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MIPS

Review SPRING 2013

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2 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

Managing Director’s report

MIPS Review Managing Director’s report 30 June 2013 MIPS Group financial results The financial results for the MIPS Group to 30 June 2013 have again added to MIPS strength. They include: • $34 million (18%) increase in members’ surplus (net assets) to $219 million • $21 million increase in total members’ assets to $416 million • an increase in total membership from 34,078 at 30 June 2012 to 37,877 at

30 June 2013 (including a 12% increase in non-student member numbers) and • further strengthening of MIPS Insurance solvency to well over 4 times regulatory

minimum requirement. The most significant factors contributing to the 2013 results were: • A materially better than budgeted investment result that for the fourth year

running exceeds benchmark and continues MIPS unbroken track record of achieving a positive investment result each year in respect of members’ assets (even through challenging economic times). • Continuing growth in member numbers to over 37,000 as at 30 June 2013 • Ongoing attention to containing the cost of operations. MIPS management works hard to minimise operating costs through achieving incremental increases in efficiencies while maintaining quality of service delivery to members. • Better than budgeted claims expense for the 2012/2013 year; and • Ongoing positive claims development in prior years. We believe MIPS claims results reflect; • strong and disciplined claims management ; • year on year reduction in the risk profile of MIPS membership through members

on-going participation in risk education and professional development , • our systematic routine review of existing members risk profiles (and investigation/

understanding/mitigation of any outliers) and • careful committee assessment of new member applications – being accepted

into MIPS membership is a significant professional achievement!

Inside

Managing Director’s report.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Importance of selecting the right membership categories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Royal Children’s Hospital ‘giving bad news’ actor simulation communication skills program. . . . . . . 4 The Simple Extraction…or is it?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Keep your practice safe online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Member article. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Child immunisation and the immunisation exemption conscientious objection form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Spring 2013 Risk education workshop program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Spring 2013 Risk education workshop schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 YOUR13 Photocomp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

mips.com.au . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SPRING 2013

Importance of selecting the right membership categories! Members are reminded to ensure they have selected the membership category that best describes the healthcare services they provide. To ensure you are appropriately covered, accurate selection of your membership category is very important. It means that your membership category and the associated membership fee is an accurate reflection of your risk and provides equity to all other members. Furthermore, you will not be entitled to the benefits of membership, including indemnity cover, for the provision of healthcare which is outside your membership category. MIPS cannot select the membership category on your behalf. MIPS staff are authorised to provide general not personal advice. There is a general requirement that every member has the appropriate recognised, qualifications, training and experience for the healthcare services they provide and complies with guidelines issued by AHPRA and colleges and practices within registration requirements and conditions. Some common membership category issues: • Non procedural v Procedural GP

(refer p27-30 MIPS Membership Benefits Handbook) Non procedural GP category practice is generally described as routine consultations and procedures carried out in the GP’s surgery/rooms or in patient’s residence, hospitals or other healthcare facilities. Some local anaesthesia is allowed but not administration or monitoring of sedation. • Procedural GP– no anaesthetics/

obstetrics or cosmetics category includes procedures usually performed under regional or general anaesthesia or sedation. It includes accident and emergency activities in rural and remote settings.

• Cosmetic practice

(p28-29, p35-36 MIPS Membership Benefits Handbook) Minor cosmetic practice (minimally invasive office based cosmetic procedures such as Botox, nonpermanent fillers, superficial peels and resurfacing) can be added to either the non-procedural or procedural GP categories. MIPS requires specialists performing procedures within the scope of their speciality to select the Cosmetic Proceduralist category if cosmetic work constitutes the bulk (greater than 50% of billings) of their practice. Membership benefits will not extend to practitioners undertaking cosmetic practice unless an appropriate ‘cosmetic’ membership category is selected.

| MIPS Review | 3

Membership

Benefits Handbook 2013/2014

Combined Financial Services Guide and Product Disclosure Statement

• Billings bands and limited private

practice categories (p23 MIPS Membership Benefits Handbook ) – There are a number of ‘limited private practice’ billing membership categories for GPs, physicians and psychiatrists and specialists available. To ensure that you are appropriately covered members should ensure that their membership category (including billings band) accurately reflects their practice. – Members who believe they may exceed the billings band for their membership category should advise MIPS once they are in an appropriate position to determine expected total billings earned for the financial year. MIPS will then assess this information and make an appropriate membership determination. Members should advise MIPS of the expected billings prior to 30 June expiration. • General dentist including specified

procedures (p23 MIPS Membership Benefits Handbook) General dentist membership categories either include or exclude specified procedures. Specified procedures are defined as surgical placement of implants, bridgework or veneers in excess of 4 units per treatment plan, Botox (as prescribed by the Dental Board) and maxillofacial or dento-alveolar surgery by non-specialists in high risk situations.

Contact MIPS Should members wish to review or change their membership category or have any further concerns please contact MIPS on 1800 061 113 or info@mips.com.au . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mips.com.au


4 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

The Royal Children’s Hospital ‘giving bad news’ actor simulation communication skills program The MIPS sponsored RCH ‘giving bad news’ actor simulation communication skills program has been running successfully for a number of years. The aim of the program is to teach junior doctors via a method of simulation, ways to improve communication with patients and parents.

There are two workshops within the program. In workshop one, junior doctors are introduced to the principles of good communication based on the Calgary Cambridge Guide (CCG), an internationally recognised evidencebased communication framework for teaching medical communication. This is followed by the screening of a simulation DVD showing an experienced doctor breaking bad news to a mother. This is then reviewed taking into consideration the CCG. Doctors are able to discuss their own experiences and reflect on successful and difficult communication scenarios. The sessions are facilitated by experienced consultants with a great deal of teaching experience in communication and the hospital’s Medical Education Officer (MEO) who is a clinical communication lecturer.

Workshop two involves the doctor choosing a scenario and practicing the delivery of bad news to an actor/ educator. The actor provides detailed feedback to the doctor around the structure of their communication, active listening and empathy and gives them suggestions to reflect on better communication in the future. This simulation is filmed and the junior doctors are given a DVD copy to help them further reflect on the interaction. They also have the opportunity to watch this communication simulation with the MEO or a mentor in the hospital for further feedback if required. Junior doctors have reported that this program is a unique and a vital part of their learning whereby they can practice new communication strategies in the safety of a simulated environment and be given comprehensive feedback in a private and professional manner.

“I certainly found my angry actor every bit as intimidating as if I really were on the ward with an upset parent! The immediate actor feedback as well as the video recording was immensely beneficial to reflect and learn how my communication style may be perceived by a parent in a stressful situation.“ Dr Raymum Ghumman

Increase in complaints against dental practitioners Dental Notifications (Complaints) Trend 700 600 533

500 400

298

300 200

Annual Report Data

343 257

173

2007/08

Read what the Dental Council is doing to reverse this alarming trend in the first edition of their newsletter.

Annualised Data

100 0

Complaints against dental practitioners have increased alarmingly since the introduction of the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme in July, 2010.

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

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SPRING 2013

| MIPS Review | 5

The simple extraction… or is it? by Dr Gerard Clausen

Most dental practitioners recognise the potential issues that can arise when performing extractions in the mandibular molar region. Root fracture in dense mandibular bone can and does occur, and sensory disturbance is a possible consequence when the roots of mandibular molar teeth are in close approximation to the inferior dental nerve. In general, dental practitioners provide the patient with adequate warnings surrounding potential complications and a matter usually only becomes a concern when the warnings are not provided nor documented, or the patient does not fully comprehend the advice supplied. Unfortunately, the issue with regard to extractions in the maxillary molar region differs considerably from those of the mandibular arch. As the potential for neural damage is much less, many practitioners provide little in the way of warnings for maxillary extractions, aside from the usual post-operative instructions. In the maxilla, as in the mandible, root fracture can occur. When the roots of maxillary posterior teeth are close to, or even within the maxillary sinus, there is always the potential for the root fragment to be displaced into the sinus. Removal of a fragment in the sinus is usually outside the expertise of most general dental practitioners, and the patient must then be referred for surgical management. Understandably, the patient who presented for a “simple extraction” may then become somewhat upset, given that further surgery is required, along with additional costs, and other considerations such as time off work, travel and inconvenience. The patient may demand recompense and it is often at this stage that MIPS will receive a notification from the dental practitioner.

When the notification is received, and clinical notes reviewed, it is disappointing to find occasions where no warning was given about the potential for the above situation to arise, even when pre-operative radiographs clearly demonstrate the close relationship between the tooth roots and the sinus. In these circumstances, the difficulty in defending the clinical management of a complication which the patient understood prior to agreeing to the proposed treatment, can be understood. In addition, there is now the possibility that damage of a more significant nature may occur during the course of surgery to access the maxillary sinus and remove the offending root fragment. The scenario outlined above is highlighted by a recent case. In this instance the patient presented for extraction of a maxillary molar tooth, and during the course of extraction the palatal root fractured. The remaining fragment could not be clearly located, and after obtaining radiographs, it was determined that the root tip was in the maxillary sinus. The patient was referred for surgical management, and during the course of this there was damage to the infra-orbital nerve.

There was a significant divergence of opinion amongst several experts as to the presence and location of the root tip, and the nature of the infra-orbital nerve damage. Concerns included, the records of the initial treating dentist, and lack of detail and record of any specific warnings. Negotiations prior to a formal court proceeding could not resolve the matter and during the court hearing, the matter settled for a significant monetary amount. The lesson in this case is that the simple maxillary molar extraction can result in a situation that is just as difficult, protracted, costly and distressing for both the dentist and patient as a case of neural damage resulting from extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth.

The patient may demand recompense and it is often at this stage that MIPS will receive a notification from the dental practitioner.

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6 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

Keep your practice safe online Computers and the internet play an important role in most businesses today. Healthcare practice is no exception. From inventory management to patient records, online security is paramount to the provision of health services. Compromising on security and taking ‘short-cuts’ can severely impact not only the security of your practice, but also the security of your patient records. Breaches may form the basis for complaints, litigation and review by AHPRA. It is your obligation to prevent and/or detect security breaches and manage the online security of your practice through implementation and maintenance of an appropriate IT security framework.

Make a plan To help you better avoid/deal with IT risks it is necessary to develop an appropriate risk management plan for your practice. As that plan must cover IT matters you might need the assistance of someone with IT experience to help you develop, implement and manage your risk management solutions. Health practices should take steps to manage unauthorised access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification or destruction of your practice’s information and/or systems. Best practice is to create a formal, documented risk management plan that acknowledges the probability, roles, responsibilities, compliance criteria and methodology for performing IT risk assessments. Such plans should be kept updated and reviewed when necessary for example when any condition that may affect the impact of risk to the practice changes. A formal annual review will help ensure arrangements remain appropriate. For more information on how to keep your practice safe online visit the RACGP Computer and Information Security page at http://www.racgp.org.au/yourpractice/e-health/cis that outlines practice standards.

Back Up Nowadays it is common for organisations to back up records on a daily basis with a ‘cloud’ solution. This is also an easy and efficient method for small businesses. This allows many companies to conduct backups of their important emails and files. The following provides some simple tips in staying protected from Stay Smart Online: • Install security software that includes a firewall, anti-virus and anti-spyware. Ensure that it is updated automatically. • Develop a backup strategy for your critical data. A good strategy includes daily backups, an additional weekly or monthly backup and offsite storage of at least the weekly back-up media. Test that you can recover with back-up data. • If you do not have a dedicated IT Manager, assign at least one person in your organisation to have responsibility for network security (password, backups, AV updates).

• Develop clear policies for staff

using your computer or network. Ensure that staff understand how they are allowed to use email and the internet. • Develop a ‘culture of security’. Businesses need to have Internet security measures in place and make sure staff are aware of and follow internet security practices. • Use software from reputable sources. Keep your software patches up-to-date. • Use spam filters to reduce the amount of spam that your business receives. Know how to manage the spam that gets through and ensure your staff knows how to recognise scam and hoax emails and to avoid clicking on links or opening attachments from suspicious emails. • Keep yourself informed about the latest cyber security risks. Subscribe to email notification services that keep you informed about the latest cyber security risks and solutions. (Stay Smart Online, 2013)

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| MIPS Review | 7

Member article Dr Steve Reid assists Rowing Australia at World Cup Regatta Steve Reid is a Fellow of the Australasian College of Sports Physicians. He works in private practice in Hobart, Tasmania and has a broad patient demographic ranging from 8 to 80+ years of age. Although this recent tour with Rowing Australia involved the care of elite athletes, his work more frequently involves treating enthusiastic amateur sportspeople, and those injured during other recreational pastimes, or at work. I recently enjoyed a three week tour accompanying both the Under 23 and senior Australian Rowing Teams to regattas in Europe. Preparation for the tour started months prior to departure with collection of screening medical information (medical and injury history, immunisations etc) on all team members. I left Australia on July 6th, landing first in Zurich, Switzerland. Rowing Australia sent a relatively small team to the World Cup Regatta in Lucerne. Only eight crews were entered across the different events. Between them they collected one gold, two silver and a bronze medal, making it a highly successful event. From Lucerne I travelled to northern Italy. There I met up with the Australian Under 23 rowing team. The team spent a week training at the European Training Centre (ETC) of the Australian Institute of Sport in Varese. This is essentially a ‘home away from home’ for Australian athletes competing in Europe. The premises contain an accommodation wing, state of the art gym facilities, medical and physiotherapy consulting rooms, exercise physiology laboratory and dining hall. During the time that the U-23 rowers were at the ETC, the centre was also used by a number of Australian cyclists and track and field athletes.

After the training camp in Varese the team moved to Linz in Austria for the U-23 Rowing World Championships. This event was held over 5 days, with Australia winning one gold, and three silver medals. During the tour I was responsible for the care of 75 athletes, coaches and support staff. The work days were often long, since rowers generally train early in the day, with racing continuing until late afternoon. However, most days were punctuated with breaks that permitted time for personal exercise and relaxation (including an occasional gelataria stop during the stay in northern Italy). The type of medical practice included musculoskeletal complaints that are common among rowers. Principle among these was thoracic and lumbar back pain, and forearm pain. Chest wall pain is also common among rowers, with rib stress fractures being a cause of days lost from training and competition. Thankfully there were no rib stress fractures among the athletes on this tour. In addition to these musculoskeletal presentations, upper respiratory and gastrointestinal ailments troubled a number of the touring party.

The medical kit for the tour was comprehensive, the aim being for the tour doctor to be self-sufficient, and not reliant on having to access prescription medications while overseas. This required careful pre-planning so that the broad spectrum of medical problems that might afflict members of a party of 75 persons during a three week period was provided for. I certainly enjoyed this touring experience with Rowing Australia. As a practicing Sports Medicine Physician, travelling with these elite athletes and helping them achieve personal best performances was very satisfying. Australia’s success in these regattas at the beginning of a new Olympic cycle bodes well for our rowers’ prospects as they prepare for Rio de Janeiro in 2016. Dr Steve Reid Sports Medicine Physician, Hobart. [Top] Dr Steve Reid on the shore of Lake Varese, Italy [Bottom left] Mick Drew (physiotherapist), Lauren Van Leent (Soft Tissue Therapist), Steve Reid. [Bottom middle] Australia’s gold medal crew from the Women’s Coxless 4 at the Under 23 World Champs L-R Hannah Vermeersch, Alex Hagan, Charlotte Sutherland, Lucy Stephan [Bottom right] All essentials packed!

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8 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

Child immunisation and the immunisation exemption conscientious objection form This advice to members is in connection with child immunisation and the immunisation exemption conscientious objection form which parents/guardians may ask members to sign. The form includes a declaration confirming that an appropriate and detailed discussion about the benefits, risks and dangers of immunisation has occurred in respect of the child. Healthcare practitioners have a duty to provide advice which is objective, comprehensive and factual and which includes the benefits, risks and potential dangers to the child, to other children and to other members of the community of vaccination and non-vaccination. The following advice is based on typical questions put by members. 1. Do I have to sign the conscientious objection form? No. The form cannot be signed when the discussion required by the declaration has not taken place, or there is uncertainty that the information has been understood by the parent/ guardian. Those practitioners who refuse to complete a form because they have a conscientious objection to doing so after providing appropriate information about the benefits, risks and potential dangers of vaccination should anticipate a complaint and having to justify their objection. MIPS cannot advise how a complaint body will respond. 2. Can I bill for any consultation that does take place, even if the parent/ guardian refuses to sign/pay? Yes – but follow the usual requirements of Medicare in respect of the MBS and your normal billing practices and have a contemporaneous written record of the consultation to support the MBS Item number used for a billing.

3. How should I advise patients I support community vaccination, but do not support conscientious objection to vaccination? It is the parent/guardian who completes the declaration on the form that he/she holds the conscientious objection. The practitioner is required to complete the declaration that the required discussion has been had with the parent/guardian. The practitioner is not declaring that he/she supports conscientious objection to immunisation. A broad policy position that the practice will refuse to complete the conscientious objection form may lead to a complaint. However information should be provided that before you can complete the form, you must have explained the benefits and risks associated with immunisation to the parent/guardian and that the form will only be completed when you are; • satisfied that the required discussion has taken place and • that discussion is understood by the parent/guardian, and • a separate consultation may be required for the purpose of fully meeting your professional responsibilities

4. Will MIPS support me with any complaint made to a complaint body about refusal to sign? MIPS will provide assistance in accordance with MIPS member benefits, namely the MIPS Members Medical Indemnity Policy or MIPS Protections. For advice or should any complaint be lodged against you, please contact MIPS immediately for assistance. Should you have any queries please contact clinico-legal assistance on 1800 021 223 or claims@mips.com.au

Further resources: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing – Immunise Australia Program immunise.health.gov.au/

Conscientious objection form Immunisation exemption conscientious objection form

Such a discussion should be charged in accordance with the normal billing policy of the practice. mips.com.au . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SPRING 2013

| MIPS Review | 9

Risk Education Spring 2013 Workshops Register online mips.com.au/education

Spring 2013 Risk education workshop program Members would have recently received an invitation to participate in the MIPS Spring 2013 risk education workshop program. Members are reminded that registration for CPD is a mandatory requirement for all healthcare practitioners. The program provides members with a variety of options in terms of event type, dates and locations throughout Australia to ensure attendance is convenient for all our members. Highlights of this program include: • Four MIPS developed workshops presented by MIPS clinico-legal advisers that provide practical advice and strategies for immediate implementation into your practice • eHealth/PCEHR workshops in conjunction with the RACGP covers the purpose, benefits and opportunities of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record. A MIPS clinico-legal adviser will also provide MIPS observations on clinico-legal matters associated with the program • Presentation of a Cognitive Institute workshop titled Mastering Safer Practice, (in five States) • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. This has been extended to cover Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia. The CPR training is available as either a workshop only or a combination of online module and workshop.

The full workshop program can be found at mips.com.au/workshops

Registration

Workshop Suitability

Members can register online or visit mips.com.au/workshops

Suitable for all members: • Beyond negligence – your

professional risk • Dealing with difficult patients • Limiting your clinico-legal risk • Mastering Safer Practice • CPR training

Suitable for all members:

Members can also call Member Services 1800 061 113 Confirmation of your placement and reminders will be sent via email For further enquiries contact education@mips.com.au Registrations are filling quickly so please register soon to avoid disappointment.

• RACGP eHealth/PCEHR

Suitable for all members: • Consent for dental treatment

“The program provides members with a variety of options in terms of event type, dates and locations throughout Australia.”

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10 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

Risk Education Spring 2013 Workshops Register online mips.com.au/education

Spring 2013 Risk education workshop schedule Workshop

Date & Time

Venue

Presenter

Code

RACGP eHealth PCEHR

Wednesday 11 September 7pm to 9pm

RACGP House, 100 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne VIC 3002

Dr John Stanton & Dr Rob Hosking

RACGP 1302

Mastering Safer Practice

Tuesday 17 September 7pm to 10pm

Rydges on Swanston 701 Swanston Street, Carlton VIC 3053

Dr Mark O'Brien

5871

Beyond Negligence - Your Professional Risks

Wednesday 18 September 7pm to 9pm

Amora Hotel Riverwalk Richmond 649 Bridge Road, Richmond VIC 3121

Dr Rob Grenfell

MP1313

Consent for Dental Treatment

Saturday 12 October Bayview on the Park 10am to 12pm 52 Queens Road, Melbourne VIC 3004

Dr Jeff Cox and Dr Gerry Clausen

DP1304

Beyond Negligence - Your Professional Risks

Saturday 12 October Bayview on the Park 1pm to 3pm 52 Queens Road, Melbourne VIC 3004

Dr Rob Walters

MP1317

Limiting Your Clinico-Legal Risk

Tuesday 15 October 7pm to 8.30pm

Rydges on Swanston 701 Swanston Street, Carlton VIC 3053

Dr Rob Grenfell

MP1318

CPR Workshop

Saturday 9 November 9am to 12.30pm

Australian Red Cross Red Cross 23 - 47 Villiers St, North Melbourne VIC 3051 paramedic

CPR1320

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 9 November 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Australian Red Cross Red Cross 23 - 47 Villiers St, North Melbourne VIC 3051 paramedic

CPRonl1321

Dealing with Difficult Patients

Saturday 9 November 10am to 12pm

Punthill Knox 337 Stud Road, Wantirna South VIC 3152

Dr Rob Walters

MP1324

MP1314

Victoria

Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales Limiting Your Clinico-Legal Risk

Wednesday 25 September 7pm to 8.30pm

Crowne Plaza Canberra 1 Binara Street, Canberra ACT 2601

Dr Margaret Daley

RACGP eHealth PCEHR

Thursday 12 September 7pm to 9pm

RACGP College House Level 7/12 Mount Street, Nth Sydney NSW 2060

Dr Trina Gregory & RACGP1303 Dr Peter Simpson

Mastering Safer Practice

Wednesday 18 September 7pm to 10pm

Mercure Sydney Parramatta 106 Hassall Street, Rosehill NSW 2142

Dr Mark O'Brien

5872

Beyond Negligence Your Professional Risks

Wednesday 9 October 7pm to 9pm

City Beach Function Centre 1 Marine Drive, Wollongong NSW 2500

Dr David Gorman

MP1315

Beyond Negligence Your Professional Risks

Saturday 12 October Mantra Chatswood 10am to 12pm 10 Brown Street, Chatswood NSW 2067

Dr Peter Simpson

MP1321

Dealing with Difficult Patients

Saturday 12 October Mantra Chatswood 1pm to 3pm 10 Brown Street, Chatswood NSW 2067

Dr Peter Simpson

MP1322

Consent for Dental Treatment

Saturday 19 October Vibe Hotel 10am to 12pm 111 Goulburn St, Sydney NSW 2000

Dr Jeff Cox and Dr Gerry Clausen

DP1305

CPR Workshop

Saturday 2 November 9am to 12.30pm

Australian Red Cross, St Andrews House Level 4, 464 Kent St , Sydney NSW 2000

Red Cross paramedic

CPR1318

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 2 November 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Australian Red Cross, St Andrews House Level 4, 464 Kent St, Sydney NSW 2000

Red Cross paramedic

CPRonl1319

mips.com.au . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SPRING 2013

| MIPS Review | 11

Risk Education Spring 2013 Workshops Register online mips.com.au/education

Spring 2013 Risk education workshop schedule (Cont.) Workshop

Date & Time

Venue

Presenter

Code

Limiting Your Clinico-Legal Risk

Wednesday 6 November 7pm to 8.30pm

Mercure Sydney Parramatta 106 Hassall Street, Rosehill NSW 2142

Dr Margaret Daley

MP1323

RACGP eHealth PCEHR

Tuesday 10 September 7pm to 9pm

RACGP Faculty Building Level 1, 201 Logan Road, Buranda QLD 4102

Dr Ian Williams & Dr Paul Alexander

RACGP1301

Beyond Negligence Your Professional Risks

Saturday 14 September 10am to 12pm

Victoria Park Function Venue 223 Herston Road, Herston QLD 4006

Dr Nichola Davis

MP1312

Mastering Safer Practice

Tuesday 8 October 7pm to 10pm

Victoria Park Function Venue 223 Herston Road, Herston QLD 4006

Dr Mark O'Brien

5881

Dealing with Difficult Patients

Saturday 12 October The Events Centre Caloundra 10.30am to 12.30pm 20 Minchinton Street, Caloundra QLD 4551

Dr Nichola Davis

MP1316

Limiting Your Clinico-Legal Risk

Tuesday 22 October 7pm to 8.30pm

Dr Nichola Davis

MP1320

Consent for Dental Treatment

Saturday 26 October Victoria Park Function Venue 10am to 12pm 223 Herston Road, Herston QLD 4006

Dr Jeff Cox and Dr Gerry Clausen

DP1306

CPR Workshop

Saturday 16 November 9am to 12.30pm

Red Cross College Level 1, 140 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

Red Cross paramedic

CPR1322

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 16 November 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Red Cross College Level 1/140 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

Red Cross paramedic

CPRonl1323

Dr Rob Walters

MP1311

Queensland

Rydges Tradewinds 137 Esplanade, Cairns QLD 4870

South Australia, Tasmania, Western Australia and Northern Territory Dealing with Difficult Patients

Thursday 5 September 7pm to 9pm

CPR Workshop

Saturday 26 October Red Cross College 9am to 12.30pm Level 2, 83 Currie Street, Adelaide SA 5000

Red Cross paramedic

CPR1314

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 26 October Red Cross College 1.30pm to 2.30pm Level 2, 83 Currie Street, Adelaide SA 5000

Red Cross paramedic

CPRonl1315

Mastering Safer Practice

Saturday 14 September 10am to 1pm

Hobart Function & Conference Centre 1 Elizabeth Street, Hobart Tas 7000

Dr Mark O'Brien

5870

CPR Workshop

Saturday 5 October 9am to 12.30pm

Australian Red Cross 40 Melville Street, Hobart TAS 7000

Red Cross paramedic

CPR1312

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 5 October 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Australian Red Cross 40 Melville Street, Hobart TAS 7000

Red Cross paramedic

CPRonl1313

Mastering Safer Practice

Monday 9 September 7pm to 10pm

Four Points by Sheraton Perth 707 Wellington Street, Perth WA 6000

Dr. Mark O'Brien

5869

CPR Workshop

Saturday 2 November 9am to 12.30pm

Australian Red Cross 110 Goderich Street, East Perth WA 6004

Red Cross paramedic

CPR1316

CPR Online (plus workshop)

Saturday 2 November 1.30pm to 2.30pm

Australian Red Cross 110 Goderich Street, East Perth WA 6004

Red Cross paramedic

CPRonl1317

Consent for Dental Treatment

Thursday 14 November 7:30pm to 9.30pm

Crown Perth Great Eastern Hwy, Burswood WA 6100

Dr Jeff Cox

DP1307

Dealing with Difficult Patients

Thursday 17 October Hilton Darwin 7pm to 9pm 32 Mitchell Street, Darwin NT 0800

Crowne Plaza Adelaide 16 Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide SA 5000

Dr Ralph Chapman MP1319

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mips.com.au


12 | MIPS Review | SPRING 2013

Your13 Photocomp

Details Enter a photo in the MIPS YOUR13 Photography Competition for a chance to win a large canvas print of your image and have it feature on the cover of the MIPS Review. The MIPS Review is a quarterly publication distributed to over 36,000 students and practicing healthcare professionals. This year, the cover of the Summer Review is being offered as a blank canvas for all MIPS members. Whether you’re a SLR superstar or point-and-shoot rookie, MIPS wants to see what 2013 meant to our members!

First prize • The winning photograph will be

How do I enter? Find your photo Find a photo that tells a story about your fondest memories, accomplishments, new passions, new relationships, career development, travel, new skills or education milestones.

Post your photo (enter in the competition) Post it on the MIPS Facebook page facebook.com/mips.com.au (you’ll need to like us first – use the same link) or email it to info@mips.com.au and we’ll post it for you.

Say something (or nothing) about your photo Include a small abstract about your photo when you post it – remember that winners are determined by ‘likes’ so sell your photo as best you can.

Share you photo with friends Repost and share your photo with your friends, so they can visit facebook.com/mips.com.au and like your photo and help you win.

featured on the cover of the MIPS Summer Review 2013. • The winner will also receive a 78 x 53cm canvas print of their winning photo.

Good luck

Second and third prize

Winners will be decided by the number of ‘likes’ received for each photo. Photos must be submitted by midnight 24th November. For full terms and conditions visit mips.com.au/terms.

2 Runners up will also win a 78 x 53cm canvas print of their photo

Winners will be notified by Tuesday 26th November 2013.

mips.com.au . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Mips Review Spring 2013