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CONTENTS FEATURES 8 12 14

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VOLUME 26 • ISSUE 1 2014

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker

KEBLAS OUT, BECKER IN AS DIRECTOR OF SEATTLE’S FILM OFFICE

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins

LYNN SHELTON RETURNS TO SUNDANCE WITH LAGGIES

SALES

Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER

SUNDANCE: MY MISADVENTURE OF WORK, PLAY AND STARS

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

Dawn Carlson Beth Harrison Christina Poisal

2014 SALARY AND HIRING TRENDS FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

WEBMASTER

Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER

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WHO’S NEWS

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SUNDANCE ROUND-UP

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WELCOME BACK TO PORTLANDIA

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SAG-AFTRA SEATTLE - THE NEW UNION FALL GUYS: THE NORTHWEST’S BEST STUNT PROS CAPTIONS MOVE BEYOND TV KOERNER DEBUTS ARRI AMIRA CLACKAMAS: OREGON’S NEW DIGITAL MEDIA HUB SOUND OFF: SPOTLIGHT ON RECORDING STUDIOS MY TOP 3 WAYS TO WORK WITH THE MARCOM MANAGER GATEKEEPER MEDIA INC. ISSUE ONE 2014

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PPI EDUCATIONAL TRUST GIVES STUDENTS A CLOSEUP VIEW OF PRINTING HOW TO USE THE MAGIC FIVE FOR SUSTAINED SALES RESULTS CHALK TALK: SUPER BOWL AD REPLAY MARKETMIX 2014: WHAT’S NEW IN NORTHWEST MARKETING? CHOOSING THE RIGHT FULFILLMENT VENDOR

MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS 28

TALENT, MODELING AND CASTING AGENCIES

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RECORDING STUDIOS AND AUDIO SERVICES

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CREATIVE & MEDIA STAFFING AGENCIES

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DIRECT RESPONSE MARKETING SERVICES

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn

COVER

Director Lynn Shelton on the set of Laggies, which premiered at Sundance. Photo by Barbara Kinney.

Media Index Publishing Group 14240 Interurban Ave. S. Suite 190 Tukwila, WA 98168 (206) 382-9220 (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Publishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus tax. Copyright © 2014 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA


“Run and Gun” Style

Game Changer

CINEMA EOS LEAVE NO STORY UNTOLD

Sales & Rentals

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WHO’S NEWS Check out the latest hires and promotions throughout the Northwest’s media companies. If you would like to submit an announcement and photo for Who’s News, e-mail them to the editor at editor@media-inc.com, or mail to P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124. Photos should be 3” x 5” at 300 dpi, tiff or jpeg, labeled as the person’s name. ADVERTISING/MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Borders Perrin Norrander/Portland Willyum Beck hired as Art Director

Borders Perrin Norrander/Portland Chasson Gracie named Dir. of Account Planning & Strategy

Borders Perrin Norrander/Portland Hali Griffun hired as Assistant Account Executive

Borders Perrin Norrander/Portland Anna Naef hired as Graphic Designer

Borders Perrin Norrander/Portland Madeline Parker hired as Account Executive

EXCLAIM/Seattle Marcus Peddy added as Production Manager

Hacker Group/Seattle Kristin Flor hired as Managing Dir. of Bus. Dev., Marketing & PR

Hacker Group/Seattle Haydn Sweterlitsch promoted to VP, Executive Creative Director

Hacker Group/Seattle Matt Witter named General Manager

Hacker Group/Seattle Carrie Woolman promoted to Executive Director

Hanna & Assoc./ Coeur d’Alene, ID Jay Davis hired as Copywriter

Hanna & Assoc./ Coeur d’Alene, ID Ian Shea hired as Web Developer

Hydrogen/Seattle Michael McGrath hired as VP, Creative Director

JayRay/Kirkland, WA Bridget Baeth joined as Advisor

Leopold Ketel/Portland Lea Anne Clifton hired as Account Manager

Magner Sanborn/ Spokane, WA Karmen Blake joined as Senior Solutions Architect

CREATIVE

Magner Sanborn/ Spokane, WA Nicole Vander Meulen joined as Content Strategist

Stevenson Advertising/ Lynnwood, WA Mary Beth Manley hired for Web Development and SEO

Stevenson Advertising/ Lynnwood, WA Lindsey Weedston hired for PR and Content Marketing

52 Limited/Portland Deborah Arce hired as Chief Financial Officer

52 Limited/Portland Joshua Heineman hired as Talent Coordinator

52 Limited/Portland 52 Limited/Portland Martha Humphrey Lydia Mazer hired as Talent Manager promoted to Director of Talent Management

52 Limited/Portland Ami Vo hired as Account Manager

52 Limited/Portland Nate Webb promoted to Business Development Manager

52 Limited/Portland Michelle Wood promoted to Director of Account Services

Hornall Anderson/ Seattle Jack Anderson named as Chairman

Hornall Anderson/ Seattle John Anicker promoted to President/CEO

V2Works/Seattle Brandee Borror appointed as Senior Art Director

V2Works/Seattle Jay Harmon hired as Account Manager

V2Works/Seattle Gary Mason promoted to Chief Innovations Officer/ Major Projects

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V2Works/Seattle Margaret Denton added as Graphic Designer

MEDIA INC. ISSUE ONE 2014


Quality with great service, it just comes naturally to us. Now in our 44th year of meeting your challenges large and small.

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ISSUE ONE 2014 MEDIA INC.

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KEBLAS OUT, BECKER IN as Director of Seattle’s Film Office n February 6, James Keblas, director of Seattle’s Office of Film + Music, announced that he was not being reappointed to the position under new mayor Ed Murray. Keblas had served in the role for nine years. “It has been an honor to serve this community,” said Keblas in a statement. “My goal has always been to make Seattle better by making it a great place to make a living making film and music. Over the past nine years we have moved well in this direction.” The reaction from the Seattle production community ranged from stunned to perplexed to outraged. Keblas’ supporters made phone calls, sent emails, and posted messages to Facebook, all decrying the decision and advocating for his reappointment. Douglas Horn, a local director and screenwriter, took it a step further. He launched a petition asking Murray to reappoint Keblas, which as of this writing had garnered a total of more than 1,200 signatures. Meanwhile, it was announced that Kate Becker, strategic advisor for the City of Seattle, Kate Becker had been named as Keblas’ replacement. Becker quickly sent out a statement acknowledging the concerns that the community had expressed and reassuring them of her dedication to the continued growth of the industry. “Please know that I am deeply committed to advancing the success of the work that is underway and the work of the future,” said Becker. “I have an extensive background in leadership and community organizing, deep music community history, and a lifelong love of film.” In the weeks that followed, the fervor over Murray’s decision seemed to die down. Most in the film community had accepted that Keblas was not going to be reappointed, and were redirecting their energy toward securing the future of the film industry in Seattle. On Tuesday, February 18, Media Inc. attended a caucus in which several prominent members of the local community addressed the needs of the industry going forward to ensure continued growth and success. More than 100 people attended the event, held at Saint John’s Bar in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle. Krk Nordenstrom, a freelance editor and city producer of the Seattle leg of the 48 Hour Film Project, organized and moderated the caucus. He made the opening remarks, explaining that the overall goal of the event was “to not only talk about what it’s been like to work with the Office of Film + Music over the last nine years, but what it’s going to be like in the next nine years.” Becker was in attendance and introduced herself to the audience of film industry professionals, saying, “Thank you all for the incredibly warm welcome I have had in these past… well, let’s just say, two weeks ago, I was sitting at my desk doing my work on the position I had been hired by the city to be doing, with not a clue other than that a dear friend

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of mine had lost his job four days before and I was having to mull over what that meant for me now, when the mayor’s deputy called and said, ‘I need to talk to you first thing in the morning.’ I thought, ‘maybe I’m next.’” Instead, she was offered the position of director of the Office of Film + Music, and after meeting with the deputy mayor and talking it over with Keblas, she accepted. Becker emphasized that, although her calendar “is a little slammed this week,” she is ready and willing to help the production community in any way possible. “As we move forward,” she said, “I just want you to know that I am accessible to you, I am interested in what you want and need, and Amy Lillard committed to continuing the momentum that you all have built with James in the office over the past nine years, stabilize that as much as possible and move things forward in a way that benefits all of you.” Among the speakers was Amy Lillard, executive director of Washington Filmworks. Lillard said that she and fellow Filmworks board members Don Jensen and Donna James had recently met with Becker and the new deputy mayor, and she stressed that the mayor’s office has a “deep, deep commitment to film.” “There’s a whole discussion around ‘yes, we built this incredible thing over the last nine years, but how do we take it to the next level?’” said Lillard. “I think the evidence of the fact that they are committed to working with us and on our behalf as a community is the fact that Kate is here tonight.” She continued, “We can spend a lot of time, energy and effort talking about the change that happened, but what I’m hoping tonight becomes about is the change that gets us to talk about the vision and the next steps.” Megan Griffiths, a Seattle-based filmmaker whose films include Eden and Lucky Them, agreed, adding, “We have such a braintrust in this room. There’s so many people with so many great ideas about what we need to do to keep going in the right direction and building on what we’ve been building towards to make Seattle as viable a film industry town as… I don’t know if we’ll ever hit L.A. or New York, but certainly I think we can be one of the great regional destinations.” One way to stimulate growth and create this viability, according to Seattle producer Lacey Leavitt (Laggies, Safety Not Guaranteed), is through city-based initiatives for shooting in Seattle. She applauded Lillard for doing great things with the state film incentive, but maintains that the city needs one, as well. “It gives me great hope that Mayor Murray, who is supporting the Seattle start-up initiative, might be able to also put some funds toward getting something going in this arena, as well,” said Leavitt. Continued on page 11


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James Keblas: Leaving Behind a Legacy In his nine years as the director of the Office of Film + Music, James Keblas made a significant impact on the Seattle arts community, and he will be missed by many. In fact, on Wednesday, February 26, members of the local film and music communities gathered together to “roast” Keblas in an effort to celebrate his legacy and James Keblas and Donna James thank him for his service. In our own form of tribute, Media Inc. has asked some of Keblas’ friends, collaborators and supporters to share some of their memories of working with him and their thoughts on his legacy. Donna James Vice Chair, Washington Filmworks Board of Directors “Mayor Norm Rice created the Film Office in the early 1990s and I was the first director. When James took over the Film + Music Office many years later—in 2005—I was a bit apprehensive, especially about the film part of the job—James was a MUSIC guy after all! But James is a very quick study, and ended up taking both the film and music work to a much higher level! “As the work grew, he hired great staffers and really integrated both the film and music communities into City Government in very creative, innovative ways. “He’s done a fantastic job and he will be dearly missed.” Steve Manning Director of Marketing, World Famous “I have had the pleasure of working with James over the years from the start of the Vera Project through the launch of Commercialize Seattle in October. James has an innate ability to connect people as well as the dogged pursuit of what’s best for the community. I’ve never heard James say ‘that’s not possible’ and I think he actually believes everything is possible. “ Michele Scoleri Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Mayor Mike McGinn “James and I first starting working together when I was at One Reel and he was at Vera. Most recently I worked with him in my role as a Senior Policy Advisor to the previous Mayor Mike McGinn. James is EXACTLY the kind of person you want to have working in government. Brimming with energy and enthusiasm, he wants 10

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to make things happen for the communities he serves. I think his legacy is a Seattle that recognizes film and music as industries that are important to our economic vitality as well as our cultural vibrancy.” Megan Griffiths Director, Eden “James was a huge asset to this community throughout his nine years at the Office of Film + Music. He allowed an access to government that I’ve never experienced, and always really made me feel like the office was working for the community and trying to facilitate the creative process rather than impede it. He is also a stellar person and a good hang. I’m really jealous of the next organization who gets to benefit from his involvement.” Don Jensen Chair, Washington Filmworks Board of Directors “James brought great energy to an already high functioning film office when he started nine years ago. He was a key person in getting government entities to strongly support film production in the Seattle area, and to institute and support the various film incentives run by Washington Filmworks. James was key in lobbying the incentive legislation, and in developing the Commercialize Seattle program. He inspired his staff, and filmmakers in many ways. “On a personal level I have always enjoyed working with James. He has been the best!” Michael Seiwerath Chair, Seattle Arts Commission “James Keblas brought a punk rock and DIY aesthetic to running the Office of Film + Music, making a tremendous impact with limited resources. In the process he changed the way the city works with the creative industries.” Ben London Media Rights Manager, Hewlett Packard: Melodio “James Keblas is a Snake Oil salesman…but it turns out that Snake Oil is an elixir that fuels creativity, commerce and community. James brings together a unique combination of intellectual curiosity and passion that is going to serve him, and anyone he works with, well for the rest of his life. Basically, we should all just submit and realize the world is James’ oyster, we just live in it.” Megan Jasper Executive Vice President, Sub Pop “James Keblas is a true visionary. He has big ideas and a unique ability at understanding how to execute those ideas by pulling people and communities together and creating interesting and effective partnerships. He knows how to put people in a position where they’re able to put their best foot forward and, in doing so, experience killer results.”


Continued from page 8 Peter Barnes, owner of post-production facility Clatter&Din, also talked about the importance of incentives, but he especially emphasized the necessity of pulling together as a community and lobbying the legislature to gain their support. Peter Barnes “I think we have a lot of work to do because I think we have a legislature that doesn’t quite get it,” he said. “I think that we have a lot of facts to present to them to where we get them behind us to get our incentive package the best it can possibly be.” He added, “Whenever there’s a chance for us to show up in Olympia or any of these meetings in Seattle, we need to be very loud and proud and we need to make sure that they understand how passionate we are about this and how we’re not going to let up until they give us some tools to work with.” Echoing the rallying call of Barnes and the other panelists, SAGAFTRA board member Rik Deskin pointed out the need for teamwork in the acting community and beyond. Ben Dobyns with Zombie Orpheus Entertainment further added that having a strengthened and organized film industry would help ease the transition the next time a governmental shake-up like this occurs. “I would like us to be thinking proactively about how do we build a stronger organization so that when someone new does come into office, they know to come to us, they know to involve us in the process, so that it’s not a surprise,” said Dobyns. “And if we can take that lesson from it and work together and create, whether it’s a formal organization or an informal one, enough of a public pres-

ence that the next mayor, the next whoever, is able to work with us, it’s going to benefit us all tremendously.” Douglas Horn, who had launched the petition to reinstate Keblas, agreed with Dobyns. Speaking on behalf of the broader film community, he said, “We felt that part of the sadness here was losing James, one of our great champions, but part of the sadness was realizing that a change of this magnitude could be made with no word. I mean, none of us—even, I assume, people like Amy and people who everyone here knows has their ear Douglas Horn to the ground—had no idea this was happening. “I don’t think that should ever happen again. And my hope is that we walk out of here and say, ‘holy s***, this is an organized community.’” It seems this call to arms was a success, as the Seattle Film Caucus has already undertaken next steps to empower and improve the local filmmaking community. On February 25, a week after the initial caucus, breakout sessions were held where attendees continued the conversation about the future of the Seattle film industry. Topics included: Education and Mentorship; Seattle City Film Incentive; Commercialize Seattle; Web Series and TV Production; and Pitching, Producing and Distribution. The breakout groups workshopped ideas and worked collaboratively to produce a list of actionable items that were then brought to the caucus finale on March 4, where a “mission statement” was ratified. The mission statement will serve to guide the filmmaking community as they continue to create a thriving industry in the region.

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Lynn Shelton Returns to Sundance with Laggies ne of the highlights of this year’s Sundance Film Festival was Washington incentive film Laggies, the latest from festival favorite and Seattlebased filmmaker Lynn Shelton. A longtime festival alumnus, with films like Your Sister’s Sister (Sundance 2012), and Washington incentive film Touchy Feely (2013), Shelton premiered Laggies at the January festival. Not only did the film earn rave reviews at Sundance, but shortly after its premiere, A24 acquired domestic distribution rights for $2 million. Laggies is scheduled to hit theaters later this year. The film tells the story of Megan (Keira Knightley), who accepts a marriage proposal and then pretends to be at a weeklong seminar, but she is actually hanging out with teenaged girls. The woman must struggle to decide what will really make her happy, while reliving highlights of her high school days. In addition to Knightley, Laggies stars Sam Rockwell and Chloë Grace Moretz. Laggies may center on a reluctant woman clinging to the past, but the project is one of Shelton’s more ambitious Washington productions to date. Dave Drummond, location manager for the film, described the indie film as location-intensive; he estimates production took place at 23 locations in about as many days. In addition, 18 base camps, 8 parking locations, and 9 catering sites were used. Most filming took place in Seattle, but production spilled out into surrounding Puget Sound areas, too. “We worked directly with four different city governments, as well as both King and Snohomish Counties, plus the Seattle Police, Renton Police, Snohomish County Sheriff, and Washington State Patrol,” said Drummond. The looks that Washington and Seattle offer are so distinct that they have lured Anonymous Content, producers of Laggies, back to the area three times. “I loved shooting in Seattle. The crew was simply outstanding in every aspect and the locations we secured were perfect,” said producer Alix Madigan. “It was also wonderful to spend time in this great city, which has much to offer.” Seattle resident Jennifer Roth, who regularly works all over the world, had the opportunity to work locally as executive producer on Laggies. “As a producer, my job is to help the creative team make informed, smart decisions about where they can make the best business and creative decisions for their project,” said Roth. “Seattle is my home and I am so very pleased to help bring such a wonderful and worthwhile film such as Laggies to our

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Lynn Shelton (center) on the set of Laggies. BARBARA KINNEY

community. If it wasn’t for the production incentive program and the help of Washington Filmworks, it never would have been possible.” A key scene in the film shot at Chihuly Garden and Glass in the Seattle Center, an art experience showcasing the most significant works of internationally acclaimed artist Dale Chihuly. Shelton and the film’s producers invited state legislators to the spectacular venue for a set visit. The day doubled as a reminder of the vital collaboration Washington is nurturing to keep producers coming back. With an incentive program that concentrates on independent features like Shelton’s, a cityscape prime with charming and iconic looks, and a thriving crew base, it’s no wonder they keep returning to Seattle.


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SUNDANCE: My Misadventure of Work, Play and Stars

By Jessica Sullivan Guest Columnist

ouching down in Salt Lake City, it was mountainous, snowy, and sunny. Within an hour, I was in my hotel room in Park City. The next morning, dehydrated and in an altitude haze, I made my way through the snowstorm to Sundance training, my first day of work. As Sundance Program Assistants, we first trained and tasked on how to accommodate the local sales and sold tickets over the phones. We prepped for “Townie Tuesday” and more presales. I strolled Main Street to learn the neighborhood and find the venues, like the historic nonprofit Egyptian Theater. The Yarrow Hotel would come to be my temporary home away from home—and it would become a hub for film showings, celebrity sightings and networking. Danny Glover, Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro would all arrive. I would come to learn the layout of Park City via its proximity to the Yarrow, including pubs, liquor store, great Thai food, and best bagel spot. And Glen, the dog sledding concierge, would be invaluably helpful. It was fascinating to see the Yarrow transform from a sleepy spot into a bustling theater of world premiere films, where groupies would clog the ladies room for signatures the minute actors exited their stall, and all the while keep its personal charm. The locals had been taken care of, the holiday decorations were down and the event planners had descended—the street began its transformation. The J Go gallery was turned into the home for Variety magazine, the HP House emerged, and venues such as the Filmmaker Lodge, the ASCAP Music Cafe, and the Airbnb House would come to be most popular with director panels, live music, film trivia competitions, art stations and free hot toddies. It was the opening festival weekend. I made my way over to headquarters, donning my Sundance

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The J GO Gallery transformed into the home for Variety magazine.

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Posters along Main Street advertise films being screened.

jacket. I met press and producers. “Are you here with a film?” I asked one woman. “Yes,” she said, “Land Ho!” “Oh, great,” I said, “do you have a flyer? I will check it out.” She laughed and said it was just in the can last Thursday so they didn’t even have any promotional materials printed. A week later, I would see Land Ho!, the hilarious odd couple road trip comedy to Iceland. I would learn the lead actor was a surgeon by profession and that the film was picked up by Sony Classics. Main Street was transformed. At the Gateway Center, box office central, the crystal balls a la Studio 54 were being hoisted to create the party space where I would mingle among directors and editors a week later. Across the hall, New Frontier, an interactive exhibit room of digital artists, was almost complete. On the third night, I received disturbing news that my lodging had fallen through. I quickly sent an email to my Sundance HR inquiring about the illusive Sundance housing I had heard about. My email was quickly returned as a no-go. But by Thursday, my director friends were arriving; by Friday, I was meeting producers, actors, and festival organizers at work—how could I go home now? I was now residing in an RV without running water and no key access, located down a steep icy embankment off the highway. But I came all this way... was I really going to miss this? With a Hippie House invite, where I could now walk to work, I was granted five more days. I started meeting creatives, seeing independent films, going to exhibits and finding my way into a few parties. At each turn, I had a few copies of Washington Film Magazine. At the Yarrow Hotel and at the Gateway Center, I would meet festival directors from Nashville, Tennessee; Naples, Florida; and Cape Cod. At the parties I would enjoy conversations with writers, editors and sound composers from such movies as


Alive Inside, Drunktown’s Finest and They Came Together. My final 48 hours consisted of film, film, music, video installations, more film, hot toddies, and of course a text message saying, “My mother is coming tomorrow. Your last night is tonight.” I awoke, packed my bags, got some coffee Outside the and hopped a bus headed to see Filmmaker Lodge. the film I Origins at Eccles Center. It had won an award the previous week and it lived up to its hype. I sat in the balcony; the ladies next to me were locals and so proud that finally, this year, “we are doing the festival right!” They shared with me the 10 films they had seen. I was on a film high. I had seen I Origins, Life After Beth, Land Ho!, Ping Pong Summer, and Sepideh – Reaching for the Stars. And I had achieved a full recovery from the midnight showing of Jim Jarmusch’s moving vampire painting, Only Lovers Left Alive. The most touching film was Sepideh, a documentary about a girl who simply desires to go to college and realize her dreams of working in aerospace. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house; we

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Filmmakers talk about Land Ho!


A video installation, The Source, at New Frontier.

all wanted Sepideh’s stars to align. In accepting the Sundance job, I anticipated that I would need to be open to the experience. Through living in six locations in three weeks and a fabulous bus-free system, I learned the layout of Park City and how it transforms into the Sundance Film Festival. While encountering a few ice patches and freezing nights along the way, I met homeschooled kids, Mormons, the New York Magazine press, directors, and producers, and saw great independent films. But it was the people I met that embodied the spirit of Sundance. A month in Park City, where locals and film lovers come together, was inextricably linked to my stars aligning—and enjoying the festival experience that Robert Redford envisioned 30 years ago.

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Sundance

ROUND-UP everal Washington- and Oregon-based productions debuted at Sundance 2014, earning critical acclaim— and, in some cases, distribution deals.

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The most prominent Northwest success story coming out of Sundance might be Laggies, the latest from Seattle-based director Lynn Shelton. Starring Keira Knightley, Chloe Grace Moretz, and Sam Rockwell, the dark comedy centers on Megan (Knightley), a woman in her late-twenties who is stuck in permanent adolescence, as she watches her friends get married and advance their careers. When her high school The One I Love boyfriend proposes, Megan panics and tells him she’s going to a weeklong career seminar, when in fact she is hanging out with 16-year-old Annika (Moretz) and her friends. After the film’s debut at Sundance, A24 acquired domestic distribution rights, including a theatrical release, for $2 million. See more on page 12. Another film with a Seattle connection making its debut at Sundance was The One I Love, which was filmed in L.A. but has Seattle-based producer Mel Eslyn attached. The film revolves around Ethan (Mark Duplass) and Sophie (Elisabeth Moss), a couple on the brink of dissolution. Radius-TWC has acquired worldwide rights to the romantic comedy. Portland also got in on the Sundance action with documentaries and feature films alike. The Battered Bastards of Baseball The Battered Bastards of Baseball, a documentary about 1970s minor league baseball team the Portland Laggies Mavericks, received a lot of attention at the festival. After Major League Baseball moved Portland’s

Land Ho!

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All photos courtesy of Sundance (www.sundance.org) except Laggies movie poster.


minor league team to Spokane, Washington, in 1973, Bing Russell (father of actor Kurt) founded his own team, independent of any MLB affiliation. The Mavericks were a rag-tag group of players, described as a real-life “Bad News Bears.” Co-directed by Chapman and Maclain Way (Bing’s grandsons, and Kurt’s nephews), the highly entertaining documentary features vintage footage and recent interviews with former players, including Kurt himself. Shortly after its Sundance premiere, the film’s narrative remake rights were acquired by Justin Lin, who will produce and self-finance the remake. As for feature films, Land Ho!, co-written and co-directed by Portland native Aaron Katz, made its debut at the festival. The road-trip comedy follows two retirees—Colin (played by Seattle actor Paul Eenhoorn) and Mitch (Earl Lynn Nelson)— as they travel throughout Iceland, attempting to reclaim their youth. Sony Classics has acquired worldwide rights to the film. Also with a Portland connection is Low Down, a feature film based on A.J. Albany’s memoir. Albany’s book, about growing up in Hollywood with her heroin-addicted jazz pianist father, was first published by Portland-based Tin House Books. The film stars Elle Fanning and John Hawkes. Low Down received mixed reviews, but Christopher Blauvelt received the Cinematography Award: U.S. Dramatic for his work on the film. These are just a few of the Northwest connections at Sundance 2014. Look for these films to be distributed in theaters and other formats later this year.

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WELCOME BACK TO PORTLANDIA GET AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE NEW SEASON OF THE HIT IFC SHOW

AUGUSTA QUIRK/IFC

n February 27, lovers of sketch comedy and all things Portland received a belated Valentine when Portlandia returned to IFC. Starring the dynamic duo of Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen, fresh off his departure from Saturday Night Live, the fourth season features the return of beloved characters and familiar themes—but it also delves into uncharted territory for the series. “We have a distinct style. People will say, ‘It was like a Portlandia sketch’ to describe certain situations. People know what that means and that’s really cool, but this season we tried some new things,” says co-creator and director Jonathan Krisel. “For example, a horror film opens the first episode of the season, and we have a big film noir sketch that takes its roots from a ‘traditional’ Portlandia topic dealing with the popularity of different vegetables, but it goes off the rails to become like a John Grisham novel. “Thematically we’re always on the Portlandia topic. We’re very specific about what we’re making fun of, but we can attack it a few different ways.” This includes different types of storytelling. For instance, Armisen and Brownstein have always appeared in sketches together, but this season, a few of the episodes feature separate storylines for the pair; Krisel has dubbed these storylines “the Fred Chronicles” and “the Carrie Chronicles.” Another tactic the Portlandia team used to shake things up this season was to add new writers to the mix.

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“Usually we bring in one writer, but this year we brought in three,” says Krisel. “Having different voices in the process really helps a lot.” Portland-based producer David Cress has been with the show since the beginning. Likening his role as a producer to that of a general contractor, Cress and his team handle the technical aspects of the production: “We hire the crew, budget for the show, schedule it, and put it into action, and hope it all comes out right.” He credits the creative team with keeping Portlandia fresh. “That trio of people—Jon, Carrie and Fred—they’re kind of brilliant,” says Cress. “They’re really the birthers of the show. I do as much as I can to support them, but they’re making the magic.” He continues, “There’s always sort of a fear that there’s a limitation of material. But there is a lot of inspiration, lots of great ideas. I think they really found their voice. In a sense, I almost feel like it’s the same show but ‘more’ this year.” “Since we’re a satire show, in the year in between seasons, there’s so much new material—social trends are an unending source of raw source material—to draw from,” explains Krisel. “This season we took on the ‘anxiety’ theme: people e-mailing you constantly, texting, always on the hook to be available, which is kind of a new thing.” He adds, “The first storyline of the season is about people sharing their finances, a couple joining bank accounts. It’s so simple, but I’m curious to see if it strikes a chord with people. I think it’s


Portlandia director, co-creator and co-writer Jonathan Krisel (left) and DP Bryce Fortner. SCOTT GREEN/IFC

really funny. Whenever you’re tapping into the way people live, and identifying that and then satirizing it, it’s really exciting. The topics sound mundane but these are things that haven’t been used as a source of comedy yet.” Each season of the show thus far has boasted some great guest actors, and that is one thing that has remained the same for season four. This season features appearances from Kirsten Dunst, Maya Rudolph, Olivia Wilde, Jello Biafra (Dead Kennedys), Joshua Homme (Queens of the Stone Age), Duff McKagan (Gun N’ Roses), and Paul Allen and the Portland Trail Blazers, in addition to returning guest stars Kyle MacLachlan, Jeff Goldblum, Ed Begley Jr., and Steve Buscemi.

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“The word is out that the show is fun to work on,” says Cress. “Fred and Carrie allow them to come in and improvise, so that’s exciting for actors. It’s very loose and improvisational. Jon grew up with this style and taught us; I hadn’t seen that style before. It allows us to be inventive and work off each other. We used to have to rely on Fred’s and SNL’s connections and now people just know the show and like the show and want to be a part of it.” One of Cress’ favorite guest stars this year is McLachlan, who has played Portland’s mayor since the first season. “He has a real love of improvised comedy,” says Cress. “You can tell he enjoys doing it and is really good at it. That’s one of my favorite characters.” Krisel, meanwhile, is particularly impressed with the improvisational skills of singer/songwriter k.d. lang, a first-time guest star. “We tried to get her last season but the scheduling didn’t work,” he says. “This year another role came up, so she agreed to come out and do it. She’s one of those artists that is so genuine, so when she came to set, it was like, ‘OK, what’s this going to be like?’ Her performance was so natural. She took it to a very funny place. I’m excited to see how it turns out. It’s easy to be over the top and crazy, but to act natural is hard.” In addition to the actors and musicians who have guest roles this season, there are many local politicians who also make appearances. “David tries to keep us in good favor with the community, especially with the film incentive,” says Krisel. “David worked closely with a lot of politicians, so their appearance on the show was a thank you. That tax incentive makes a huge difference, so it was a way for the crew, and for Fred, Carrie and me, to meet them and say thank you.” Indeed, the tax credit has been a boon to not only Portlandia,


but to several other Oregon-based productions, especially television shows. “When Vince (Porter) first became film commissioner, he and I sat down and talked about the state of film in Oregon,” says Cress. “He thought one of our problems was that the modest incentive would draw one big film, which would drain it, and then there would be a slack period. TV fits us better because it goes on for a longer period. That really helped build our industry and infrastructure.” Other shows that have taken advantage of the incentive include Grimm and Leverage. Cress continues, “Even though they’re different genres and different formats, I think that the shows have all benefited from each other. The talent base has grown a lot in the last decade. I think it used to be hard for an actor to stay in Portland. There was a limited number of things to do. Now with TV, the possibilities have increased.” These possibilities have likewise benefited Oregon’s crew base: Portlandia’s crew is made up of 99 percent locals. Add to that the supportive nature of the community—from bars and restaurants letting the show film in their establishments to the city and state helping in any way they can—and it’s no wonder Portlandia keeps coming back. “We couldn’t do the show anywhere else,” says Krisel. “We couldn’t pay for it anywhere else, and the town has embraced us. It feels very grassroots in a way. We’re stretching the dollar as far as it can go, and what we’re able to achieve is awesome.”

AUGUSTA QUIRK/IFC

The 10-episode fourth season of Portlandia premiered on February 27 on IFC. Visit www.ifc.com/shows/portlandia for more information.

AUGUSTA QUIRK/IFC

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SAG-AFTRA Seattle – The New Union s the first point of contact for filmmakers in the state, Washington Filmworks (WF) is often asked about our talented and professional cast and crew. One of the best places to direct producers for information about Washington talent is SAG-AFTRA Seattle Local. WF has been following changes at the new union since the 2012 merger and we reached out to Brad Anderson, executive director, to find out more. Prior to the merger, Anderson was Northwest regional director of AFTRA, based in Seattle. Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, he trained and practiced as a lawyer, spending his career working through complex problems involving employee and labor issues.

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Washington Filmworks: Explain the SAGAFTRA merger. What are some of the benefits, locally? Brad Anderson: The community of professional performers in Seattle and the Northwest has recently been strengthened. The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists combined with the Screen Actors Guild into a more powerful SAGAFTRA. SAG-AFTRA Brad Anderson now speaks with a unified voice for all performers in the region, covering film, television, radio, broadcasting, sound recordings and more. The SAG-AFTRA Seattle Local represents

approximately 1,500 people working day after day in this industry. These performers are the professional talent that producers depend on to create the quality work the Seattle area is known for. The merged SAG-AFTRA will make it easier for productions to get made. No longer will people have to concern themselves with having to compare two different potential sets of contracts, with differing processes and procedures in how those contracts are administered. SAG-AFTRA in Seattle is now a “one-stop shop” where producers can work with the staff of the Seattle Local to get the best fit in terms of a contract and to have their questions and concerns answered in a timely and responsive way. SAG-AFTRA has added to the staff on the ground at the Seattle Local specifically to provide a continuing dynamic connection between the union and other stakeholders. WF: Tell us about the initiatives that SAGAFTRA is focused on. BA: Part of being an effective labor union and participant in the entertainment community is tapping into the innate desire of people, through their own social nature, to lift each other up, not tear each other down. SAG-AFTRA and its members recognize that what is good for them—a better standard of living, access to healthcare and pensions, and satisfying work—is the same for all the members of this community, lifting everyone’s material well-being, and that of their families and their children. We

W-2s = WF Attention Washington Workers! Please take our surveys. You should have received your W-2s from employers by now. That means it’s time for the 2nd Annual Washington Filmworks (WF) Job Survey. New this year is a Vendor Survey as well. We listened to the community and heard the need for a vendor survey to better understand film businesses that support the industry and have year-round staff. These surveys are vitally important in explaining why film is important in Washington State. Results from the surveys will inform our legislative agenda as we work to create a stronger and more sustainable local film industry. Whether you work freelance, own a production company, or own a film support services company, help us better understand how Washington film professionals create their careers. We want to better comprehend how our industry contributes to the larger economy. The surveys can be accessed through the WF Blog now through March 15. Remember the information collected in the job and vendor surveys is confidential. Go to blog.washingtonfilmworks.org. 24

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want to create an environment for work that brings security to performers and other stakeholders. The Seattle Local understands that organizing performers is its responsibility, but believes that the market will become stronger if it is responsive to the needs and concerns of the other stakeholders, and if it provides continuing outreach and education for the industry. WF: What specific partnerships and programs are you working on? BA: The Seattle Local has expanded its partnership with the Seattle International Film Festival in 2013. Seattle performer members and broadcast members participated in a number of forums for education of filmmakers, filmgoers, and actors, including: • Transition from Stage to Screen – an exploration of the resources and tools for stage actors to thrive in film. • Inside Stunts: Meet the Men and Women that Pack the Punch into Movies – a discussion and demonstration of stunts, industry standards, stunt performers and local

WASHINGTON FILMWORKS WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBER JUAN MAS Washington Filmworks is pleased to announce Governor Jay Inslee has appointed Juan Mas as our newest Board Member. Mas has been entrenched in the indie film world for over 25 years and is a seasoned producer and director of television, film, and theater. He is experienced in a wide range of budgets and has produced film abroad and all over the United States. A longtime resident of Spokane, Mas is actively involved with the city’s film, theater, music, and art scenes through his company Purple Crayon Pictures. He’s a founding member of the Spokane Film Project and 50 Hour Slam Film Festival, and serves on the advisory board for the Spokane Falls Community College Photography/Video department. Mas is an avid advocate for the development of the arts in Spokane and Washington State, but most importantly he is the proud father of three amazing children. Join Washington Filmworks in welcoming Juan Mas!


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resources for budding stunt performers. • The Alchemy of Film Scoring – a commentary on scoring for movies and the effects of good and bad scoring, from the composer. • Getting the Most Out of the Media – an engagement with film reviewers about media techniques to capture the attention of reviewers, bloggers and the public. WF: What does 2014 look like for the new union in the Pacific Northwest? BA: The SAG-AFTRA Seattle Local will continue its outreach to the performing community and entertainment industry and will provide educational and engagement opportunities for all stakeholders. Watch for information about these opportunities in the coming year! For more information, please contact the appropriate staff member, listed below: • Brad Anderson - Executive Director. Brad is responsible for overseeing all performer and broadcaster areas of work. He can be reached at brad.anderson@sagaftra.org. • Chris Comte - Contracts Administrator. Chris is responsible for interpreting and administering the union’s contracts and working with producers under those contracts. He can be reached at chris.comte@sagaftra.org. • Allison Harger - Membership Coordinator. Allison is responsible for managing both performers and producers with respect to performers’ union status. She can be reached at allison.harger@sagaftra.org. SAG-AFTRA Seattle staff may also be reached by phone at 206-282-2506.

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Topo Swope Talent Celebrates Two Decades in Business ow in its 20th year in business, Topo Swope Talent is a permanent fixture of the entertainment industry in the Pacific Northwest. Though Topo herself is often confused with an Italian bowling ball company, she is indeed a real live person! Born in New York and raised in Los Angeles by a family of performers and artists, Topo has been a vibrant member of the arts and entertainment community for most of her life. Her credit-rich career in front of the camera, working with the biggest names in the business, gives her a world of experience she readily draws from to this day. Inspired by her healthy respect for the craft and a love for actors, she opened the agency in 1994. The main goal at Topo Swope Talent is to provide a variety of fabulous talent to satisfied clients. Throughout the years, TST has endeavored to maintain a highly professional work ethic within the agency and expects the same from the stellar talent it represents. The scene at the agency is always lively with a nimble and efficient team of three running things as smoothly as possible. In order to maintain this structure, there is always a sense of fun, diligence and humor in the office. With its strong, diverse talent roster, TST offers top-notch, highly skilled, professional and diverse actors who will complement the quality of any project. Topo Swope Talent is more than proud of its accomplishments over the past 20 years and looks forward to continued success! For more information, visit www.toposwopetalent.com.

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NW TALENT, MODELING AND CASTING AGENCIES Elicia Walker, owner/agent

SAG-AFTRA

20+ yrs

Jamie Lopez

AEA, SAG-AFTRA

DND

Actors in Action, LLC; Portland, OR 503-780-7555 damon@actorsinaction.com www.actorsinaction.com

Damon Jones

SAG-AFTRA

0 - 100 yrs

Arthouse Talent & Literary; Portland, OR 503-546-8862; fax 503-536-6767 kaili@arthousetalentandliterary.com www.arthousetalentandliterary.com

Kaili Carlton

SAG-AFTRA

16 - 100 yrs

Colleen Bell Modeling & Talent Agency; Bellevue, WA & West Linn, OR Colleen Bell 425-649-1111; fax 425-226-4324 Stephanie Yates bellagency@aol.com (WA); bellagencyoregon@aol.com (OR) www.colleenbellagency.com

SAG-AFTRA

0 - 100 yrs

Big Fish NW Talent Representation; Spokane & Seattle, WA 877-424-4347 info@bigfishnw.com www.bigfishnw.com

Becky Reilly Gordon Adams

N/A

All

The Kim Brooke Group Models-n-Actors; Seattle, WA 206-329-1111; fax 206-328-5177 kimbrookegroup@hotmail.com www.kimbrooke.com

Kimberly Brooke, president

N/A

0 - 100 yrs

Copeland Williams Talent; Bellevue, WA 425-748-5133; fax 425-562-0147 calley@copelandwilliams.com www.copelandwilliams.com

Calley Copeland, coowner/booking agent Kathie Williams, coowner/talent director

N/A

0 - 100 yrs

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Actors First Agency; Seattle, WA 206-52AGENT / 206-522-4368 actors@actorsfirstagency.com www.actorsfirstagency.com The Actors Group; Vashon, WA 206-427-7449 info@theactorsgroup.com www.theactorsgroup.com

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NW TALENT, MODELING AND CASTING AGENCIES DreamCatchers; Seattle & Spokane, WA 208-696-1761 joshua@dreamcatcherstalent.com www.dreamcatcherstalent.com

Joshua Cooper, owner

N/A

DND

Emerald City Model & Talent; Edmonds, WA 425-248-4565; fax 425-248-4562 john.harb@emeraldcitymt.com www.emeraldcitymodelandtalent.com

Easa John Harb

N/A

6 mo - 80 yrs

ENTCO International, Inc.; Lynnwood, WA 425-670-0888; fax 425-670-0777 info@entco.com www.entco.com

Terry Quick, president

SAG-AFTRA

All

Foreground Background LLC; Milton, WA 425-246-2725 foregroundbackground@gmail.com www.foregroundbackground.com

Denise Gibbs, owner

N/A

DND

Sherrie Garcia & Associates Entertainment Service; Spokane, WA 509-922-2362; fax 509-922-2362 garciaentertainment@yahoo.com

Sherrie Garcia, agent

N/A

DND

Global One Seattle; Seattle, WA 206-858-6900; fax 206-858-6901 seattle@globaloneltd.com www.globaloneltd.com

Sunny Chae, CEO

N/A

5 - 80 yrs

Heffner Management; Seattle, WA 206-622-2211; fax 206-622-0308 info@heffnermanagement.com www.heffnermanagement.com

Nancy Peppler, president

N/A

DND

In Both Ears, Inc.; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-892-8833; fax 503-892-7182 info@inbothears.com www.inbothears.com

Jennie Mull, agent/CEO Amanda Clark, agent Britt-Marie Carlson, talent liaison

N/A

3 - 75 yrs

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NW TALENT, MODELING AND CASTING AGENCIES

Patti Kalles, president/owner Laurie Levine, CEO

N/A

DND

LLL Talent; Hayden, ID & Spokane Valley, WA 509-720-8312 contactus@LLLtalent.com www.tripleltalent.com

Anne Mitchell, owner Ginny Abdallah, entertainment agent

N/A

DND

Martin Model Management; Bellevue, WA 360-333-5576 christine@martinmodeling.com www.martinmodeling.com

Christine Goulet

N/A

8+

Option Model and Media; Portland, OR 503-233-4244 dennis@ommtalent.com www.optionmodelandmedia.com

Kit Garrett, VP Nina McLaughlin, president Dennis Troutman, talent agent

SAG-AFTRA

All

Puddletown Talent, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-546-3006; fax 503-536-6767 jason@puddletowntalent.com www.puddletowntalent.com

Jason Jeffords, owner

SAG-AFTRA

Infancy - 18 yrs

Q6 Model & Artist Management, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-8555; fax 503-274-4615 justin@q6talent.com www.q6talent.com

Justin Habel, president

N/A

12+ yrs

Jodi Rothfield Casting CSA; Seattle, WA 206-448-0927; fax 206-448-1016 jodirothfield@gmail.com

Jodi Rothfield, CSA

N/A

DND

Ryan Artists Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-1005; fax 503-274-0907 modelinfo@ryanartists.com www.ryanartists.com

Cholee Thompson, president

SAG-AFTRA

All

SAG-AFTRA; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-282-2506 brad.anderson@sagaftra.org www.sagaftra.org

Brad Anderson, executive director

SAG-AFTRA

All

Sports + Lifestyle Unlimited; Portland, OR & Los Angeles, CA 503-227-3449; fax 503-227-4383 info@SLUagency.com www.SLUagency.com

Dave Weiss, president Paul Herschell, VP

LA office: SAG-AFTRA, ATA

Kids to Seniors

Topo Swope Talent, LLC - Celebrating 20 Years!; Seattle, WA 206-443-2021; fax 206-443-7648 topo@toposwopetalent.com tim@toposwopetalent.com www.toposwopetalent.com

Topo Swope, owner/ agent Tim Crist, agent

SAG-AFTRA

18+

TAKE 2 Talent; Portland, OR 541-870-7474 info@take2pro.com www.take2pro.com

Stacie Overman, agent Larry Overman, owner

N/A

All

TCM Models & Talent LLC; Seattle, WA 206-728-4826; fax 206-728-1814 terrim@tcmmodels.com www.tcmmodels.com

Terri C. Morgan, owner/director

N/A

All

Tiffany Talent Agency; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-264-8433 tanya@tiffanytalent.com www.tiffanytalent.com

Tanya Tiffany, agent

N/A

0 - 99 yrs

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Kalles Levine Casting; Seattle, WA 206-522-2660 kalleslevine@hotmail.com www.kalleslevinecasting.com

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FALL GUYS: The Northwest’s Best Stunt Pros Kent Luttrell Kent Luttrell has been a Hollywood stuntman from a young age, starting at age 19 in the movie Stand By Me. He has doubled several stars in film and TV including Danny DeVito, Johnathan Taylor Thomas, Corey Feldman, Michael J. Fox, David Gallagher, Joseph Mazzello and many more. He has performed stunt work throughout the U.S. and Canada, with a few stints overseas. Predominately doubling for Danny DeVito for over 10 years. After moving from Portland to Los Angeles, Kent’s resume and experience grew and he eventually found himself working steadily in the Hollywood stunt industry. Kent has plenty of big-budget experience. When he is not hitting the ground, he can be seen stunt driving, high falling and the occasional body burn. He was last seen on fire for a Widmer Brewing Company commercial. When Kent is not actively doing the stunt work, he can be found coordinating stunts and innovating older stunt equipment and improving many of its designs. A certified welder and mechanical designer, Kent has manufactured all of his own and others’ equipment for many years, including air rams, ratchets, cylinder decelerators and high fall air bags. Air bags and high falls became a passion for Kent and he built many sizes and types of air bags with his good friend Paul Dallas. Always innovating always looking ahead.

Dominic Cicero Stunts add drama to our favorite movies. They capture our attention in TV commercials. From stage performances to live shows, stuntmen do what few others can; risk their lives and walk away to tell about it. With a combination of acting, science and mathematics, a stuntman can easily make you believe his car is wildly out of control before he rolls it down an embankment and it bursts into flames. It’s all in a day’s work. When you’re searching for a professional stuntman who can deliver an action-packed yet safe performance, Dominic Cicero can deliver. Whatever your production needs concerning stunt or precision driving, I can fulfill those needs, while safely getting the shot on time and on budget! I strive to be the best carrying on from our roots in professional racing at the highest levels. An active SAG/AFTRA and OMPA member.

Keith Cox Having recently appeared numerous times on hit shows like NBC’s Grimm and TNT’s Leverage, Keith brings to the set experience and a great attitude! He will be an asset to any production you have. Keith has an appetite for hard work and dedication. Having past experience as a reserve police officer, bouncer, and body guard, his many skills include firearms, knife techniques, practical take downs and hand cuffing. Keith is also a high ranking instructor in many disciplines such as Muay Thai and American Kickboxing, Arnis, Escrima, Kali, as well as extensive experience in on screen fighting. Please scan QR code to the right for stunt reel featuring footage of other skills such as explosions, driving, falls, and creature work. Check out his IMDB link at www.imdb.com/name/nm4757641. Contact Missy’s Action Service at 818-774-3889 or kseecox1960@msn.com. He comes with professional references that include coordinators Matt Taylor, Kevin Jackson, Allen Robinson, Michael Hilow, and Alex Terzieff.

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Jerry Buxbaum With 20+ years of experience in the stunt industry and an impressive list of projects, Jerry Buxbaum brings an energy and a passion to his work that is unmatched. From water safety to precision driving and stunt coordinating, Jerry has worked his way through the industry with professionalism and commitment to a job well done. As an avid lover of many sports, from water and snow skiing to martial arts and tennis, Jerry has been able to bring his athleticism and ability to think quickly and creatively to the many productions that he has coordinated. Films like, Bigger Than The Sky (2005), Music Within (2007), The Kill Hole (2012), Rise of the Zombies (2012) and Bullet (2013) with Danny Trejo. Jerry’s extensive gear package can make even the smallest productions live large. His camera car, process trailer and car dolly are all well kept tools for projects big and small. High falls, fight scenes and car chases all benefit from the rigging, fall mats and insert rigs that Jerry has in his large arsenal of professional equipment. Stunt doubles, second unit directing and fight coordination are all represented within the diverse career of your Northwest Stunt Coordinator, Jerry L. Buxbaum.

James August Smith James August Smith has coordinated and performed stunts many years for motion picture as well as live events, jumping, skiing and crashing cars at race tracks across the nation. As a member of the elite team of drivers, LA Motorsports, James stays busy making vehicles of all sizes from trucks/trailers to exotic cars look amazing in many different commercials. The “ski” or two wheel car driving has become a specialty for James seen in multiple television shows and feature films. Coming from a background of car restoration and metal fabrication, James brings some innovative and creative ideas to the set. Whether it be an elaborate jump ramp design or a “trick” drift brake set up, having the resources and knowledge on set can be a huge savings in production time.

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Captions Move Beyond TV sk your average person about closed captions, and most will picture the black and white blocks of text that accompany live or pre-recorded television broadcasts. But with a gentle but firm push from the Federal Communications Commission and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, captions have moved beyond television and into the realm of multimedia. Whether a screen is housed in a sports stadium, computer, tablet or phone, chances are it can support captions. “Captioning has evolved a great deal since we got into the business 21 years ago,” reported Carol Studenmund, president and co-owner of Portland’s LNS Captioning. “When we started, we captioned only in the broadcast world, both live and postproduction. And while we continue to work in that environment, captioning over 250 hours of live television every week, we also produce captions for clients such as CenturyLink Field, MetLife Stadium and the Moda Center.” The technology supporting stadium captioning is rapidly improving. Whereas just a few years ago, deaf or hard-of-hearing fans had to make do with handheld assistive devices with weak or nonexistent signal strength, many stadiums now support captions on video boards and huge HD screens. LNS Captioning now provides live realtime captions for all Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Sounders home games in CenturyLink Field, where captions are displayed on two different screens in the stadium so all fans can read along with the public address announcer and any other onfield pronouncements, such as referee calls. On February 2, LNS provided live open captions at MetLife Stadium for the Super Bowl. “The best part of captioning the Super Bowl was writing in real time what Mr. Allen said when he was presented the trophy, and knowing Derrick Coleman—one of the Seahawks players who is deaf—could read along and understand what was being said as it was being said,” said Studenmund. The Portland Trail Blazers have been an LNS broadcast client for 16 years. This season, the Blazers added open captioning to Blazers games in Moda Center. Blazer fan Jay Hutchins commented, “It’s so much easier to follow what the announcer

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LNS Captioning provided live open captions to Century Link Field (above) and the Moda Center for Trail Blazer games.

is saying when you can read along on the big screen.” LNS also provides captioning services for the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, and the Superdome, captioning for both the New Orleans Saints and Tulane University. But sports franchises aren’t the only new captioning clients out there. A 2011 Johns Hopkins University study found that 7.8 percent of people in our country over the age of 12, or about 48 million people, have a significant enough loss of hearing to have harmful impacts in work and school. Those are all people who need assistance understanding the sounds of everyday life. Whether captioning a city council meeting, a university commencement ceremony or the Super Bowl, LNS Captioning enjoys serving their clients and caption viewers across the Pacific Northwest and the entire country.

Corporate communications specialists. Deep experience throughout the Northwest. • Digital Cinema/Crews • Studio/Greenscreen • Post, Animation, EFX

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425-259-4429

Everett, WA


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Koerner Debuts ARRI AMIRA n mid-February, Koerner Camera held an open house at both its Portland and Seattle offices to unveil the new ARRI AMIRA camera. The versatile camera, designed for documentary, reality and live event shooting, combines exceptional image quality and affordable CFast 2.0 workflows with an ergonomic design optimized for single-operator use and extended shouldermounted operation. “The ergonomics of the camera is what sets it apart,” said ARRI’s Jim Davis, product specialist broadcast, who introduced the camera to the Seattle audience. Snehal Patel, also from ARRI, was on hand to explain the AMIRA’s accessory options. A cousin of the higher-end ALEXA cinema camera, the AMIRA features the same 16:9 sensor and exceptional image quality (up to 200 fps) as the ARRI ALEXA. But the AMIRA is lighter, and requires no set up or rigging, which makes it perfect for ‘run-and-gun’ documentary and reality shoots where the action is unpredictable and the camerawork responsive.

I

AMIRA prototypes have been tested by such entities as NFL Films, who used it as a B-camera during the Super Bowl. ARRI has also been contacted by Major League Baseball, who is interested in using the AMIRA during the upcoming season. Explaining the reason sports organizations are so interested in the AMIRA, Davis said, “The high speeds and certain features are very attractive.” The AMIRA begins shipping in April, around the time of the NAB Show. Customers can choose from three levels of software packages—basic, advanced, and premium—starting at $39,999 (compared with the ALEXA’s base price of $75,000). Rentals will also be available from shops like Koerner.

ARRI’s Jim Davis (left) explains the ins and outs of the new AMIRA at the Seattle office of Koerner Camera.

For more information, visit www.arri.com and www.koernercamera.com.

PRODUCTION RENTALS

[A new name and a new location!]

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RENTALS, SALES, SERVICE 38

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Commercial recording in a more relaxing atmosphere* (*two words: Chaise Lounges)

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(

BRIEFS

OSF Costume Rentals Moves to New Facility Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) Costume Rentals has moved their stock of over 50,000 costume pieces to a brand-new, 11,000square-foot, state-of-the-art facility in Talent, Oregon. The exquisite costumes created by OSF’s talented professional artisans are now available through the full-service costume rental facility. OSF offers a wide variety of costumes and accessories in many different styles and periods, from Roman to Modern, and beyond. The OSF Costume Rentals staff will help you find what you need for your next production or film. They ship anywhere in the country, and reduced rates are available to schools, theaters and nonprofit organizations. For more information, contact Emily Ehrlich Inget, costume rental manager, at 541-482-2111 x 308, or visit www.osfcostumerentals.org.

Providing operators and equipment

Lon Haber & Co Expands into Seattle Lon Haber & Co, a Los Angeles-based full-service film and entertainment PR agency, has opened an office in Seattle to complement the L.A. hub and its three satellite offices. “We couldn’t be more thrilled to establish official roots in our old home,” said founder and CEO Haber. “The Pacific Northwest, a stone’s throw from both Los Angeles and Vancouver, nestled in some of the world’s most beautiful nature and among cutting-edge, inspiring, raw, honest and magical filmmakers, both up and coming and well-established.” Haber said the new site offered “an excellent opportunity to have an ongoing presence in an area where many of our environmental and marine-based clients call home while opening up doors for filmmakers and film festivals on local, regional, national and international platforms.”

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425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com

Big in Japan Set to Screen at SXSW Big in Japan, which follows a struggling Seattle band as they travel to Japan, was recently selected to screen at the SXSW Film Festival in March. Loosely based on actual events, the film stars the three members of the band Tennis Pro—David Drury, Philip A. Peterson, and Sean Lowry—and tells the story of their last-ditch attempt to prevent their day jobs from becoming their careers. Written and directed by John Jeffcoat, who also co-wrote and directed the Seattle-shot film Outsourced, the film will premiere Tuesday, March 11, as part of SXSW’s 24 Beats Per Second series.

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Clackamas: Oregon’s New Digital Media Hub MOTION CAPTURE STUDIO WILL SUPPORT THE STATE’S GROWING FILM, TV AND VIDEO GAME DESIGN INDUSTRY ust 20 miles south of Portland lies Oregon’s next big production hub: the Digital Media Communications department at Clackamas Community College (CCC). Through a partnership with video game animation studio SuperGenius, CCC recently unveiled its new motion capture studio, which will exponentially expand Oregon’s film, video game, animation and digital media production industry. The $95,000 studio investment was made possible with the help of a grant from the Clackamas County Cable Division. The motion capture studio— or “mocap”—is the first of its kind in the state. “Our system consists of 16 cameras and is able to capture motion performances of four actors at a time,” said Andy Mingo, director of the Digital Media Communications program at CCC. “There is no other system like it in the state of Oregon, so from a workforce development standpoint, it is invaluable for training students in the skills needed for motion capture in video game development and film. “As educators in the Digital Media program at Clackamas Community College, we pride ourselves on meeting industry needs in the moment because we are finding film and media technology is evolving so rapidly that it is imperative to keep pace. We would be doing students an injustice should we continue giving them educational opportunities with cameras utilizing mini DV, for example. So from this standpoint, we feel very satisfied with our investment in motion capture. We are constantly looking towards the future.” The first motion capture class began in January, and will be offered four times a year. Students will learn how to create motion capture-driven projects that can be used in video game development and the motion picture industry. “Our motion capture class at CCC is going very well,” said Mingo of the program’s inaugural class. “The system is very complicated, but by week three students are already able to calibrate the system and capture motion capture sessions of real time rendered 3D avatars. We’ll be integrating the live camera mode next, which will give mocap directors the ability to capture sessions from the virtual camera’s point of view. We are all very excited about the projects

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CCC’s new motion capture system in action.

that students are currently putting together. We’ll be sure to make these sessions available on the college’s cable channel, CCCTV (and then later online), should anyone want to tune in and check out our work at the end of the term.” In addition to the new motion capture course, the Digital Media Communications program offers courses in audio and sound engineering, film studies, computer animation, video production and Web design. For more information, visit www.clackamas.edu.


SOUND OFF: Spotlight on Recording Studios Bad Animals • www.badanimals.com Bad Animals is an internationally recognized audio production and post-production company specializing in voice talent casting and recording, sound design, original music composition, and sound mixing for feature films, television, radio, games, corporate communications and all audio environments. Located in the heart of downtown Seattle, Bad Animals has four studios along with a music studio for original music composition and scoring. Bad Animals has been a prominent part of Seattle’s production community since 1979 with its rich history steeped in recording artists, bands and music projects as well as production. In June, Bad Animals principals and national Emmy winners Dave Howe, Mike McAuliffe, and Tom McGurk and Seattle entrepreneur Charlie Nordstrom will celebrate 15 years of owning the company. “Our success is built on maintaining a balance of creativity while maintaining a collaborative and fun environment,” says Howe.

Clatter&Din • www.clatterdin.com Clatter&Din, Inc. is a media creation company based in Seattle’s SODO district, which provides production and post-production services to the broadcast, entertainment, communication and corporate communities. Our technical specialties include audio and video production, webcasting and website development. We have a soundstage for shooting video projects in-house and for webcasting services. We also provide many business affairs services, including production, casting, music supervision, content licensing, and AFTRA/SAG contract signatory work. We are a company which prides itself on providing an integrated and cost-effective approach to media creation across multiple platforms. We work with every major NW agency and many nationally-known corporate clients.

Paradise Sound Recording • www.paradisesound.com This year marks Paradise Sound’s 30th year in business. Through the years, Paradise has had the pleasure of working with hundreds of notable projects including those for Universal Studios, Disney, Sony Records, MCA Records, The Hendrix Foundation, Jerry Cantrell of Alice in Chains, Tony Levin of Peter Gabriel and King Crimson, Sunny Ade, The Walkabouts, and the Children of the Revolution… Paradise’s facility was designed and built from the ground up to provide an excellent acoustical environment. Equipped with an SSL 4056G console, Pro Tools, a host of excellent microphones and outboard effects, there is also a wide choice of instruments including a Yamaha C7F grand piano and a Hammond B3/Leslie. Known for its peaceful, relaxed, and private environment, Paradise Sound Recording is located overlooking the north fork of the Skykomish River and the Cascade Mountains in the town of Index, just outside of Seattle. Onsite accommodations are available. Call 1-800-877-6867, email pat@paradisesound.com or visit our website at www.paradisesound.com.

Pure Audio • www.pureaudio.com At Pure Audio, we manage our projects through all phases of audio production, including: talent casting, sound design, dialog direction, voice-over recording, AFTRA & SAG union payroll services, and original music creation. We also supply ADR and looping services for major motion picture studios. Our team is involved throughout the entire process, supervising it closely from beginning to end. In the end, doesn’t it really come down to talent? We think so. Although we have plenty of hightech equipment, we believe it’s more about how you use the technology between your ears. That’s the reason why we’ve been a leader in Seattle’s creative community for over 18 years. Our team works with projects from grand to modest and we approach all of them with the same passion: We are leaders on the west coast in sound for video games, radio, documentaries, museum installations, live theatre, and more. 44

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REX • www.rexpost.com REX offers a high-value customized production experience. We have earned a reputation for quality media production/post-production work in the Pacific Northwest. Whether you need soup-to-nuts production or any of our services a la carte, we are here to serve. Our creative team consistently delivers high quality work. REX is housed in a beautiful 6,200-square-foot Jim Stoikoff-designed facility with two Russ Bergerdesigned recording studios and a full complement of microphones and audio gear and two video edit suites. We have a super quiet green screen shooting stage and lighting, camera, and crewing packages that make REX a one-stop shop for all your production and post needs. Our team approach focuses on delivering your key messaging to your important audience, delivered appropriately whether an entertainment, corporate, educational or informational project. And the goal at REX is to make you look like a hero!

Don Ross Productions • www.donrossproductions.com This may come as a surprise to many of you, but there’s a full-service recording studio in that other city in Oregon. Eugene. We play nice with the big boys and girls: Columbia Pictures, Warner Bros. Television, New Line Cinema, Walt Disney Company, Fisher- Price, NPR, Rubin Postaer and Associates, Yahoo! and DRAFTFCB, Chicago. But enough with the name-dropping (it’s small town syndrome), we take just as much care with our regional and local clients as with the nationals. We’ve been in business since 1988, surprising our parents & competitors. Call us if you’re looking for ADR, ISDN, quality voice over talent and great rates. www.donrossproductions.com 541-343-2692

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NW RECORDING STUDIOS/ AUDIO SERVICES

ADS Recording; Portland, OR 503-223-9941; fax 503-223-6073 ads-recording@comcast.net www.adsrecording.com

Ryan Wiley, president

2

AM Music; Fall City, WA 425-222-6660 ammusic@ammusic.net www.ammusic.net

Steven Ray Allen, president

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Aurastan Music Designs Ltd.; Portland, OR 503-297-9254 greg@gregives.com www.gregives.com

Gregory Ives, CEO

2

Avast! Recording Co.; Seattle, WA 206-633-3926 www.avastrecording.com

Stuart Hallerman

2

Bad Animals; Seattle, WA 206-443-1500; fax 206-441-2910 wendi@badanimals.com www.badanimals.com

Dave Howe Mike McAuliffe Tom McGurk

5

Bear Creek Studio; Woodinville, WA 425-481-4100; fax 425-486-2718 bearcreek@seanet.com www.bearcreekstudio.com

Ryan Hadlock, owner Jerry Streeter, manager

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Bing Bang Boom!; Otis Orchards, WA 509-892-5382; fax 509-892-8102 info@bingbangboom.net www.bingbangboom.net

Bill Byrne, composer

2

Blue Charles Prod., dba Studio Blue; Seattle, WA 206-783-6797; fax 206-783-6796 scot@bluecharles.com www.bluecharles.com

Scot Charles, president

1

Clatter&Din, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-464-0520; fax 206-464-0702 tickle@clatterdin.com www.clatterdin.com

Peter Barnes, president Vince Werner, president Rachel Komenski, EP

4

Cloud City Sound; Portland, OR 503-228-2222; fax 503-228-6819 sandi@superdigital.com www.superdigital.com/cloudcitysound.com

Rick McMillen

3

CryBaby Studios; Seattle, WA 206-660-0117 www.crybabystudios.com

Leigh Stone, owner Justin Wilmore, engineer Chris Proff, engineer

1

Dead Aunt Thelma’s Studio; Portland, OR 503-235-9693 mikem@thelmas.com www.thelmas.com

Mike Moore

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Digital One; Portland, OR 503-228-3441; fax 503-224-7413 cameron@digone.com www.digone.com

Eric Stolberg, president Cameron Shaw, EP

4

Executive Audio; Seattle, WA 206-381-1244 executive@executiveaudionw.com www.executiveaudionw.com

Joseph Reineke

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Fresh Tracks Studio; Portland, OR 503-235-7402 jon@freshtracksstudio.com www.freshtracksstudio.com

Jon Lindahl, owner/ engineer

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GMB Technical Corporation; Sequim, WA 206-851-6667; fax 866-605-5519 info@gmbtechnical.com www.gmbtechnical.com

Jeffrey Bruton, president

1

Grey Hawk Productions; Olympia, WA 206-595-8408; fax 360-754-9165 mark@greyhawk-productions.com www.greyhawk-productions.com

Mark W. Iler, owner

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Hanzsek AV; Snohomish, WA 206-380-2641 hanzsekav@comcast.net www.hanzsekav.com

Chris Hanzsek

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NW RECORDING STUDIOS/ AUDIO SERVICES

Hayton Multimedia; Conway, WA 360-840-0902 wayne@haytonmultimedia.com www.haytonmultimedia.com

Wayne Hayton

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Brendan J. Hogan; Seattle, WA 206-678-2699 brendan@brendanjhogan.com www.brendanjhogan.com

Brendan J. Hogan

1

McComb Sound; Seattle, WA 206-774-7915 info@mccombsound.com www.mccombsound.com

Matt McComb, owner Maggie Garcia, producer

1

Ken Fordyce, CEO Aaron Parks, engineer Diana Skye, manager

1

Mortimore Productions; Spokane, WA 509-327-8384 info@mortimore.com www.mortimore.com

Dan Mortimore, president/ DP/producer; Angela Downey, VP marketing & sales/producer; Ray Gross, senior editor/audio engineer

2

Orbit Audio; Seattle, WA 206-381-1244 orbitaudio@gmail.com www.orbitaudiorocks.com

Joe Reineke, owner

2

Pure Audio; Seattle, WA 206-728-6300; fax 206-728-1433 inbox@pureaudio.com www.pureaudio.com

Paul Goldberg, president Kathy Levin, studio manager

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Mirror Sound Studio; Shoreline, WA 206-440-5889 info@mirrorsound.com www.mirrorsound.com

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NW RECORDING STUDIOS/ AUDIO SERVICES

Rex Post; Portland, OR 503-238-4525; fax 503-236-8347 info@rexpost.com www.rexpost.com

Russ Gorsline

3

Don Ross Productions; Eugene, OR 541-343-2692 don@donrossproductions.com www.donrossproductions.com

Don Ross

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Secret Studio Records, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-935-1165 secretstudio@secretstudio.com

Mark Dabek, president

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StudioBard; Portland, OR 503-273-2273 audiospa@studiobard.com www.studiobard.com

Michael Bard, head funkologist

1

Tim Underwood Productions/TheWebVoice.com; Bend, OR 877-284-7876; fax 541-317-0496 studio@tuproductions.com www.thewebvoice.com

Tim Underwood, owner

2

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services

4

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, partner/EP/director Andrew Watts, partner

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2014 Salary and Hiring

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for Creative Professionals By Maria Scheleen Guest Columnist

f one of your New Year’s resolutions is to make more money, you may be in luck. According to The Creative Group’s 2014 Salary Guide, starting salaries for creative and marketing professionals are expected to be 3.3 percent higher than 2013 levels. If you possess certain in-demand skills, you may see even greater gains.

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The 2014 Salary Guide features in-depth information about hiring and workplace trends, as well as average starting salary ranges for more than 125 interactive, design and marketing positions that can be customized for 135-plus markets in the United States. Following are some of the most notable compensation and hiring trends for 2014, according to the guide: Dearth of Digital Skills As companies invest more dollars in online projects, they seek professionals with experience developing, launching and monitoring digital campaigns. In-demand positions include user experience designers, mobile developers and digital community managers, among others. The catch: There simply aren’t enough of these individuals to go around, making it harder for employers to recruit and retain these individuals. In fact, nearly one in three marketing and advertising executives recently surveyed by The Creative Group said it’s challenging to find


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skilled creative professionals today. That’s why hiring managers must move quickly when the right interactive candidate comes along. Rising Interactive Salaries Starting salaries for interactive professionals, on average, are forecast to increase 3.8 percent this year, slightly higher than the projected increase for creative positions overall. But some jobs are expected to see greater starting salary gains. See chart at right. Seeking Soft Skills It’s not enough to have technical proficiency. Employers seek candidates with strong problem-solving and interpersonal abilities, too. Professionals who can think creatively and find innovative solutions to business problems—and communicate their ideas in a clear and compelling manner—are in strong demand. Raising the Stakes To secure top creative talent, savvy employers are expediting the hiring process and loosening the purse strings. In fact, more than 6 in 10 advertising and marketing executives surveyed by The Creative Group said they are at least somewhat willing to negotiate compensation when extending a job offer to a top candidate; 28 percent of respondents were not. See chart at right. Beyond offering competitive starting salaries and benefits packages, firms also are awarding bonuses (even signing bonuses, in some cases), free or subsidized training, and flexible or remote work arrangements. Opportunities for Freelancers It’s a great time to be a freelancer. More in-house creative departments and agencies are tapping project professionals to support core staff during busy periods and access specialized skills that don’t exist internally. It’s also becoming more common for companies to use temporary assignments as a way to evaluate whether a candidate is a good fit for full-time employment. Want to learn more? Visit The Creative Group Salary Center for additional information on hiring trends for 2014 52

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and access to our Salary Calculator, which allows you to quickly compute average starting salaries for a single position and city. Maria Scheleen is branch manager of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing firm placing interactive, design and marketing professionals on a project and full-time basis. The company has offices in major markets across the United States and in Canada, and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com. Contact the Seattle branch at 206-749-9046.


NW CREATIVE & MEDIA

STAFFING AGENCIES

24 Seven Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-340-0247; fax 206-340-9247 seattle@24seventalent.com www.24seveninc.com

David Miller, director of recruiting – Marketing, Interactive and Creative Services Division

Both

52 Limited; Portland, OR 503-517-0052; fax 503-517-0053 brooks@52ltd.com www.52ltd.com

Brooks T. Gilley, president

Both

Aquent; Portland, OR 503-797-6600; fax 503-220-1821 www.aquent.us

DND

Both

The Creative Group; Seattle, WA 206-749-9046; fax 206-749-9243 seattle@creativegroup.com www.creativegroup.com

Megan Slabinski, district president

Both

FILTER, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-682-6005; fax 206-682-5830 www.filterdigital.com

Kristin Knight, CEO Max Thelen, president

Both

Scion Staffing, Inc.; Seattle, WA 888-487-8850; fax 888-487-8850 sales@scionstaffing.com www.scionstaffing.com

Isaac Schild, CEO Braden Busch, EVP

the smartdept. inc.; Seattle, WA 206-381-5716; fax 206-625-9993 meghann@thesmartdept.com www.thesmartdept.com

Meghann Kern, managing consultant

Both

Vitamin T; Portland, OR 503-797-6622; fax 503-220-1821 www.vitamintalent.com

DND

Both

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Both

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PROFESSIONALS/SERVICES PROVIDED


My Top 3 Ways to Work with the MarCom Manager Gatekeeper By Daniel A. Cardenas Guest Columnist

ecently, it seems there’s a new hurdle to get over when working to nail good creative for our clients: the advent of the MarCom manager gatekeepers. Here’s how it rolls: You finally get the opportunity to work with a great client. You have your initial meeting, go over objectives, even do up a creative brief. You agree on a budget range and go away to dream up the next big thing. All good, right? Enter the Junior MarCom manager. She’s been out of school for a couple of years with a marketing degree in her back pocket. She is the gatekeeper. Her job is to keep people away from her boss so that your client, the key stakeholder/decisionmaker, can address all the other projects going on. So she runs interference in an effort to save time. But is this really the best, most efficient way to work? As Stephen R. Covey talked about in The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, sometimes the “fastest” moves actually end up taking more time. Even though the gatekeeper is keeping the gate closed, supposedly to save time for the decision-maker, the process of finishing your project gets drawn out that much

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farther, wasting time and killing productivity. Let’s say you spend a week or so coming up with a campaign, idea or design for a product launch. Now you need to set up a meeting to passionately present your solution and get a signoff so you can get going on production.

If the manager sees you as someone she needs to manage, she will manage the hell out of you. If she sees you as an expert, she may give you the space you need to create. Bam, you run smack into the gatekeeper. “Just send it to me, I’ll look it over and share it with the team.” The MarCom manager looks it over, makes some suggestions and sends it back to you for a revision. You put the hours in, make the changes, and re-submit. After a few rounds of this, it finally trickles onto the desk of your client with as much passion as a cold fish. You get word that your client wants you to re-work it into something closer to what you started with. This goes on and on throughout the project. You waste a lot of time playing that old game of telephone with a go-between who can’t give up control, but doesn’t yet have the experience necessary to see the bigger


picture. After running into this a few times, here are my top three strategies for working with MarCom manager gatekeepers to keep clear lines of communication with the stakeholders and make the gatekeeper your new best friend. Meet the gatekeeper face to face, even if it’s a 15-minute meeting. Your passion and ability to articulate the concept won’t get lost in an email, and you get the opportunity to show you know what you are talking about by having done your homework on the background of the project. If the manager sees you as someone she needs to manage, she will manage the hell out of you. If she sees you as an expert, she may give you the space you need to create. From the very start, make it clear how important it is to have access to the decision-maker when presenting the initial

1.

2.

concepts. You can do this by limiting the number of revisions allowed before your creative costs start going up. Everyone wants a little creative control, but no one wants to cost the company more money. Suck it up. Sometimes that’s the way it is. Take this time to mentor and educate the gatekeepers you work with, and eventually they will come up to speed and they will trust you as a knowledgeable resource. Today’s gatekeeper for one client may just bring you a new client when she moves on or moves up.

3.

Daniel A. Cardenas is the founder and executive producer at Sierra Media, Inc. and creator of NWLive.tv. He’s worked creative services for over 25 years.

MANY PRINTER PRINTERS RSS TO FROM. CHOOSE FROM M.

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PPI Educational Trust Gives Students a Close-up View of Printing By Teri LeVine WhyVizComm/PPI Educational Trust Manager

s print professionals, it doesn’t take much to remind us that we need to attract young talent to the printing industry. Just look around. The current workforce is aging and contracting. As a result, our industry craves fresh ideas and professionals that will embrace new technologies, marketing solutions, and cutting-edge sales strategies. Where will they come from? Out of Hillsboro, Oregon’s Chamber of Commerce came opportunity. Their tri-county program, School-to-Work, introduces high school students to promising jobs and careers that can be pursued without a four-year degree. On January 8, 2014, Pacific Printing Industries (PPI) and the School-to-Work program hosted 45 high school students from the greater Portland area for PPI’s Career Day... an up-close view of the ROCKING world of PRINT. This was PPI’s fourth Career Day and it received accolades from the students and instructors, who spent a full morning touring local area printer, B&B Print Source. Opening the Career Day, Jules Van Sant, PPI executive director, shared with students an overview of the exciting opportunities in the printing industry. Van Sant felt the day “showed the breadth of exciting career opportunities print businesses can offer young, innovative minds. The addition of digital

A

Many printing companies use the term marketing service provider to describe their relationships with agencies and design firms.

We prefer “best friend.” Stevens Integrated Solutions 4101 SE 26th Avenue, Portland Oregon 503.233.5746 | www.stevensIS.com

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capabilities and integration into our communication’s business mix offers students interested in design, information technology (IT), manufacturing, and performance (sales) solid potential job paths. Businesses need to embrace the future generation of workers to help shift their plans and product offerings to create longevity and success in years to come.” Students broke into small groups that rotated from station to station, hearing from print professionals anecdotes of their careers, opportunities they know exist for entry-level positions, and hints on how students can get their foot in the door, all the while seeing print production in process. The team of presenting professionals included: • Paper Manufacturing: Ed Allen, WCP Solutions • Digital Printing: Karen Kimerer & David Dull, Xerox • Printing Sales: Steve Ohrman,


B&B Print Source • Graphic Design/Prepress: Pippa Currie-Wood, B&B Print Source • Wide Format Printing: Tracey Henderson, B&B Print Source • Offset Printing: Mike Stevenson, B&B Print Source • Bindery: Gregg Lazoff, B&B Print Source Ed Allen of WCP Solutions well represented the commitment and energy of the professionals. When asked to participate for his third PPI Career Day, Allen said, “I can’t think of a better way to spend my birthday. These kids are great and I enjoy helping them discover print.” PPI’s and the Educational Trust’s program is focused on attracting young adults to the graphic communications industry. Their goal is to increase awareness of digital, offset and web printing career opportunities, plus supportive functions, including graphic design, web design, prepress, social networking and full-service in-house marketing. Established in 1989, it is financially supported by PPI member firms, and in turn supports ongoing education and advocacy for the companies PPI serves. PPI is now planning its next Career Day in April and plans to entice students with another plant tour. If you would like to participate as a presenting professional or host a Career Day at your print manufacturing facility, or would like to learn more about the Trust activities, let Jules@ppiassociation.org know!

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ppiassociation.org | 877.762.7742 | jules@ppiassociation.org ISSUE ONE 2014 MEDIA INC.

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How to Use the Magic Five for Sustained Sales Results By Lisa Magnuson Guest Columnist

ow many times have we put all our relationship eggs in one all-purpose basket? Have you ever experienced the despair associated with your key contact moving on? Is it possible to get so enamored with your internal champion that you miss opportunities for expanded sales? If we’re really honest with ourselves, we’ve all fallen prey to one or more of these issues in the past. But have you ever considered what the real cost of these less-thanoptimum conditions might be?

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• Lost opportunities for more sales • Accounts going south • Maintain vs. Grow mentality More to the point, as we move up-market into larger accounts, this environment will naturally provide ready access to more lucrative opportunities and greater revenue-generating potential. If you want to put gain (instead of just maintain) on your sales results, it’s essential to think more broadly and pro-actively about your existing client contacts and general account relationship plans. Enter the “Magic Five.” The Magic Five The Magic Five helps us to re-define, re-evaluate, or re-prioritize our accounts (or divisions, locations, subsidiaries) in terms of both depth and breadth, and in a far more meaningful and quantifiable way. Regardless of the nature of your product or services, or which market segment your sales effort is focused on, there are general “rules of engagement” that we can all use to apply the Magic Five. The Magic Five are the five essential relationships needed for success in a complex selling environment. For example, to achieve any measurable and sustainable level of account growth, we all need: • An executive sponsor • A financial approval contact • A day-to-day or key contact • Relationships with end-users of your products or services • An internal champion In today’s do-more-with-less economic reality, sometimes these roles or relationships are combined or re-purposed based on current trends or market forces. But as you can see, it’s fairly easy to target the Magic Five for your situation. (And by all means, don’t stop at five if the opportunity presents itself. Five is a minimum, not a maximum!) Why five? Because five is where the “magic” starts to happen. There may be other “must have” relationships associated with your solution, such as project management, legal or HR contacts, and so on. Consider the benefits of casting a wider 60

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net, and re-thinking all avenues of approach in terms of viable chances for real and measurable expansion. Don’t Be a Lone Ranger The good news is that you don’t have to establish and maintain all these relationships on your own. As a matter of fact, it’s best not to. Your customers and prospects also want to see depth and breadth from your company. As the team quarterback or leader, assemble your team and start calling the shots from a re-organized and more refined playbook. Develop a simple and effective threephase strike: (1) target the Magic Five, making sure you cover all important relationship bases for your business; (2) discuss appropriate pairings; and (3) assign critical next steps for each relationship. Review your relationship plan on a regular basis to keep it fresh and dynamic. No amount of thoughtful scrutiny or a more expansive profiling of your client list will ever be a wasted effort. Avoid the common pitfalls of: • No relationship plan • Too few relationships • Contacts all at the same level • Once and done approach to top executives • Letting too much time lag between contact The Magic Five will help get you started and can be considered a general rule for all medium to large sales opportunities. It should also be used for existing clients as a key part of your foundation for future account growth and retention. The Magic Five Pays Huge Dividends The benefits associated with the Magic Five approach are numerous and quite lucrative. This “extraordinary” method will go a long way toward getting your solutions through the sales pipeline much more quickly, making roadblocks and setbacks disappear before your very eyes. They include: • Faster and larger sales through executive sponsorship • Awareness of new opportunities through internal champions • Streamlined contract negotiations by knowing the financial decision-maker • Pulse on customer satisfaction and changes by interacting with end-users • Avoid or reduce technical issues with clear communications • Avoid the pitfalls we outlined above • And the list goes on and on… Lisa Magnuson, founder of Top Line Sales, LLC helps high potential sales people, business owners who sell and VPs of Sales win more sales. She works side by side with her clients to navigate through their most complex sales cycles and sales challenges with remarkable results. A recent accomplishment was helping one client secure $44m in contracts last year using her proven framework for landing large opportunities.


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Chalk Talk: Super Bowl Ad Replay Photos by David Speranza

n the world’s biggest stage, armed with the year’s biggest budgets, Super Bowl Sunday is as high stakes for agencies and brands as it is for the teams on the field. The Seahawks may have dominated the game itself, but who dominated during the commercial breaks? At Chalk Talk, held February 6 at Impact Hub Seattle, a panel of marketing experts and audience members debated this very topic. Presented by the Seattle chapters of American Advertising Federation (AAF) and American Marketing Association (PSAMA), the annual event attracted nearly 150 attendees—by far the biggest Chalk Talk ever. This year’s panel included Erin Kelley (POSSIBLE), Zach Huntting (Crown Social), Alison Tintle (Seattle Wunderman Network), Trish Cox (T-Mobile), and Matt McCain (WongDoody). In addition to these ad industry Chalk Talk panelists.

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veterans, Trish Cox, VP of National Advertising and Brand for T-Mobile, also attended and provided her own perspective on the creation of T-Mobile’s three Super Bowl ads. Emcee Chris Cashman from KING TV’s The 206 brought his own observa- Chalk Talk drew nearly 150 people to the event. tions and humor to the proceedings, keeping the crowd entertained and informed. Overall, the panel agreed that this year’s ads were somewhat of a letdown creatively, but the panelists still had plenty to discuss, from critiquing the USA Today Ad Meter’s top and bottom five ads, to how the emergence of women as a major advertising target affected the content, to yogurt wars and head-scratchers, to safe, crowd-pleasing cheesy standards, shifts in social media and technology strategies, and a lively Q&A session. In addition to AAF Seattle and PSAMA, this year’s sponsors included The Seattle Times, Print NW, The Creative Group, Redhook, and Local Craft. Turbo Tax’s “Love Hurts”

BEST TWEETS OF THE NIGHT Throughout the event, attendees of Chalk Talk tweeted their reactions to the commercials and to the discussion using #chalktalk2014. Here are some of the night’s best, courtesy of storify.com: Ad: Maserati “Strike” Best Tweet: @CharlotteAlvina: The more I watch that Maserati spot the creepier it gets. Ad: Chevrolet “Romance” Best Tweet: @thelastblt: “What does the panel think about cow sex?” Ad: RadioShack “Phone Call” Best Tweet: @kacieleacy: Haha! @RadioShack should now be Pager Barn according to @chriscashman Ad: General Mills Cheerios “Gracie” Best Tweet: @sinkorschwim: Maybe Gracie from the Cheerios spot can get the puppy from the Budweiser spot? Ad: Bud Light “Cool Twist” Best Tweet: @iKerry: Would love to see that focus group! Little old ladies begging for a way to save that beer for later. 62

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TWO W+K SUPER BOWL SPOTS LAUDED BY AD AGE Portland agency Wieden+Kennedy had several spots that ran during this year’s Super Bowl, and two of them made Advertising Age’s list of the top ten best. The TurboTax spot, “Love Hurts,” was named the fifth best ad of the entire event. Said Ad Age’s Ken Wheaton, “This spot speaks directly to the millions of football fans watching the game who like neither Seattle nor Denver. The Super Bowl might not be a reason to celebrate for you, the hater of Seattle and Denver. But thanks to TurboTax, tax day can be your holiday.” Coke’s controversial ad, “It’s Beautiful,” was listed as number eight on the list. Said Wheaton, “Coke trades on both its global presence and America’s melting pot in a spot showing happy Americans—of varying races and creeds—having a good, ol’ happy time while ‘America the Beautiful’ rolls in the background in multiple languages. #AmericaIsBeautiful. Damn right it is.” Ad Age did ding W+K for their Maserati ad, however. “Strike” was named the seventh worst spot of the night. For more info on Wieden+Kennedy, visit www.wk.com.


MarketMix 2014: What’s new in Northwest marketing? he Puget Sound chapter of the American Marketing Association (PSAMA) will host the ninth year of MarketMix on Wednesday, March 26, at Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Washington. MarketMix is the premier marketing event of the Pacific Northwest, where marketers from diverse backgrounds come together to learn the latest trends from experts brought in from around the country. The theme for MarketMix 2014 is ‘Discover – Connect – Accelerate.’ The event’s goal is to help marketers discover new tools and new strategies, connect with their peers, and accelerate their business and careers. The one-day conference opens with a keynote from Amy Bohutinsky, CMO of Zillow, entitled ‘The White House is Worth What? Data, Storytelling and the New Business of Building Brands.’

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Other sessions include: • ‘Advanced Email Marketing: Adding Video, Automation, Mobilization, and Dynamic Content’ by Matt Highsmith, president and CEO, Tailored Mail. • ‘Making Your Mark: A Re-Branding Case Study’ by Ron Hansen, president, Hansen/Belyea, and David Kinard, associate VP of marketing, Physician’s Insurance. • ‘Breaking the Mold: The New Rules of PR and Earned Media’ by Aaron Blank, CEO and president, The Fearey Group, and Dana Lewis, manager digital marketing and internal communications, Swedish Medical Center. • ‘Capturing – and Keeping – Online Customers’ by Erin Zefkeles, global online marketing manager, Microsoft/Bing Ads. • ‘How to Hit a Moving Target’ by Mark Capps, executive director, Hacker Group; Scott Fasser, director of digital innovation, Hacker Group; and Kristen Flor, managing director of business development, Hacker Group. • ‘Goodbye AIDA, Hello Mobius: The New Consumer Journey’ by Marc Williams, president, Williams-Helde Communication.

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The event closes with a keynote from Andrew Sherrard, SVP, T-Mobile, followed by a cocktail reception and networking opportunities. For more information www.marketmix.org/register.

and

to

register,

visit

UPCOMING EVENTS The American Marketing Association (AMA) is one of the largest marketing associations in the world, with over 30,000 members who work, teach and study in the field of marketing across the globe. Both the Puget Sound and Portland chapters host events year-round for networking and learning purposes. See below for a few upcoming highlights, and visit www.psama.org and www.ama-pdx.org for more information. February 27, 2014 PSAMA: The 4-C’s of Content Marketing Cast Iron Studios, Bellevue 7:30am – 9am The panel will focus on the importance of building relevant and creative content in order to shape a brand and grow your customer base. March 5, 2014 AMA-PDX: Helsel Hell Bent on Effective Market Research Living Room Theater, Portland 5:30pm - 7pm Learn how market research can improve your messaging, social media strategy and improve your customer’s perceptions of your company – and have fun doing it! March 11, 2014 AMA-PDX: The Social Conversion Opportunity Bridgeport Brewery, Portland 11:30am - 1pm The widespread adoption of Social + Mobile platforms is creating new opportunities to convert customers from both traditional and online media.


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BRIEFS

Anvil Media Merges with Formic Media Anvil Media, Inc., a Portland integrated marketing agency specializing in search engine marketing, social media marketing and analytics, has merged with sister agency, Formic Media, Inc. “While the agencies were initially created with different purposes, they began to evolve and paths converged over the past year or so. After months of planning and analysis, we determined a merger was the best path forward for success for all involved,” said Kent Lewis, president and founder of Anvil Media and Formic Media. “We will gain significant efficiencies across the board, leveraging a combined executive, marketing, sales and operations infrastructure.” Anvil continues to create momentum from the recent evolution from search engine marketing to integrated marketing agency. Several new clients have come on board in recent months, including Aviator Club, Colorado State University, Mindtree and RoboShields. Anvil also expanded relationships with current and former clients including Dr. Martens and Right Management. For more information, visit www.anvilmediainc.com. New Year, New Clients, New Brands for JayRay Nonprofit organizations looking to renew their brands in the new year have chosen the creative and strategic services firm JayRay to help engage their supporters. The Tacoma firm’s recent work is for new and repeat clients. • JayRay is leading a rebranding effort for the 32-year-old Washington Women’s Employment & Education. The effort seeks to differentiate the nonprofit, which helps low-income individuals transform their lives by readying them with career and life skills. WWEE is a new JayRay client. • Tacoma Schools supporters rallied at an inspiring event this month and received the JayRay-produced community benefit report for the Foundation for Tacoma Students. JayRay worked with the foundation, a first-time client, to interpret complex data and concepts to engage readers. • The Tacoma-Pierce County Economic Development Board has returned to JayRay to design its annual report, which graced the tables at the EDB’s annual luncheon in February. For more information, visit www.jayray.com. PRR Receives Top Marks at PRSA’s Totem Awards On Thursday, February 6, Seattle firm PRR received several Totem Awards from the Puget Sound Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). PRR received Totem Awards in Special Events and Observances – Government for its work on the SR 99 Tunnel Project’s “Bertha’s PreBore Dedication Event” with EnviroIssues and in Public Services – Government for its “Don’t Drip and Drive” campaign. PRR was also awarded a Certificate of Excellence in Special Events and Observances – Government for “Street is Complete,” the Linden Avenue North Project Completion Event. • “Bertha’s Pre-Bore Dedication Event”: Bertha is the tunnel boring machine (TBM) that will dig the future SR 99 Tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle. PRR and EnviroIssues worked with their clients, Seattle Tunnel Partners, and WSDOT to help the public meet Bertha and give the world’s largest TBM an appropriate send off. • “Don’t Drip and Drive”: PRR worked with the King County Department of Natural Resources and the Stormwater Outreach for Regional Municipalities (STORM) consortium, which includes more than 40 government agencies, to develop and implement a program aimed at educating Puget Sound residents about the pollution that occurs from small oil motor leaks in cars and to encourage them to take action by fixing their leaks. • “Street is Complete”: The Linden Avenue North Complete Street Project focused on improving pedestrian and bicycle safety through the completion of the missing Interurban Trail link and redeveloping the street into a neighborhood friendly roadway. The “Street is Complete” celebration was a fun-filled community event designed to give Linden Avenue back to the neighborhood once construction was completed. “PRR is exceptional in our ability to genuinely engage people,” said Mike Rosen, managing principal at PRR. “We are very honored by these awards and I am proud of our ability to communicate with people about what is going on, rather than just tell them. That is what sets PRR apart.” For more information, visit www.prrbiz.com.

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Choosing the Right Fulfillment Vendor By Julie Hiatt Guest Columnist

ow do you know if your fulfillment vendor is the best fit for you? When choosing a fulfillment vendor (or choosing to stay with a fulfillment vendor), you need to make sure that not only your product is right for them but that your values and missions are in alignment, too. Fulfillment vendors aren’t just suppliers; for all intents and purposes, they are your business partners. With today’s demands on your company, your fulfillment vendor will be taking on more and more details and functions on your behalf. Their actions will have direct effects on you; make sure those actions support your company’s mission and help you get where you want to go. Just like most companies, fulfillment vendors have niches or target markets that hit their sweet spot. Some fulfillment companies are extremely large. They excel with customers who may have millions of items that need storage and pick and pack. They usually can provide other supporting services like print, procurement and cart services. They usually have vast systems to track all the inventory, shipping and project details. Because of their size and volume, they can usually provide these services at a lower unit cost, however they can be somewhat rigid and you may feel like a cog in the machine. At the other end of the spectrum, there are the mom and pops of fulfillment. They tend to have a small space and only a few employees. They are limited on systems and the volume they can process in a specific period of time, but they can offer great flexibility and personal service. If you have a small, low volume or simple project, they may be the best fit for you.

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Then there are mid-sized fulfillment companies. They may have 50,000 to 100,000 square feet, they may provide some supporting services like digital print or assembly, and they most likely have inventory and fulfillment systems to support their services. Mid-range companies will have more trained staff and they may have a specialty or niche market that they cater to. A lot of mid-sized fulfillment companies are still independent with managing owners. This allows them to be more flexible and give more personalized service, while providing more output and larger capacity than the mom and pops. If your products or orders range between 250 and 10,000 a month, the mid-range fulfillment company may give you the best of both worlds. Of course all of this only speaks to size and price; your fulfillment vendor is responding, inspecting, and fulfilling on your behalf. Your clients will be dealing directly or indirectly with them and will think they are you, so make sure they project your values and mission. After all, when you sign that fulfillment contract, it’s a lot like a marriage license. You should be taking the same care and consideration you took to pick out your mate. After all, divorcing your fulfillment vendor can be just as expensive and painful. These are only three examples of different types of fulfillment companies. All fulfillment companies are different with different capacities, services, capabilities and values. One fulfillment company type is not better than another, they just service different needs. If you would like more information or have any questions or comments, you can contact Julie Hiatt at Global Fulfillment at 206-405-3350 or www.gloful.com.

Relax. Relax e Targeted marketing is our specialty.

www.gcdirect.com www.gcdirect.com 206.262.1999 2 06.262.1999 x 205 205 66

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AAA Printing; Bellevue, WA 425-454-0156 info@aaa-printing.com www.aaa-printing.com

John Madden, president

AccuDirect Response Co; Portland, OR 503-223-2076; fax 503-228-6632 info@accudirectnw.com www.accudirectnw.com

Karen Munro, president Fred Haase, printing & fulfillment; Chris Samples, data processing

ADi; Portland, OR 503-227-5914; fax 503-227-3269 kate@animationdynamics.com www.animationdynamics.com AKA Direct, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-467-2200; fax 503-445-0064 info@akadirect.com www.akadirect.com

Kate Ertmann, president

APDOT LLC; Seattle, WA 206-595-0172; fax 866-853-8568 apheurberg@apdot.com www.apdot.com

Arne-Per Heurberg

Atomic Direct; Portland, OR 503-296-6131; fax 503-292-9684 info@atomicdirect.com www.atomicdirect.com

Doug Garnett Skye Weadick

Aurora Prints; Shoreline, WA 206-274-8475; fax 206-364-0584 print@auroraprints.com www.auroraprints.com

Abyaz Mahmud, president

Bradshaw Advertising; Portland, OR 503-221-5000; fax 503-241-9000 info@bradshawads.com www.bradshawads.com

Barb Bradshaw, president Dave Born, CD Jane Kitchen, controller

Catalysis; Seattle, WA 206-826-8000; fax 206-826-8888 info@catalysis.com www.catalysis.com

Douglas Hunt, CEO Nancy Hadley, MD

Cendix; Lake Oswego, OR 888-898-0066; fax 503-210-6479 sales@cendix.com www.cendix.com

Wilson Zehr, GM

Cesari Direct; Seattle, WA 206-281-7975; fax 206-284-1281 tobrien@cesaridirect.com www.cesaridirect.com

Rick Cesari, CEO Tim O’Brien, VP/partner

The Day Group; Seattle, WA 206-652-3400 x41; fax 206-652-3401 jday@daygroup.com www.daygroup.com

James P. Day, president

Direct Connect Group West; Seattle, WA 206-784-6892; fax 206-782-3623 bclarke@mpg.dcgwest.com www.dcgwest.com

Brad Clarke, president Terry Storms, CEO

Direct Marketing Solutions; Portland, OR 503-281-1400; fax 503-249-5120 www.teamdms.com

Mike Sherman, CEO

The Envision Response Group; Seattle, WA 800-809-8397; fax 206-299-3562 sean@envisiontv.com www.envisionresponse.com GCDirect; Seattle, WA 206-262-1999; fax 206-262-0999 mikeg@gcdirect.com www.gcdirect.com

Sean K. Fay, CEO Justin C. Fay, president/head of creative

Global Fulfillment; Seattle, WA 206-405-3350; fax 206-405-3356 info@gloful.com www.gloful.com

Robyn Bayless, sales manager

Golden Lasso; Seattle, WA 206-838-3170; fax 206-838-3161 philips@goldenlasso.com www.goldenlasso.com

Bridget Culligan, CEO Philip Shaw, president

Good News Media Group; Tukwila, WA 206-398-2399; fax 206-398-2398 info@tbopusa.com www.tbopusa.com

Dan Langdon, CEO Ken Balduff, president

Hacker Group; Seattle, WA 206-805-1500; fax 206-805-1599 cdillon@hackergroup.com www.hackergroup.com

Spyro Kourtis, president/CEO

Hunt Marketing Group; Seattle, WA 206-447-5665; fax 206-447-5789 brian@hmgseattle.com www.hmgseattle.com

Brian Hunt, president

K/P Corporation; Renton, WA 425-227-5400; fax 425-204-6305 info@kpcorp.com www.kpcorp.com

Joe Hollandsworth, VP sales

Mailing Lists Plus Inc.; Bellevue, WA 425-451-3335; fax 425-646-4485 info@mailinglistsplus.com www.mailinglistsplus.com

Carol Kollmann

Marketry; Bellevue, WA 425-451-1262; fax 425-451-1941 bruce@marketry.com www.marketry.com Massini Group; Hillsboro, OR 503-640-9800; fax 503-640-9888 info@massini-group.com www.massini-group.com McIntyre Direct; Portland, OR 503-286-1400; fax 503-286-1300 dan@mcintyredirect.com www.mcintyredirect.com PrintWest, Inc.; Woodinville, WA 425-402-8600; fax 425-481-1454 jim.slayton@printwest.net www.printwest.net

Greg Swent, president Bruce Morrison, VP

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Wayne Modica, president/CEO

Mike Gilbert, partner Cynthia Cruver, partner

Joe Krisky, president

Susan McIntyre, founder/chief strategist Phil Parrish, president/CEO

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SERVICES PROVIDED

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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R2C Group; Portland, OR 503-222-0025; fax 503-276-4096 info@r2cgroup.com www.r2cgroup.com

Michelle Cardinal, Cmedia CEO Tim O’Leary, Respond2 CEO

Seattle Mailing Bureau; Renton, WA 206-431-5700; fax 206-431-5705 kyler@seattlemailing.com www.seattlemailing.com Signature Graphics, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-256-5956; fax 503-256-5763 ddutton@signature-graphics.com www.signature-graphics.com

Chad Richardson, president

Sir Speedy Printing and Marketing Services; Seattle, WA 206-768-9686; fax 206-768-9689 jimb@sirspeedy0922.com www.sirspeedy0922.com Zairmail; Lake Oswego, OR 888-898-0066; fax 503-210-6479 sales@zairmail.com www.zairmail.com

Jim Brebner, owner

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B. Daniel Dutton, president/CEO

Wilson Zehr, GM

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SERVICES PROVIDED

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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NWDIRECT RESPONSE MARKETING SERVICES


Produce, protect, and deliver your brand.

Offset Printing

Digital Printing

Specialty Bindery

Fulfillment

Envelope Manufacturing

Direct Mail

DCGWest.com 206.784.6892

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HEY! H EY! WHA W WHAT’S AT’S YOUR YOUR

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