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spring edition 2012

mips review


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managing director’s report 30 June 2012 results I am pleased to report that the financial results for the MIPS Group to 30 June 2012 have further strengthened MIPS. They include: • $35 million increase in members’ surplus (net assets) to $185 million • $68 million increase in total members’ assets to $395 million • 5% increase in member numbers and • additional strengthening of MIPS Insurance solvency. The most significant factors contributing to the result were: • Significantly better than expected claims expense. The better than anticipated claims experience of our members was seen particularly in relation to prior year claims where we were able to finalise a number of significant matters for much less than their reserved amount. The result reflects strong and disciplined claims management as well as on-going reduction in the risk profile of the membership through ongoing risk education, routine review of existing members risk profiles and careful review of new member applications. • A better than budgeted investment result despite challenging and volatile investment conditions. The 2011/2012 result continues MIPS’ track record of achieving a positive investment result each year.

• Continuing growth in member numbers to over 34,000 as at 30 June 2012 • Sustained focus on containing the cost of operations. MIPS management works hard to minimise operating costs through incremental increases in efficiencies but not at a cost to quality of service delivery. MIPS maintains a prudent claims reserving policy and reserves medical indemnity liabilities at a higher level of sufficiency than that required under the prudential standards of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority. That decision provides MIPS members with further confidence that their medical indemnity provider will be well capitalised over the long period required to finalise medical indemnity claims.

2012/2013 membership renewal applications I am pleased to report that for the 2012/13 year an even higher percentage of members than for 2011/12 reaffirmed their trust in MIPS through renewing their membership. MIPS exists to support its members and we treat very seriously our responsibility to members. Members are reminded that membership subscriptions are calculated from the ground up each year to ensure MIPS

from the MDs desk

Dr Troy Browning Managing Director, MIPS

can continue to provide members with very high levels of security on an ongoing stable and sustainable basis. Towards the end of the 2011/2012 year when setting MIPS 2012/2013 membership subscription reference rates MIPS factored in the better than expected claims experience and anticipated increased levels of solvency. Members will be aware that membership subscriptions are individually determined and reflect factors such as the exposure each member has to claims arising from their current and past practise including geographic locations of that practise.

other matters Elsewhere in this edition are articles that include the perils of skin staining from iron injections and resources available to members and their staff to help ensure that non-clinical administration and reception staff of a practice are better equipped to react when patients ring or present in person with warning signs of heart attack or stroke. page 2

case study intramuscular iron therapy - an indelible mark

page 3

medical indemnity case update

page 6

risk education health foundation beAWARE program risk education Workshop Schedule

page 9 pages 11 & 12

member articles volunteering in Fiji - Dr Sue Woolfenden

page 4

fulfilling an Olympic dream - Dr Charles Hause

page 5


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intramuscular iron therapy – an indelible mark case study

The following case highlights the medico-legal dangers of intra muscular iron injections. A 39 year old woman with menorrhagia was found to have mild iron deficiency. Oral contraception or other birth control measures were not an option for her to control her cycle as she did not want to impair her ability to conceive. Her GP recommended the option of an IM iron injection. The other alternatives were to take iron tablets or to undergo an IV iron infusion. The potential for pain associated with the injection and the possibility of skin pigmentation were outlined by the GP, but the patient elected to proceed. The injection was administered by the practice nurse following the full explanation of the right Z-track technique by the GP. Unfortunately, the patient subsequently developed pigmentation over the injection site and as a result pursued a claim. The patient alleged the injection technique used by the nurse (under supervision) was not correct and/or it was not correctly administered. The patient also alleged that the iron injection was an unnecessary and incorrect treatment. Even though the patient accepted that the risks were explained prior to the injection, she alleged that the option of intra muscular injection should not have been given. The case was settled out of court because of the absence of unequivocal medical expert support in respect of the actions of the nurse and vicariously, the supervising GP.

Unfortunately MIPS has encountered a number of similar incidents. The MJA 2010; 193 (9): 525532 provides an article on diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anaemia: a clinical update. In regard to IM iron therapy, in summary it states that whilst this can be effective, it is painful and associated with permanent skin staining and its use is discouraged unless other approaches cannot be practically delivered. Therefore after finding the cause of a patients iron deficiency, IM iron injections should normally only be considered when; • other treatment measures are inappropriate or have failed, • the patient is fully warned of the potential for iron staining and its permanency and • providing such injections the appropriate injection technique is used to help reduce the likelihood of iron staining • administering IM iron, a discreet site (specifically, not deltoid) should be selcted. Members need to be mindful that all pathological and physiological causes of IDA (iron deficiency anaemia) should be fully explored and properly investigated, and where appropriate, relevant referrals made. Appropriate risk mitigation should be implemented and includes: • Use only as a last resort • Satisfy yourself that the use of iron injections is necessary and justified • Ensure informed consent and warnings are recorded in the medical record – warning your

patient about the possibility of skin staining (Please see attached example of permanent staining) and advising that if it occurs it will be permanent while also explaining that efforts will be made to avoid this situation from occurring. • Familiarise yourself with the product information including warnings • Inject into the buttocks– the upper arm or are any other exposed areas are not appropriate. • There is a correct injection technique- the “Z track” – displacing the skin before puncturing so the needle track in the muscle tissues is covered after removing the needle.


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volunteering in Fiji Dr Sue Woolfenden, Paediatrician, Sydney

Since 2010, I have had the privilege of visiting Suva, Fiji bi-annually for 1-2 weeks at a time and working as a volunteer medical officer with the paediatric team based there under the supervision of the Head of Paediatrics, Dr Joseph Kado at the Colonial War Memorial (CWM) Hospital. In addition, I have been a guest lecturer with the Fiji National University, College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Medicine, supported by Assoc. Professor Elizabeth Rodgers, Head of the Department of Medical Sciences.

The children’s wing of the Colonial War Memorial Hospital is the tertiary children’s hospital for the region of Fiji. It has a large outpatient’s ward that sees around 10,000 children a year from all across Fiji. Its 40 beds can look after at about 70 inpatients during busy times. It also has neonatal and paediatric intensive care. The paediatric team at CWM is an outstanding group of talented and innovative clinicians. They are a great example of how to work cohesively and respectfully despite a heavy paediatric workload that encompasses a diverse clinical range from Dengue Fever and malnutrition to autism, cerebral palsy and child protection matters. My main role has comprised capacity-building by giving advice to the team regarding children with developmental problems and systems of assessment; training registrars and consultants around developmental paediatrics and child protection and acting as a team member on locally driven internationally supported research. Most of the clinical component

is providing developmental assessments that confirm the concerns of the local team and parents. The registrars I have trained then maintain assessment of the children in my absence. Any concerns regarding new children are discussed with the local paediatrician and where appropriate I review these children with the registrar or consultant on their next visit. The children and families that I have worked with in Fiji are a resourceful group who really appreciate any explanations regarding a child’s development and progress. We are able to then work with early intervention services and schools to support these children’s needs. In addition it forces me to really focus on my diagnostic skills as the range of investigations available is limited. The paediatric consultants, registrars and fellows that I work with in Fiji are highly trained, competent and enthusiastic individuals who I would gladly have as colleagues and trainees back in Australia. They have specialist board exams for paediatricians,

often come to Australia or New Zealand for part of their advanced training and at CWM they have all undertaken and passed APLS (Advanced Paediatric Life Support).

Fiji medical school trains future doctors across the Pacific spanning from the Solomon Islands, Micronesia, Fiji and Tonga. Sixty to seventy doctors graduate a year. I have had the privilege of giving lectures and conducting Problem Based Learning tutorials to groups of MBBS Years 4 or 5. These medical students must also pass the ICATT-IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses Computerised Adaptation Training Tool programme) and the PLS (Paediatric Life Support) as part of the undergraduate programme. Therefore, their training spans primary care Paediatrics through to acute critical care. These students are as capable as those that I work with in Australia and frequently test the limits of my knowledge. I have gained far more from Fiji than I think Fiji has gained from me. I have


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learned new clinical, research and teaching skills; how to be innovative and how to work across different cultures in a safe and supportive team environment. This coupled with the beauty and gentleness of Fiji is an outstanding experience that I hope continues for many years to come. I would like to thank MIPS for extending my cover to my volunteer work in Fiji and highly recommend incorporating volunteer work as a regular part of your practice.

fulfilling an olympic dream! Dr Charles Howse, Sports Physician, Australian Capital Territory

Eighteen months prior to the recent Summer Olympics of 2012 held in London, I completed a lengthy application process concerning my experience and qualifications in sports medicine in order to then be accepted as a volunteer for the Games. All modern technology was utilised to bring the whole process to fruition including a phone interview while I was skiing in Japan! A rigorous clearance included a police check, passport check and medical registration check in Australia as well as the United Kingdom. The whole trip was self-funded. There were mainly doctors from the UK and one from Sweden in my group. A popular venue for concerts and exhibitions in inner London is the Earls Court exhibition centre, which

was converted into a Volleyball stadium for the 15,000 strong crowd. As expected there was no great need for medical services so I had a chance to catch some great volleyball matches including the gold medal women’s match between Brazil and the USA. The London weather held up and as anticipated everything was very well organised with a lot of tightened security. There was a very good medical setup at the back of the stadium, well stocked with emergency equipment. A number of staff including doctors, physicians and massage therapists was on standby to assist sportspeople. The Australian men’s Volleyball team progressed well after a slow start and given that they are all very young, we can be sure most will be around for the next Olympics. The whole experience was very rewarding and helped me fulfil a lifelong dream.

Dr Charles Howse on court!


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medical indemnity case update In recent times, MIPS has successfully defended to judgement a number of high-profile medical negligence cases. This is good news for all members and has achieved many positive outcomes such as:

Summary of clinico-legal fundamentals

• Supporting MIPS’ view that when independent external experts confirm that an appropriate standard of healthcare has been provided by members then such matters should be vigorously defended.

maintain appropriate health records

• Confirming that when non-sustainable clinical evidence and opinions of less than objective experts are provided by claimants then they should be actively challenged • Reinforcing a message to plaintiff legal firms that MIPS says what it means and will back that up • Protecting members’ funds and helping also to reduce both pressure on membership subscriptions and the fees paid by patients of MIPS members for medical services. Medical indemnity litigation can only be considered on a case by case basis. There are many variables – the jurisdiction, the strength of the respective expert evidence (and the expert’s ability to give evidence at trial), the respective abilities and experience of the plaintiff’s and defendant’s legal representatives, the written, oral and contemporaneous evidence of the plaintiff and the defendant health practitioner/s- and other factors such as the Courts interpretation of precedent and various legislation throughout Australia. What is self evident is that the fundamentals of appropriate practice must be adhered to so that sustainable defences can be provided. This has been exemplified from the practice conduct found in these recent successfully defended matters.

Maintain appropriate health records. In our cases the records were excellent and detailed and were paramount in the defence of the matters.

stand by your clinical judgements Stand by your clinical judgements made with the best of your ability and understanding at the time when they are supported by objective independent external expert peers.

maintain continuing clinical education Maintain continuing clinical education in contemporary practices , standards, protocols, prescriptions and medications.

steer clear of outlying treatment options Steer clear of outlying treatment options – peer supporting evidence is critical.

take detailed notes on the first examination Take detailed notes on the first examination. When dealing with lesions of any type, record the location, size, colour and any unusual features about it. Appropriate photographic images are best.

promptly report any adverse or unexpected outcome to MIPS Promptly report any adverse or unexpected outcome to MIPS (in accordance with cover requirements) to enable a contemporaneous investigation and advice.


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the brave new world of eHealth – an eHealth hypothetical

Saturday 27 October 3.30 pm – 4.45 pm

General Practitioner members are advised that MIPS is sponsoring the last plenary session of the RACGP GP12 which is being held at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre from 25-27 October 2012. The session will be an interesting hypothetical discussion of an eHealth scenario with a panel of experts debating the potential benefits and pitfalls from each perspective. The possible medico legal challenges and potential risks will be discussed and strategies provided. Our facilitator is Dr Norman Swan, medical and health expert, media personality and host of the hypothetical. Two of the General Practitioners on the panel (Dr Nichola Davis from Cairns and Dr Rob Walters from Hobart are MIPS medico legal advisers. It is sure to be a lively and fascinating discussion so if you are attending the GP12 conference be sure not to miss this final plenary session.

Overview: Medical and Health Expert, Media Personality and Host Dr Norman Swan, will facilitate this interactive e-health hypothetical exploring the implications of the federal governments e-health initiatives from a medico-legal, clinical and consumer perspective. The risks and benefits of e-health will be investigated and debated with interesting hypothetical scenarios considered by various industry stakeholders. What are the benefits and issues with the personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR)? How will medical indemnity organisations view this practice in view of concerns about integrity of data, custodianship of the record, privacy, security and concerns around continuity of care? The hypothetical will explore the barriers to adoption and the resources available to assist you in your practice as we enter the brave new world of e-health.

Dr Nichola Davis Medico-legal Advisor MIPS

Mr Ashley Jones Partner of law firm - Norton Rose

Further information can be obtained at www.gpconference.com.au/

Norman Swan Plenary facilitator, Medical and Health Expert, Media Personality and Host

Dr Rob Walters Medico-legal Advisor MIPS


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common medico- and dento-legal risks MIPS experience indicates that areas in which members are most likely to face allegations of sub optimal care have not changed greatly in recent years. Common areas of risk include the following: For medical members; Failure or delay in diagnosing: • breast cancer • melanoma • rectal cancer • ectopic pregnancy • fractures • foreign bodies • myocardial infarction To help minimise risk, medical practitioners should be mindful of; relevant contemporary evidence based medicine, College and stakeholder protocols, appropriate investigation, referral and follow up, together with appropriate notes detailing treatment, referrals and discussion. • Suicide Members treating patients with possible suicidal ideation and/or or on large doses of potentially lethal medication (such as in a psychiatric clinical setting e.g. treating anxiety/depression, dependency etc.), should ensure that concern is reflected in their consultation, prescribing and management plan. • Vaccination errors: • the wrong vaccine • at the wrong time • the wrong dosage

For dental members; In general terms for dental practitioners the most common incidents reported to MIPS are those involving: • failed implants and crowns • unsatisfactory aesthetic or therapeutic outcome • nerve damage • ill-fitting dentures

All dental practitioners should observe the golden rules of: • maintaining appropriate clinical

records of all investigations and treatment plan • provide all options for treatment, an informed consent (including financial consent) with all appropriate warnings documented in the clinical record • do not proceed with treatment in which you are not qualified to provide – refer to a more appropriate dental practitioner • do not proceed with treatment where you have genuine concerns about a successful treatment outcome – be prepared to refer to others for a second opinion

Investigations and disciplinary proceedings In general since the introduction of tort reform and in cases where patients’ claims do not meet the necessary thresholds to sue and or where they are told their claim is unlikely to be successful, complaints are likely to be made to Medical or Dental Boards and to the various State and Territory, complaint entities. Members should always notify MIPS of any such development. Depending on the nature of the matter outcomes from such investigations and disciplinary proceedings can be catastrophic (may lead to suspension of practice). MIPS has also observed growth in investigations by entities such as Medicare and Drugs and Poisons who monitor practitioner clinical and prescribing behaviour and profile closely.

AHPRAs notifications data for 2010/11 revealed 8,139 notifications about health practitioners including 428 mandatory reports. 67% of the notifications related to medical

practitioners (4% of registrants) and dental practitioners (96%). The basis of the AHPRA notifications was reported as follows:

medical dental conduct 1760 465 health 103 6 performance 804 182

Professional misconduct Recent research by the Melbourne School of Population stated there is a greater likelihood of suspension for character flaws than errors in care delivery and/or poor judgement. 485 cases were reviewed in which tribunals found doctors guilty of professional misconduct over a 10 year period in Australia and New Zealand. The results showed that 43% of cases resulted in removal of the doctor from practice. Complaints and investigations cannot be always prevented, however all members should note the following which cannot only help prevent issues arising but also mitigate subsequent fallout: • appropriate communication: • pre-treatment options warnings, risks, consent, agreement • post treatment options - open disclosure, plan for ongoing management • appropriate record keeping – necessary for good patient healthcare, Board, Medicare of other authorities requirements • maintaining your own health – see your GP regularly, try and find the right work/life balance – often physical and mental issues troubling practitioners can be the underlying cause of an error or mishap.


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health foundation BeAWARE program Education for non-clinical staff Members are alerted to this important initiative of the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the National Stroke Foundation. BeAWARE of the warning signs of heart attack and stroke is a practice triage strategy to support nonclinical staff to promptly identify patients who call or attend with warning signs of heart attack and stroke. BeAWARE consists of three components: A ‘warning signs’ online learning module for non -clinical staff at www.heartfoundation.org.au/ online-learning

A ‘warning signs’ desktop ‘tent card’ for your reception area/ workstation. ‘Warning signs’ of heart attack and stroke posters for the patient waiting room area. Based on claims and complaints against members over time MIPS believes this information , made available at no cost to members in the primary care sector, will be beneficial and will potentially reduce a member’s medicolegal risk through demonstrating adherence to accreditation standards regarding patient triage and responding to emergency patient presentations.

member risk education Members can still register for the Spring 2012 risk workshops. Risk workshops are a valuable membership benefit, provide several CPD points and for medical members participating in the Premium Support Scheme (PSS), your attendance meets your mandatory risk management requirement. For further details please see the attached schedule and registration form. Please check pages 11 & 12 for Registration form and workshop schedule As well as Risk Workshops MIPS provides a range of risk education topics to assist with the management of risk in your day to day practice. These can be viewed at mips.com.au

The Heart Foundation has also developed patient resources that can be handed out by health professionals to patients who have been identified at high risk of heart attack i.e. patients with heart disease or high absolute risk??. These can be found via this link www.heartattackfacts.org.au/ action-plan/ For further information contact the Heart Foundation. www.heartfoundation.org.au/ Pages/default.aspx


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it’s your choice MIPS member benefits

Club MIPS rewards our loyal members everyday

MIPS Protections for non-medical indemnity matters relating to professional practice

MIPS Members’ Medical Indemnity Insurance, Practice Entity Insurance and Personal Accident insurance

24/7 Medicolegal advice and a range of clinical risk management initiatives

visit our website for more benefits


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MIPS risk management workshop schedule Autumn 2012 spring risk management schedule MIPSMIPS risk management workshopworkshop schedule 2012 Please visit our website www.mips.com.au for further information Spring 2012 Victoria code

topic

date

location

time

Victoria

venue

5016 code

Mastering Professional topic Interactions

Saturday date 17 March

Wantirna location South

10:00am – 12.00pm Punthill Knox time venue 337 Stud Road, Wantirna South 3152

5339 5017

Mastering MasteringPatient Adverse Expectations Outcomes

Thursday Saturday 1117October March

Richmond Wantirna South

7:00pm -9:00pm Hotel Riverwalk 1:00pm – 4:00pm Amora Punthill Knox 649337 Bridge StudRoad, Road,Richmond Wantirna 3121 South 3152

5342 Shared Decision MP01 Mastering Dealing with Difficult Patients Saturday Wednesday 1328October Making March

Wantirna Carlton South

10:00am Knox 7:00pm- –1:00pm 9:00pm Punthill Rydges on Swanston, 337701 Stud Road, Wantirna South 3152 Swanston Street, Carlton 3053

5343 Work/Life Balance MP02 Mastering Limiting Your Medico-Legal Risk

Saturday Wednesday 1318October April

Wantirna Carlton South

2:00pm - 5:00pm Knox 7:00pm – 8:30pm Punthill Rydges on Swanston, 337701 Stud Road, Wantirna South 3152 Swanston Street, Carlton 3053

MP03 Case MP03 Medical DealingIndemnity with Difficult Patients Tuesday Wednesday Update 232 October May

Carlton Carlton

MP06 5018

Carlton Richmond

7:00pm - 9:00pm Carlton 7:00pm – 9:00pm Rydges Rydges on Swanston, 701701 Swanston Street, Carlton 30533053 Swanston Street, Carlton 7:00pm - 9:00pm Rydges Carlton 10:00am – 1:00pm Amora Hotel Riverwalk 701 Swanston Street, Carlton 3053 649 Bridge Road, Richmond 3121 7:00pm - 9:00pm Rydges Carlton 701 Swanston Street, Carlton 3053 Wales

MP07

5019 MP02 5020 5338 5021 MP08 MP10 5346 MP04 5347 MP05

Dealing with Difficult Patients Wednesday Healing at the End of Life Tuesday 31 October 5 May Social Media, eHealth & Wednesday Telehealth 14 November

Mastering Patient Expectations Dealing with Difficult Patients Mastering Professional Interactions Mastering Patient Mastering Work Life Balance Expectations

Saturday 17 March Wednesday 19Saturday September 17 March Wednesday 10Saturday October 31 March Social Media, eHealth & Wednesday Limiting Your Medico-Legal 17Tuesday Telehealth October Risk 3 April Mastering Difficult Saturday Interactions with Patients October Dealing with Difficult Patients 27Thursday 26 April Mastering Work/Life Balance Saturday October Dealing with Difficult Patients 27Tuesday 8 May

Carlton

New South

10:00am – 12:00pm NewChatswood South Wales Sydney Chatswood Parramatta Parramatta Parramatta Newcastle Chatswood Sydney Chatswood Parramatta

Mantra Chatswood 10 Brown St, Chatswood 2067 7:00pm - 9:00pm Vibe Hotel Sydney 1:00pm – 3:00pm 111Mantra Chatswood Goulburn Street, Sydney 2000 10 Brown St, Chatswood 2067 7:00pm – 9:00pm Mercure Sydney Parramatta 10:00am – 1:00pm 106Mecure Parramatta HassallSydney Street, Rosehill 2142 106 Hassall St, Rosehill 2142 7:00pm - 9:00pm Mercure Sydney Parramatta 7:00pm – 8:30pm 106Crowne Newcastle, Merewether HassallPlaza Street, RosehillCnr 2142 St & Wharf Road, Newcastle 2300 10:00am - 1:00pm Mantra Chatswood Brown St, Chatswood 2067 7:00pm – 9:00pm 10 Vibe Hotel Sydney 111 Goulburn Street, Sydney 2000 2:00pm - 5:00pm Mantra Chatswood Brown St, Chatswood 2067 7:00pm – 9:00pm 10 Mecure Sydney Parramatta 106 Hassall St, Rosehill 2142

Queensland Capital Territory Saturday Australian Sunshine Coast 10:30am - 12:30pm

MP01

Social Media, eHealth & September MP07 Telehealth Dealing with Difficult Patients 15Tuesday 13 March 5337 Mastering Professional Tuesday Interactions 9 October

Mastering Shared Decision Tuesday Making Difficult 27 March Mastering Saturday Interactions with Patients 13 October MP06 Dealing with Difficult Patients Saturday 5345 Mastering Work/Life Balance Saturday 21 April 13 October MP11 Dealing with Difficult Patients Tuesday MP05 Medical Indemnity Case Wednesday 1 May Update 31 October 5023 Mastering Your Risk Saturday 19 May

Mantra Mooloolaba Beach VenningPlaza, St & The Mooloolaba 7:00pm – 9:00pm CrnCrowne 1 Binara St, Esplanade, 4557 CanberraMooloolaba 2601 Gold Coast 7:00pm - 9:00pm Vibe Hotel Gold Coast 42 Ferny Avenue, Queensland Surfers Paradise 4217 Gold Coast 7:00pm – 10:00pm Radisson Resort Gold Coast Palm Park Meadows Drive, Carrara 4211 Herston 10:00am - 1:00pm Victoria Function Venue 223 Herston Road, Herston 4006 Townsville 1:00pm – 3:00pm Mecure Townsville Herston 2:00pm - 5:00pm Victoria Park Function Venue 4810 Woolcock Street, Townsville 223 Herston Road, Herston 4006 Brisbane 7:00pm – 9:00pm Victoria Park Function Venue Brisbane 7:00pm - 9:00pm Norton Rose Solicitors 223 Herston Road, Herston 4006 Level 21, 111 Eagle Street, Brisbane 10:00am – 12.30pmBrisbane Brisbane Riverview Hotel, Cnr Kingsford4001 Smith Drive & Hunt St, Hamilton 4007

5024 5340

Mastering Difficult Colleague Saturday Interactions 19 May Mastering Work/Life Balance Wednesday 10 October

Brisbane Hobart

5341 5022

Mastering Decision MasteringShared Your Risk Making

Launceston Adelaide

5025 5344

Thursday Tuesday 113 October April

Canberra

Tasmania

South

1.30pm – 5:00pm Brisbane Riverview Hotel, Cnr KingsfordSmithFunction Drive & Hunt Hamilton 4007 7:00pm - 10:00pm Hobart and St, Conference Centre, 1 Elizabeth Street Pier Hobart 7000 Australia 7:00pm - 10:00pm Boathouse onPark North Bank 7:00pm – 9.30pm TheRydges South Adelaide 55a1 Lindsay Street, Invermay South Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000 Launceston 7250

Tasmania Western Australia MP09 Mastering Limiting Your Medico-Legal Thursday 5378 Adverse OutcomesRisk Tuesday April 1619October

Workshops hosted by Cognitive Institute Presenters Workshops hosted by Cognitive Institute Presenters

Hobart Perth

7:00pm – 8.30pm Duxton Hobart Function & Conference Centre, 7:00pm - 10:00pm Hotel 1 St Georges Terrace, 1 Elizabeth Street Pier, Hobart 7000 Perth 6000

Workshops hosted by MIPS Medico–Legal Advisers/Presenters Workshops hosted by MIPS Medico–Legal Advisers/Presenters


CPD points points information information sheet sheet CPD All participants who complete a Proof of Attendance at the workshop will receive a certificate detailing the duration of the event, and CPD Accreditation points where applicable. social media, eHealth & telehealth – 2 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

4 Category 2 CPD points

dealing with difficult patients – 2 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

4 Category 2 CPD points

mastering adverse outcomes – 3 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Australasian College for Emergency Medicine Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

6 Category 2 CPD points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 1.5 MOPS points 3 PDP Core points 3 points – Category 7 3 PR & CRM points 3 points, Category 2.3 3hrs CME for GPEP Stage 2 and MOPS 3 points

mastering shared decision making – 3 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Australasian College for Emergency Medicine Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

6 Category 2 CPD points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 1.5 MOPS points 3 Core PDP points 3 points – Category 7 3 PR & CRM points 3 CPD points, Category 2.3 3 points

mastering work/life balance – 3 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

6 Category 2 CPD points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 3 Core PDP points Category 7–2 CPD points 3 PR & CRM points 3 points

mastering professional interactions – 2 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Australasian College for Emergency Medicine Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners

4 Category 2 CPD points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 1 MOPS point 2 Core PDP points 2 points – Category 7 2 PR & CRM points 2 points, Category 2.3 2 points 2 hrs CME for GPEP Stage 2 and MOPS

mastering patient expectations – 2 hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

4 Category 2 CPD points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 2 PR & CRM points 2 points

mastering difficult colleague interactions – 3.5 Hours

CPD points

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

7 Category 2 CPD Points 3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2

mastering difficult interactions with patients – 3 hours

CPD points

Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists Australasian College for Emergency Medicine Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists

3 Credits/hour – Category 3, Level 2 1.5 MOPS Points 3 Core PDP Points 3 Points – Category 7 3 PR & CRM Points 3 Points, Category 2.3 6 Category 2 CPD Points 3 hrs CME for GPEP Stage 2 and MOPS 3 Points

Fellows of of other other colleges colleges will will be be provided provided with with a a certificate certificate that that will will specify specify the the duration duration of of education education undertaken undertaken which which may may assist assist them them to to Fellows individually claim CPD credit with their college or other professional body. individually claim CPD credit with their college or other professional body.

MIPS review spring 2012  

MIPS review spring 2012

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