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2 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015


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CONTENTS

VOLUME 27 • MAY/JUNE

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker EDITOR

Katie Sauro OREGON EDITOR

Mary Erickson STAFF WRITERS

Crystal Foley, Stephanie Hoover STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Regan MacStravic SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles, Steve Joseph PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Kelly Baker DESIGNERS

Beth Harrison, Sonija Kells, Sam Rockwell, Liz Weickum WEBMASTER

31

Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins

Locally-shot Valley of the Sasquatch will screen at SIFF. PHOTO BY REGAN MacSTRAVIC

INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn COVER

7

STIFF Opening Night

9

Portland Wins Role as City for Moviemakers

LISTS

13

The Innovation Lab: Shaping the Future of Film

47

15

Washington Legislative Update

Production & Post-Production Equipment Rental

17

Oregon Legislative Update

51



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Support Equipment Rental

Spotlight on SIFF 21

Northwest Connections to Audience and Filmmaker



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37

Extras Only: An Interview with Lance Mitchell of Flannel Background

39

Ashland, Oregon: #1 Town to Live and Work as a Filmmaker

43

Flying Beyond 4K at the NAB Show



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59

Eastern Oregon Film Festival Celebrates Sixth Annual Event

61

Coming Attractions: Central Oregon Film Festival

62

Briefs

4 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

CORRECTIONS In the last issue of Media Inc., Flannel Background was erroneously listed as a “casting director,” when in fact the company is a talent agency that represents extras. Read more about the company on page 37. In the same issue, Complete Casting by Stephen Salamunovich was mistakenly omitted from the casting directors list. The listing should have read as follows: Contact Info: Complete Casting by Stephen Salamunovich Seattle, WA 206-903-6500 stephen@completecasting.com www.completecasting.com Top Local Executive: Stephen Salamunovich, CSA Types of Talent Cast: Principal Actors Media Inc. regrets these errors.

Filming a scene for Grimm in Portland, named to MovieMaker’s list of the top 10 cities to live and work as a moviemaker. COURTESY OF NBC UNIVERSAL

Media InC Publishing Group 14240 Interurban Ave. S.,Suite 190 Tukwila, WA 98168 (206) 382-9220, (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com 1219 SE Lafayette, Suite 201 Portland, OR 97202 Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (6 issues) are $15 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $30.00 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Publishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus shipping. Copyright © 2015 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA


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T H G I N G N I N E OP byn Photos Courtesy of Melinda Rae

of the 11th annual event on May ing en op the ed rat eb cel ) IFF (ST endent Film Festival cid Lounge. Formerly known Lu at rty he Seattle Transmedia and Indep pa eraft an d an ter ea man at Grand Illusion Th ar, offering a slate of web ye s thi us foc 1 with a screening of Bristel Good w ne a d an me na w Film Festival, STIFF has a ne dition to as the Seattle True Independent d social media narratives—in ad an , let tab d an e on ph e bil mo rytelling apps for series, video game concepts, sto over the course of nine days. — rld wo the d un aro m fro s lm fi nt some of the best truly independe

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Grimm films in Portland.

PORTLAND WINS ROLE AS CITY FOR MOVIEMAKERS By Shelley Midthun and Anne Mangan Guest Columnists Librarians images courtesy of Electric Entertainment Grimm images courtesy of NBC Universal

On the set of The Librarians, which returns to Portland to film its second season in June.

F

rom Wheel of Fortune to Wild, Portland earns rave reviews for its performance, both on screen and behind the camera. The city’s most recent accolade: inclusion in MovieMaker magazine’s top 10 places to live and work as a filmmaker. Interest in Portland hasn’t sprung up overnight—but success definitely breeds success. In addition to Oscar-nominated films like Wild, Portland has attracted enough features, commercials and solid TV shows in recent years (Leverage, Portlandia, Grimm, The Librarians) to build an impressive lev-

el of local industry, from casting agencies to production crew. The training and experience that such productions offer add to Portland’s deepening talent pool. This makes the city ever more appealing to Hollywood honchos who enjoy Portland’s combination of laid-back vibe and dedicated, professional MAY/JUNE 2015

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Filming a scene from Grimm.

local crew. Portland has always been a fine place to be a moviegoer. The central city is dense with independent movie screens, and the local film community is strong, committed and proud of the city’s standing as a location of choice. The homegrown love for movie magic and craft is an unquestionable asset, fostering an environment that is especially hospitable for filmmakers. That hospitality extends to money matters as well: Portland is the most affordable big city on the West Coast, and Oregon’s $10 million tax credit program (raised from $6 million in 2013) offers 20 percent off Oregon-based goods and services and 10 percent off Oregon-based payroll. But the biggest draw may

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be the one thing that comes most naturally: Portland’s good looks. It’s a beautifully designed city with a scenic waterfront, stately bridges, urban parks, and a versatile blend of outdoor spaces, historic buildings and distinctive neighborhoods that can stand in for any number of cities, from Minneapolis to Dubai. Makers of car commercials love the open streets and storefronts; outdoor apparel businesses create wilderness shots in parks just steps from city amenities. Location, lifestyle and local support make a tough-to-beat trio. When it comes to choosing where to live and work as a moviemaker, Portland definitely wins the award. MI Shelley Midthun is Film, Television and Digital Me-

The cast of The Librarians films a scene in Portland, one of the top cities in the country for filmmakers.

dia Program Manager at the Portland Development Commission. She is also on

the Advisory Council of the Oregon Story Board. Anne Mangan is Senior Commu-

nications Coordinator at the Portland Development Commission.

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THE INNOVATION LAB:

SHAPING THE FUTURE OF FILM By Andrew Espe Washington Filmworks

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ashington Filmworks just completed the Spring 2015 cycle of the Innovation Lab, and is pleased to announce the recipients of funding assistance. The program, which is part of a long-term economic development strategy, invests in the future of film by capitalizing on Washington’s creative community and artists, while encouraging original storytelling that uses new forms of production and technology.

Van Alan

Ben Dobyns

Following a “Pitch Session” of the program in which finalists presented new business and revenue models that leverage Washington’s film infrastructure in the digital era, the jury made their official recommendations and the Board has approved their decisions. Funds have been allocated to two exceptional projects, Automata and Strowlers. “I am so pleased with the decisions of both the jury and the Board of Directors,” said Washington Filmworks’ Executive Director Amy Lillard. “The projects selected for funding represent interesting and cutting-edge business models that will truly shape the future of film and the creative economy in Washington State. We look forward to partnering with these extraordinary storytellers as they make their projects over the next year.” Automata is a comic property created by Penny Arcade, a Seattle–based web-comic conglomerate. It is a serialized science-fiction noir comic set in an alternate 1930s Prohibition-era New York City. In this alternate history, it is not alcohol that is illegal, but rather the continued manufacturing of highly intelligent robots known as automatons. Former police detective Sam Regal and his robot partner Carl Swangee tackle cases involving the seedy underbelly of New York City. While they work to solve the case, they also work to understand each other in this dystopian America. The project is to be written and directed by Van Alan, and produced by Will Lummus. “It feels great to be supported by such a remarkable incen-

tive program [that] will allow our production to recoup certain expenses to achieve the highest quality possible, while also creating and maintaining jobs in the state,” says Alan. He adds that the Innovation Lab was a good fit with his project because of their inclination towards emerging technologies. “It’s a great fit because Automata is a known online comic with a built-in audience that should find lots of support in the digital world. Producing our project as an online web series is the only way that made sense to us.” Up next for the project, says Alan, is creating a 1930s New York—with robots. The jury was quite keen on the project, saying, “The filmmakers have scripted a pilot that has the potential to engage a global audience and achieve mainstream success by fully revealing the complex relationship between a human detective and his brilliant automaton, who seek only to help the helpless in a despairing world.” Strowlers is a shared multi-platform world from Zombie Orpheus Entertainment. Set in the modern day, it tells the story of the misfits, outcasts, artists and activists who exist on the magical fringes of society. Released under a Creative Commons share alike attribution license—which allows any creator to make and sell works based in the Strowlerverse— ZOE is currently developing the first round of short films and webisodes that will introduce the fantastic, magical and unexpected world of the Strowlers. The project is to be directed by Ben Dobyns. According to Dobyns, being approved by the Innovation Lab is “a fantastic vote of confidence in local innovation and risk-taking, a big financial boost, and a good incentive for us to stay on schedule!” Dobyns insists Strowlers must engage constantly with technological innovation. “Our project requires a marriage of content and technology to create a seamless multimedia experience for an audience that won’t just be passively consuming what we create, but rather will be creating their own works within the world.” Up next for the project is finding the right partnerships to bring it to the widest possible audiences. The jury describes Strowlers as “defined by magic and rebellion,” saying that “this Strowlerverse is the blending of traditional storytelling and crowdsourced creativity. [It leaps] forward into an entirely new model of global engagement with viewers and creative collaborators.” Washington Filmworks is especially grateful to the Innovation Lab jury for their hard work and dedication. The jury is composed of gifted film industry professionals, including Steve Edmiston, Line Sandsmark, Tracy Rector, and Chris White. MI MAY/JUNE 2015

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WASHINGTON

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

I

n Washington State, Senate Bill 6027 (SB 6027) aims to increase the funding for the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program. The bill was introduced in the Washington State Senate on February 17, and was subsequently referred to the Senate Ways and Means Committee, where it remains as of press time. On April 29, it was reported that Washington State is in for at least one 30-day special legislative session, where the House and Senate leadership will negotiate the final budget. According to Washington Filmworks, which oversees the state’s film production incentive program, SB 6027 will “likely remain in the Senate Ways and Means Committee until the major components of the budget have been negotiated (education funding, revenue, etc).” With a cap of $3.5 million per year, Washington currently has the fifth smallest incentive program in the country. SB 6027 would double the size of the production incentive program over the next two years to $7 million and increase the fund incrementally each year until it reaches $10 million in 2019. The sunset date for the program would also be extended to 2022. In 2015, the $3.5-million cap was met by mid-April. Washington Filmworks announced that it had approved funding for season two of Z Nation, which began filming this spring, and a feature from director Todd Rohal (The Catechism Cataclysm) called Sweet Cheeks, which will begin filming in June. Filmworks also awarded a portion of the funding to two Innovation Lab recipients (see page 13 for more), and is holding another portion in reserve to accommodate commercials for the Commercialize Seattle program. “These commitments exhaust the 2015 fund, less than two months after opening the application window,” said Washington Filmworks Board Chair Don Jensen. “As the Board considered the applications, there were an additional four projects that were interested in filming in Washington State over the

The second season of Z Nation was approved for incentive funding through Washington Filmworks. PHOTO BY OLIVER IRWIN

summer months. These projects would have generated an estimated $66 million of economic impact in our state, and it is maddening that we had to tell them not to apply.” Currently, Washington Filmworks is working on getting the adaptation of the best-selling book Boys in the Boat to film in the state. Filmworks’ executive director Amy Lillard, along with several film-friendly senators, recently joined author Daniel James Brown for a book signing event in Olympia. Brown not only discussed his book—which tells the story of the University of Washington crew team and their path to gold—but also his thoughts on the importance of filming the upcoming motion picture at the University of Washington and in Seattle. Filmworks is quick to point out that without the passage of SB 6027, Washington will “miss the boat” and the film, which is being produced by The Weinstein Company, will likely film in Vancouver, BC, instead. They urge all members of the film production community to continue to reach out to key legislators—including Speaker of the House Frank Chopp, Rep. Pat Sullivan, Rep. Eric Pettigrew, and Rep. Larry Springer—in this final push before the budget is set. MI For more information, visit www.washingtonfilmworks.org or www.keepfilminwa.com.

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OREGON

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE By Mary Erickson Oregon Editor

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he Oregon State Legislature is currently reviewing three bills to increase economic support of the film and media industry in the state.

Senate Bill 872 proposes raising the amount of maximum total tax credits from $10 million to $14 million. It increases the limit on reimbursements for local film and media production companies, and limits the reimbursement amount for non-local filmmakers. A public hearing was held on April 1, with speakers coming from various corners of the state to submit statements in support of SB 872. Testimonies came from Portland Mayor Charlie Hales, the Oregon Film Office, Southern Oregon Film and Media, the City of Eugene, Klamath County Chamber of Commerce, as well as representatives from various production and post-production houses in the state. The Senate Committee on Business and Transportation recommended the bill for approval on April 20, with committee members voting 4-1 in favor of the bill (Sen. Fred Girod voted against the bill). The bill is currently being reviewed by the Senate Joint Committee on Tax Credit. House Bill 2072 requests an increase to the program tax credit cap, from $10 million to $20 million. It also proposes a reappropriation of the funds, shifting reserve funds for i-OPIF from 5 to 7.5 percent and creating a reserve of funds for projects outside the Portland Metro area. The bill includes a provision to establish a task force on Oregon film and media production, as well as a few other minor policy changes and clarifications. The bill would take effect in the 2015-2016 fiscal year. The main thrust of House Bill 2898 extends the sunset date of the tax incentive program from January 2018 to January 2024. As Nathaniel Applefield, Interim Executive Director of OMPA, notes, “As we get closer to 2018, TV production companies are

SUMMARIES OF PROPOSED LEGISLATION Senate Bill 872:

• Increases maximum total tax credits from $10 million to $14 million. ‡,QFUHDVHVUHLPEXUVHPHQWDOORZDQFHIRUORFDOÀOPDQG media production companies. ‡/LPLWVUHLPEXUVHPHQWDOORZDQFHIRUQRQORFDOÀOPPDNHUV

House Bill 2072:

• Increases program tax credit cap from $10 million to $20 million. • Shifts reserve funds for i-OPIF from 5% to 7.5%. • Creates reserve of funds for projects outside Portland Metro area. ‡(VWDEOLVKHVWDVNIRUFHRQ2UHJRQÀOPDQGPHGLDSURGXFWLRQ

House Bill 2898:

• Extends sunset date of tax incentive program from January 2018 to January 2024. ‡,QFUHDVHVUHLPEXUVHPHQWDOORZDQFHIRUORFDOÀOPDQG media production companies.

getting worried. They can film Season 1 here, but what about Seasons 2 and 3?” The extended sunset will reassure productions that they can be rooted in Oregon for a longer duration. This bill also increases the amount of reimbursement allowed to a local filmmaker or production company from $1 million to $2 million. The bill would take effect in the 2015-2016 fiscal year. A public hearing for the two House bills was held on April 27, with numerous stakeholders submitting statements in support of the bills. These included Tim Williams of the Oregon Film Office, Lana Veenker of Cast Iron Studios, Gretchen Miller of HIVE-FX, Jose Behar of Electric Entertainment, and others. Both House Bills 2072 and 2898 are currently awaiting action in the House Committee on Revenue. MI For more information, visit www.oregonfilm.org.

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APPLEFIELD NAMED AS INTERIM HELM AT OMPA By Mary Erickson Oregon Editor

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ith nearly two decades working at the intersection of Oregon media industries and government affairs, Nathaniel Applefield has helped to build economic and political support for filmmaking in the state. Now he’s taken on a new role as Interim Executive Director of the Oregon Media Production Association (OMPA), following the February 2015 departure of former Executive Director Tom McFadden. Applefield’s career in the local film industry started with brief work on a short 8mm film in the late 1990s, but he moved into political campaigns for the next decade. In 2011, he became the Executive Director of Portland’s AFTRA branch (which soon became SAG-AFTRA). As the organization underwent successive downsizing, initiated by SAG-AFTRA’s head office, Ap- Nathaniel Applefield plefield began to shift his focus over to the OMPA. He started working with the OMPA’s Government Affairs Committee and soon started on the Board of Directors. As the industry in Oregon has grown, Applefield has worked to gain visibility for many of the industry’s workers. During his tenure on the OMPA Board, he grew the number of Source Oregon’s listings of performers from 120 to 1,200. He spearheaded organizing the Media Production Industry Day event

in 2013, held in the Salem Capitol. This crucial, industry-wide lobbying effort brought over 120 industry professionals to the Capitol to meet with legislators. “When we got our stakeholders taking on an ownership role,” says Applefield, “we were able to do something amazing.” Now Applefield is in the midst of steering the OMPA after McFadden’s departure. “Tom’s successful service saw many accomplishments,” confirms Applefield. “For one, he doubled the membership numbers of the OMPA” during his seven-year tenure. This growth means that the OMPA needs to start honing its long-term vision, starting with a Board strategic planning retreat in May to jumpstart the conversation. Another of the OMPA’s most immediate activities is its involvement in the current legislative session, where two House bills and one Senate bill are being debated. Instead of one big event like that of 2013, Applefield is organizing a more sustained effort that will take place over multiple days. It kicks off on May 18, with The Librarians star, Christian Kane, opening the legislative assembly with a song. Laika’s The Boxtrolls will make an appearance, along with a virtual reality Wild experience and an evening reception. Meetings between industry representatives and legislators will happen over multiple days. “This will give us sustained interest, keeping our industry in the minds of the legislators,” Applefield says. He acknowledges the challenge that legislators face in determining priorities for the limited available funding. In their talks with legislators, OMPA members will stress the positive economic impact that the media production industry makes in the state. As the OMPA begins its search for a permanent Executive Director, Applefield will continue promoting the industry in the region at all levels of government and representing the diverse membership of the OMPA. “Oregon has lots of talent for onscreen roles and talent that’s needed behind the scenes. We’re continuing to build a healthy industry.” MI

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF Beth Barrett (right) with Lynn Shelton at the premiere of Laggies. REGAN MACSTRAVIC

NORTHWEST CONNECTIONS TO AUDIENCE AND FILMMAKER By Crystal Foley Staff Writer

A

t an international film festival as prestigious as SIFF, one might think it hard for anyone local to gain recognition. However, amidst the 450 films showing at the Seattle International Film Festival this year, the Pacific Northwest has not been forgotten. The “Northwest Connections” program boasts 35 films from local artists including features, documentaries and shorts.

Beginning on May 14, SIFF will celebrate its 41st year of bringing incredible cinema to the area, screening films from 92 countries over the course of 25 days. It’s grown quite a bit since the first festival in 1976, screening 19 films. While it is not listed in the catalogue, the Northwest MAY/JUNE 2015

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF Connections program can be found on the SIFF website by searching “Seattleâ€? or “Northwest Connections.â€? A version of the Northwest Connections program has been part of SIFF for almost as long as it’s been running, previously classiďŹ ed as “Spawned in Seattle.â€? Though quite catchy, Beth Barrett, the Director of Programming for SIFF, said the name changed because the category broadened.

“It’s not just about Seattle, it’s about Washington State, it’s about stories that are sort of focused up here in the PaciďŹ c Northwest,â€? Barrett said. She added that creating a new title was a way to “expand that vision a little bit and celebrate things that are from the eastern part of the state, too.â€? “Northwestâ€? is a broad term, and SIFF does place some ďŹ lms from Northern Oregon in the Northwest Connections

NORTHWEST CONNECTIONS PROGRAM in the changing landscape RI WKH FLW\ RI 6HDWWOH 7KHVH ÀOPV GHSLFW DQG DGGUHVV WKLV important ongoing cultural GLVFRXUVH 3 Minute Masterpieces 2015 | 60 minutes How hard could it be to make DWKUHHPLQXWHÀOP":HFKDOOHQJHG\RXWRÀQGRXW

Beach Town USA | 2015 | 72 minutes | Erik Hammen In this rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll beach movie of the mind shot on 16mm and entirely in Seattle, love and music intertwine over one summer in a ramshackle FRDVWDOWRZQ Bodyslam: Revenge of the Banana USA | 2015 | 86 minutes | Ryan Harvie, John Paul Hortsmann For six years, the stars of SeatWOH 6HPL3UR :UHVWOLQJ WKULOOHG crowds as they parodied professional wrestling with their boozy blend of burlesque DQG DWKOHWLFLVP %XW ZKHQ D newcomer felt slighted by the tight-knit cabaret performers, he tried to take them down, forcing them into an all-tooUHDOĂ&#x20AC;JKWIRUWKHLUIXWXUH Faces of Yesler Terrace USA | 2015 | 69 minutes 7KH JHQWULĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ RI <HVOHU Terrace is highly controversial 22 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

The Glamour & The Squalor USA | 2015 | 82 minutes | Marq Evans Seattle DJ Marco Collins stars LQ WKLV XQĂ LQFKLQJ GRFXPHQtary about media fame and addiction, which tracks his rise, fall, and resurrection as DQ LQĂ XHQWLDO SURPRWHU RI grunge, alternative rock, and HOHFWURQLFGDQFHPXVLF

The Hollow One USA | 2015 | 97 minutes | Nathan Hendrickson Rachel and Anna return home two years after their PRWKHU¡VGHDWKDQGĂ&#x20AC;QGWKH town abandoned with their house left in disgusting disarUD\:KHQ5DFKHOEHJLQVKDOlucinating about their dead mother and some ancient artifact, terrifying clues begin falling into place surrounding WKHLUIDPLO\¡VSDVW Paper Tigers USA | 2015 | 102 minutes | James Redford Cameras follow six troubled students at Lincoln AlternaWLYH +LJK 6FKRRO LQ :DOOD :DOOD :$ RYHU D IXOO VFKRRO \HDU :LOO D QHZ JXLGDQFH program that focuses on a trauma-sensitive approach

pull these teens out of stasis, WUXDQF\DQGPLVEHKDYLRU" Personal Gold: An Underdog Story USA | 2015 | 89 minutes | Tamara Christopherson This doc about one of the greatest Olympic underdog stories, shows how four women cyclists emerged from the cloud surrounding the Lance Armstrong scandal to become Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unlikely medal hopefuls at the 2012 /RQGRQ*DPHV

Pilchuck, A Dance with Fire USA | 2015 | 68 minutes | John Forsen )RXQGHG LQ 6WDQZRRG :$ in 1971 by Dale Chihuly, the Pilchuck Glass School is the premiere glass art center of WKH ZRUOG 7KLV GRFXPHQWDU\ traces the rise of this beautiful and fragile art, and how Pilchuck evolved from a summer workshop to the most important Glass School for interQDWLRQDODUWLVWV

The Primary Instinct USA | 2015 | 73 minutes | David Chen Sprouting from the popular podcast and stage show,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tobolowsky Files,â&#x20AC;? The Primary Instinct takes Stephen Tobolowskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storytelling to the big screen, featuring the character actor humorously discussing life, ORYHDQGKLVĂ&#x20AC;OPDQG79FDUHHU:RUOG3UHPLHUH Uncertain USA | 2015 | 82 minutes | Anna Sandilands, Ewan McNicol The town of Uncertain lies on the Texas and Louisiana border, and is a quiet escape for many people looking to start D QHZ OLIH ,Q (ZDQ 0F1LFRO and Anna Sandilands beauWLIXOO\ Ă&#x20AC;OPHG GRFXPHQWDU\ the lives of several Uncertain citizens are examined, painting a powerful portrait that is sure to put this town on the PDS Valley of the Sasquatch USA | 2015 | 92 minutes | John Portanova A father and son attempt to establish a relationship after being forced to move into an old family cabin following a tragedy that left them KRPHOHVV 7KH\ VRRQ UHDOL]H that making a connection isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t their biggest problem when a tribe of angry Sasquatch come out from the IRUHVWWRFODLPWKHLUWXUI West of Redemption USA | 2015 | 90 minutes | Cornelia Duryee Moore In this tense three-hander of D SRWERLOHU VKRW LQ (DVWHUQ :DVKLQJWRQ WKH KXVEDQG LQ a farmhouse-dwelling couple takes a stranger hostage and interrogates him, unwinding a complicated web RI P\VWHULHV LQ WKH SURFHVV :RUOG3UHPLHUH


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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF program, but Barrett said that they do their best to add submissions from Washington State. In focusing on local films, SIFF supports the Washington Filmworks film incentive by screening films funded through it. “We love to celebrate films that are shot here, because it brings a lot of economic power and, you know, jobs and recognition to the Northwest,” Barrett said. Barrett defines a Northwest Connections film as “a story about here or from here.” She uses the example of Body Slam: Revenge of the Banana, directed by Ryan Harvie and John Paul Hortsmann, a story about Seattle Semi-Pro Wrestling. While a Seattleite did not direct the film, it’s very localized to the city. Films shot with a cast and crew here in Washington State also qualify for the Northwest Connections category. With just under 200 local film submissions for the 2015 festival, most came from within Seattle Metropolitan limits. But don’t be fooled into thinking the films are all similar, Barrett said. Northwest Connections films span a wide range, including drama, documentary, narrative, short film and animation. “One of the great things about the community here is that they do shoot in all genres… and they do explore all the different edges of their creativity,” she said. Barrett said what sets Seattle filmmakers apart is “an unerr-

ing commitment to working together.” “There’s something really unique about this area in that everybody really literally does work on everybody else’s films.” She said this means a Seattle filmmaker gets “so many different kinds of experiences and makes them a really viable artist and really sought after.” The term “crewtopia” is something you might hear amongst Seattle filmmakers. Barrett defines it as the “idea that being on a crew in a film in Seattle is sort of the best thing that could possibly be, and it kind of is. Everyone gets paid a living wage, you’re treated with respect, your art is honored.” She said, as a result of this, “everybody is working together toward an ultimate goal.” While some might think “crewtopia” seems too good to be true, Barrett stated, “It’s not a lie, it’s not some pie in the sky kind of thing. It actually does happen here.” This year SIFF will have about 300 guests coming and 70 to 80 of those will be local filmmakers. Barrett said she enjoys interacting with them. “My favorite part of what I do is that I get to bring all of these films to the audiences and then watch the audience connect to the filmmaker. That’s the most amazing thing when an audience and a filmmaker have an honest connection,” she said. The devotion of SIFF audiences is what sets it apart from other festivals, Barrett said. “They not only just attend, but

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they are present,” she said. Filmmakers who attend SIFF often have conversations with audiences that surprise them. “[They get] questions about things that the filmmaker didn’t really even think about… they’re like, ‘Well, that’s fascinating that you saw that, I didn’t—really? How?’” Barrett explained it is no small feat to have an audience be truly present. “Our mission is to create these experiences so the people can come and watch films together,” she said. “Which is really important in an era where we can all watch films on our phone.” Barrett said she also enjoys watching audiences connect with each other. “The ‘Seattle freeze’ thing doesn’t seem to apply to SIFF… the audiences are actually really friendly,” she said. “[You’re already] leaps and bounds over just your average, ‘Hi, we’re in a bar.’” Barrett thinks this level of connection is especially important in the modern age. “It’s more important than ever to bring people together, to have those experiences.” MI See sidebar on page 22 for the full Northwest Connections program, and visit www.siff.net for SIFF’s entire schedule, including screenings, galas, tributes, forums and more.

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF

Director Cornelia Moore takes a look at the next shot on West of Redemption.

HOMETOWN HEROES OF SIFF:

CORNELIA MOORE’S WEST OF REDEMPTION

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est of Redemption, a Washington Filmworks incentive production that wrapped principal photography in 2013, marks the third feature from Seattle’s Kairos Productions that has premiered as part of SIFF. The other two features were The Dark Horse and Camilla Dickinson. “Seattle is my hometown, so premiering at SIFF again means the world to me. I love Seattle; I am a fourth-generation Seattleite, and hope to make as many movies as possible here,” said Cornelia Duryée Moore, the film’s director and founder/owner of Kairos Productions. Her partner in the company is Larry Estes. “Being given the gift of Washington Filmworks’ grants for the last two features is a blessing that Larry and I deeply cherish—and it is our fondest wish and prayer that the film incentive grows and grows each year, so that more and more movies can be made locally.” West of Redemption was shot in the Spokane area of Eastern

Cornelia Moore consults with DP TJ Williams Jr.

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF Washington and stars Billy Zane (Titanic), Kevin Alejandro (Southland), and Mariana Klaveno (True Blood). The film was written by Meagan Daine, and produced by Larry Estes and Tony Becerra for Kairos Productions. Rich Cowan of Spokane-based production company North By Northwest served as executive producer. By working with North By Northwest, West of Redemption was able to leverage high quality production value within a short pre-production schedule in order to meet the needs of its script and budget. “We have been honored to work twice in Eastern Washington, at North By Northwest,” said Moore, whose Camilla Dickinson was also shot in Spokane. “What an incredible group of talented folks they are! Our West of Redemption main location on the dry farm really could only have been found

over there, and we were very happy to make the movie in Eastern Washington again. They took really good care of us.” The end goal for the film, said Moore, is to find its perfect

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Cornelia Moore discusses continuity with script supervisor Andy Spletzer.

home: “a wonderful, warm-hearted distributor.” She added, “Since we will soon have two movies out—as Camilla Dickinson will be released late this summer or early fall—we have faith that this one will find its place some day, too.” Meanwhile, the team at Kairos has a full slate of upcoming projects. “It looks like one of our next projects may be on the west side of the mountains, which should be fun,” said Moore. “It is a collaboration with Zombie Orpheus Entertainment on their show Strowlers, directed by my wonderful friend Ben Dobyns. We are very excited about that project, which we have watched Ben create for many years. Strowlers was incentivized by Washington Filmworks too, through their Innovation Lab. Bless them with a thousand blessings for empowering our shows! “In addition, we are talking to a wonderful local author about an option on her novel, and we are continuing work on Courageous Dying, my documentary about, among other things, the last seven years of my mother’s life. We are interviewing many people on the topics of death, dying and courage for the journey that we all must take some day.” MI West of Redemption will screen at SIFF on Monday, May 25, at 7pm and again on Wednesday, May 27, at 4:30pm. Both screenings will take place at Harvard Exit. For more information about Kairos Productions, visit kairosfilm.tumblr.com.

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF

Director John Portanova on the set of Valley of the Sasquatch. REGAN MACSTRAVIC

HOMETOWN HEROES OF SIFF:

JOHN PORTANOVA’S VALLEY OF THE SASQUATCH Actors Jason Vail (who plays Roger) and Miles Joris-Peyrafitte (who plays Michael).

O

ne of the Northwest-shot films screening at this year’s SIFF comes from local production company The October People.

Inspired by actual stories of a Bigfoot attack on a mining cabin near Mt. St. Helens, Valley of the Sasquatch tells the story of a fractured family battling a tribe of angry Sasquatch. The film was shot last year in Snoqualmie Pass and Roslyn, Washington, with 80 percent of the cast and crew from Washington. “I’ve called Washington State home for my entire life, so

it means a lot to play at the biggest festival in the region for the West Coast premiere of Valley of the Sasquatch,” said Poulsbo native John Portanova, who wrote and directed the thriller. “We shot the film here, the plot was inspired by local Sasquatch legends, and the story is set in Washington. Honestly, it would feel a little weird if our biggest festival release wasn’t here!” The film is more than six years in the making, when Portanova began writing the first draft of the screenplay. Back then, he said, his goal “was simply to make the Bigfoot film I always wanted to see. I wanted to create something that was dramatic, scary, and incorporated real-life stories of Sasquatch encounters into the narrative. I’ve already accomplished that goal, so now I just want to make sure the hard work of the cast and crew gets out there for as many people to see as possible.” Another goal for Valley of the Sasquatch is to get the word out about all the great independent film being made in Washington State, and all the talented filmmakers, cast and crew who reside here. MAY/JUNE 2015

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF “When discussing film in Washington, I often see people get excited about a big star, company or director coming to our state to make a film. Those are the projects that get the incentive dollars and are pushed to the forefront of the discussion about Seattle’s film community,” said Portanova. “But in reality, they equal about 10 percent of what’s happening here. The majority of things being made are much smaller projects that keep the great artists of our state busy week after week. These shorts, web series and micro-budget features are making it so artists can have more consistent work and a better chance of making it as full-time filmmakers.” He continued, “Valley of the Sasquatch is one of those projects, a low-budget film made from beginning to end in Washington with a cast/crew predominately filled with local talent and no big-name stars. The fact that a small project like this is getting the festival response that it has shows the world what it looks like when this community comes together and puts all of their effort into something they are passionate about, no matter what the budget.” MI Valley of the Sasquatch will screen Sunday, May 24, at 8pm and again on Tuesday, May 26, at 4pm. Both screenings will take place at SIFF Cinema Uptown Theater. For more information about the film, visit www.valleyofthesasquatch.com.

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF Doug Hudson created the Sasquatch costume for the Washington-shot film. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN PORTANOVA

MAKING MOVIE MAGIC WITH EFFECTS & COSTUMING EFFECTS ARTIST DOUG HUDSON EXPLAINS WHAT IT’S LIKE WORKING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, INCLUDING CREATING THE ULTIMATE REGIONAL ICON, BIGFOOT, FOR THE NEW HORROR FILM VALLEY OF THE SASQUATCH. Article and photos courtesy of Doug Hudson

I

have always been fascinated by movie magic, even at a young age. I spent countless hours watching sci-fi and horror movies, followed by scrounging and digging up any information on how special effects were created. The internet didn’t exist, so it wasn’t that easy. But there were a few books and magazines that I read religiously, and I made home movies with my friends and produced haunted houses for the neighborhood, which helped me hone my craft at a very young age. Thinking back, my parents must have thought I was really weird! I always knew that I wanted to be a special effects makeup artist, I just wasn’t sure on how to go about it. Growing up in Ohio, that world was foreign to me—Hollywood was so far away and seemed unreal.

Doug Hudson in his KloneFX studio.

Then one day I saw an ad in the back of a horror film magazine for a makeup contest sponsored by a famous Hollywood makeup school. I decided to enter, sending in a couple photos of demon makeup that I did a few months earlier. I promptly forgot about it. That is, until I received a letter in the mail. I saw the return address was from the MAY/JUNE 2015

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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF

Actor Bill Oberst Jr., who plays Bauman in the film.

makeup school. I thought to myself, “Cool, at least they sent me my photos back.” I opened the letter and started to shake it to get the pictures out, but nothing came out. So I read the letter and realized that I had won! The prize was a full scholarship to attend the makeup school in Hollywood. This put things in motion for me to put all the chips on the table and move to California. Things just snowballed from there. I spent 15 years in Hollywood creating special makeup effects and animatronics for numerous films, television shows and commercials. I got involved in Valley of the Sasquatch (2015, produced by The October People) after the producers reached out to me. When the director, John Portanova, saw my previous “Bigfoot” experience, it was a match made in heaven. (I have always been fascinated by Bigfoot. I decided to make a life-size replica bust of the creature from the famous 1967 Patterson/Gimlin film. That was sold to the Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy, who used it for promotions. That got me known in the Bigfoot community, and soon I became an expert advisor on debunking Bigfoot videos on internet shows like The Squatchers Lounge and Bigfoot Busters.) Designing any creature or effects for a film starts first with the budget. Valley of the Sasquatch was a low-budget indie film, but they did have a budget I could work with. It was also important to take into consideration the locations where we would be shooting. The costume had to work in remote woods during the summer, so it had to be very easy to get in and out of. With this in mind, we headed into the studio to “flesh” out the design. What we created was something custom, just for this production. The Sasquatch costume in Valley of the Sasquatch has a 34 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

Doug Hudson getting producer Matt Medisch made up for his cameo in the film.

mask made out of silicone, because we were shooting long hours in the hot summer. Any other material would not have held up after being drenched in sweat from the performer. Plus we had to incorporate a “cool vest” to help keep our suit performer cool and not have him overheat inside the costume. The fur was made from NFT (National Fiber Tech). It’s not cheap, but it’s a must if you want a good-looking fur suit. (That’s why there aren’t many good-looking Bigfoot costumes out there!) It was a priority for the whole Valley of the Sasquatch team to have an excellent Bigfoot costume. After production, John, the director, was given the Bigfoot


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SPOTLIGHT ON SIFF The cast of the film along with a hint of Sasquatch.

FX Creator Doug Hudson working with Sasquatch suit performer Connor Conrad.

tion here to support it. But if they want to work with great people, and be able to get to pick and choose projects, this is a great area to work. Living in this area and mentoring the next generation of effects artists has given me great satisfaction. MI head as a memento. I believe he has it on display in his office! But the rest of the suit still exists, and is actually available to rent through our website (www.klonefx.com). For those looking to break into the business as a special effects artist in the Northwest, they should know that for now it isn’t a full-time job. There simply isn’t enough film produc-

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Doug Hudson is a Hollywood effects artist who has over 20 years’ experience in designing and fabricating custom themed displays, props, costumes, animatronics and special makeup effects. Valley of the Sasquatch is produced by Matt Medisch and Brent Stiefel, and directed by John Portanova. Visit www. valleyofthesasquatch.com for more info.


: y l n O s a r t x E

An Interview with Lance Mitchell of Flannel Background

F

lannel Background is a talent agency representing a deep roster of extras and background actors for Northwest-based productions.

The agency was formed last year when Triple L Talent, Lance Mitchell owned by Anne Lillian Mitchell, was restructured and separated into two entities: Mitchell Artist Management (MAM), which focuses on principal actors, and Flannel Background, which focuses on extras. “An extras agency focuses on extras’ needs, assuring that production does not have to shoulder that responsibility,” explains Lance Mitchell, owner of Flannel Background, when asked about the importance of an extras-only agency. “Not only do we supply the ‘everyday’ real person, we prepare them to enter the work environment on set.” He continues, “Whereas principal actors come on set with knowledge, training and procedure, we educate those who are breaking into the business or looking for their 15 minutes of fame. My first experience on set, I had no idea what to expect. An agent is there to walk you through the process, from what to expect to support on set to assuring those payments come in a timely manner. I’m just an ordinary guy who stepped on set one day. I ‘get’ what information an extra needs to be successful. We assist with not only bookings, but familiarizing our talent with film terminol-

ogy, set etiquette, and the tools they need to be successful.” Flannel Background operates on both sides of Washington state, building a roster in the Seattle and Spokane areas in order to “best service our clients’ needs,” says Mitchell. “We assure a reliable, confident, and prepared extra. We are a resource for those asking ‘Where to start?’ or ‘What’s it like to be on set?’” The company recently provided extras to both seasons of the Spokane-based Syfy series Z Nation, ensuring that each scene teemed with terrifying zombies. Other recent projects include industrial and commercial bookings for WSU, AT&T, Rubbermaid, Best Buy and several others. “We have one extra who’s become our go-to gal for any industrials that include eyedrops,” says Mitchell. And Flannel Background is always looking to add to its roster, aiming to have the widest range of talent possible. “When it comes to extras, we need everything and anything,” he says. “You never know what production might ask for. We cover a variety of skills, body types, age ranges, and ethnicities. We cast a wide net in what we look for to anticipate productions’ needs.” Since becoming the owner of Flannel Background, Mitchell has relished all of the experiences that come with building a new agency. What has he enjoyed most? “The hunt!” he says. “There is a thrill in the tight timelines and finding the impossible. The enthusiasm when we call to book talent is contagious. There is no better feeling than fulfilling a dream.” MI If you are looking for background actors, visit www.flannelbackground.com. Interested in becoming an extra? Visit the website and complete the instructions under the “JOIN” tab.

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ASHLAND, OREGON:

1 TOWN TO LIVE AND WORK AS A FILMMAKER

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By Leah Gibson Southern Oregon Film and Media (SOFaM)

E

nvision a special place that embraces green forests, snowcapped mountains, blue lakes and hastening rivers. This is an enchanted land where citizens enjoy the good life in a small quaint town. Located just 15 miles north of the California border in the Rogue Valley, right where the Siskiyou and Cascade Mountains intersect, is one such town: Ashland, Oregon. This dynamic hamlet of 20,000 souls boasts a vibrant and artsy community where natural spring water literally bubbles to the surface through fountains in the welcoming downtown hub the locals refer to simply as “The Plaza.”

Banner over Main Street celebrates Ashland’s achievement. PHOTO BY GARY KOUT

Wondering if you’ve seen Ashland on the big screen? In 2014, it was hard to miss. The picturesque town was featured as one of the stops along the Pacific Crest Trail in the acclaimed Reese Witherspoon film, Wild. The town was prominently featured in Night Moves, the indie eco-terrorism thriller starring Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning. And Ashland was where Shirley Knight took her first Oz Rodriguez (Director) and David Robert Jones (Director of Photography) on the set of Brother in Laws. PHOTO BY TYLER MADDOX steps towards the Oregon coast in Redwood Highway. It’s important to note that it’s a rare production that only Ashland is known for many things: world-class theater at takes place in Ashland and relies solely on Ashland resources. the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, a top-notch liberal arts edIn truth, another thing Ashland has going for it is the robust ucation at Southern Oregon University, and the beauty and and varied region of which it is a part. The Southern Oregon solitude of Lithia Park, designed by John McLaren of Golden coast and the high desert to the east, along with many small Gate Park fame. What Ashland hasn’t been known for is filmtowns, have all hosted productions. These are where many of making. But that is starting to change. the region’s crews and cast call home. Located 13 miles north After quietly producing quality productions of all types of Ashland, Medford is the area’s biggest town and the locaand sizes for years, Ashland was recognized in 2014 by Movtion for many of its productions. Medford also supports the ieMaker magazine by being named the #2 town to live and industry with economic development money. When taken as work as a filmmaker in the nation. Then it was kicked up a whole, the MovieMaker designation of Ashland as #1 really one more notch to #1 in January of 2015. To be sure, this applies to all of Southern Oregon. esteemed position is partly due to its extraordinary locale, Making and watching movies overlap at the region’s many cultured atmosphere and high quality of life. These aspects of film festivals, including the Siskiyou FilmFest (focused on enAshland land the town atop many lists. The recognition for vironmentally themed films), the Klamath Independent Film Ashland’s filmmaking is specifically thanks to the numerous Festival (focused on locally shot films and films by local filmletters of support from local businesses and community leadmakers), the Killer Valley Horror Film Festival, and the Southers. This town’s support runs deep, as evidenced by its filmern Oregon University Student Film Festival. Of course, the focused economic development grant two years running. MAY/JUNE 2015

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Crane shot of the Ashland Springs Hotel. PHOTO BY BEN LIPSEY

Enthusiastic crowds pack the Varsity Theatre during the Ashland Independent Film Festival. PHOTO BY AL CASE, ASHLAND DAILY PHOTO - COURTESY OF THE ASHLAND INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL

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Ashland Independent Film Festival is a highly regarded and nationally known festival that MovieMaker magazine also recognized as a festival “worth the entry fee.” The festival, known as AIFF, attracts top-quality long and short narrative and documentary films from all over the world. Recent keynote participants have included Morgan Spurlock, Julie Taymor, Barbara Kopple and Ty Burrell (who attended college in Ashland). In a nod to the robust local film and media industry, AIFF has a Locals program and a student film competition that lets local filmmakers, both budding and veteran, experience the excitement and energy of having audiences watch and comment on their films. These individuals

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and works to connect productions with local film professionals, actors, equipment and resources via its online directory. Open to industry participants, businesses, students and general supporters, SOFaM membership offers access to digital

also get the invaluable opportunity to connect to the wider community of award-winning filmmakers. Shepherding and supporting the local industry is Southern Oregon Film and Media (SOFaM). With its office in Ashland, SOFaM is a membership-based non-profit that promotes the region to both local and out-of-area producers Commercial shoot for Grange Co-op. PHOTO BY TYLER MADDOX

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newsletters, networking opportunities, job postings, free and discounted admission to special SOFaM events, and reciprocal benefits with sister organizations across Oregon. With its large database and deep reach across the entire region, SOFaM is the starting point for any film or media need. SOFaM has been instrumental in bringing high-profile projects to the area in its eight-year history, such as a recent Budweiser commercial filmed in Jacksonville and the upcoming feature comedy Brother In Laws from producer Lorne Michaels, which shot in and near Klamath Falls. But it’s not just these and the previously mentioned produc-

Writer/Director Gary Lundgren watches the shot on the set of Black Road on the Oregon coast. PHOTO BY ANNE LUNDGREN

tions that define the Southern Oregon film and media industry and keep its members busy. The area sees a great number of local, regional and national commercials and corporate videos, television projects, short films, music videos and many independent features, all taking advantage of what earned Ashland and Southern Oregon the top spot on the list of places to live and work as a moviemaker. MI

On the set of Redwood Highway. PHOTO BY GARY KOUT

Leah Gibson is a freelance special effects makeup artist and the Executive Assistant to Southern Oregon Film and Media. For information on filming in Southern Oregon, visit www.filmsouthernoregon.org.

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FLYING BEYOND 4K AT THE NAB SHOW By Wéland Bourne Guest Columnist Photos by Odin Lindblom and Wéland Bourne

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very year in Las Vegas, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show features some of the latest and greatest in tech for the film and television industries. From drones, to cameras, to computer hardware and software, NAB has it all.

If someone would have said several years ago that drones would become an every day part of filmmaking, there would have been some very skeptical reactions. With NAB’s addition of the Drone Pavilion this year, it seems drones have become an essential part of the digital production tool set. The flying nets up at the drone booths and at the drone pavilion highlight the growing safety concerns about drones. Lawmakers and the FAA are currently struggling to regulate this booming part of the industry. Despite this producers, cinematographers and television station managers are investing in drones like crazy. Booths like 3DR and DJI were slammed as demonstrations of drones filled the air. The popularity of the drone booths could even explain why 3DR walked away with awards for best drone and best booth. As I managed to walk past the drones and continue viewing the one million-plus square feet of exhibits, it was easy to become more grounded in some of the latest trends in gear. Many of the audio equipment brands including Shure, Sennheiser and Marshall were showing off microphones and microphone interfaces designed to work with mobile devices and make field production easier for journalists. These same devices can be used by filmmakers for audio clips for sound design and Foley work while on the go. Sennheiser also showed off their new AVX wireless microphone system. The AVX system features fully digital transmission and has the ability to change frequencies automatically in case of interference.

The smallest 4K cinema camera to date from IO Industries on display at NAB.

Even RED had a camera mounted to a drone at NAB this year.

While most companies had their 4K products out front, some like NewTek were offering new feature rich HD products at remarkable prices. NewTek’s TriCaster Mini, which starts at $5,995, is a live production studio in a tiny box. The Mini can switch between 6 cameras, record HD video, webstream video, live chroma key and even has built in virtual sets. Virtual sets were popular at NAB. From creation tools by software companies to camera and studio gear for the live shoots to companies offering turnkey solutions, you could find tons of options for virtual sets. Virtual sets are increasing in quality and complexity at a fast pace. I wonder how long it will be before more film effects are done live like these virtual sets? Nearly every production light on the show floor was LED powered. The selection was huge from Mole-Richardson’s new 5,000 watt equivalent LED fresnel down to Manfrotto’s new tiny 60mm wide Lumie light. There were options for almost any lighting need. Shaky camera movement may not be as popular as it once was if the number of stabilizers shown at NAB were any indication. From motorized rigs like DJI’s newly updated Ronin to Steadicam’s new M-1, their first fully modular sled, to tons of small handheld units, there were plenty of new options to look at. 4K workflows were being demonstrated with hardware and software products throughout the NAB show floor. As I wandered the show floor looking at the new 4K cameras from just about everyone who made cameras, I couldn’t stop thinking, “Why don’t I have 4K TV?” OTT services like Netflix have already begun streaming UHD 4K on select titles. Certain film titles are already available for download in the 4K format. Improvements in compression have already demonstrated the ease of conversion for broadcasting of 4K. In fact, 4K broadcasting is available in most of JaMAY/JUNE 2015

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pan. At NAB, the consensus seemed to be that the majority of U.S. broadcasts would be in 4K in the next three to five years. While UHD will replace HD in the near future, 4K not only has its replacement being actively developed but also rolled out. RED Digital Cinema already has their Epic camera with their Dragon sensor that shoots 6K. At NAB this year, RED announced the upcoming release of their new camera called Weapon. Weapon is due to release later this year with a 6K Dragon sensor and will be upgradable to an 8K sensor in 2016. Hitachi is taking pre-orders for their 8K cameras, and Sharp announced that they will soon begin retailing their 8K monitors. Nvidia says their Quadro M6000 video card will be able to handle 8K and beyond as soon as the monitors are ready. Companies like Christie are even in development of projectors that exceed the 12K threshold. According to Japanese broadcaster NHK, 8K broadcasting will begin in Japan in 2017. Their goal is to have international 8K broadcast from Japan by 2020 in time for the Tokyo Summer Olympics. There is no question that 8K and beyond will eventually become reality, the only question is how soon? Resolution wasn’t the only trend in cameras. Many camera makers were displaying smaller models of their cameras or new tiny units. New from Blackmagic Design was the Ursa Mini and the Micro Cinema Camera, which looked to be built with drones in mind. IO Industries’ new 4KSDI camera shoots 4K at 60fps and weighs just over 1½ pounds! Waccom, an industry leader in pen tablets, was showing their new Cintiq tablet for artists and animators. The Cintiq

Adobe shows off their new Character Animator software which is now part of Adobe’s Creative Cloud.

Hitachi maps out 4K workflow from ingest through post and to delivery.

Blackmagic Design shows off their new Super 35mm Ursa Mini 4K camera.

Ikegami’s 8K camera on display at NAB.

44 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

has over 2000 levels of pressure sensitivity and can be configured with a 3.4 GHz processor, 16GB of DDR3 ram, 512GB of SSD storage, and a 2.5K screen making it a power house mobile device. There were many new products and releases on the software side as well. Adobe unveiled a new animation tool called Adobe Character Animator which can track facial expression from a webcam feed and use it to automatically animate a character in real time. Red Giant talked heavily about the new Magic Bullet plug-ins and the free Red Giant Universe plugins. Blackmagic Design unveiled Fusion 8, their compositing software, which will now run on PC, Mac and Linux. AutoDesk had a massive update to all of their software. Notable changes for their animation software include a nodes layout for 3D Studio Max and upgraded fluid simulation including foam and bubbles to Maya. While a keynote about Virtual Reality (VR) excited many with the hopes of a new broadcast platform, the uphill battle VR faces was painfully obvious. VR lacks a standard platform and delivery system. Also missing is a consistent workflow from camera to post. There is hope for standards as more companies get involved in VR development. VR may one day become more than just a toy for video gamers and a platform for advertisers. NAB’s exhibit floor is stimulating for the mind but grueling for the feet. Next year, I’d like to demo a drone that will fly me over the entire show floor! MI


t: h ig tl o p S t n e m ip u q E

WATER BUFFALO’S OWNER REFLECTS ON NEARLY TWO DECADES IN BUSINESS By Phyllis Bown Guest Columnist

Water trucks on the set of Murder In Law.

I

started Water Buffalo in 1996 with one cute little 1,500-gallon water truck. It was my goal to be the most diverse water truck company in the area and provide our customers with great service with fully equipped trucks.

The Murder In Law production filmed several scenes at Water Buffalo’s shop in Bonney Lake.

This year will mark 19 years in business. We have grown to six water trucks and two water trailers. We have been involved with the film industry for over 10 years. We have done many car commercials and still shoots, as the Northwest has so many beautiful locations. We’ve helped make rain and get the wet look on productions like The Road, Battle in Seattle, Waste Management, and most recently a Washington State Lottery commercial and Carhartt’s farm series. I love working with the film industry, as the work that you do lives on in print. The people that we get to work with are always great and there are so many good memories and good food. By far my best experience was working with Screaming Flea Productions on their pilot for Murder In Law. They were casing the Bonney Lake plateau area, where we are located, to find a spot to shoot their “desert” scenes. They needed a rocky area without too many trees, as the segment was set in the California desert and about a family that owned a water trucking company. They stopped by my shop to look over the water trucks, which this time were needed not to make rain but to be part of the scenes. I have a large area of gravel parking around the shop and with noth-

ing working out for them at other hopeful shooting locations, they asked if they could film at my place. I couldn’t turn them down; what a unique opportunity. Not only did my truck get a starring role, but my truck driver got in on the action, my kids and I were extras in the jail and party scenes, and my shop, office and living room were also used. My 1976 Dodge Dart also got to be a getaway car for the bad guy. I always joked that I wanted to be “craft services” in a movie and I also got that wish, helping make iced tea and opening up my kitchen and dining area for the cast and crew. It felt like a holiday with lots of people coming in and out and having a great time filming. I’m not sure anything can top that. Water Buffalo has also helped out on many Mud Obstacle Runs here in the Northwest, such as Dirty Dash, Warrior Dash and Tuff Mudder, and provides potable water service for Hempfest, Festival of The River and many other events. We’ve even sprayed down the hot crowds at a Kenny Chesney Pre-Concert Party. Whatever you can think of doing with bulk water, we can help. MI For more information, visit www.waterbuffaloinc.com.

Phyllis Bown's 1976 Dodge Dart gets a cameo in the production.

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46 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015


NW

Alexander Party Rentals; Tukwila, WA 206-282-1987; fax 206-283-4545 events@alexanderpartyrentals.com www.alexanderpartyrentals.com

Scott Alexander, president

BLT Productions LLC; Portland, OR 503-803-1512 bltproductions@me.com

Bruce Lawson, partner Brent Lawson, partner

Cascade Video Systems; Portland, OR 503-381-7640 james@cascadevideosystems.com www.cascadevideosystems.com

James Walton

Cine Rent West; Portland, OR 503-228-2048; fax 503-228-1789 chris@cinerentwest.com www.cinerentwest.com

Chris Crever, owner

CineMonster Inc.; Poulsbo, WA 206-953-1946 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

Day Wireless Systems; Seatac, WA 206-878-3750; fax 206-878-1926 mhoffman@daywireless.com www.daywireless.com

Mark Hoffman, Washington rental sales

Elite Camera Cars LLC; Portland, OR 503-803-1512 elitecameracars@me.com www.elitecameracars.com

Bruce Lawson, partner Mark Haleston, partner Brian Lawson, partner

Fremont Media Studios; Seattle, WA 206-838-9080; fax 206-838-9088 info@fremontstudios.com www.fremontstudios.com

Scott Jonas, president

Gearhead Grip & Electric; Portland, OR 503-542-3990; fax 503-542-4455 gear@gearheadgrip.com www.gearheadgrip.com

Joel Stirnkorb, partner Greg Schmitt, partner

Glazer’s Camera; Seattle, WA 206-233-0211 rentals@glazerscamera.com www.glazerscamera.com/rentals

Bill Seymore, rentals manager; Rebecca Kaplan, co-owner; Ari Lackman, co-owner

Intersect Video; Wilsonville, OR 971-224-4808 sterling.fiock@intersectvideo.com www.intersectvideo.com/soundstage.htm

Sterling Fiock

Key Code Media; Seattle, WA 206-728-4000; fax 206-728-4001 seattle@keycodemedia.com www.keycodemedia.com/seattle

Andrew Takacs, NW territory manager

Koerner Camera Systems Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-6533; fax 503-274-5446 michael@koernercamera.com Seattle, WA office: 206-285-7334; fax 206-285-7335 seattle@koernercamera.com, www.koernercamera.com

Michael Koerner, Portland Karen MacDonald, Seattle

Maddox Visual Productions; Jacksonville, OR 541-899-1456/541-261-4396 tyler@maddoxvisual.com www.maddoxvisual.com

Tyler Maddox, owner

Magic Gadgets; Aurora, OR 503-678-6236; fax 503-678-6237 info@magicgadgets.com www.magicgadgets.com

William McIntire

Brad McCormick; Portland, OR 541-285-6366 brad@jibnorthwest.com www.jibnorthwest.com

Brad McCormick

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NW

PRODUCTION & POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT RENTAL Northwest Camera Support; Hillsboro, OR 877-799-9128; fax 877-799-9128 bryan@nwcamsupport.com www.northwestcamerasupport.com

Bryan Fletchall, owner/operator

Nuge Inc. (Go4Nuge); Seattle, WA 206-234-4075; fax 206-333-1137 dave@go4davenugent.com www.go4nuge.com Oppenheimer Cine Rental; Seattle, WA 206-467-8666; fax 206-467-9165 marty@oppcam.com www.oppenheimercinerental.com

David P. Nugent, owner Bobbi Gerlick, co-owner Marty Oppenheimer

Pacific Grip & Lighting; Portland, OR office 503-233-4747 Seattle, WA office 206-622-8540 www.pacificgrip.com PDXpendables; Lake Oswego, OR 503-887-5880; fax 503-344-4809 info@pdxpendables.com www.pdxpendables.com

Doug Boss

Picture This Production Services; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 info@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

Perry Loveridge, president Sari Loveridge, VP Ben Olberg, GM

PNTA; Seattle, WA 206-622-7850; fax 206-267-1769 rcarlson@pnta.com www.pnta.com

Richard Carlson, president

Pro Photo Supply; Portland, OR 800-835-3314 rental@prophotosupply.com www.prophotosupply.com

DND

Professional Video and Tape Inc.; Tigard, OR 503-598-9142; fax 503-598-9172 dmcandrews@provideoandtape.com www.provideoandtape.com

Doug McAndrews, rental manager

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin Sue Feil-Erwin

Sasquatch Lighting and Grip; Beaverton, OR 503-332-7937 wonder20@netzero.net

Scott A. Walters, owner

Seattle Grip and Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-285-0840; fax 206-285-9503 mlane@seattlegrip.com, jknapp@seattlegrip.com www.seattlegrip.com

Mick Lane Jeremy Knapp

VER - Video Equipment Rentals; Tukwila, WA 866-837-9288/206-242-3860; fax 206-242-3859 rentals@verrents.com, www.verrents.com

Steve Daniels Anthony Routh

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke Saul Mitchell Brent Sharp

Visual Imagery Production; Portland, OR 503-201-4631 timmyjib@gmail.com www.vipjib.com

Tim Jankowski, owner/operator

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com, www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

Westside Camera Crane Co.; Lake Oswego, OR 310-345-2919 1denniskw@gmail.com

Dennis Wilson, president

Rick Wiley Camera Cars; Shelton, WA 360-426-3904; fax 360-426-3904 rwileycc@hcc.net www.imdb.com/name/nm0928867

Rick Wiley

48 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

Don Rohrbacker David Bluford

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NW

Air Systems Sales & Rentals; Lake Oswego, OR 503-635-9670 charley@airsysrent.com www.airsysrent.com

Charley Rowland

AK Teleprompt; Redmond, WA 425-891-8575 duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com

C. Duffel

Alexander Party Rentals; Tukwila, WA 206-282-1987; fax 206-283-4545 events@alexanderpartyrentals.com www.alexanderpartyrentals.com

Scott Alexander, president

Cascade Video Systems; Portland, OR 503-381-7640 james@cascadevideosystems.com www.cascadevideosystems.com

James Walton

Central Rentals; Portland, OR 503-528-2824; fax 503-206-8908 hello@centralrentals.tv www.centralrentals.tv

Todd Carlson Michael Lovelady

Cine Rent West; Portland, OR 503-228-2048; fax 503-228-1789 chris@cinerentwest.com www.cinerentwest.com

Chris Crever, owner

CineMonster Inc.; Poulsbo, WA 206-953-1946 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

Day Wireless Systems; Seatac, WA 206-878-3750; fax 206-878-1926 mhoffman@daywireless.com www.daywireless.com

Mark Hoffman, Washington rental sales

Event Communications; Portland, OR 503-232-9031; fax 503-232-7384 jay@eventcomm.us www.eventcomm.us

Jay Pomeroy Wayne Lund Scott Reilly

Five Star RV; Everett, WA 425-741-9600; fax 425-741-9605 kevans@fivestarrvs.com www.fivestarrvs.com

Kristina Evans

FocalPoint Digital; Portland, OR 503-245-5300 steve@focalpointdigital.com www.focalpointdigital.com

Steve Smith, owner

Fremont Media Studios; Seattle, WA 206-838-9080; fax 206-838-9088 info@fremontstudios.com www.fremontstudios.com

Scott Jonas, president

Gearhead Grip & Electric; Portland, OR 503-542-3990; fax 503-542-4455 gear@gearheadgrip.com www.gearheadgrip.com

Joel Stirnkorb, partner Greg Schmitt, partner

Glazer’s Camera; Seattle, WA 206-233-0211 rentals@glazerscamera.com www.glazerscamera.com/rentals

Bill Seymore, rentals manager; Rebecca Kaplan, co-owner Ari Lackman, co-owner

Intersect Video; Wilsonville, OR 971-224-4808 sterling.fiock@intersectvideo.com www.intersectvideo.com/soundstage.htm

Sterling Fiock

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NW

Island Station Media Lab; Milwaukie, OR 503-901-4202 info@isml.info www.isml.info

Roger Hancock

Kenmar Water Truck Service; Stanwood, WA 360-652-3725; fax 360-652-3725 kenmarwater@aol.com www.kenmarwatertrucks.com

Kenneth Fowler, owner

Konect Aviation; McMinnville, OR 503-376-0190 mail@konect-aviation.com www.konect-aviation.com

Ingo Nehls, manager

Maddox Visual Productions; Jacksonville, OR 541-899-1456/541-261-4396 tyler@maddoxvisual.com www.maddoxvisual.com

Tyler Maddox, owner

National Barricade; Seattle, WA 206-523-4045; fax 206-525-2042 jimh@barricade.com www.barricade.com

James Humphryes

Northwest Helicopters LLC; Olympia, WA 360-754-7200; fax 360-754-1761 duttecht@nwhelicopters.com www.nwhelicopters.com

Brian Reynolds, CEO Doug Uttecht, chief pilot

Nuge Inc. (Go4Nuge); Seattle, WA 206-234-4075; fax 206-333-1137 dave@go4davenugent.com www.go4nuge.com

David P. Nugent, owner Bobbi Gerlick, co-owner

Nuvelocity; Seattle, WA 206-399-2147 info@nuvelocity.com www.nuvelocity.com

Dahlin Call & Lori Call, owners

Oppenheimer Cine Rental; Seattle, WA 206-467-8666; fax 206-467-9165 marty@oppcam.com www.oppenheimercinerental.com

Marty Oppenheimer

Pacific Grip & Lighting; Portland , OR office 503-233-4747 Seattle, WA office 206-622-8540 www.pacificgrip.com

Doug Boss

Picture This Production Services; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 info@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

Perry Loveridge, president Sari Loveridge, VP Ben Olberg, GM

PNTA; Seattle, WA 206-622-7850; fax 206-267-1769 rcarlson@pnta.com www.pnta.com

Richard Carlson, president

Professional Video and Tape Inc.; Tigard, OR 503-598-9142; fax 503-598-9172 dmcandrews@provideoandtape.com www.provideoandtape.com

Doug McAndrews, rental manager

Redline RV Productions; Orange, CA 866-720-1930 jim@redlinervp.com www.redlinervp.com

Jim Stern

Royal Restrooms of WA; Maple Valley, WA 206-816-5406; fax 425-432-5406 seattle@RoyalRestroomsWA.com www.RoyalRestroomsWA.com

Jayne Van Vleck, member Max Van Vleck, member

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NW

Sasquatch Lighting and Grip; Beaverton, OR 503-332-7937 wonder20@netzero.net

Scott A. Walters, owner

Seattle Grip and Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-285-0840; fax 206-285-9503 mlane@seattlegrip.com, jknapp@seattlegrip.com www.seattlegrip.com

Mick Lane Jeremy Knapp

Seattle RV Center; Everett, WA 425-741-3860; fax 425-348-0978 jeffr@seattlervcenter.com www.seattlervcenter.com

Jeff Richford

Seattle Teleprompter; Medina, WA 425-454-5659 teleprompting@gmail.com www.seattleteleprompter.com

Maia McQuillan, owner

Stageright2 Inc.; Portland, OR 503-287-0361; fax 503-282-5495 stageright2@msn.com www.stageright2.com

Michael Cory, CEO Matt Davis, COO

Starvoyager 1 RV; Portland, OR 503-313-9769 authentic.creations08@gmail.com www.starvoyagerrvrental.com

Christina Fletcher Melvin Oswalt

Turn Key RV Rentals Inc.; Eugene, OR 541-914-2246; fax 541-741-0112 rentals@turnkeyrv.com

Eleanor McGehee

www.turnkeyrv.com/production-rv-rentals-and-service

VER - Video Equipment Rentals; Tukwila, WA 866-837-9288/206-242-3860; fax 206-242-3859 rentals@verrents.com, www.verrents.com

Steve Daniels Anthony Routh

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke Saul Mitchell Brent Sharp

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

Water Buffalo Inc.; Bonney Lake, WA 253-863-8883; fax 253-447-3826 waterbuffaloinc@netzero.net www.waterbuffaloinc.com

Phyllis M. Bown

Water Truck Service; Wilsonville, OR 503-682-2723; fax 503-570-0779

Bob Jonas

Westside Camera Crane Co.; Lake Oswego, OR 310-345-2919 1denniskw@gmail.com

Dennis Wilson, president

WorldWind Helicopters Inc.; Arlington, WA 425-271-8441; fax 425-271-8442 info@wwheli.com www.wwheli.com

Michael J. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary, president

Zarr Studios; Portland, OR 503-477-7050 sophia@zarrstudios.com www.zarrstudios.com

Sophia Bilyk

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Helicopter • Scenic Tours • Commercial Ops

503-376-0190 • konect-aviation.com

56 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

Photography by Julian Wilde


50 HOUR SLAM:

FILM FESTIVALS

SHOWCASING SPOKANE FILMMAKERS By Peyton Scheller Communications Manager, Visit Spokane

T

he secret criteria: a food dish, a Spokane business and a “Slam Video.” The task: 50 hours to create a three- to six-minute film. The result: an epic film fest showcasing the Spokane region’s creative talent.

Created by organizers from Vexing Media, Purple Crayon Pictures, Community Minded Television, The Magic Lantern Theater, Robert Foote and Saranac Public House, 50 Hour Slam was designed to encourage and develop filmmakers throughout the region. We sat down with one of the co-organizers, Juan Mas, to find out a little bit more about the event:

it meets all of the criteria before passing it on to the judges. The judges then review all of the films and narrow it down to their top 15. The organizers choose a favorite film that wasn’t in the judges’ top 15 and that’s included as the sixteenth film. All 16 films were shown at the audience screening on May 2, with the audience choosing the final winner. There’s also a viral vote element. For any film that’s submitted after the due date, or is maybe missing a part of the criteria, it’s included in the viral vote along with the rest of the films. It’s always fun to see how everything shakes out, as films that are the favorites at the screening may not necessarily be the favorites online. Why did you decide to include a food dish as this year’s theme? JM: We wanted to honor food as an art form, especially considering Spokane has such an awesome culinary scene. We narrowed down some of our favorite chefs and asked them to

Juan Mas

For those not aware of the event, how would you describe it to them? Juan Mas: It’s a timed film event, where competitors have just 50 hours to complete a three- to six-minute movie. Each year, there’s a secret criteria that involves a theme and a location element. This year, the theme was culinary and the location element incorporated several historic Spokane businesses. There’s also an educational component to the event. Every entry must include all of the proper paperwork, releases, etc. that would normally go along with the process of shooting a real film. Teams have the opportunity to work with us and learn how to take the correct steps throughout the filmmaking process. What inspired you to start the 50 Hour Slam? JM: We wanted to create an event that was a little different and a little more edgy… something with more freedom compared to the other film festivals which were generically more family friendly. How many people compete? JM: On average, we have about 32 to 35 teams compete, with about 5 to 10 people on each team. This year we have 37 teams with about 300 total participants. With so many teams, how does the judging process work? JM: First, the organizers watch every film to make sure

participate. What element is new about this year’s Slam compared to previous years? JM: Since this is the Slam’s fifth year, we wanted to include one other part of the criteria that gave credit to the past five years’ Slams. Each of the teams was given a “Slam Video” including clips from entries over the past five years, which the teams were then required to incorporate into some aspect of their film. What is your favorite part of the process? JM: Coming up with the criteria is always a blast. For the co-organizers, it gives us a chance to think of fresh, really outside-the-box ideas. We don’t want the teams to get too comfortable. The audience screening is also a lot of fun. How have you seen the event grow over the past few years, and what do you foresee for its future? JM: Each year the event continues to grow, with more teams and more creative products. For the future, we plan to grow the event, and hopefully include some more educational workshops. Down the road, we hope this could one day become a multi-city event. MI For more information, visit www.50hourslam.com. MAY/JUNE 2015

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58 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015


FILM FESTIVALS

Eastern Oregon Film Festival Celebrates Sixth Annual Event Guy Reid’s documentary, Planetary, played opening night at the Eastern Oregon Film Festival. IMAGE COURTESY OF PLANETARY COLLECTIVE.

By Christopher Jennings Director, Eastern Oregon Film Festival

T

he sixth annual Eastern Oregon Film Festival brought Eastern Oregon to life May 7-9, 2015. The opening night of the festival, set in La Grande, featured Guy Reid’s stunning feature documentary, Planetary. It was accompanied by Danny Madden’s All Your Favorite Shows!, and a live Q&A with the filmmakers after the films. Additional selections included Scott Cummings’ hypnotic Buffalo Juggalos, Sara Dosa’s The Last Season, a meditative look at Oregon mushroom hunters, and Alison Bagnall’s closing-night comedy Funny Bunny.

From all directions, this year’s musical guests created the soundscape to the sixth annual event. On Thursday, May 7, the Art Center at the Old Library hosted a local kick-off show with Ham n Cheese and Pendleton’s JDK&EOPB. The following night, Benchwarmer’s parking lot saw Boise’s Hillfolk Noir and Old Death Whisper. Wrapping up the festival’s musical selections were Portland’s Yeah Great Fine and Astoria’s pop rock group Holiday Friends. Bijoux and Like a Villain also made an appearance as special guest solo performers. Special screening events included a Secret Screening with Zach Weintraub and an Online Showcase hosted at Film-

Filmmaker Nandan Rao at Eastern Oregon Film Festival 2014. PHOTO BY CODY GITTINGS

makerMagazine.com, and a local showcase of works by Eastern Oregon University students and Eastern Oregon media makers. MI Full program details and wrap-up are available at the Festival’s website, www.eofilmfest.com. MAY/JUNE 2015

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Sara Burton Location Scout and Manager 60 MEDIA INC. MAY/JUNE 2015

sara@girlscoutlocations.com 503.998.2793 www.girlscoutlocations.com


g n i m o CATTRACTIONS

FILM FESTIVALS

M

ark your calendars for the annual Central Oregon Film Festival (COFF), to be held on the evening of May 16 in Terrebonne, Oregon.

COFF is a local, family-friendly festival for all ages, featuring a selection of locally-produced short films (1 to 12 minutes in length). With COFF, festival organizers celebrate local indie film artists by encouraging them to create films to share with the community. For more information, visit www.centraloregonshowcase.com. MI

VISIT US ONLINE TODAY!

WWW.MEDIA-INC.COM

Location Management and Production Support Creative & Thorough Location Scouting • Friendly & Reliable Service

425.269.3396 dave@drummondmedia.com • www.drummondmedia.com

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BRIEFS CW’S SIGNIFICANT MOTHER TO SHOOT SERIES IN PORTLAND The CW’s series entitled Significant Mother is set to shoot in the Portland area in late May. The series shot three digital episodes for The CW Seed last year, and now has upped the series to TV. According to Variety, the story follows Portland restaurateur Nate (Josh Zuckerman), whose world is turned upside down when he comes back from a business trip to find out that his best friend and roommate, Jimmy, is now dating his newly single mother (Krista Allen). The attempts by Nate’s dad (Jonathan Silverman) to woo back his mom are not helping the situation. Alloy Entertainment is producing the show in association with Warner Bros. Television and CBS Television Studios. Significant Mother is co-created and executive produced by Erin Cardillo and Richard Keith. The series is set to premiere in August.

THE DIVINE MARIGOLDS NOW AVAILABLE ON INDIEFLIX Seattle filmmakers Willard Chase, Lisa Coronado, Alder Sherwood, and Jeremiah Kaynor recently released the pilot episode of their series, The Divine Marigolds, on IndieFlix.

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The show about an Irish family living in Seattle was funded by a Kickstarter campaign and shot in West Seattle’s Alki Beach neighborhood. View the pilot at indieflix.com/indie-films/the-divine-marigolds-34657/.

HELP OPPENHEIMER CINE RENTAL RECOVER STOLEN EQUIPMENT On the early evening of Saturday, April 11, at approximately 5:30pm, Oppenheimer Cine Rental was burglarized. The Seattle-based company has been renting and servicing film and digital cameras, cinema lenses, and related equipment to local filmmakers since 1975. The list of equipment that was stolen includes the following: ARRI Alexa EV #3664, EVF #4004, Accessories ARRI Alexa EV #2807, EVF #2502, Accessories ARRI Alexa EV #2632, EVF #2803, Accessories RED Epic #01569, Accessories RED Epic #01778, Accessories Sony F55 #100652, Accessories Sony F55 #100874, Accessories Sony FS700 #112443, Accessories ARRI SR-3 #1075, w/CEI Color Tap, Accessories Angenieux 24-290 #1588410 w/ Rods, Bridge, LMB4, MF, Heden M26, Cables Angenieux 17-80 #1590281 w/ Rods, Bridge Angenieux 25-250HR #1552636 w/ Rods, Bridge Cooke 18-100 #788839 w/ Rods, Bridge Century Canon Series 2000 150-600mm #C14863 w/ Rods, Bridge, PL Mt Canon 400mm T/2.8 #C3756 w/ Rods, Bridge, PL Mt Nikkor 300mm T/2 #182418 w/ Rods, Bridge, PL Mt Nikkor 400mm T/2.8 #200060 w/ Rods, Bridge, PL Mt All in OppCineRental yellow/white ATA style cases, except RED Epics without cases and Sony F55’s in large black Pelican cases. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/OppenheimerCineRental.


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