing does not apply (1005.2) MIN DIST. ALLOWED BETWEEN TWO EXITS: No less than ½ the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served. For a building that is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system, the distance shall not be less than 1/3 of the length of the max. overall diagonal dimension of the area served. (1015.2.1) MIN EGRESS STAIRWAY WIDTH: Total occupant load served by egress x .3” per occupant for stairways and .2” per occupant for other egress components. .3” x 157 = 47.1” therefore, Min 48” (1005.1)

FIREPROOFING BEAMS, COLUMNS, TRUSSES

FIRE PARTITIONS – 1 hr separation needed in dwelling units (709); Residential and Assembly Occupancies need to have an 1-hr rated separation (pg. 94, Codes Guidebook for Interiors)

DETECTION:

DETECTION SYSTEMS REQUIRED: • Automatic Sprinkler System for A-3 Occupancies (903.2.1) • Manual Fire Alarm System for Group A occupancies with an occupant load > 300. (907.2.1) • Manual Fire Alarm System and Smoke Alarms for R-2 (907.2.9) • Table 907.5.2.3.3 – 6-25 Sleep Units Need 2 Alarms. • Carbon Monoxide Alarms for Group R occupancies – 908.7.1


C OD E

RESEARCH

-

GE N E R AL

1. STAIRS/RAMPS/ELEVATORS: (Source: 2007 OSSC | Chapter 10: Means of Egress | Section 1009 – Stairways) Maximum Rise and Run: 1. 1009.4.2 Riser height and tread depth. Stair riser heights shall be 7 inches maximum and 4 inches minimum. Rectangular tread depths shall be 11 inches minimum. Winder treads shall have minimum tread depth of 11 inches and a minimum tread depth of 10 inches within the clear width of the stair Exceptions • Spiral stairways in accordance with Section 1009.9 • Aisle stairs in assembly seating areas where the stair pitch or slope is set, for sightline reasons, by the slope of the adjacent seating area in accordance with Section 1028.11.2 2. HANDRAIL HEIGHT FOR STAIRS: (Source: 2007 OSSC | Chapter 10: Means of Egress | Section 1012 – Handrails)

FAIR

US E

&

S AF E T Y

3. Decks, patios and walkways that have a single change in elevation where the landing depth on each side of the change of elevation is greater than what is required for a landing do not require handrails. 4. In Group R-3 occupancies, a change in elevation consisting of a single riser at an entrance or egress door does not require handrails. 5. Changes in room elevations of three or fewer risers within dwelling units and sleeping units in Groups R-2 and R-3 do not require handrails. 1010.9 Handrails for Ramps. Ramps with a rise greater than 6 inches (152 mm) shall have handrails on both sides. Handrails shall comply with Section 1012 From the OSSC:1009.10 Handrails. Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall comply with Section 1012. Where glass is used to provide the handrail, the handrail shall also comply with Section 2407.

Exceptions: 1. Aisle stairs complying with Section 1025 provided with a center handrail need not have additional handrails. 2. Stairways within dwelling units, spiral stairways and aisle stairs serving seating only on one side are permitted to have a handrail on one side only. Proper Minimum Lengths of the Extensions at Top & Bottom of 3. Decks, patios and walkways that have a single change Stairs & Ramp: in elevation where the landing depth on each side of the change of elevation is greater than what is required for a 1012.5 Handrail Extensions. Handrails shall return to a wall, guard or the walking surface or shall be continuous to the handrail landing do not require handrails. 4. In Group R-3 occupancies, a change in elevation of an adjacent stair flight or ramp run. At stairways where consisting of a single riser at an entrance or egress door handrails are not continuous between flights, the handrails shall does not require handrails. extend horizontally at least 12 inches beyond the top riser and 5. Changes in room elevations of only one riser within continue to slope for the depth of one tread beyond the bottom riser. At ramps where handrails are not continuous between runs, dwelling units and sleeping units in Group R-2 and R-3 the handrail shall extend horizontally above the landing 12 inches occupancies do not require handrails. minimum beyond the top and bottom ramps. 1009.15 Handrails for Stairways. Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall Exceptions: comply with Section 1012. Where glass is used to provide 1. Handrails within a dwelling unit that is not required to be the handrail, the handrail shall also comply with Section accessible need extend only from top riser to the bottom riser. 2407. 2. Aisle handrails in Group A occupancies in accordance with Section 1025.13. Exceptions: 1. Handrails for aisle stairs provided in accordance with 3. GUARDRAIL REQUIREMENTS FOR ELEVATION Section 1028.13. CHANGES (From the ICC: 1009.15 Handrails.) 2. Stairways within dwelling units and spiral stairways are Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall comply with permitted to have a handrail on one side only. 3. Decks, patios and walkways that have a single change Section 1012. Where glass is used to provide the handrail, the in elevation where the landing depth on each side of the handrail shall also comply with Section 2407. change of elevation is greater than what is required for a landing do not require handrails. Exceptions: 4. In Group R-3 occupancies, a change in elevation 1. Handrails for aisle stairs provided in accordance with consisting of a single riser at an entrance or egress door Section1028.13. does not require handrails. 2. Stairways within dwelling units and spiral stairways are 5. Changes in room elevations of three or fewer risers permitted to have a handrail on one side only. 1012.2 Height. Handrails height, measured above stair tread nosings, or finish surface of ramp slop shall be uniform, not less than 34 inches and not more than 38 inches.


within dwelling units and sleeping units in Groups R-2 and R-3 do not require handrails. 1010.9 Handrails for Ramps. Ramps with a rise greater than 6 inches (152 mm) shall have handrails on both sides. Handrails shall comply with Section 1012 From the OSSC: 1009.10 Handrails. Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall comply with Section 1012. Where glass is used to provide the handrail, the handrail shall also comply with Section 2407. Exceptions: 1. Aisle stairs complying with Section 1025 provided with a center handrail need not have additional handrails. 2. Stairways within dwelling units, spiral stairways and aisle stairs serving seating only on one side are permitted to have a handrail on one side only. 3. Decks, patios and walkways that have a single change in elevation where the landing depth on each side of the change of elevation is greater than what is required for a landing do not require handrails. 4. In Group R-3 occupancies, a change in elevation consisting of a single riser at an entrance or egress door does not require handrails. 5. Changes in room elevations of only one riser within dwelling units and sleeping units in Group R-2 and R-3 occupancies do not require handrails 4. ADA RAMP RISE TO RU N RATIO: Max. slope of a ramp in new construction shall be 1:12’. Min. Ramp Width: 36” and Max Rise: 30” 5. STAIRWAY LANDINGS. (Oregon Building Code Section 1009.5) (page 233) There shall be a floor or landing at the top of the each stairway. The width of landings shall not be less than the width of the stairways they serve. Every landing shall have a minimum dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 48 inches (1219 mm) where the stairway has a straight run. Doors opening onto a landing shall not reduce the landing to less than one-half the required width. When fully open, the door shall not project more than 7 inches (178 mm) into a landing. When wheelchair spaces are required on the stairway landing in accordance with section 1107.6.1, the wheelchair space shall not be located in the required

width if the landing and doors shall not swing over the wheelchair spaces. Exception: Aisle stairs complying with section 28. (The Codes Guidebook for Interiors, p128) Each run of stairs must have a landing. In addition, the codes do not usually allow a stairway to rise more than 12 feet without an intermediate platform or landing. The width of the stair determines the minimum dimensions of these required landings or platforms. Other variables must also be considered…Any required areas of refuge may also increase the size of the landing. 6. HEAD HEIGHT CLEARANCE FOR STAIRS The ceiling above a stair and it’s landing must also meet certain requirements. Both a minimum ceiling height and minimum headroom are set by the codes. As shown in the image below, the minimum ceiling height is typically 90 inches (2286 mm). It is measured vertically from the landing and the front edge of the tread of the stair to the ceiling directly above. Some projections below that height are allowed. These may include structural elements, light fixtures, exit signs, or similar ceiling-mounted items. However, a minimum headroom of 80 inches (2032 mm) is required. This height is measured in the same way. When determining stair dimensions, you should know what floor covering will ultimately be used in the construction. Some floor coverings may change the final dimension of the treads or risers and, therefore, the effectiveness of the stair. The required dimensions are based on much research and are critical for ease of use.


7. ELEVATOR TY PES: Conventional Hydraulic Passenger Elevator An in-ground jack lifts a platform that is guided by rails. The hole is usually drilled before the building is erected. Inside drilling can be arranged for special situations. Mechanically, this is the most balanced hydraulic elevator configuration since the lifting point is centered on the load of the elevator car. Holeless Hydraulic Passenger Elevator A cantilevered platform is lifted by a jack that runs between the guide rails. This configuration cannot have rear entrances.

Conventional Hydraulic Freight Elevator An in-ground hydraulic jack lifts a platform that is guided by rails. These durable units stand up well to rough loading conditions including forklifts and tow motors. Most freight elevator sizes are custom designed to suit the loads being lifted. Freight Platform Lift (FPL) (Material Lift) A more economical way to move freight (5000 mm maximum). These lifts can only penetrate one floor and may carry only one operator. The swing door systems are typically not as durable as in freight elevators.

Holeless Dual Cylinder Passenger Elevator Two cylinders situated beside the rails lift a platform guided on the rails. This configuration can have front and rear entrances. The maximum travel is 4500 mm. Oil noise is greater than an in-ground

8. ELEVATOR USE IN TIME OF EMERGENCY

Roped Hydraulic Passenger Elevator A cantilevered platform is lifted by ropes that pass over a sheave fastened to the top of a hydraulic jack. This configuration cannot have rear entrances.

9. ELEVATOR ENCLOSU RES DEPENDED ON MAJOR STRUCTU RE BEARING

Geared Traction Passenger Elevator A conventional overhead geared machine with the car attached to cables that are counter-weighted over the drive sheave. The motor size and power consumption is significantly lower than hydraulic elevators, but the elevator and building costs are higher. Enclosed Vertical Wheelchair Lifts (Accessibility Lift) A budget-priced lift that meets all applicable codes. It is available is several different cab configurations and cab colors.

ICC section 1007.2.1 Elevators are NOT used in times of an emergency.

Elevator enclosures are NOT depended upon for major structure bearing.


ACCESSIBILITY:

10. CLEAR FLOOR SPACE: The minimum unobstructed floor or ground space required to accommodate a single stationary wheelchair and its occupants. This clear floor space is the space that should be available for functional use that excludes other defined spaces. (eg. Plumbing, fixtures, anterooms, vestibules, toilet rooms, closets, lockers, wardrobes, fixed-based cabinets and wall hung counters) 11. REQUIRED CLEAR FLOOR SPACE FOR DOORS: (ADA Standards for Accessible Design) 4.13.5 Clear Width. Doorways shall have a minimum clear opening of 32 in (815 mm) with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop (see Fig. 24(a), (b), (c), and (d)). 4.13.6 Maneuvering Clearances at Doors. Minimum maneuvering clearances at doors that are not automatic or power-assisted shall be as shown in Fig 25. The floor or ground area within the required clearances shall be level and clear. Exception: Entry Doors to acute care hospital bedrooms for in-patients shall be exempted from the requirement for space at the latch side of the door (see dimension X in Fig. 25) if the door is at least 44â&#x20AC;? wide.


12. PROTRUDING OBJECTS: 4.4.1* GENERAL (1) Objects projecting from walls (for example, telephones) with their leading edges between 27 in and 80 in above the finished floor shall protrude no more than 4 in into walks, halls, corridors, passageways, or aisles (see Fig. 8a).

F I GU RE 8A - P ROTRU DI N G OBJ E C TS: WA L K ING PA R A L L E L TO A WA L L

(2) Objects mounted with their leading edges at or below 27 in. above the finished floor may protrude any amount (see Fig. 8a and b).

F IG U R E 8 B - P R OTR U D ING OB J E C TS: WA L K ING P E R P E ND IC U L A R TO A WA L L

(3) Free-standing objects mounted on posts or pylons may overhang 12 in. maximum from 27 in. to 80 in. above the ground or finished floor (see Fig. 8c and d).


F I GU RE 8C - P R OTR U D ING OBJ E C TS: F RE E STA N DI N G OV E R H A NG ING OBJ E C TS

F I GU RE 8C. 1 - P R OTR U D ING OB J E C TS: OV E R H E A D H A Z A R DS

F I GU RE 8 D - P R OTR U D ING OB J E C TS: OB J E CTS M O U NT E D ON POSTS OR PY LONS


(4) Protruding objects shall not reduce the clear width of an accessible route or maneuvering space (see Fig. 8e)

F IG U R E 8 E P R OTR U D ING OBJ E C TS: E XA M P L E OF P ROTE C TION A R O U ND WA L L - M O U NT E D OB J E C TS A N D M E ASU R E M E NTS OF C L E A R W IDT H

4.4.2 HEAD ROOM

Walks, halls, corridors, passageways, aisles, or other circulation spaces shall have 80 in. minimum clear head room (see Fig. 8a). If vertical clearance of an area adjoining an accessible route is reduced to less than 80 in. (nominal dimension), a barrier to warn blind or visuallyimpaired persons shall be provided (see Fig. 8c-1).

C L E A R F L O O R S PA C E F O R L AVATO R I E S : 13. LAVATORY GUIDELINES (1109.10.7) What is the clear floor space for a lavatory? There needs to be a clear floor space of at least 30 inches by 48 inches. What is the height for a lavatory? The height of the lavatory from the finished floor to the rim/countertop can be no higher than 34 inches.


14. WATER CLOSETS (1109.10.5) What is the clear floor space for a water closet? 1. Where the approach to the water closet is only a forward approach, the clear floor space shall be at least 48 inches (1220 mm) wide and 66 inches (1675 mm) deep. 2. Where the approach to the water closet is only either a left- or right-handed approach, the clear floor space shall be at least 48 inches (1220 mm) wide and 56 inches (1420 mm) deep. 3. Where the approach to the water closet is both a forward and either a left- or right-handed approach, the clear floor space shall be at least 60 inches (1525 mm) wide and 56 inches (1420 mm) deep What is the height for a water closet? The water closet height needs to be a minimum of 17 inches and a maximum of 19 inches. What is the distance from the wall? The lateral distance from the centerline of the water closet to the nearest obstruction needs to be 18 inches on one side and no less than 42 inches on the other side.

15. U RINALS (1109.10.6) What is the clear floor space? A clear floor space measuring 30 inches by 48 inches (762 mm by 1219 mm) shall be provided in front of urinals to allow a forward approach. The clear floor space shall adjoin or overlap an accessible route. Urinal shields that do not extend beyond the front of the urinal rim may be provided with 29-inch (737 mm) clearance between them. Urinals shall be stall type or wall hung with the rim at a maximum of 17 inches (432 mm) above the floor. Flush controls shall be mounted not more than 44 inches (1118mm) above the floor, and shall comply with Section 1109.3.


HVAC

AP P ROAC H


The Ancient Order of United Workmen Templeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heavy masonry walls allowed for spaces to have a similar thickness. As a result, the HVAC system in BĂ RA is varied.

Ducts are exposed in the industrial studios - such as the Wood Shop and the Sculpture Studio. On the Ground Floor, the ducts are exposed but brightly painted in the Artist Boutique. This is to add a sense of playfulness to the public space, but also to differentiate it from the restaurant.

For the artist apartment rooms, all personal rooms will have a gypsum board dropped ceiling. This is so their apartment rooms will look finished and separate from their work spaces.

HVAC will be stored in both the basement and the roof. This is so the HVAC can function more efficiently and offer better ventilation to the artists and visitors.

Due to the small floor plate and existing lightwell, there is an abundance of light within the building. The majority of the windows are operable to increase breathability and ventilation in the building.


RESEARCH

ARC H IV E


AN

INTERV IE W

W IT H

S OP H IA

C H ANG


SOPHIA CHANG is an emerging New York graphic designer who has partnered with the likes of Puma, Nike, Wieden + Kennedy, and even the NBA. Here, she spends a few moments talking about her life as a freelance designer. Miranda Lee: Tell me a little about yourself. Sophia Chang: Umm...I’m actually a native New Yorker, I take a lot of pride in that. I’m born and raised in Queens - I’m still living there now. I’m a full time freelancer. I focus specifically on illustration and design. Different aspects of design, from web, graphic design, print, clothing, and anything - you name it. Except for lighting and interiors. That’s a whole new playing field. That’s kind of me in a nutshell. ML: How did you get started with the arts? SC: I’ve actually been involved with the arts my whole life. I was a “doodler.” I would draw everything. I didn’t get serious about art until I started school at Parsons. ML: Describe your average workday. SC: I start work around 11am, checking my emails, figuring out what’s in store. I usually work at home, run errands or have client meetings. After meeting with a few clients, I review my notes from the meetings, and try to finish up a few sketches. ML: I noticed that a lot of your work has a hand media quality to it despite being computerized, what is your customary design process? SC: It varies. For this specific project, I have a pencil drawing that I’ve inked and scanned into the computer. I then take the image into Photoshop to clean up the lines and color in all the images from there. I choose to use Photoshop because I believe it gives me more control in terms of color choices and producing a final clean graphic that I am satisfied with.

ML: Working as a freelance designer at home, I know that creativity can sometimes be hard to find. Where do you draw your inspiration? SC: “I document my ideas in many ways. I’ll take photos or save images in various reference folders on my computer. I’m always looking for ML: Do you have specific qualities you look for in a work space? SC: As a graphic designer living in New York, I like to change up my day. I usually, however, work on my laptop or computer at home.


P RE C E DENT

ST U DIES

M a c D owel l “ to m b s to n es, ” wh ere ever y Fel l ow i n s c r i b es h i s / h er n a m e fo r p o s ter ity.

Ph o to cred i t: Vi cto r i a Sam bu na ri s.


MacDowell Art Colony is one of the most prestigious art colonies in the nation. With 450 acres of land, this colony hosts 32 artist studios. To preserve privacy, studios are hardly within view of each other.

Because the artist studios are so detached - Colony Hall is the artists’ communal space. Meals and logistical needs are taken care of here. Also, MacDowell’s library is also situated here to provide the artists with resources to aide their work.

MacDowell prides itself on being able to offer its residents a “sanctuary-like enviornment,” as well as, catering to each artist’s specific needs. Healthy lunches packed in the famed MacDowell baskets are quietly dropped off at each studio to prevent distractions for the MacDowell residents.


ARCHITECTS: Fellden Clegg Bradley Studios LOCATION: Manchester, United Kingdom AREA: 17320.0 sqm (~ 186,431 sq ft) YEAR: 2013

The Manchester School of Art is one of the oldest art schools in the United Kingdom. After merging with the Manchester Metropolitan University, the school wanted to expand its facilities to become the nation’s leader in design education. The Art School Extension is a combination of new buildings and an adaptive reuse of a 1960's Arts tower. It currently consists of studios, workshops, galleries and houses 3,500 students.

The architecture firm’s design concept was to provide an “engaging and lively environment...and help re-assert the art school’s...profile on the national stage.” David Crow, the dean of the Manchester School of Art desired a “hugely exciting arena where anything is possible and everything is relevant.” The goals were to create interactions between the various art and design disciplines through working alongside each other and showcasing their finished work.

Fellden Clegg Bradley Studios’ (FCB) design solution was the “Design Shed,” a series of open studios, workshops and teaching spaces. In addition, to connect the old renovated arts tower with the new construction, FCB created a seven storey “Vertical Gallery” to act as the main exhibition room and as a billboard of sorts for the school.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


Studios and work spaces are centered around a communal area to promote interactions between users.

The gallery connects the old tower with the new expansion.

These Interaction nodes either give the users direct access to a communal space or allow for a vertical visual connection to others. These centers are designed to increase interaction and interdisciplinary work.

The “Vertical Gallery” acts as the seam between the old and the new buidling. These 7 floors showcase & advertise the school’s work.


C reated by D u tch d es i g n er, C h r i s K a b el , fo r Fo g o I s la nd a n i s l a n d o f f o f C a n a d a â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s c o a s t wh i ch h o u s es l i ve-i n a rtis ts â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s tu d i o s a n d c abins. Ph o to cred i t: Math i j s L a b a d i e.


ARCHITECTS: Saunders Architecture

The Long Studio is the first of six studios that will be built on Fogo Island. Located off the coast of Newfoundland, Fogo will be the location of a secluded Arts Residency Program. The first studio was pre-fabricated by local builders and then constructed on-site. The studios were designed to contrast the natural enviornment, but still be submissive to the landscape.

Each residence is divided into three zones. These three zones were designed to respodn to the seasons in Fogo Island. The open covered porch represents Spring and is also the entrance into the studio. The central portion is exposed so that the long Summer sun can infiltrate into the space. The last portion is a fully enclosed room to provide protection from the exterior yet still offer a connection to the natural surroundings.

LOCATION: Fogo Island, Canada AREA: 120 sqm (~ 1,292 sq ft) YEAR: 2010


D E S IGN

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P ROC E S S

AR C H I VE


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N E A R B Y

A R T I S T I C A T T R A C T I O N S P O R T L A N D , O R E G O N

1. Museum of Contemporary Craft 2. Chinatown Gate 3. Classical Chinese Garden 4. Portland Building & Portlandia 5. Pioneer Courthouse Square 6. Portland Center Performing Arts 7. Northwest Film Center

I N

8. Portland Art Museum 9. Director Park 10. Da Tung Elephant Sculpture 11. Gov. Tom McCall Waterfront Park 12. Salmon St Springs 13. Japanese-American Historical Plaza 14. Keller Fountain Park


BUILDING NOTES NAMES: Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple, Tourny Apartments NEIGHBORHOOD: Southwest Portland/Downtown Portland CONSTRUCTION: 1892 - 1893 ARCHITECT: Justus L. Krumbein STYLE: Richardsonian Romanesque WIDTH: 97-0’ LENGTH: 76-0’ HEIGHT: 89-0’ SQUARE FOOTAGE: 44,232 sq. feet NO. OF LEVELS: Basement + 6 Stories

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION: Type III Masonry. Timber Beams & Columns on all floors except the third floor. The 3rd floor has been reinforced with steel girders and columns. Bowstring Trusses on load-bearing walls FLOORS: 3/4” Plywood on Floor Joists WALLS: Rock Faced Ashlar & Masonry Brick CEILING: 12’ - 25‘ BAYS: 18’ columns o.c.

EGRESS ELEVATOR: 1 Freight Elevator STAIRS: 2 Fire Stairs, 1 Exterior Fire Escape

NEIGHBORHOOD The Ancient Order of United Workman Temple is situated in the heart of Portland in between the Hawthorne and Morrison bridges. Located two blocks away from the Waterfront Park, 915 SW Second Avenue borders the fringes of Portland’s Cultural District. Southwest Portland is currently undergoing one of the city’s largest redevelopment projects in hopes of changing this area into a dense, high-rise and mixeduse neighborhood.


PLANNING INFORMATION ZON E : CX - Central Commercial P ROJE CT TY P E: • Assembly (A-3), • Residential (R-2) FIRE S U PPRE SSI ON: Completely Sprinkled Opportunities & constraints • Existing Lightwell • Possibilities of building expansion into the adjacent parking lot • High Ceilings • Fire Egress Limitations • Small Floor Plate

HISTORY

89’

915 SW Second Avenue was originally built as a meeting place and public hall for the Ancient Order of United Workmen. The building was later appropriately nicknamed AOUW (Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple). Years later, the building was converted into an apartment complex known as the Tourny Apartments. In the last decade, the building’s first, second, and sixth floor have been re-purposed to serve as a night club as well as a restaurant. It is currently vacant.

89’

2 2 ’6 ”


V e r n a l eq u i n ox

Summer Solstice

8 Am

2 Pm

7 Pm

2 pm

7 pm

2 pm

7 pm

au t u m n eq u i n ox

Winter Solstice

8 am

8 am

2 pm

7 pm

2 pm

7 pm

8 am

V e r n a l eq u i n ox

8 am

B ow s t r i n g t r u s s e s

au t u m n eq u i n ox

F i r e s ta i r w e l l

8 am

2 pm

7 pm Existing freight e l e vato r a n d s ta i r core

Steel c olumns

Plumbing core

3 / 4 â&#x20AC;? P ly wo o d f lo o r i n g o n 2 x6 to n g u e & g r o ov e s u b f lo o r

Existing Light Well o n F lo o r s 2 - 6 M a s o n ry c o l u m n s

Existing Central s ta i r way

B r i c k m a s o n ry wa l l s


W INT E R

MID T E RM

E U G E N E ,

R E VI E W

O R E G O N


“POP-O U Ts” SC H E M E

S AM E OL D/SA M E OL D SC H E M E

C E N TRA L STA IR SC H E M E


+ add itio ns on t h e b uild ingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s par t y wall to a ttract the p ublic. + co mb in ing t h e old wit h the new

+ uses existing egress + new lig htwell geom et r y + exp lo res a r t ist res i de nces on ever y f loor

+ op e n ce ntral stair to un ify the e nt ire b uildin g


W IN T E R

FINAL

E U G E N E ,

RE VI E W

O R E G O N


GROUND FLOOR

GIFT SHOP


PAINTER’S STUDIO

SECOND FLOOR: GRAPHIC DESIGN & PAINTING STUDIO


THIRD & FOURTH FLOOR: APARTMENTS

FIFTH FLOOR: WOOD SHOP & SCULPTURE STUDIO


SIXTH FLOOR MEZZANINE

SIXTH FLOOR: RESTAURANT & GALLERY


SECTION


SPRIN G

T E RM

2 0 1 4


I N -PROCESS

WORK

Between Winter & Spring Term, I was wrestling with what the most fitting parti for my building was. In this diagram, I was sketching out to see whether or not a “collaborative circulation” path could help integrate the different artist disciplines.

Throughout this project, there were many revisions to what parts of the building should remain protected for the artists and what parts should be open to the public. This diagram sketch helped discover that the spaces that served the artists were very much the heart of the program. Thus, it was fitting for these spaces to also be located in the heart of the building. This ultimately lead to the sectional parti that drove my spatial design.

Napkin Sketches: In-Process drawings thinking through the “pop outs” occurring on the party wall. Sketches look at the geometries of the “popouts” and how they can be structurally supported.


Re-Scheming Floor Plans


S K E T C H E S E X P L O R I N G R O O M AT M O S P H E R E

Recessed Bed Cove Sketch


Studio Sink Pod Design

Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Personalized Bedroom Wall

Apartment Loft Space Sketch

Artist Communal Dining Sketch


S P RI NG

MIDTERM

P O RT L A N D,

O R E G O N

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BARA ENTRANCE


COPY

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ROOM

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PREPARATION BATHROOMS EXECU TI VE

OF F ICE

B A R I S T A S T A N D

T A Y L O R

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A R T I S T E N T R Y

S E A T I N G

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C A F E

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BARÁ I N FORMATION DES K & CAS H I ER

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THIRD FLOOR


CNC RO U T E R

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M A T E R I A L S T O R A G E J OI NT E R P L A NE R

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15”

D ISC

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DOW ND R AF T S A ND I NG TA B L E S

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M I TR E

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W O O D S H O P TA B L E

SCROL L

S AW

B E LT

S A N D E R

S P I ND L E

S A N D E R

S AW

D UST COL L E CTOR & COM P RE SSOR

D U ST COL L E CTOR & COM P R E SSOR

FIFTH FLOOR

S I N K

S I N K

S Q U A R E

S Q U A R E

SOL ARIUM

P I N - U P

COM MUNAL

B O A R D S / R E V I E W

TABL E S

COM MUNAL

D R A F T I N G & G R A P H I C D E S I G N S T U D I O

C O M P U T E R

S P A C E

TABL E S

P A I N T E R ’ S

D E S K

/

S T U D I O

W O R K S P A C E

FOURTH FLOOR


B A R Á

S L I D I N G

D I S P L A Y

A R T I S T

G A L L E R Y

S L I D I N G

W A L L S

L I G H T W E L L

D I S P L A Y

W A L L S

P I V O T

D I S P L A Y

W A L L S

P I V O T

D I S P L A Y

W A L L S

L I G H T W E L L

S K Y L I G H T

S L I D I N G

D I S P L A Y

W A L L S

G A L L E R Y

R E A D I N G

A R T I S T S ’

D I N I N G

R O O M

R O O M

SIXTH FLOOR

BARA RESTAURANT


N O R T H W E S T S E C T I O N

-

N O R T H E A S T

G A L L E R Y

G A L L E R Y

W O O D S H O P

G R A P H I C

&

S C U L P T U R E

D E S I G N / A R C H I T E C T U R E

C O M M U N A L

S T U D I O

&

S T U D I O

A R E A

A R T I S T A P A R T M E N T S

A R T I S T A P A R T M E N T S

C O M M U N A L A R T I S T A P A R T M E N T S

P A I N T I N G

A R E A A R T I S T A P A R T M E N T S


S O U T H W E S T - S O U T H E A S T S E C T I O N

G A L L E R Y

W O O D S H O P

G R A P H I C

&

S C U L P T U R E

D E S I G N / A R C H I T E C T U R E

C O M M U N A L

A R E A

C O M M U N A L

A R E A

B A R Á

R E S T A U R A N T

&

S T U D I O

P A I N T I N G

S T U D I O

A R T I S T

A P A R T M E N T S

A R T I S T

A P A R T M E N T S

C A F E

E N T R Y

L O B B Y


S P R IN G

FINAL E U G E N E ,

RE V I E W O R E G O N


BÁ R A

OF F IC ES

A RTI ST PR I VAT E EN TRY

K I TC H EN D RY WON

STORAGE

DOOR

MAIN PUBLIC CIRCUL ATION

B Á R A

R E S T A U R A N T

BÁRA FRONT DESK

A A R T I S T

G R O U N D

G I F T

F L O O R

S O U T H W E S T

2 N D

A V E N U E

B O U T I Q U E


N T I O N

T O

P R I V A C Y

Z O N I N G

ZONI NG

G A L L E R Y

P R I V A T E

S C U L P T U R E & W O O D S H O P G R A P H I C D E S I G N & P A I N T I N G

S O U T H W E S T

P U B L I C

T A Y L O R

B A L A N C I N G d privacy is a key ingredient to the Oc cRe sAs To f I aOr t N i s t c& o l o nI i eS s .O L A T I O N

ss is zoned to maintain & respect the s. By using the private egress, artists avel from floor to floor without being cted from the general public.

S T R E E T

opportunity for various types of work environments. rtments provide private work rooms, n studios allow for interdisciplinary ogue and idea exchanges.

A P A R T M E N T S

A P A R T M E N T S

R E S T A U R A N T B O U T I Q U E

+

B Á R A’s f i r s t a n d sixth floor are zoned for the public. These floors contain the art galleries, the restaurant, and the boutique. Floors 2 - 5 are reserved for the a r t i s t s o n l y.

B A R Á ’ s fAi r sTt Ta nEd Ns i T x t hI O f l oN o r aTr eOz o nPe dR fI oVr A t h eC pYu b l i c . These floors contain the art galleries, the restaurant, and the boutique. Floors 2 - 5 are reserved for the artists only.

ATTE N TION

TO

P RIVAC Y

P R I V A T E

P U B L I C

Isolation and privacy is a key ingredient to the success of artist colonies. Thus, the egress is zoned to maintain & respect the resident artists. By using the private egress, artists are able to travel from floor to floor without being distracted from the general public.

G G B BAALL AA NNCCI NI N L A B O R A T I O N & I S O L A T I O N C O LC LOAL B OR ATION & ISOL ATION

Z O N I

Isolation and privacy is a key ingredient to the success of artist colonies. Thus, the egress is zoned to maintain & respect the resident artists. By using the private egress, artists are able to travel from floor to floor without being distracted from ARÁ’s first and sixth floor ar t hTBhe general ese floors contain the art g public. and the bou Floors 2 - 5 are reserved

A T T E N T I O N

T O

P R I V A C Y

Artists have the opportunity for various types of work environments. R I rV t A iTsE t TheP a apartments provide private work rooms, while the open studios allow for i n t e r d i s c i PpU lBi LnI a C r y dialogue and idea exchanges.

Artists have the opportunity for various types of work environments. The artist apartments provide private work rooms, while the open studios allow for interdisciplinary dialogue and idea exchanges.

Isolation and privacy is a key ingredient to success of artist colonies. Thus, the egress is zoned to maintain & respec resident artists. By using the private egress, a are able to travel from floor to floor without distracted from the general public.


B Á R A

R E S T A U R A N T

B Á R A

L O B B Y


A R T I S T

B O U T I Q U E


ARTIST

GYM

“JACK & JILL” WORKSPACE

ARTIST

SALON

PRIVATE WORKSPACE

ARTIST ARTIST

T H I R D

F L O O R :

APARTM ENT ARTIST

LOFT

SUITE

A P A R T M E N T S

ADA ACCESSIB LE APART M ENT

A RTI ST

GY M

“JAC K & J I L L” WOR KSPAC E

ARTIST

S ALON

P R I VATE WOR KSPAC E

A RTI ST

A PA RTM EN T A RTI ST

S E C O N D

F L O O R :

A P A R T M E N T S

SUI TE


M I N I M A L L I V I N G : L O F T A P A R T M E N T

L A R G E S I N G L E A P A R T M E N T W I T H P E R S O N A L W O R K S P A C E

“ J A C K

&

J I L L ”

S H A R E D

A P A R T M E N T :

W O R K S P A C E


C L AY

SC U L PT U R E

ROOM WOR K

LO U NGE

S HOP

TABLE

VAC

S AW

M I TRE

S AW

STON E

J OI NTE R STE E L

WOOD & TOOL STORAGE

F U R N I T U R E

14”

15” 12”

D I SC

BE LT

BAND

D I SC

W O O D

S H O P

+

17”

BAND

S AW

S C U L P T O R ’ S

S AND E R

S AND E R

S T U D I O

M I LLI NG

MACHI NE

D UST COLLE CTOR & COM PRE SSOR

S C U L P T U R E

L IGH T

P HOTOGR A P H Y

S AW

S AND E R

ASS E M BLY & GLU E - U P TA BL E S

F L O O R :

S AW S AW

W O O D S H O P

DOW N D R AF T S A N D I NG TA B L E

F I F T H

CI RCLE SCROLL

PL ANE R

SC U L PT U R E S PAC E

S AW

TA B L E

STAGE

WOR K

LO U NGE

STORAGE

AV

ROOM

S I N K

G R A P H I C

D E S I G N

STATION

P A I N T E R ’ S

S T U D I O

P I N - U P & R E V IE W S PAC E

D R AF TI NG

F O U R T H

F L O O R :

G R A P H I C

D E S I G N

+

P A I N T I N G

A R E A

S T U D I O


STORAGE

GAL L E RY

C AF E

SC U L PT U R E

D IS P L AY

STAIR STORAGE

P I VOTI NG DI S PL AY WA LLS

S C U L P T U R E

R E A D I N G

A R T

S I X T H

F L O O R :

G A L L E R Y

A R T I S T

A R T I S T S ’

G A L L E R Y ,

G A L L E R Y

R O O M

C O M M U N A L

D I N I N G

C A F E ,

&

A R T I S T

D I N I N G


/8” STEEL ANGLE

3/8” CK TUBE

OOD

1 / 4” H AN N E L W E L D ED TUBE

L F E LT 1”

FA B. PANE L

OAR D AL FELT

C1 7 0 3 2 COOPER LIGH TING, BL ACK ALU M IN U M F IN ISH

3/ 4” GYP. WALL BOARD

3 /4 ” PLYWOOD SH EATH ING 3 /4 ” QU IETROCK GYPBOARD

1” I NDUSTRI AL F ELT

3 /4 ” ARM STRONG ACOU STICAL BAM BOO PAN EL 2 4 “X 4 8 ”

4 ’ X 1 0 ’ X 3 /4 ” PREF IN ISH ED M APLE PAN EL

/8” K TUBE

EL ANGLE CLIP STEAL BEAM AND

1 / 4” H A NN E L W E L D E D TUBE

3 ” X 3 ” STEEL ANGLE CLIP


3” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL ANGLE 5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

3/4” PLYWOOD 2 ” X 1 ” X 1 /4 ” STEEL U CH AN N EL WELD ED TO STEEL TU BE IN DU STRIAL F ELT 10’ X 6’ X 1”

M APLE PREFAB. PANEL 3 /4 ” GYP. BOARD 1” INDUSTRIAL FELT

3” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL ANGLE 5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

3/4” PLYWOOD 2” X 1” X 1/ 4” STEEL U C HA NNEL W EL DED TO STEEL TUBE

3” X 3” STEEL ANGLE CLIP BOLTED TO STEAL BEAM AND FLOOR

I NDUSTRI A L F ELT 10’ X 6’ X 1”

2 ” X 1 ” X 1 /4 ” STEEL U CH AN N EL WELD ED TO STEEL TU BE

MA P L E P REFA B. PA NEL 3/ 4” GYP. BOA RD 1” INDUSTRIAL FELT

5” X 5” X 3/8” STEEL BLACK TUBE

3 /4 ” GYP. WALL BOARD

3/4” PLYWOOD SH 3/4” QUIETROCK G

1 ” IN DU STRIAL F ELT

3/4” ARMSTRONG 24 “X 48”

SCALE: 1/2” = 1


SCULPTURE

READING ROOM

GALLERY

ARTIST GALLERY

WOODSHOP & SCULPTURE STUDIO

GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO

PAINTING STUDIO

ARTIST APARTMENTS

ARTIST APARTMENTS

LOBBY ENTRANCE

SECTION

A

SCALE 1/8” = 1’-0”


SCULPTURE

READING ROOM

GALLERY

ARTIST GALLERY

WOODSHOP & SCULPTURE STUDIO

GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO

PAINTING STUDIO

ARTIST APARTMENTS

ARTIST APARTMENTS

LOBBY ENTRANCE

SECTION

A

SCALE 1/8” = 1’-0”


Interior Architecture Masters Final Thesis  
Interior Architecture Masters Final Thesis  
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