Issuu on Google+

SIGNIFICANT

MOTHER

TRIPP REED TALKS PDX-SHOT SERIES

THE RAINFOREST

TV PILOT TO FILM IN WA

TEEN FILMMAKERS FILMMAKERS IN SEATTLE  S P OT L I G H T ON

OREGON

PRODUCTION HEATS UP IN THE BEAVER STATE +NW PRODUCTION CO. & SOUNDSTAGE LISTS

CELEBRATES 30 YEARS


2 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 3


CONTENTS

VOLUME 28 • JULY/AUGUST

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker EDITOR

Katie Sauro OREGON EDITOR

Mary Erickson STAFF WRITERS

Crystal Foley, Stephanie Hoover STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Regan MacStravic SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles, Steve Joseph PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Kelly Baker DESIGNERS

Sonija Kells, Sam Rockwell, Liz Weickum WEBMASTER

Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn COVER

On the set of the Portland-shot series Significant Mother with executive producer Tripp Reed and actress Krista Allen as Lydia. Photo by Scott Patrick Green/The CW — © 2015 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved.

7

Nathaniel Buzolic and Krista Allen star in Significant Mother. Photo courtesy of Alloy Entertainment

38

SIFF Opening Night Gala

41

SIFF in Review: Golden Space Needle Awards and More!

Oregon Doc Camp Offers Community and Immersive Learning

45

Tacoma Hosts the Destiny City Film Festival

PDXFF Welcomes Third Year with Films, Workshops and Special Events

47

Big Sonia: Small Stature, Big Charisma

51

Spokane: Your Next Filming Destination

53

Young Blood: Seattle-Area High School Boasts Award-Winning Filmmaking Program

55

Location Team Nominated for LMGA Award

7

The CW’s Significant Mother Shoots in Portland

9

The Goonies 30th Anniversary

13 15 17

Pro Photo Supply Hosts Portland Film Festival Educational Events

19

The Mark Spencer: Portland’s Hotel to the Arts

21

Bread-And-Butter in Southern Oregon

23

Klamath Independent Film Festival Expands its Reach

57

Stunt Work in the Northwest—and Beyond

25

Eugene Film Society to Host First TAD Talk

59

TD Curran: Northwest-based company offers Apple services and support to local media pros

27

The American Dream Comes Alive

29

Portland’s Cine Rent West: Where Production Challenges Get Solved

LISTS

33

Washington Film Legislative Update

31

NW Soundstages

35

The Rainforest: TV Pilot to be Filmed in Western Washington

61

NW Production Companies

4 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Media InC Publishing Group 14240 Interurban Ave. S.,Suite 190 Tukwila, WA 98168 (206) 382-9220, (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (6 issues) are $15 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $30.00 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Publishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus shipping. Copyright © 2015 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA


6 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


THE CW’S SIGNIFICANT MOTHER

SHOOTS IN PORTLAND

By Mary Erickson Oregon Editor (Photo courtesy of Alloy Entertainment)

L

ast June, a new digital TV comedy started shooting in Portland. The producers of the show with a tentative name unsuitable for mixed company put an unconventional spin on the sitcom with a cross-generational romantic relationship. The result is Alloy Entertainment’s Significant Mother.

Originally created for The CW’s digital channel, CW Seed, three digital episodes were produced in 2014. Once CW executives saw the show, they ordered a total of nine episodes for broadcast on the CW network, forgoing Seed altogether. The three original episodes were never shown on CW Seed. Alloy Entertainment, which produced Pretty Little Liars and The Vampire Diaries, has just wrapped production last month on the first season of Significant Mother. The story follows Nate, a young restaurateur played by Josh Zuckerman. Nate goes out of town and comes back to find his best friend and roommate, a Lothario of sorts, in a relationship with Nate’s mother. “It’s kind of a new twist on Three’s Company with a lot of funny, and it ends up having a lot of heart as well,” says Tripp Reed, the show’s executive producer and director of several episodes. Joining Zuckerman on screen is Krista Allen, who plays Nate’s mom Lydia, and Jonathan Silverman, who plays Nate’s dad. The show has also brought in Denise Richards and Linda Gray for guest appearances. Creators and writers Erin Cardillo and Richard Keith considered Portland to be a perfect location thanks to its reputation as a mecca for food appreciation. “When we were thinking about places to set the show,” says Cardillo, “we thought about Portland and how it’s such a great foodie town. Rich and I are both foodies, and we’re really into that culture up here.” Reed connected with Oregon Film’s then-executive director Vince Porter to scope out Portland. “Vince was kind enough to fly me up and showcase Portland,” he says. “He introduced me to the physical production team of Portlandia. Their first and second year budgets were similar to what we’d be working with. We got to see what is possible in Portland.” The show also qualifies for i-OPIF incentives, making Portland all the more appealing. Keith recalled his previous experience working in Portland on 2013’s City Baby, directed by David F. Morgan. This low-budget independent production introduced him to crew with whom he’d reconnect for Significant Mother. “About half the crew on our show now is from that movie,” says Keith. “Everybody is really laid back and enjoys what they do. That makes it so much more fun.” “The crews are professional and they’re used to working on a

A scene from the upcoming season of the Portland-shot series Significant Mother.

variety of sizes of shows,” says Reed. “They can work on something small, but they know how to do it well. They can shift gears easily. On a small production like ours, we don’t always have the luxury of pre-planning, so the crews here are flexible when we need to bring in stars or change the location.” Significant Mother works hard to bring Portland to the forefront of the screen. “The show has a very Portland vibe,” says Reed, “so we’re constantly trying to find ways to get our characters out into the real Portland.” To accomplish this, the production has worked with the city’s film office. “We’ve had incredible support from the city of Portland and we’ve been able to do pretty much what we want to do. We shot in front of Union Station. It’s such an iconic building, and it’s amazing that we can do that. In Los Angeles, you’d have to be a large production to shoot in such a prominent location.” With its unconventional premise of an older woman dating a much younger man, the show is pushing boundaries and breaking down preconceived ideas of how people behave. As Reed points out, “Portland goes by its own rules and the people of Portland have an attitude and perspective on life that you don’t find everywhere else in the country. That’s one of the reasons why it’s such a great place to set the show.” MI Significant Mother premieres on The CW on Monday, August 3, at 9:30pm. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 7


The west coast's most experienced communications company, Emmy award winning Event Communications has more than 25 years of experience. 24-hour support and thousands of radios ready when you are.

jay@eventcomm.us www.eventcomm.us

8 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


3 0 t h

A n n i v e r s a r y

Photo by Andy Petrou

By Regina Willkie Marketing Manager, Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce

T Pirates and Mr. Perkins on the beach. (Photo by Jeff Wallen)

he Goonies 30th Anniversary Celebration was held in Astoria, Oregon, from June 4 to 7, 2015—just a short two weeks ago as of this writing. We enjoyed a successful event overall, bringing a nice economic boost to our community to kick-off the summer season. This is our third anniversary celebration to host, starting in 2005 with the 20th. Attendees come from all across the U.S. and Canada, and we had a representative from every continent except for Antarctica at this year’s celebration. We estimate that 12,000 people participated in some way during the weekend.

The celebration took place at several venues in Astoria and even Cannon Beach, 30 miles away, where some of the movie’s scenes were also filmed. Activities ranged from behind-the-scenes presentations about the filming both from locals and Hollywood guests, a Truffle Shuffle 5K fun run on the beach, themed musical performances, an outdoor film screening on the high school football field seen in the film (which will be torn down in the near future), and bus tours to see the town’s many filming sites—from not only The Goonies, but Kindergarten Cop, Short Circuit and others. Photo by Carrie Marino Ank JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 9


Photo by Tyler Little

This community effort relied on volunteers filling more than 600 shifts in a variety of roles and venues. The event took over the historic Astoria Armory as a headquarters (known as The Goondocks) where attendees could pick up tickets, official event merchandise and browse the 80s Con, a gathering of vendors with items reminiscent of the ‘80s and modern-day pop culture. The remaining 30th Anniversary Goonies products, including T-shirts for the whole family, drinkware and magnets, are available on our website store at www.OldOregon.com. Be sure to pick up your Goonies Gordo, the licensed collectible plush of Chunk and Sloth launched from the celebration. The spirit of collaboration was evident throughout the weekend as the Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce partnered with several organizations as sponsors or activity hosts for the celebration. One such sponsorship came from Geocaching, based in Seattle, who took on the treasure hunt aspect of the event and brought it to the “next level” by creating an interactive, digital experience for attendees. This was a great way for visitors to explore the community, families to work together to solve the puzzles, and residents to join in on the fun by experiencing their home in a new way. Not only did they provide this new digital platform for the “One-Eyed Willy Treasure Hunt,” but they brought in an army of volunteers to help staff that event. KOA (located in Warrenton) was the first sponsor to sign up and supported the event throughout the year with two senior staff members on the event’s planning committee providing expert guidance. They also donated lodging to a few promotional giveaways, as well as to volunteers coming to the event from out of the area. To round out the three major event sponsors, Dark Horse Comics (based in Milwaukie, Oregon) joined the team by lending their design skills to the event’s promotions and publicity work, including layout and design of the souvenir program. As for the main objective of this milestone anniversary— we nailed it! The Goonies events are not held to fund the Chamber’s operations, but to bring awareness to our region as a worthy travel destination, while leveraging the love of 10 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

this cult-classic film. We not only attracted thousands of people to town for the weekend, we garnered international attention through social and traditional media. We have tracked more than 80 print/online stories and 125 broadcast (TV/radio) stories that, combined, reached more than 395 million people. We’ve heard from many area businesses that they had record sales that weekend, too. Our post-Goonies 30th goals are taking advantage of the wave of attention for our area around this film-tourism phenomenon and converting it into year-round tourism, encouraging visits throughout all four seasons. Much of this is happening naturally, with many visitors at the Goonies events explaining that they’ve made it an annual (or more frequent) tradition to come to the Astoria-Warrenton area. We continue to face the challenge of the popular film site of “the Goonies house” being in a dead-end, small neighborhood and are working to shift the focus away from being at the house to other more accessible locations, like viewing it from a distance and visiting the Oregon Film Museum as the must-see experience for film-related visits to our area. MI For more information, visit www.oldoregon.com.

Photo by Andy Petrou

Photo by Carrie Marino Ank


JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 11


12 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


OREGON DOC CAMP OFFERS COMMUNITY AND IMMERSIVE LEARNING Oregon Doc Camp drew nearly 40 participants from around the country.

Keynote presenter Steve James chats with attendees.

A “Speed Dating” pitch session with Steve James.

By Jackie Weissman (Photos by Jan Sonnemair)

O

regon Doc Camp recently wrapped its second year of programming during the last weekend in May 2015 at Silver Falls Conference Center in Sublimity, Oregon. Keynote presenter Steve James, director of award-winning documentaries Life Itself and Hoop Dreams, kicked off the Friday evening programming with a “Silver Linings” Master Class. He shared clips from his films Stevie and No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson, discussing what he learned, what he would have done differently, and how he was able to redeem troubled projects. Oregon Doc Camp, designed as an intimate retreat fostering both learning and fun, was comprised of around 35 attendees hailing from as far away as Florida and New York. Both Oregonians and visitors alike marveled at the beautiful forested setting in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Tangible takeaways included communing with other documentary filmmakers, attending talks by guest presenters, watching works-in-progress, hiking, relaxing, and talking story at campfires together. Inspired four years ago by a group of Portland-area documentary filmmakers as a way to gather informally and watch works-in-progress, Oregon Doc Camp is now hosted under the mantle of Women in Film-Portland, with additional sponsorship by other local organizations such as Pro Photo Supply, Hot Pepper Designs, Koerner Camera and others. In addition to Steve James, this year’s dynamic roster of presenters included Caitlin Boyle, executive director of noted grassroots distribution company, Film Sprout; Curt Ellis, co-founder and chief executive officer of Food Corps, Inc. and producer of the documentary, King Corn; Greg Snider, senior editor at Blue Chalk Media and editor of How to Die in Oregon, among many others; and Courtney Hermann, producer of Crying Earth: Rise Up!, among others. Also offered was a “Speed Dating” pitch session, in which attendees met one-on-one with guest presenters, resulting in a valuable experience for both parties. Oregon Doc Camp combines immersive learning and community building for documentary filmmakers in all stages of

production. This blend of relaxation and inspiration form a rare experience for filmmakers who usually work alone or with very small crews. One attendee said, “Doc Camp is an awesome opportunity to meet others from the documentary community, get out of your vacuum, and gain new insight and ideas you didn’t even know were out there.” More information about Oregon Doc Camp 2016 will soon be up on the website at www.oregondoccamp.com. For more information, please contact Jackie Weissman at jackie@rockmamafilms.com. MI For the past 25 years, Jackie Weissman has worked as a media producer, director, editor, writer, and educator. Her documentary, Rock N Roll Mamas, has shown around the world to sold-out audiences. Her award-winning documentary, The Gorilla and the Piker, was featured on WNET, Channel 13 in New York, as a part of its Reel New York series. She is a founding board member of Women In Film-Portland and has served as Board President from 2012-2014. Jackie is also a founding organizer of Oregon Doc Camp. She received her MFA in film and video production from Columbia College-Chicago and lives in Portland with her husband and teenage son. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 13


14 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


FILM FESTIVALS

PDXFF WELCOMES THIRD YEAR WITH FILMS, WORKSHOPS AND SPECIAL EVENTS By Josh Leake Executive Director, Portland Film Festival

I

n its third year, the Portland Film Festival (PDXFF) has made a big splash on the festival circuit. This includes a nod as one of the “coolest film festivals in the world,” by MovieMaker Magazine, followed by the designation as one of the 50 festivals “worth its entry fee” by the same publication. The seven-day event brings out filmmakers like no other in Oregon, giving filmmakers a chance to connect and network in a compact amount of time. Last year, the festival boasted over 240 visiting filmmakers, cast and crew from its 145 film selections, over 1,200 industry attendees, and over 23,000 general audience members. This made PDXFF the largest film festival in Oregon in 2014 in terms of films screened and visiting filmmakers. Most festivals around the globe screen films and host panels, but the Portland Film Festival has exploded its educational offerings by creating several tracts focused on different fields in the industry. Last year, the festival focused on acting

and screenwriting. This year, it’s adding crew to its offerings, although it will also have speakers, panels and workshops in cinematography, directing, editing, post production, sound and more. Among several other partners, the festival joins with SAG-AFTRA to offer daily acting classes, workshops and discussions with visiting filmmakers and local talent. In addition, Willamette Writers, one of the West Coast’s oldest writing groups, is partnering with the festival to offer two screenwriting classes, panels and workshops each day of the festival. Last year the festival held a screening of Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure with the screenwriters in attendance. The writers also wrote The Doors and Men in Black, among other features, shorts and TV series. Randall Jahnson, screenwriter of Oliver Stone’s The Doors, offered both advanced and introductory level classes. “What I love about PDXFF,” notes Jahnson, “is their commitment to affordable professional level education, giving people of any economic level access to filmmaking. People can really take a class and watch movies after, or go network and meet the crew to shoot their next film.” This year’s classes will be better than ever. Attendees can learn from actors from Boyhood, True Blood, and more. Acting and screenwriting passes will grant you admission to all of the daily workshops. The festival is scheduled from September 1 to September 7, leading up to the Labor Day weekend. For more information on purchasing passes or tickets or to attend one of the workshops, visit www.portlandfilmfestival.com. MI Josh Leake is the executive director of PDXFF. A film he produced, called Glena, can currently be seen on Showtime. He was recently announced as the producer of Chuck Palahniuk’s adaptation of Lullaby. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 15


16 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


FILM FESTIVALS Pro Photo Supply will once again host a series of workshops as part of the Portland Film Festival.

PRO PHOTO SUPPLY

HOSTS PORTLAND FILM FESTIVAL EDUCATIONAL EVENTS

T

he Portland Film Festival has always been as much about making films as it is about watching them. Today, cameras capable of shooting cinema-quality video are cheaper and more accessible than ever before, meaning any independent filmmaker can get the tools to give his or her film the look it deserves. However, access to tools alone won’t make a film.

As a camera store, we here at Pro Photo Supply obviously get excited about new technology and products, and we love putting those cameras in as many filmmakers’ hands as possible. But we also know how important education is in training would-be directors and cinematographers in the art of filmmaking. It used to be that it took years of education just to get to a point where one had access to a high-end movie camera. Now, people can literally shoot first and ask questions later. This has made education all

the more important. That’s why Pro Photo Supply is happy to support and partner with a number of local film education resources, and we are excited to once again welcome the Portland Film Festival back to the Pro Photo Supply Event Center for another week of great workshops and filmmaker presentations. MI For more information on events at Pro Photo Supply, follow the “Events/Education” link at www.prophotosupply.com. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 17


Shooting in Oregon? Let our world-class casting company handle all of your principal talent needs. NW Casting Directors of Wild, Grimm, The Librarians, Twilight and oodles of commercials.

castironstudios.com CAST IRON STUDIOS 15 YEARS & COUNTING | CSA, ATAS, ICDN, OMPA

18 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


THE MARK SPENCER: PORTLAND’S HOTEL TO THE ARTS By Cydelle Higa-Johnston

I

n 1907, the Nortonia Hotel opened its doors in the heart of Portland’s Theatre District and quickly became a second home for many artists and entertainers, including Louis Armstrong, Spike Jones and Sammy Davis Jr. In 1966, the Nortonia Hotel was remodeled and renamed what is currently standing today as the Mark Spencer Hotel. While the Mark Spencer remains “home” to many modern day artists and performers, it is now a hidden gem in the heart of Portland’s newest district in Downtown, the West End District. As Portland’s Hotel to the Arts, the Mark Spencer partners with many art and music organizations, both locally and nationally, welcoming all who stop by. As the oldest, still operating boutique style hotel in Portland, the Mark Spencer is currently undergoing a large, multi-million-dollar renovation. Each of the hotel’s 102 guestrooms and suites will feature new plumbing, wiring, raised ceilings in select rooms and a fresh air intake system through the building. After that, each room is rebuilt with museum finish walls and beautiful crown molding. Finally, modern touches are added with comfortable, top of the line interior accents, premium bedding and updated technology. Throughout the renovation, it was important to preserve the history of the hotel while uncovering beautiful architectural elements and integrating these into the new design. Original brick work and interior beams are being exposed and refinished throughout the hotel for a nice marriage of old world charm and modern day beauty. The hotel is also recognized as a Green Seal Certified property for its practices in environmental sustainability. One thing that will remain unchanged is the first-class service provided to all guests. Each overnight guest receives a complimentary continental breakfast each morning, fresh baked cookies in the afternoon, an evening wine tasting reception featuring local wines, a daily copy of The New York Times and complimentary wireless internet access. Guests will also soon be able to experience neighboring restaurants and retailers in Spencer Court, adjacent to the hotel, through a direct access. Nestled in the heart of the vibrant up and coming West End District, visitors have an opportunity to walk to renowned restaurants, enjoy tax-free shopping, visit museums, theaters and music venues, as well as easily accessing public transportation to take in the sights of the city. Whether this is your first time or if you’ve been here any number of times in the past, we invite everyone to “Stay Like a Local” at the Mark Spencer Hotel – Portland’s Hotel to the Arts. MI Photos courtesy of www.markspencer.com

Visit www.markspencer.com for more. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 19


20 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


BREAD-AND-BUTTER

IN SOUTHERN OREGON

Motorcycle USA spot rolls on location. Photo by Tyler Maddox

By Anita Gomez

E

veryone likes to talk about the large-scale productions and big-budget films and TV shows that come to Oregon. But for those who live and work in the Oregon production industry, the day-to-day local and smaller-budget productions, TV and web commercials, and corporate videos keep bread on the table. And much of that everyday creative action is happening in Southern Oregon. Leading the pack of companies that return time and again to shoot in Southern Oregon is Emotion Studios. Their work for clients such as Nike, Adobe and Hewlett-Packard takes them around the world, but they’ve shot many of their recent HP spots in Southern Oregon. “Shooting in Southern Oregon is like coming home to me,” says Glen Janssens, a CEO and director now based in San Francisco but who previously lived in Southern Oregon. “The combination of incredible crew, talent, the wide variety of stunning locations (and great food!) make Ashland and the Rogue Valley among my favorite places to shoot. And… a macchiato from Case [Coffee] rivals any that I’ve ever had.” Budweiser recently shot a high-profile spot in Southern Oregon. “One of the reasons was the 50-plus acres of private land my family owns. It made it easy for Budweiser to stage whatever they needed, including a large bonfire,” explains Tyler Maddox, owner of Maddox Visual Productions, who appeared in the spot. Other locations for the spot included the film-friendly Medford/ Jackson County Airport and the City of Jacksonville. The spot’s production company hired many local crew. Southern Oregon sees a lot of production for the auto industry, thanks to its incredible array of environments and roads. The C2 Ranch outside of Eagle Point was recently scouted for Subaru, and Crater Lake and the coast have been locations for Mercedes, Ford and more. Lithia Motors, headquartered in Medford, which grew from a single car dealership in 1946 to one of Amer-

ica’s largest chains of automotive dealerships, shoots almost all of their dealer spots and running packages in Southern Oregon, using local talent both in front of and behind the camera. One local company doing work for both local and national clients is the aforementioned Maddox Visual Productions. With 15 years of experience in the industry, their list of recent clients include Husky Liners, Motorcycle USA, Goodwill Industries, Motorcycle Superstore, Bell Helmets, Brammo Electric Motorcycles, and Harry & David. Maddox Visual Productions is situated on large rural ranch property that Tyler Maddox’s family owns in Jacksonville. The complex includes a 1,650-square-foot studio with a 3-sided cyc wall studio. Combined with the only 5-ton grip truck in Southern Oregon and an inventory of rental camera gear, Maddox is keeping many members of the production industry in Southern Oregon busy. In the agency world, Lanphier Associates in Medford is one of the region’s largest. With 27 years of experience in marketing and advertising, Lanphier provides a range of creative services, including print, web, branding, radio and television for their clients, which include Premier West Bank, Cascade Wood Products, Pacific Retirement Services, and many others. Adding to the list of local creative agencies and production companies that aggressively pursue commercial and corporate work using a diverse set of skills and experience is Sights & Sounds. The event production company used their 25 years of experience, combined with their video production chops, to asJULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 21


On stage for Sauce Labs marketing videos. (Photo by Todd Wilson)

sist the show Wheel of Fortune when it came to the area. The beauty of Southern Oregon is not just a draw for commercial clients. It’s also a region that attracts creative people from around the country to take advantage of its great locations, experienced crews, abundant acting talent, and cost-friendly resources. Feature film company Joma Films relocated from Los Angeles and diversified into marketing work for Mondavi Wines, eMyth, and the Ashland Independent Film Festival, among others. Fraser Film Group principal Todd Wilson relocated from Atlanta, bringing clientele like Leica Geosystems and Sauce Labs in tow and producing their spots in Southern Oregon. Commercial work demands high creativity requiring quality crew and the top tools of the industry, and both are in strong supply in Southern Oregon. Lotus Motion Pictures, one of the new kids on the production scene, owns one of the EPIC Dragons

22 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

available for rental. Other high-end cameras that can be found in the area are the Black Magic, Canon C500, and Sony FS700 with Odyssey 4K recorder. Jib arms, steadicams, MˆVIs, drones and more are also available locally. Reel House Films, owner of a 30-foot jib arm, will soon be reopening a 5,000-square-foot soundstage with large green screen cyc wall. Rocky Garrotto, who co-owns the Odyssey gear with Sights & Sounds, exemplifies the strong and multi-talented crew that live and work in Southern Oregon. “In a smaller market, you have to wear many hats. I shoot, 1st AC, light, grip and edit. Because of those diverse skills, I have been able to work on a variety of productions, ranging from in-house training videos to local car commercials to complex shoots for HP and Leica.” Garrotto, who is listed as a Location Scout/Manager in the area’s online industry directory hosted by Southern Oregon Film and Media, recently scouted for L.L. Bean. The clothing retailer came to shoot their 2015 Fall Catalogue on local BLM and U.S. Forest Service lands. Whether it’s for the web, TV, or any of the many growing outlets for video marketing, production is booming in Southern Oregon and growing every year. Quality creative talent is attracting attention, further strengthening the region’s reputation as a great place to live and work as a filmmaker. For information contact Southern Oregon Film and Media (SOFaM) via its website, www.filmsouthernoregon.org, or e-mail sofam@filmsouthernoregon.org. MI Anita Gomez is a freelance writer living in Grants Pass, OR.


FILM FESTIVALS A still from Ryan Niemi’s CG film The Edge of Eternity. (2013 Klamath Independent Film Festival)

KLAMATH INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL EXPANDS ITS REACH By Jesse Widener

T

he Klamath Independent Film Festival highlights resident filmmakers of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, Siskiyou and Modoc counties of Oregon and California. As a new addition to the festival this year and part of its continual expansion, films from outside filmmakers primarily shot in the region are also welcome. There is no cost to filmmakers to submit, and general admission is free thanks to full support from sponsors and donations.

At nearly a mile in altitude, Southern Oregon’s Klamath Falls sits against a backdrop of rugged high desert and alpine mountains, miles of national forest, and the largest and deepest freshwater lakes in the Western United States. It also serves as the hub of commerce and entertainment for Southern Oregon and Northern California residents off the beaten path as far as 100 miles in any direction. With its roots in timber and agriculture, and an increasingly strong technology presence, Klamath’s burgeoning arts community is as varied as it is spread out. Painters, photographers, musicians, writers and filmmakers grown locally, along with those settled in from greater metro areas, are seeking out means to exhibit their work in this community previously unknown for its arts presence. The Klamath Independent Film Festival (KIFF) is the premier event bridging the gap to put the best films from the best filmmakers in and around the region on the big screen... and what a big screen! 2015 marks the third year of the festival, produced by the Klamath Film Makers Group in partnership with the Ross Ragland Theater, a genuine 700-plus-seat

Part of the daily routine in Sean Johnson’s Monday. (2013 Klamath Independent Film Festival)

A wanderer contending with the desert in Jesse Widener’s Bare the Sun. (2014 Klamath Independent Film Festival)

Interrogation at gunpoint in David Kirk West’s Liberation. (2014 Klamath Independent Film Festival) JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 23


es, grows and supports a base of local talent through the gathering of like-minded individuals, building and utilizing skill sets relating to the film industry, and promoting those films. KIFF is an extension of KFMG’s mission to provide the means and venue for Klamath filmmakers, as well as for other filmmakers in Southern Oregon, for whom there is no other festival headlining filmmakers and films of all genres from the region. KFMG also sponsors additional film-related events to enrich and challenge local filmmakers and the local community. These include filmmaking workshops, guest speakers, and corollary events such as Portland’s Northwest Filmmakers Festival annual traveling show. This year’s Klamath Independent Film Festival runs Saturday, August 29. Screenings start at 7pm, so mark your calendar and see what else Klamath has to offer. KIFF 2015 is sponsored by the Ross Ragland Theater, Southern Oregon Film and Media, Main Street Jewelers, Klamath Audiology, Bank of the Cascades, Riverside School Learning Annex, and Sharky’s Shack Restaurant. For more information about KIFF and the Klamath Film Makers Group, visit www.klamathfilm.org. MI

OMPA APPOINTS INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Filmmakers on stage for Q&A at the 2014 Klamath Independent Film Festival. (photo by Gary Kout)

Art Deco theater from the 1930s. This theater had fallen into disrepair in the 1980s and was on the brink of demolition. It was rescued, renovated and expanded into Klamath’s cultural arts center as it stands today. Twenty-five years into its tenure, the Ragland serves up national and international entertainment for the region, capping its season each year with the festival in late August. The Klamath Film Makers Group (KFMG) works to create motion pictures produced by or involving filmmakers of all levels in and around the Klamath region. It establish-

24 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Jesse Widener has a wide range of experience in the arts, including architecture, music composition, photography, software development, drawing and writing, in addition to filmmaking. Jesse is a member of both Klamath Film Makers Group (www. klamathfilm.org) and Southern Oregon Film and Media (www. filmsouthernoregon.org).


EUGENE FILM SOCIETY TO HOST FIRST TAD TALK By Joshua Purvis Executive Director, Eugene Film Society

O

n August 11, the Eugene Film Society, in partnership with the Technology Association of Oregon (TAO) and Downtown Eugene Economic Development, will host the first TAD (Technology & Arts Downtown) Talk event highlighting the role the arts and technology play in supporting downtown Eugene’s recent renaissance. TAD Talks are the first fruits of labor from the newly formed partnership between EFS and TAO to promote creative enterprise and foster innovation in the Eugene area, as well as advocate for greater integration of technology and the arts into the local K-12 public education system. The Eugene Film Society is a recently formed community arts organization that supports regional film production and a grassroots film culture by encouraging competition and collaboration among community film organizations; promoting seasonal cinematic events; fostering innovation and investment in the local visual media industry; and improving visual literacy among our youth. We organize several film events throughout the year, including a 72 Hour Horror Film Competition, a 72 Hour Music Video Competition, and a Screening & Social celebrating the best of local film production and specialized exhibition that successfully engage the University of Oregon, Lane Community College and downtown Eugene communities. Along with TAO, we now aim to coalesce much of that energy and goodwill to better support media and tech education in the Eugene School District. We are so thrilled to have Matt Sayre in town leading the local TAO office to support Eugene’s tech sector. Already, he has helped introduce world-class internet capabilities into the downtown core and intends to expand its reach significantly if he can attract much needed investment to build out that infrastructure. The Eugene Film Society is committed to aiding Matt’s efforts because it will, in turn, increase Eugene’s ability to attract more multimedia ventures like Iris Educational Media, a behavioral research and development firm, and Pipeworks Studio, which

produces live games for console, PC, tablet and mobile players. Increased investment in tech infrastructure will maximize our city’s investment in human capital—our young artists, developers and engineers—to not only compete regionally, nationally and globally in their professional endeavors, but also reinvest in our community with their creative entrepreneurship. By examining how technology and the arts encourage economic development and community engagement in the downtown Eugene area, EFS and TAO aim to promote more creative enterprise and attract greater investment in Eugene’s tech infrastructure. After much dedication by the City of Eugene, and a network of downtown stakeholders, to renew downtown Eugene, we are starting to see signs of progress and success where once there was blight and exodus. Eugene is progressively becoming a desired destination for young professionals, and with ready access to the University of Oregon and Lane Community College, EFS and TAO believe we can become even more so. MI Joshua Purvis is the Executive Director of the Eugene Film Society and serves on the board of Downtown Eugene Economic Development. He is also the Manager of Events & Promotions for the Bijou Cinemas and Community Engagement Coordinator for the University of Oregon Cinema Pacific Film Festival.

“Camp Abercorn” Photo by Ethan Jewett

Professional Casting - Reasonable Rates MOBILE CASTING • COMMERCIALS • FILM • WEB • TV Lori Lewis • Casting Director • FreeSpirit Casting LLC 503.720.4458 • www.FreeSpiritCasting.com


26 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


THE AMERICAN DREAM

COMES ALIVE F By Blake Laitner

irst off, let me say, “Movie magic is real.” I’m living proof of it. My story came flying off my script pages and into an indie film.

It all started one day, when I met fellow student filmmaker, Hakym. I presented him with my idea: “Let’s start a film club and call it ‘Project Portland,’ due to the fact that is where we are located.” Hakym laughed. My dream consisted of bringing Portland’s finest filmmakers, actors, grips, booms and volunteers together to make an indie film. Their responses, for the most part, were positive. Now, we needed a project to bring to the table. I had written a screenplay called The American Dream. Hakym loved it. It’s a story of one man’s search for independence. Hakym advised me that the story was too long and that it needed a rewrite. I started doing my part, while Hakym met at coffee shops with the right people. He put together a solid cast and crew. They all believed in The American

Dream and didn’t mind working for free. I brought Hakym a revised copy of my script, and recommended, “Why don’t we schedule a meeting at a library and see who shows up?” The next week, Hakym called with great news. “I can’t believe it! We had a cameraman, actors and a boom show up.” I was ecstatic about this news. A real experienced cast and crew. My dream was really coming alive. I started thinking peanuts and popcorn. I told Hakym, “When you think popcorn, you got a blockbuster on the way.” He nodded his head in agreement. On paper it looked perfect, but it felt intangible. That was, until the cast and crew met for the first time. I was as nervous as a cat on a celluloid roof. I didn’t know what to expect, but everyone was here for Hakym and The American Dream. Now that pre-production was completed, it was time to execute. The next three days of shooting were a paradox: long days that flew by. Having an experienced cast and crew made my life easier, but just like in real life, we did have a lot of problems to solve. After the three days of hard work and months of preparation, I knew The American Dream would be an astonishing film. Film festivals, here we come! MI For more information, visit the film’s Facebook page at www. facebook.com/theamericandreamshort?fref=ts. This article originally appeared at www.mortlaitner.com.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 27


Production & Deluxe Make-up, Wardrobe Trailer Christina Fletcher - Owner 42ft Production & Celebrity Trailer & Generator Rental • Double Power • 2-6 Make-up/Hair Stations • Dressing Room w/ Shower • Green Room • Wardrobe • Fully Furnished Galley • Excellent Service • WiFi

503-286-7000 • 503-347-8453 www.StarvoyagerRVRental.com

The Best in the Business www.sagaftra.org/locals/seattle 123 Boylston Ave E. Seattle, WA 98102 206-282-2506

Sara Burton Location Scout and Manager

sara@girlscoutlocations.com 503.998.2793 www.girlscoutlocations.com

JUSTINA’S CRAFTY

HORSES & TRAINING  

www.imdb.me/billlawrencevii

“If it has hooves, I can train it.” CREDITS INCLUDE:

CHEF JUSTINA PANTHER-RENOUD healthy variety • fresh food throughout shoot vegetarian, vegan & gluten free available • culinary trained credits include: Z Nation, The Architect, Transformers 4 & More

chefjustina@hotmail.com • 509-981-5803 28 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

• Ben Hur ‡0DJQLÀFHQW • The Legend of Zorro • The Young Black Stallion ‡*DUÀHOG • Evan Almighty • War Horse • 50 to 1

260 Colockum Road Ellensburg, WA 98926


PORTLAND’S CINE RENT WEST: Where Production Challenges Get Solved

“I

always want to film in Cine Rent,” says director Kevin Costello, “whether it’s shooting a scoop of ice cream, or an entire village in snow. For me it’s a perfect balance of size, layout, facilities and vibe. Definitely a place where you can do your best work.” Located in Northwest Portland’s industrial-turned-creative district, the full service facility with its 5,000-square-foot soundstage and 1,600-square-foot cyc wall, attracts producers and photographers looking to create exceptional work for their clients. And that means they bring their biggest production challenges. Cine Rent West owner Chris Crever, who began his career as an assistant cameraman, remembers what it was like to work on ambitious productions. “When you’re pushing yourself to do your best work,” he says, “you don’t play it safe. You’ve told the client, ‘Yeah, we can do that.’ You plan carefully and then there’s that moment at the start of the day when you think, ‘Are we really going to be able to pull this off?’” From working with trained animals (like the mischievous cat that shuts Sir Spamalot in the microwave for a SPAM commercial), to holiday TV spots requiring a dozen child actors, to complex projects that require a melding of digital effects and live footage, Cine Rent West has positioned itself as the go-to facility for ambitious work. Creative agency Mutt Industries brought a unique challenge to the production facility when they landed the job of creating a TV spot for Nike’s Hyperdunk basketball shoes. The concept was to show a single player fast-breaking the length of an outdoor court on the surface of the moon. Because of the moon’s low gravity he’s able to launch himself at the top of the key and dunk on an 18-foot rim. Working with production company Cardboard Castle, the creative team and crew marked the green cyc wall for motion capture. Then they spent the next few days filming the talent driving, jumping, and dunking from every conceivable angle. The resulting spot looked like it had been shot in a lunar blimp hangar, with the illusions of size, reduced weight, and even moon dust perfectly created. Still photographers have come to Cine Rent West to do indoor shoots for things that are too large to fit inside anywhere else. Marcus Swanson rolled in the Castrol Rocket, a 25-foot-long Triumph super-motorcycle, designed to break the land speed record at over 400 mph. Bushwacker, maker of off-road vehicle accessories, regularly brings in three big trucks at a time. Runner’s World magazine could photograph women marathon runners at race speed. And Energy BBDO

Nike’s Hyperdunk shoot.

brought in an eight-foot-tall yeti for their Altoids breathmints shoot. The challenge that brought in business portrait photographer Kelley Dulcich was when she needed a spread out group photo for a local realty office—all 46 realtors. “Sometimes a client’s challenge isn’t nailing a special effect,” says Cine Rent West stage manager Brynden McNew. “It’s getting everything shot in a single day.” Because of the facility’s extra room and ample selection of lights and other gear, when a problem comes up, producers can quickly get the equipment they need to keep going. There are no extended breaks while a grip makes a frantic trip to a rental house. This efficiency has made Cine Rent West a favorite location for music videos, attracting recent shoots from Liv Warfield, Gossip, Sepiatonic, and Goldfoot. “If it’s Nike or Adidas shooting next season’s big shoe with pro athletes, or a direct response agency getting testimonials from real people, they’re here because they need to do exceptional work,” says Crever. “And we are set up to help make that happen.” MI JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 29


30 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


NW

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE; FAX E-MAIL WEBSITE

N S UMB STTAAGESER O GE /SO F S UN D

SOUNDSTAGES STAGE DIMENSIONS

DESCRIPTION OF FACILITY

AMENITIES

109 Salmon; Portland, OR 503-913-0123 contact@109salmon.com www.109salmon.com

Payam Sadri, 1 owner Kevin Hasenkopf, stage manager

24’ x 16’ corner cyc with 16ft ceilings. Lighting grid at 12ft.

On the eastside waterfront, our 2500 square foot studio offers a cyc wall, options for natural lighting, funky art walls and rooftop views of downtown.

Production office, wireless internet, freight elevator, rooftop views, equipment rental, green screen, photography backdrops and flashes and creative services.

@Large Films, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-287-5387; fax 503-287-5886 info@largefilms.com www.atlargefilms.com

Juliana Lukasik, owner/director

1

4500 Square Feet, 73’ deep x 62’ wide and 16’4” to rafters. Two-wall hard cove Cyc measures 30’ x 40’ and 16’ high. Roll-up door, 12’ x 10.5’, with direct street access.

Sound sealed, WiFi, elevated client area. Permanent craft station with access to full kitchen. Make-up and wardrobe room with full shower. Full heating and air conditioning.

Full sound sealed studio including 16’ sound doors. Twenty clean 20 amp outlets and a 50 amp drop from our breaker. Additional production room available.

Ackerman Films/Stage13; Portland, OR 503-504-4499 dan@ackermanfilms.com www.stage13.net

Dan Ackerman, owner

1

1600sf (36’x45’) - 26’x26’ corner Perfect for smaller productions, ready to shoot green Green room, 5 bathrooms, lobby, kitchenette, cyc - 20’ ceilings - 13’ lighting grid - screen. Client friendly. Great location in Portland’s Pearl production offices, Wifi, onsite parking available, full adjoining 12’x16’ table-top studio. District next to Whole Foods. grip & lighting packages.

Allied Video Productions; Salem, OR 503-363-7301; fax 503-363-6477 scott@alliedvideo.com www.alliedvideo.com

1 Scott Hossner, CEO Dan Walker, CFO Jeff Hart, COO

48’ x 46’

Lighting grid, DMX lighting board, 4 Kino Parabeams, 4 Shop area, full kitchen/lunch room, makeup/wardKino Image 45s, ellipsoidals, Pars, electricity included, robe room, bathrooms & shower, client office, Wi-Fi, roll up doors, control room, black drapes, green screen. phone, fax.

B47 Studios; Seattle, WA 206-501-3054 info@b47studios.com www.b47studios.com

Kevin Maude, CEO

1

950 sq. ft. soundstage.

Soundstage is rigged with a full lighting grid with DMX control and dedicated studio cameras, and can be staged with a multi-purpose, anchor-style broadcast set. The control room includes a full switching package, live satellite up- and down-link capabilities, Chyron, teleprompter, CCU, ProTools, IFB, and comm system.

Private parking, reception area, 2 conference rooms with 48” networked HD monitors, stocked coffee bar, full working kitchen (including refrigerator, microwave, range and oven), private bar with taps, prop room, loading dock.

Cine Rent West; Portland, OR 503-228-2048 production@cinerentwest.com www.cinerentwest.com

Chris Crever

1

Studio measures 71’ deep x 72’ wide x 17’ to light grid. (85 ft. diagonal distance). Stage cyclorama walls and floor are supplied painted white and ready to shoot, with two-wall hard cove measuring 35’ x 46’ x 17’.

We have 1800 amps of total power, a full overhead TV light grid with forty-five 20 amp bates outlets (600 amps total) and 1200 amps of stage floor distribution available. The Loading Bay area is 18’ x 20’. Trucks do require a lift gate for unloading large equipment.

Rental price includes the stage, stage manager, the CRW grip package, the production office, 5 work stations, 2 high speed DSL connections, fax, copier, make-up room, greenroom, bathrooms with showers and the lunchroom. Also includes our on-set client lounge, private conference room and parking.

Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/EP Debbie Mann, office manager

1

N/A

Cinemagic Studios features a full service production studio to meet all of your shooting needs.

Professional and talented crews available. A wide range of lighting solutions and packages. A large variety of grip gear and production equipment.

Cinesaurus; Lynnwood, WA 425-830-3545 info@cinesaurus.com www.cinesaurus.com

David Hudson, EP 1 Steven Hudson, CD

21’ x 21’ greenscreen corner cyclorama with 16’ wall. Production space with 836 square feet and 18’ ceilings.

The Cinesaurus Studio is a floor-to-ceiling green screen studio with a hard chroma green corner cyclorama. Studio rental includes lighting for the green screen, but additional subject lighting is not provided. There is direct outside access to the studio through a roll-up garage door.

Rental includes access to a fully-furnished lounge, bathroom/dressing room with vanity lights for hair/ costume/make-up, and a loft space that overlooks the studio for high-angle filming. Also available: Audio recording booth (recording equipment not included).

FLUTTER Studios; Seattle, WA 717-746-8611 studio@flutterseattle.com www.flutterseattle.com

David Wentworth

1

1,900 square foot loft-style studio with 18 foot-high ceilings.

100-year-old exposed brick walls, huge open production space, 2nd-floor creative lounge with Frenchdoors, and mezzanine viewing deck overlooking the entire production space.

Fully equipped studio, complimentary grip equipment. Hair & Makeup station. 50/50mb Wireless, 100/100mb Ethernet. Surround sound audio. Waterfront, beautiful historic buildings, public parks, and an incredible variety of outdoor locations right outside.

Fremont Studios; Seattle, WA 206-838-9080 sjonas@fremontstudios.com www.fremontstudios.com

Scott Jonas

3

Stage A is 15,000 sq. ft. with a 60x40x42 performance stage, 20’ grid and 60x100 hard cyc. Stage B is approximately 6500 sq. ft., cyclorama approximately 40’ x 40’ x 18’.

Soundstage A is the largest and only audience rated, acoustically designed, environmentally controlled, production studio north of Los Angeles in the United States. The studio’s overall design is custom tailored for commercial film/television cinematography and high end special events.

Support rooms and facilities include post production edit suite, voice over/announcer booth, screening theater, restrooms, back stage warehouse, green room/makeup, semi loading dock.

The Greenhouse Studios; Seattle, WA 206-218-6810 book@thehousestudios.com www.thehousestudios.com/the-greenhouse

Emily Goodnight, 1 artist rep/ producer

Approximately 1550 square feet.

This commercial daylight studio offers east, west and north facing windows with plenty of options to modify the light. The Greenhouse’s main feature is an open kitchen ideal not only for food styling but great to shoot in for food photography, cooking shows and lifestyle shoots.

Outfitted with an induction range top, oven, dishwasher, deep double sink and our favorite feature, butcher block countertops.

HD Loft Studios; Portland, OR 503-880-6889 info@hdloftstudios.com www.hdloftstudios.com

Heather Harrison, 1 owner

3,800 square-ft clear span building Fiberglass, waterproof Cyc measures 24-ft (width) x with 13-ft, old growth Doug fir 12-ft (height); available in custom colors. Wet stage ceilings. capability for shoots requiring rain or liquid effects via industrial GFCI outlets. 46,080 watts lighting grid power divided by 16 Commercial GFCI power outlets.

Light-industrial shop space with 220v and 110v power for sets, props and costumes you may wish to fabricate; warming kitchen and food prep area; dressing room with bathroom and double-headed shower; conference area; WiFi network with music on demand; client lounge; full bar.

The House Studios; Seattle, WA 206-218-6810 book@thehousestudios.com www.thehousestudios.com

Emily Goodnight, 3 artist rep/ producer

8,700 square foot facility with a studio floor of 1,800 square feet. Studio A is approx. 20’ x 30’. Studio B is approx. 18’ x 30’. Studio C is approx. 20’ x 25’.

The studio floor is 1,800 square feet and may be divided into three shooting bays; each individual shooting bay is approximately 600+ square feet in size. These dimensions do not include additional amenities such as kitchen or wardrobe room.

Wi-fi, kitchen, wardrobe room, conference room, stereo, 4 bathrooms, 2 refrigerators, 3 ovens, microwave, coffee maker, loading dock and vehicle drive-in ramp, private and public parking. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 31


NW

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE; FAX E-MAIL WEBSITE

N S UMB STTAAGESER O GE /SO F S UN D

SOUNDSTAGES STAGE DIMENSIONS

DESCRIPTION OF FACILITY

AMENITIES

Our 3500 sq. ft soundstage features a 32’ long x 16’ wide x 16’ tall two-wall white cyclorama, and a larger 45’ long x 24.5’ deep x 23’ tall three-wall green screen cyclorama, both with 30” radius corners for seamless lighting and a full schedule 40 steel lighting grid at 23’ high that can be lowered to ground level.

Available with the soundstage are studio grip and lighting rentals, with additional grip packages between 2-4 tons available through our partners at OMPA. A designated 850 AMPs of power is available with any soundstage rental. The soundstage is directly accessible by a large roll-up door that can accommodate up to a 5-ton truck, and includes 2 additional semi docks that can accommodate full sized deliveries.

Soundstage rentals include the use of our kitchen & craft services area, hair & make-up room, wardrobe & changing room, conference room, and separate men & women bathrooms. Intersect Video offers 24 hour availability and requires Production Insurance for all soundstage rentals.

Intersect Video; Wilsonville, OR 971-224-4808 carey@intersectvideo.com www.intersectvideo.com

Carey Fiock

2

Island Station Media Lab; Milwaukie, OR 503-901-4202 info@isml.info www.islandstationmedialab.com

Roger Hancock, manager

1

Stage Dimensions - 24’ wide by 10’ Medium sized studio. Five diffused overhead panels tall and 14’ deep. equipped with 30 KinoFlo T8-32K55 bulbs. Four 6” fresnels upstage. Two 4x4 KinoFlo T-1275K55 fixtures downstage. Additional fills and softboxes avail.

ADR booth, multiple DAWs, changing room, hair and make-up station, record lounge, production office, garage door, on-site storage.

Maddox Visual Productions; Jacksonville, OR 541-899-1456/541-261-4396 tyler@maddoxvisual.com www.maddoxvisual.com

Tyler Maddox, owner

1

1,650-square-foot studio.

The only 3-sided cyc wall in Southern Oregon. The studio is also equipped with a 7-foot motorized turn table, motion control equipment, and a motorized 25x25 overhead-grid that drops for easy lighting rigging.

Maddox also offers the only 5-ton grip truck in Southern Oregon and an inventory of rental camera gear, in addition to a color corrected editing suite. Located on a 50-acre rural ranch property, which is available as a filming location.

Pacific Grip & Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-622-8540 info@pacific-grip.com www.pacific-grip.com

Doug Boss

1

4,400 square foot stage with a 2,500 square foot camera prep area.

From green screen work to large product shots, our stages are used by some of the leading companies in the region. In Portland, we are in the midst of building production offices so that your organization can be close to the action.

Complete grip and lighting packages available. Production offices, lunch room for the crew and a pre-cabled, 19½’ grid stocked with lights for illuminating our three wall cyc.

Picture This Production Services; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 info@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

Perry Loveridge, co-owner Sari Loveridge, co-owner

2

Stage A is a 3000 square foot clean Both stages have well maintained coved hard cyc So much to list. Go to pixthis.com. and accommodating sound stage, walls, clean and accommodating, with great customer Stage B is a 1100 square foot stage service. See website for photos and virtual tour. perfect for product and screen tests.

Pilot Rock Productions; Medford, OR 541-776-5802 info@pilotrockproductions.com www.pilotrockproductions.com

Roger Harris, GM 1

Rex Post; Portland, OR 503-238-4525; fax 503-236-8347 info@rexpost.com www.rexpost.com

Russ Gorsline, GM Tara Krick, business manager

Seattle Grip & Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-285-0840; fax 206-285-9503 mlane@seattlegrip.com, jknapp@seattlegrip.com, info@seattlegrip.com www.seattlegrip.com

8,000 sf soundstage.

With state-of-the-art HD shooting and editing equipment, a soundstage, production warehouse, a solid network of local resources, cast and crew, Pilot Rock Productions turns production dollars into production value.

40,000 sf production warehouse, production offices and facilities, extensive local network of industry keys, crew and cast.

1

21’ x 25’

Our stage is nice and quiet. It was originally designed as a large audio studio with high ceilings. Green screen, white screen or sets.

We have several spaces for green room, meetings, makeup, and a kitchen.

Mick Lane, managing member Jeremy Knapp, managing member

2

Large Stage 75’x65’ 2 Wall Cyclorama. Small Stage 45’x40’ Single Wall Cyclorama. Both Stages 18’ 6” to Grid.

Seattle Grip & Lighting has the largest film studio in Seattle with a 2-wall-corner-coved cyclorama and grid and an additional 2,000 sq. ft. insert studio under one roof.

Amenities include: parking, kitchens, dressing rooms, production offices, green room, staging areas and picture car access to both studios, High Speed Internet.

Southern Oregon University Digital Media Center; Ashland, OR 541-552-6892; fax 541-552-6628 givensb@sou.edu www.sou.edu/digitalmediacenter/index. html

Brandon L. Givens, DMC coordinator

1

Approx. 1000 sq.ft., 35’ x 30’.

Studio with support/staging spaces, full lighting grid, two wall green screen (12’ x 22’ and 12’ x 12’) and a portable green floor (foam fabric), double doors accommodate a large auto. Tricaster HD production switcher, Canon XF305 cameras (3) on pedestals.

Makeup/wardrobe room, kitchenette.

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 rentals@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, owner

2

One: 2400 sq. feet with two cyc walls of 60’ and 30’ and a coved corner. Two: 400 sq. feet with a 20’ cyc wall.

Two soundstages, kitchen, control room and make-up rooms available for rent. Grip/lighting, camera, audio and support gear available for rent on site.

Victory Studios is a full service production facility with soundstages, equipment rentals, edit suites and audio recording suites all on location available for rent.

VMG/studio520; Bellevue, WA 425-457-7100; fax 425-457-7104 info@vmgstudio520.com www.vmgstudio520.com

Kelly Sparks, CEO 1 Mark Sparks, president

40’ x 32’

Our studio features a 40’ x 32’ two wall, hard cyclorama with corner cove and a roll up door for easy load and unload.

All studio rentals come with lighting grid background lights, green room with lounge, dressing room, makeup station, complimentary WI-FI, and ample parking.

Voda Studios; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

N/A

With 18,000sqft of working space, studios and soundstages ranging from 1,500–5,500sqft, we can accommodate all your needs under one roof.

We’ve built this place to exacting standards, leaving nothing out. Studio features 22ft ceilings, drive-in access, built in cyc (1 & 2 corner), camlock power, 4 loading docks, equipment rentals, editing suites, retouching.

Amenities include cafe & espresso bar, production offices, tungsten, daylight hair & makeup, gallery, Wi-Fi, ping pong, parking.

Zarr Studios; Portland, OR 503-477-7050 zarrstudios@gmail.com www.zarrstudios.com

Sophia Bilyk

1

6,500 sq. ft. production stage that features a 50 x 30 foot cyclorama wall and 50 foot ceilings.

Zarr Studios is ideal for small productions, commercials, music videos, still photo shoots, etc. There is ample daylight or it can be fully blacked out. Our large roll-up door allows straight access to the stage.

Included with the stage is a 600 sq. ft. production office, green room, make-up and wardrobe facilities and a full gourmet kitchen. There is a luxurious client lounge with fresh coffee and tea throughout the day, and bathrooms and showers.

32 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


WASHINGTON FILM LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

I

n late June, just as Media Inc. was going to press, it was announced that the bill to increase Washington’s Motion Picture Competitiveness Program (SB 6027) was not included in the final state budget signed by Governor Inslee.

SB 6027 would have doubled the size of the production incentive program over the next two years to $7 million and increased the fund incrementally each year until it reached $10 million in 2019. The sunset date for the program would have also been extended to 2022. Washington Filmworks, which oversees the film incentive program, said in a statement: “This year’s legislative session proved to be a tough political environment. With a Republican-lead Senate requiring no new revenue and the Democratic House of Representatives calling for the closure of over $350 million in tax preferences, the fact that our bill continued to be part of the conversation is a true tribute to the grassroots efforts of our statewide film community. “We would like to thank you for your unwavering support over the past 5 months. While the outcome is not what we hoped for, we are convinced that our collective efforts raised the film industry’s profile in Olympia and beyond!” The non-inclusion of SB 6027 does not impact the state’s current Motion Picture Competitiveness Program, which will maintain its $3.5 million annual budget through 2017. However, with such a relatively small cap, Washington currently has the fifth smallest incentive program in the country, making it difficult to draw major productions. For example, last year, the Seattle area landed the pilot for Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle, which shot here throughout the summer. It was not a recipient of the film incentive because the $3.5-million cap had already been met. After the series was picked up, it relocated to Vancouver, BC, where filming is more cost-effective. Similarly, Filmworks is currently working on getting the adaptation of the best-selling book Boys in the Boat to film in the state, but without a competitive incentive program in place, the Weinstein Company production will likely film in Vancouver. MI At press time, Washington Filmworks was set to host post-legislative session debrief events in Seattle and Spokane in July to explain how this legislative session will impact the film industry in the state. Stay tuned to www.media-inc.com and www.washingtonfilmworks.org for more information.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 33


34 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


THE RAINFOREST: TV PILOT TO BE FILMED IN WESTERN WASHINGTON

Scott Capestany standing in front of field monitor.

Capestany on his Satellite phone.

T

he upcoming TV pilot The Rainforest has become quite the buzz around town and in many Western Washington regions where the project will be filmed this summer.

Created, written, directed and executive produced by award-winning Washington State resident and indie filmmaker Scott A. Capestany, this project carries quite the exotic and elaborate storyline that’s sure to get viewers excited while experiencing Pacific Northwest settings, authentic PNW Native American legends and some ‘Lara Croft’-style treasure hunting, action and adventure. Filming locations slated include Forks, Lake Quinault, Amanda Park, Sequim, Bainbridge Island and the University of Washington, which will be the central settings for this epic action/adventure network TV-style pilot. The story was conceived by Capestany during his most recent TV series production, NW Waters, while fishing in Western Washington. By December 2014, he produced a “proof of concept” teaser that he has used to help generate interest from investors, business partners and to showcase to inbound cast/crew. His project was selected as a “pitch” finalist for the Washington Filmworks Innovation Lab, which in turn led

Wide shot of actress Cindy Lemos reading the map.

to some major interest among Hollywood distributors, VODs and programming networks. With pre-production scheduled to begin this summer, Capestany’s endeavor is now on the fast track, having gained quite extensive support from well known PNW cast and crew, from statewide businesses and organizations, as well as from some well known Hollywood players.

Airfield shot in front of RED. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 35


“The goal was to spend 12 to 16 months developing new business partnerships and backers for this project with the goal to impact the Washington State economy positively through general interest and commerce,” he said. “With a limited budget, I figured that if I could connect my proposed filming locations/communities to our project, all the moving parts on the finance end of things would fall into place seamlessly.” His calculations paid off by signing on 7 Cedars Casino in Sequim, Washington, as both a marketing and creative participant whose tribe’s history and legends will be accurately featured in the main storyline. Jerry Allen, CEO of the 7 Cedars Casino, said, “We are honored to have this new partnership with Scott. I think this is a compliment to the tribe that Scott wants to do something like this. We are excited to be part of it. There were a lot of choices. When you think about the number of tribes that circle this peninsula and the fact that we were able to put this together, we are very, very flattered.” International satellite provider GLOBALSTAR has joined Capestany Films as an exclusive sponsor of the project. Preserving the delicate filming locations and environments are a primary objective for Capestany. His goal of attracting more PNW, national and international outdoor apparel, products and services (that will be functional as both props and woven into the storyline) that support sustainability and environmental awareness will remain at the forefront in the coming months with The Rainforest. As creative director at Capestany Films for a number of years, Capestany has cut his teeth like all indie filmmakers have done, by producing smaller projects to feed his limitless creative ambitions. After reading the book Rebel without a Crew by Robert Rodriguez, he launched Capestany Films on Main Street in Park City, Utah, during the 2000 Sundance Film Festival, where he was serving as a volunteer at the Slamdance Film Festival under the watchful eye of founders Peter Baxter and Dan Mirvish. He still carries his first “creative” business card he made that year in his wallet as a daily reminder that “if you can dream…you can achieve.” To date, Capestany has been selected to pitch a variety of his projects in Hollywood at some of the most recognizable film market events in the world, including Variety’s FaithBased Summit and the American Film Market in 2013, where he met one of his current consulting producers, Anne Marie Gillen. After hearing his dynamic presentation, Gillen decided to join Capestany Films to help guide his new endeavors through the quite complicated terrain of Hollywood business and finance. Gillen was the former COO of Morgan Freeman’s production company, Revelations Entertainment, and is currently an expert in business development and finance for indie filmmakers around the world. “After watching Scott on that stage in front of the world, his passion and resilience told me I had to be a part of what 36 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Interior airfield hangar of cast looking at laptop.

he was doing,” Gillen said. The Rainforest is “a hero’s journey” about a quite intelligent, skilled and beautiful female professor, Dr. Riley Stone, who one day is visited at her college campus by a young girl claiming her great-grandmother’s story of a rainforest legend should be examined further. After recognizing a very rare necklace the girl shows up wearing, Dr. Stone agrees to set off to her small town located in Western Washington to meet with the woman. Upon her arrival, Dr. Stone learns more about the legend and discovers some extraordinary clues that leads her to assemble a world-class team of explorers to join her for an expedition of discovery and adventure. Soon after the team gets underway, bizarre things begin to affect the expedition, sending them all on a death-defying race of survival and psychological mystery. Casting for the pilot is currently underway with the lead, Dr. Riley Stone, being considered for Washington State TV personality and international model Cindy Lemos. Lemos has made a name for herself at KIRO 7 on their creative team and as one of their TV hosts. “It’s an honor to again be considered for another one of Scott’s amazing adventures,” Lemos said. “Working with him over the years has always been a breath of fresh air with his explosive personality, elaborate imagination and passion he pours into all his projects.” Capestany has begun assembling quite the impressive Pacific Northwest crew, including Seattle producer Ben Andrews (founder of the Seattle Film Summit) and Vashon Island resident Tim Everitt (SFX animator who has worked on Pirates of the Caribbean and The Last Samurai). Capestany is a frequent speaker at regional industry events and an instructor at the Northwest Film Forum and Seattle Transmedia teaching emerging filmmakers the importance of connecting commerce and creativity. MI Production for The Rainforest is slated for late August with a projected 12-day filming schedule. The official series launch party will be held at the 7 Cedars Casino in Sequim, WA, August 29th from 6 8:30pm. Cast intros, live music by award-winning singer/songwriter Melanie Dekker (www.melaniedekker.com), catered food, raffle and gaming. Tickets can be purchased at www.7cedarsresort.com. More can be found on Facebook (Capestany Films and The Rainforest TV Series) and encouraged to follow on Twitter @CapestanyFilms. All inquiries may go to producer@capestanyfilms.com.


JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 37


SIFF OPENING NIGHT GALA Photos by Regan MacStravic

T

he 2015 Seattle International Film Festival kicked off with an Opening Night red carpet gala and screening of Spy, starring Melissa McCarthy, on Thursday, May 14, at McCaw Hall. The event featured a Q&A between SIFF’s Carl Spence and director Paul Feig and an after-party at Exhibition Hall. Read more about SIFF 2015 on page 41.

38 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


FILM FESTIVALS

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 39


40 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


FILM FESTIVALS

Attendees celebrate the premieres of License to Operate and Hollow One at SIFF 2015.

SIFF in Review: Golden Space Needle Awards and More! Photos by Regan MacStravic

T

he Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF), the largest and most highly attended film festival in the United States, wrapped up 25 days of film screenings, special presentations, parties and other events on June 7.

“Our 41st Festival was another fantastic celebration of storytelling in all its forms,” said Carl Spence, SIFF’s artistic director. “We presented everything from the storied cinematic past (archival screenings celebrating Martin Scorsese’s The Film Foundation and live read of the late Stewart Stern’s Rebel Without a Cause), to the iconic (Kevin Bacon!), to the independent

(Jason Schwartzman and his new comedy 7 Chinese Brothers). “With a record 92 countries represented this year and sold-out shows every night, this year’s Festival was bigger than ever, but it also fittingly included a proper send-off of an iconic movie house, the Harvard Exit. It also highlighted Seattle’s great continuing movie houses including our own SIFF Cinema Egyptian and SIFF Cinema Uptown. And I love that we bookended the Festival this year with two stellar comedies, kicking off with our Opening Night film Spy and finishing with our hilarious Closing Night indie The Overnight. Starting and ending with laughter while traveling the world in between is a great way to mark another whirlwind 25-day celebration of cinema.” In addition to special presentations with guests Kevin Bacon on May 27 and Jason Schwartzman on June 6, another JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 41


highlight was a tribute to the late Stewart Stern, screenwriter of Rebel Without a Cause and an active member of the Seattle ďŹ lm community. Stern’s mentee, writer/director Ryan Piers Williams, presented a live screenplay reading of Rebel Without a Cause featuring RaĂşl Castillo and America Ferrera along with members of Seattle’s extraordinary acting community. Other celebrities at SIFF this year included director Paul Feig for the Opening Night Gala ďŹ lm Spy; Alfonso Gomez-Rejon, director of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl; director Brett Haley and actor Sam Elliott of I’ll See You in My Dreams; Jemaine Clement, star of People, Places, Things; Kiki Alvarez, SIFF’s ďŹ rst visiting director from Cuba with his ďŹ lm Venice; Pete Carroll, Seattle Seahawks coach and executive producer of License to Operate; Cliff Curtis, star of The Dark Horse; Colin Hanks, director of All Things Must Pass; and comedian Tig Notaro of the doc Tig, among many, many others. SIFF 2015 also presented popular recurring programs of ďŹ lms like African Pictures (made possible by a grant from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences), Face the Mu-

sic, Northwest Connections, and Catalyst—as well as launching a new section, Culinary Cinema. “This year’s Festival was one big celebration after another,â€? said Mary Bacarella, SIFF’s managing director. “There was the launch of our new Culinary Cinema program and its ‘Dinner and a Movie’ events, the recreation of Studio 54 which took many of us way, way back, and the chance to see Sir Mix-A-Lot on stage at Neumos at the after-party for The Glamour & The Squalor. Connecting our incredible audiences to visiting ďŹ lmmakers and guests at screenings, parties, and forums—and celebrating their work together—is what makes our Festival an unforgettable experience.â€? The festival culminated with the 2015 Golden Space Needle Audience and Competition Awards, which were presented at a ceremony and breakfast held at the Space Needle (see below for full list of winners). MI SIFF 2016 will run May 19 - June 12. For more information, visit www.siff.net.

AND THE WINNERS ARE... SIFF 2015 GOLDEN SPACE NEEDLE AUDIENCE AWARDS 6HOHFWHGE\)HVWLYDODXGLHQFHVDZDUGVDUHJLYHQLQĂ€YHFDWegories: Best Film, Best Documentary, Best Director, Best Actor, and Best Short Film. This year, nearly 90,000 ballots were submitted. BEST FILM The Dark Horse, directed by James Napier Robertson (New Zealand 2014)

BEST DOCUMENTARY The Great Alone (USA 2015), directed by Greg Kohs BEST NEW AMERICAN CINEMA Chatty Catties (USA 2015), directed by Pablo Valencia

SIFF 2015 FUTUREWAVE & YOUTH JURY AWARDS BEST FUTUREWAVE FEATURE Seoul Searching (USA/South Korea 2015), directed by Benson Lee

BEST DOCUMENTARY Romeo is Bleeding, directed by Jason Zeldes (USA 2015)

BEST FILMS4FAMILIES FEATURE When Marnie Was There (Japan 2014), directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi

BEST DIRECTOR Alfonso Gomez-Rejon, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (USA 2015)

WAVEMAKER AWARD (GRAND PRIZE) Audio Input (USA), directed by Sho Schrock-Manabe

BEST ACTOR Cliff Curtis, The Dark Horse (New Zealand 2014) BEST ACTRESS Nina Hoss, Phoenix (Germany 2014) BEST SHORT FILM Even the Walls, directed by Sarah Kuck, Saman MaydĂĄni (USA 2015)

AUDIENCE AWARD Minimum Max (USA), directed by Josh Ovalle PRODIGY CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS I’m Not Here (South Africa), directed by Jack Markovitz Minimum Max (USA), directed by Josh Ovalle

SIFF 2015 SHORT FILM JURY AWARDS

LENA SHARPE AWARD FOR PERSISTENCE OF VISION Frame by Frame, directed by Mo Scarpelli, Alexandria Bombach (Afghanistan 2014)

Jurors choose winners in the Narrative, Animation, and Documentary categories. Each jury winner will receive $1,000 and winners in any of the three categories may also qualify to enter WKHLUUHVSHFWLYHĂ€OPVLQWKH6KRUW)LOPFDWHJRU\RIWKH$FDGHmy AwardsÂŽ.

SIFF 2015 COMPETITION AWARDS

LIVE ACTION - GRAND JURY PRIZE The Chicken (Croatia, Germany), directed by Una Gunjak

SIFF announced three Competition Awards for Best New Director, Best Documentary, and Best New American Film (FIPRESCI). Winners in each juried competition received $2,500 in cash, while the New American Cinema competition winner was also awarded the FIPRESCI prize. BEST NEW DIRECTOR Liza, the Fox-Fairy (Hungary 2015), directed by KĂĄroly Ujj-MĂŠszĂĄros 42 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE Hole (Canada), directed by Martin Edralin DOCUMENTARY - GRAND JURY PRIZE Bihttos (Canada), directed by Elle-Måijå Tailfeathers ANIMATION - GRAND JURY PRIZE The Mill at Calder’s End (USA), directed by Kevin McTurk


JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 43


On-Location Teleprompting Located near Portland OR, serving the Pacific Northwest

■ 17” sunlight readable, 1500 nit monitor ■ 70/30 glass ■ Supports any camera up to 20lbs ■ Can be set up on a medium to large dolly or jib ■ Software offers great control over speed, fonts, colors, and spacing ■ Fast set-up and professional operation! 44 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

503-913-0818 info@matrix-video.net www.matrix-video.net Contact us for more information today!


FILM FESTIVALS

TACOMA HOSTS

THE DESTINY CITY FILM FESTIVAL

T

he Destiny City Film Festival is a homegrown, true-Tacoma community event, inspired by the city’s nickname—The City of Destiny—and is built to showcase the best independent films from the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Our mission is to use the power of vibrant cinematic storytelling to curate an engaged community audience for independent film.

This three-day festival, founded in 2013, is organized by people who believe at the heart of every great movie is a great story, one that is destined to invigorate an audience through the art form of film. DCFF credits the ingenuity of independent filmmakers for continuing the tradition of compelling storytelling through motion pictures in the digital age, whether told in the documentary, animated, experimental or narrative form. It is our passion to provide screens for the finest of these independent films and strengthen the local film community by building an engaged audience. Audiences and filmmakers attending the festival can expect top-quality programming of films and an overall celebration of storytelling, including the announcement of the winner of this year’s short screenplay contest. DCFF aims to enhance the vitality of independent filmmaking in the South Puget Sound and Pacific Northwest by playing local films, along with the best being produced from around the world. The Northwest cinema landscape and the thriving talent of its filmmakers deserve to be held to a high standard—and audiences deserve to see great movies. The

experienced and devoted DCFF staff is thrilled to be the middleman. The second annual Destiny City Film Festival (August 28 – 30, 2015) will be hosted, once again, by one of Tacoma’s oldest movie theaters and, at 90 years old, is one of the oldest continuously operating movie theaters in the country— the historic Blue Mouse Theater in the Proctor District in North Tacoma. In 2014, the inaugural DCFF welcomed hundreds of movie-goers, volunteers, community members and sponsors to the Blue Mouse to watch and celebrate 29 of the year’s best independent films (including festival favorites such as I Am Big Bird, Damnation, Copenhagen, and dozens of diverse short films), to network and mingle with cinephiles, writers and filmmakers, and to strengthen the community support for independent filmmaking and screenwriting. The DCFF team aims to build on this success in 2015, by bringing work from some of the most promising and talented filmmakers to Tacoma, to entertain, inspire and engage supporters of the local arts community. MI Visit www.DestinyCityFilmFestival.com in July for a complete line-up of this year’s festival! Catch up on the latest festival news at www.Facebook.com/DestinyCityFF and on Twitter: DestinyCityFF. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 45


Voice V oice Over Ove er | On Camera Came era | Live e Eve Events ent ntss Video Games | Audio Books | Motion Capture 206.443.2021 Fax: 206.443.7648

www.toposwopetalent.com ww toposwopeta toposwope toposw ope etalent e co

21 YEARS & STILL KICKING!

46 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Providing operators and equipment

THE PARTY D O E S N ’ T S TA R T UNTIL OUR ACTORS WA L K I N T O T H E R O O M !

425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com


BIG SONIA:

Sonia Warshawski, the subject of the documentary Big Sonia.

SMALL STATURE, BIG CHARISMA

By Stephanie Hoover & Crystal Foley Staff Writers

W

ork Hard. Play Hard. Give Back.

That’s the motto of Seattle-based production company Inflatable Film, as well as the husband and wife duo who run it. Leah Warshawski and Todd Soliday are currently in post-production on their film, Big Sonia, detailing the life of a woman who easily embodies the motto. The title is by no means a comment on her stature. Standing at just over five feet tall and barely able to peek over the steering wheel, the story follows 89-year-old Sonia Warshawski, who we see still driving herself to work every day. Big doesn’t even begin to cover it with Sonia; she is hilarious, charming, and above all, a survivor. She survived the Holocaust through three death camps, two death marches and a bullet to the chest on Liberation Day, which missed her heart by an inch. She survived running her late husband’s tailor shop in a closed down mall, until last September, when the mall shut down for good. Sonia also happens to be Leah’s grandmother, but don’t let that fool you. Big Sonia isn’t about the relationship between grandmother and granddaughter, nor is it a film focused on the Holocaust. It’s all about Sonia. Despite the heavy undertones—a necessary part of her narrative—Sonia’s witty and infectious personality steals the show. “She’s a total diva, she’s always wanted to be a movie star. She talks non-stop,” Leah said. “So she actually tells her own story pretty well. I mean, there’s no need for a narrator.” Todd agrees, and has been captivated by Sonia. And he is not the only one. “My first impression is that she’s an irresistible person. But then you hang out in her shop and see the line of people that pile up with tailoring on their arm, but that’s not really why they’re there because she doesn’t sew. They’re there for healing. They’re there for banter. They’re there for stories. They’re there for their own redemption,” Todd said.

Sonia loves interacting with people, and those who engage go into what Todd refers to as “Sonia time.” “She’s a saleswoman. I mean, she is all about the sale. But she just loves that interaction,” he said. “So she takes a fitting that should take five minutes and turns it into an hour.” Leah says Todd’s role on the production team keeps them honest in their storytelling to avoid it becoming too family-focused. “Yes, her story is incredible, this incredible story of survival, not only during the war, but the fact that she survived in this mall for 35 years while it was closing,” Todd said. “We’re not telling because she is incredible or that story is incredible, but we think it’s relatable.” Sonia is now a public speaker, primarily talking to middle schoolers throughout Kansas City, about her story and empathy. “She didn’t always do that, but she looked around at the world about 10 years ago and realized things haven’t changed much. There is still discrimination, there is still bullying, there is still hate,” Leah said. “The world’s not much better. So she’s talking about what’s happened and inspiring all kinds of different people.” Todd said she is relatable because we’ve all survived some level of trauma in our lives. “And it’s a big deal, no matter how big it was relative to the Holocaust or the bully who picked on you in seventh grade,” he said. They want the film to do the same: reach an audience of any age, and tell the story of the Holocaust. “Within our lifetime they’re all going to be gone. She’s one of the last [Holocaust survivors],” Leah said. “So how do we tell her story in a way that is going to live on and not make it so archaic? You know, make it modern enough to have an impact on kids?” The answers, for them, lie not in dark photos of the past, but in a mix of interviews and animation. The style is similar to that of their 2013 documentary, Finding Hillywood, about a traveling film festival in Rwanda. JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 47


Leah Warshawski and Todd Soliday with their doc subject, Sonia.

The graphic artist for the film is Kansas City-based, where Sonia lives. However, aside from one producer in L.A., the rest of their production team is made up of the Seattle film community, which they are happy to consider themselves a part of. “Every time we think about leaving [Seattle], we just… we can’t go because the community always pulls us back,” Leah said. “The community of filmmakers here… I know everybody says it, but the community is just really important.” Todd is equally enamored with Seattle. “I’ve never been any place that’s been so diverse; that you can do good work—work that you believe in—and then cut out at 4 and go paddling,” he said. They have about 90 percent of their filming finished, and are currently working on editing and post-production

48 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

in Seattle. They are working with video production studio Lightpress, the recording studio Bad Animals, and composer Bradley Laina. Their story producer is Eric Frith, and Doug Loviska and Todd Soliday are editing the film. The film is shot in Kansas City; Napa, California; and Seattle—all places where members of Sonia’s family are based. They would like to go to Poland to capture more about her past, but they don’t have the funding. They are currently fundraising for the film and applying for grants, which has been their biggest hurdle. Without further funding, they cannot keep working on the film. Their biggest monetary success thus far has been with personal donations. They have hosted several “fundraising house parties” in which they show clips and talk about their film to a group of friends that the host invites. They also have a donate button on their website at www.BigSonia.com. Once they get to the final stretch of the project—outreach and distribution—they will likely launch a crowdfunding campaign. They learned the hard way while working on Finding Hillywood that this part of the process costs a lot more than one might expect, and they launched the film’s crowdfunding platform too early. The couple also does some contract work, primarily promotional materials for the big tech companies in Seattle, which they enjoy. But their passion is documentary filmmaking. “You get access to a completely different lifestyle, a completely different way of living. Sometimes you become that,” Todd said. “It’s hard to extract and that becomes part of you,


and you’re constantly kind of morphing into whatever your last film was, I guess.” This has certainly been the case for Todd while filming for Big Sonia, which he said constantly inspired him to be a better person. It also made him feel like he should pick up the phone and call his mom to tell her he loved her, which seems to be the unofficial PSA of the film. Many of the kids Sonia had spoken to said she had inspired them to do the same, despite being at an age where actively loving your mom is arguably uncool. As Leah said, “Call your mom. Do something with yourself. Get off your butt.” While Sonia’s story is irrefutably incredible, the complexity of the film resides in the showing of her vulnerability, and what makes her human. “There’s this woman who’s been through so much and, ‘Wow, it’s amazing that she’s getting up every day and going to work.’ But she’s going to work to keep the demons away,” Leah said. “Because being busy means she doesn’t have to think about the stuff that comes up when it’s quiet. So it’s never quiet. And her family has a difficult time living around her. She’s very judgmental.” Leah, who did not grow up around her grandmother, has enjoyed learning more about her, and hopes the film will encourage other people to learn their family stories. “You kind of put those people up on a pedestal and they’re heroes. And you spend more time with people and you start to see their humanity and their vulnerability,” she said. “That’s

what’s been so interesting Inside Sonia’s shop. because I haven’t known that side of her before, so it’s been really great.” Caroline, a teenager Sonia spoke to four years ago, when the girl was just 13, is one of many who has been deeply affected by Sonia’s story. During interviews she detailed how she no longer leaves the house without acknowledging her mother’s importance in her life and is currently in the process of trying to start an anti-bullying foundation in honor of the wisdom Sonia passed along to her. “We don’t need Leah or her family saying Sonia is this impactful person—we have characters that we have tracked that are going out into the world. Sonia’s legacy will go on,” Todd said. “Not only through her family, but through the hundreds of people that she’s touched, including the unreachable teenage kids who are on their phones all the time. She breaks through that. She crosses the barrier.” MI To learn more about Big Sonia, or to donate to the film, visit www.BigSonia.com.

McDONALD INSURANCE GROUP, INC. SPECIALIZED INDUSTRIES Special Effects Wa r d r o b e

S ets

Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n

Lighting and Grip Rentals

Po s t P r o d u c t i o n

Props

Co m m e r c i a l s

Stages

Music Videos

V i d e o D u p l i c a t i o n B r o a d c a s t i n g Au d i o, S o u n d, V i d e o Fe a t u r e Fi l m s S h o r t Te r m P r o d u c t i o n s D o c u m e n t a r y I n f o m e r c i a l V i d e o g r a p h y OFFERING COVERAGE FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS.

Call John R. Gunn ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TOLL FREE: 1.888.827.7400 DIRECT: 425.897.5956 D I R E C T FA X : 4 2 5 . 8 9 7 . 5 9 5 7 johng@mcdonaldins.com 6 2 0

K i r k l a n d

W a y ,

S u i t e

1 0 0

K i r k l a n d ,

W A

9 8 0 3 3

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 49


50 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


Riverside State Park. (Photo by Jeff Schindler)

SPOKANE:

YOUR NEXT FILMING DESTINATION

By Peyton Scheller Communications Manager, Visit Spokane

I

t’s clear from Spokane’s “Near nature. Near perfect.” mantra that outdoor filming locations throughout the region are not hard to come by. All things outdoors aside, Spokane’s never-ending “places to shoot” list is as diverse as they come, with a thriving downtown, unique public spaces and eclectic neighborhoods scattered throughout the city. While the possibilities are almost limitless, here are just a few specific scene location ideas that are sure to take your project to the next level: Duncan Garden (Photo by Alan Bisson)

GARDEN PARTY Located in 90-acre Manito Park, Duncan Garden follows the classic Renaissance garden style with symmetrical design, geometric planting beds and a central water feature. The sunken garden includes three acres of colorful displays, adding the necessary brightness to complement any garden scene. Duncan Garden is just one of five different gardens within Manito Park. CLASSIC AMERICANA For a blast from the past, head a few miles north of downtown Spokane to the Garland District. The historic Garland Theater, anchored with a giant neon sign in original art deco design, sets the stage for classic movie-theater shots. For the old-fashioned diner feel, stop by Ferguson’s café, or get your fill of milkshakes and burgers at the Milk Bottle

Spokane Steam Plant (Photo Courtesy of Steam Plant) JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 51


(a restaurant housed in a building shaped like— you guessed it—a milk bottle).

The Milk Bottle (Photo courtesy of Visit Spokane)

URBAN FOREST As Washington’s largest state park, Riverside State Park consists of 14,000 acres of lush Douglas firs, wildflower-lined trails and huge basalt rocks protruding out of the rushing Spokane River. For an urban forest scene that is relatively easy hiking but doesn’t skimp on the views, Riverside State Park is your place.

PERIOD MANSIONS Spokane recently hosted the National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference, mainly because of the city’s abundance of historically preserved buildings and homes. Neighborhood pockets such as Browne’s Addition and the Rockwood Blvd. area provide tree-lined streets with mansions on either side, showcasing the early 1900s homes of Spokane’s former elite. FARMS APLENTY Spokane is neighbored by the rolling wheat fields of the Palouse, but for farms packed with produce, head to Green Bluff, just 20 minutes away. A co-operative of 40-plus family farms nestled at the bottom of Mt. Spokane, Green Bluff features strawberry fields, apple orchards, pumpkin patches and everything in between. FOOT CHASE No action movie is complete without a foot chase scene. Add a new dimension with a dash through the Steam Plant, a once fully operating steam plant that powered downtown Spokane. The space has been completely refurbished to hold a restaurant, brewery, shops and more, but the original catwalks and boiler pipes are still exposed in true industrial form. Think steampunk and you’ll get the picture. Spokane is a filmmaker’s paradise with a dynamic city vibe, unmatched scenery, picturesque parks and more. Plus, the region is extremely accessible, with little to no traffic and an airport just 10 minutes from downtown. The icing on the cake? You don’t have to look far for talented actors and a hard-working crew—the local film industry is just as amazing as the city itself. MI For more information about Spokane, check out www.visitspokane.com. 52 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


Leo Pfeifer adjusts a shot as fellow BHS students and producers Sho Schrock and Jaya Flanary look on. (Photo by Victoria O’Laughlin)

S

ince its inception in 2001, the Digital Filmmaking Program at Ballard High School in Seattle has not only provided students with an opportunity to learn the various aspects of film production, but it has propelled many into prestigious filmmaking programs around the country and into stellar careers in the industry.

Will Erstad softens a light. (Photo by Victoria O’Laughlin)

Indeed, recent graduates of the program are studying at NYU and USC, among other top film schools, while others are currently writing television series, directing commercials and producing documentaries. One major success story from the program is that of alums Kyle Seago (’07) and Jesse Harris (’04), who co-founded the National Film Festival for Talented Youth (NFFTY), which has since become the largest youth film festival in the world. Another is that of Louis Weissman (’12), who, after a successful summer internship in Los Angeles, got an opportunity while still in high school to join an L.A.-based crew on the set of the feature film Bounty Killer. With sufficient credits under his belt, Weissman was able to graduate early and join the camera crew in the spring of 2012, before heading for Emerson College in Boston that fall. Matt Lawrence, who runs the program at Ballard High and has been involved since the beginning, couldn’t be more proud of his students and the film program’s success over the JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 53


past decade and a half. And many BHS alumni reciprocate their gratitude to Lawrence by keeping in touch and remaining assets to the program. “Many college programs have active alumni networks, but I was pleasantly surprised when one began to develop around this high school program,” said Lawrence. “Former students advise me on curricula and emerging technology. They provide current students with college and career advice, internship opportunities and mentoring. The Digital Filmmaking Program is very fortunate to have this level of support from our alumni!” Another major coup for the program is the sheer number of awards and accolades that students and their films have earned over the years. “Since the program started in 2001, students have won over 500 awards and honors from film festivals, professional organizations and arts organizations,” said Lawrence. These include awards at regional, state, national and international film festivals, as well as honors from the National YoungArts Foundation and the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (at the NW Regional Emmy Awards). Most recently, students from BHS swept both Documentary awards at the 2015 Dominique Dunne Film Competition and earned the FutureWave Jury Prize at the Seattle International Film Festival’s Golden Space Needle Awards. “It’s tremendously validating, for me and my students, when their productions are awarded by festivals, professional organizations and national arts organizations,” said Lawrence. “We’re very proud of the track record we’ve established.” Throughout the program, Lawrence aims to teach students a

wide range of skills to build upon as they decide what kind of career and/or higher education program to pursue. “Motion picture production is a synthesis of art forms, so students learn diverse arts in the program—as well as powerful tools,” explained Lawrence. “In general, they learn to critically analyze and produce a variety of motion picture productions, including ads and PSAs, dramatic narratives, news features, documentaries and music videos. Story is a critical component to many media productions, so we pay special attention to story structure and development. Because motion picture is BHS filmmakers at the 2015 regional Emmy Awards. (Photo courtesy of a visual medium, Matthew Swager) students learn strategies to show their stories through images, rather than relying on dialogue alone.” But tech and tools aside, Lawrence enjoys the human aspect of his job most: “There’s nothing more rewarding than helping young people discover and develop their talents.” MI

OMPA APPOINTS INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

54 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

For more information and to view students’ work, visit the DFP blog at www.bhsvideo.blogspot.com and the DFP vimeo channel at www.vimeo.com/bhsfilmprogram. To contact Matt Lawrence, e-mail mplawrence@seattleschools.org.


LOCATION TEAM NOMINATED FOR LMGA AWARD

T

he Location Managers Guild of America nominated Washington-based location manager Alissa Desler and location scout Lori Allen, both with A Hidden Location NW, for “Outstanding Locations in a Commercial Campaign.”

This award is given to commercials that celebrate the significance of locations as a critical element of production. This nomination, voted on by peers in the industry, is a testament to Desler and Allen’s reputation of excellence and their inspired work on the commercials for the 2015 Subaru Outback. During this three-week shoot, Desler worked diligently with the ODOT Director and their engineers to work out a traffic plan that would be the first ever to shut down Highway 101 periodically on a Friday afternoon. Locations used in this commercial included a portion of Highway 101, Cape Perpetua to Seal Alissa Desler walks the red carpet at the 2015 LMGA Awards. Caves, then to Cave Palisades and Smith Rock, both located in Central Oregon. In March this year, Desler and her husband Brad set out to Beverly Hills to attend LMGA’s 2nd Annual Awards, held at the Wallis Center of Performing Arts. Although Dodge Ram 1500 commercial won the award for that category, Desler and Allen were both honored to be nominated. MI You can view the commercials that were shown on Discovery Channel, and the “unveiling” of the new 2015 Subaru Outback by President of Fuji Industries Japan, at www.ahiddenlocation.com.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 55


6th Avenue Talent Agency SAG AFTRA FRANCHISED • WE SUBMIT OUR TALENT BOTH LOCALLY AND WORLDWIDE NO MEMBERSHIPS FEES OR PACKAGES TO PURCHASE SEEKING TALENTED ACTORS BOTH UNION AND NON-UNION ALL AGES

WWW.6THAVENUETALENT.COM 206.878.6505 • 618 S. 223RD ST #6 • DES MOINES, WA 98198 56 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


STUNT WORK IN THE NORTHWEST— AND BEYOND By James August Smith

T

he year started off on a high note and has gotten busier and better. Being one of the primary drivers on the professional drivers team, LA Motorsports, has been a great experience working closely with the best of the best!

From President’s Day Jeep commercials to Ram Truck and Jeep Renegade spots, we have been keeping the camera rolling. Another interesting spot I had the privilege of working on was the Hyundai “A Message to Space” project. We drove eleven cars side by side in formation and spelled letters on the desert floor that made a very special message. Check it out on YouTube with 65 million other viewers! Locally in the Northwest and the L.A. area, I have been in wigs and makeup to double several actors in car and truck chases for Grimm, Z Nation, as well as Ford, Toyota, Chrysler, TrueCar and Hyundai spots this year. In our spare time we provide a stunt driver training for anyone who wants to enhance their abilities in a car. We have an asphalt skid pad located near The Dalles, Oregon, in the Columbia River Gorge. With a fleet of cars set up for stunt driving, a water truck, some orange cones, and some of the best instructors in the business, the best way to get experience is through experience. Almost anyone pursuing film work that wants to up their game in a car can call me direct to schedule a stunt driving session. MI Call James A. Smith at 541-993-7625 or 818-769-1777, or visit www. skicarstunt.com for more information.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 57


58 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


TD CURRAN: NORTHWEST-BASED COMPANY OFFERS APPLE

SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO LOCAL MEDIA PROS Service Provider by Apple Inc. In addition to selling and servicing the entire line of Apple products, TD Curran offers one-on-one training sessions, onsite services and repairs, as well as remote managed services. We have engineers and account managers that can help you with anything from active directory integration and networking to storage area networking. TD Curran now has retail locations in Bellingham, Burlington, Kirkland, Issaquah and Portland. The newest location in Portland was formerly The MacPac. We can accommodate and facilitate just about any need from single users to Fortune 500 companies. All sales and service technicians are Apple Product Professionals and/ or Apple Certified Technicians. We have employees and contractors with the following Apple qualifications/certifications: • Apple Certified Help Desk Specialist • Apple Certified Macintosh Technician • Apple Certified System Administrator • Apple Certified Technical Coordinator • Apple Certified Xsan Administrator

By Jason Knopp

F

ounded in 1992 by owner Troy Douglas Curran, TD Curran began as a small company which offered hard drives, memory and mouse balls to schools all over the country. In 2001, TD Curran acquired Alpha Tech Computers and gained the designation of Apple Specialist. From that point on, TD Curran focused solely on providing Apple computers, products and accessories.

We’ve become one of the larger Premiere Apple Specialist and Apple Authorized Service Providers in the country by providing responsive, friendly and the best quality service to our customers. In the years since becoming an Apple reseller, TD Curran has consistently demonstrated exceptional and comprehensive knowledge of Apple technology. MI For more information, visit www.tdcurran.com. Jason Knopp, a skilled account manager with 13+ years of experience with Apple products and technology, can be reached at jasonk@tdcurran.com or 360-921-8036.

We’ve expanded our product portfolio into areas such as media & entertainment, backup/archive, mobile device management, cloud services and point of sale systems. On top of offering the entire line of Apple hardware, we also provide most other PC manufacturers, storage (small to large), and software such as Adobe Creative Cloud for business and education. TD Curran also provides complete service and support for Apple products and has been designated a Premium JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 59


60 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


NW

@Large Films, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-287-5387; fax 503-287-5387 info@largefilms.com www.atlargefilms.com

Juliana Lukasik, principal/ director

Adams Creative & Production Services; Des Moines, WA 206-824-6970; fax 206-824-7036 adamscreative@isomedia.com www.adamscreative.net Allied Video Productions; Salem, OR 503-363-7301; fax 503-363-6477 jeff@alliedvideo.com www.alliedvideo.com

Dan Adams, president/ CD

B47 Studios; Seattle, WA 206-501-3054 info@b47studios.com www.b47studios.com Bennett-Watt HD Productions, Inc.; Issaquah, WA 206-310-0181; fax 425-526-5851 info@bennett-watt.com www.hdvideoproduction.net

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

SERVICES PROVIDED CO RP OR ATE

CO MM ER CIA L

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Scott Hossner, CEO Dan Walker, CFO Jeff Hart, COO Kevin Maude, CEO Bennie Soto, director business dev. Norma Straw, director content dev. Kelly Watt, president

BergWorks Media; Shoreline, WA 206-239-8974 rob@bergworksmedia.com www.bergworksmedia.com

Robert Berg, principal

BigHouse Production; Seattle, WA 206-429-5111; fax 206-726-9499 george@bighouseproduction.com www.bighouseproduction.com

George Riddell, president/ producer/director

BLANKEYE; Portland, OR 503-810-0999 info@blankeye.tv www.blankeye.tv

Patrick Weishampel, CD

BLARE Productions; Seattle, WA 206-438-9788; fax 559-209-7463 info@blaremedia.net www.blareproductions.com

Blake Barnett Justin McAleece

Blu Room Advertising, LLC; Steilacoom, WA 253-241-8912 charles@bluroomadvertising.com www.bluroomadvertising.com

Charles Davis, owner Russell Silva, co-owner

Blue Plate Digital; Seattle, WA 206-388-0174; fax 206-299-3376 brian@blueplatedigital.com www.blueplatedigital.com

Brian Pelzel, producer/ director/owner Doug Cooper, creative strategist/producer/ director

Bridge Productions Inc.; Woodinville, WA 206-499-8984; fax 425-487-9792 madzola@aol.com

Eugene Mazzola

Capestany Films; Seattle, WA 206-383-0110 producer@capestanyfilms.com www.capestanyfilms.com

Scott A. Capestany, EP/ writer/director

Cesari Direct; Seattle, WA 206-282-1492; fax 206-284-1281 tobrien@cesaridirect.com www.cesaridirect.com

Rick Cesari, president Tim O’Brien, VP

Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/EP Debbie Mann, office manager JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 61


NW

CineMonster, Inc.; Poulsbo, WA 206-953-1946/206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, owner

Cinesaurus; Lynnwood, WA 425-830-3545 info@cinesaurus.com www.cinesaurus.com

David Hudson, EP Steven Hudson, CD

Clatter&Din, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-464-0520; fax 206-464-0702 tickle@clatterdin.com www.clatterdin.com

Peter Barnes, president Leigh Eckert, EP Vince Werner, CD

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP sales Mike Pool, managing director

Creative Media Alliance; Seattle, WA 206-709-1667; fax 206-838-1801 info@creativemediaalliance.com www.creativemediaalliance.com

Jai Suh, principal Beth Farnham, producer

Dawson Media Group; Portland, OR 503-477-7462; fax 866-716-6087 info@dawsonmediagroup.com www.dawsonmediagroup.com

Meighan Maloney, EP

Deep Sky Studios, LLC; Portland, OR 503-943-5999 hobbs@deepskystudios.com www.deepskystudios.com

Jared Hobbs

The Edge Creative; Seattle, WA 206-448-2222 sayhello@theedgecreative.com www.theedgecreative.com

Peter Howland

EMA Video Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-241-8663 emellnik@emavideo.com www.emavideo.com Filmateria; Seattle, WA 206-938-6791 info@filmateria.com www.filmateria.com

Ed Mellnik

Fraser Film Group; Southern OR 678-478-0154 toddwilson64@gmail.com www.toddwilsonfilms.com

Todd Wilson, principal

Funnelbox; Oregon City, OR 503-595-5901 hello@funnelbox.com www.funnelbox.com

Robb Crocker, CEO

Galaxy Sailor Productions; Portland, OR 503-206-6058 controller@galaxysailor.com www.galaxysailor.com golightlyfilms, inc.; Portland, OR 503-381-1243 golightlyfilms@comcast.net www.golightlyfilms.com

Martin Vavra, owner/ director

GoodSide Studio; Seattle, WA 206-322-1576 studio@goodsidestudio.com www.goodsidestudio.com 62 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Marisa Jeakle, EP William Jeakle, GM Mark Contratto, art director

Kenneth Luba, president/ CEO Kaja Zaloudek, EP Matt Krzycki, CD

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

SERVICES PROVIDED CO RP OR ATE

CO MM ER CIA L

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


Helicopter • Scenic Tours • Commercial Ops

503-376-0190 • konect-aviation.com

Photography by Julian Wilde

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 63


NW

GP Creative Media; Seattle, WA 206-765-0056 greg@gpcreativemedia.com www.gpcreativemedia.com

Greg Phillips, owner/ producer/director/writer

Hansen Belyea; Seattle, WA 206-682-4895; fax 206-922-3676 hello@hansenbelyea.com www.hansenbelyea.com

Ron Hansen, design director

Heller Studios; Seattle, WA 206-755-4739 tracey@hellerstudios.net www.hellerstudios.net

Dorian Heller, EP Tracey Shrier, producer

House Creative Group; Seattle, WA 206-218-6810 producer@housecreativegroup.com www.housecreativegroup.com

Emily Goodnight, artist rep/ producer

HouseSpecial; Portland, OR 503-276-0148 lourri@housespecial.com www.housespecial.com

Lourri Hammack

Inflatable Film; Seattle, WA 425-283-9504 leah@inflatablefilm.com www.inflatablefilm.com Joma Films; Ashland, OR 310-463-8619 anne@jomafilms.com www.jomafilms.com

Leah Warshawski, producer/director Todd Soliday, director/ editor

Kontent Partners; Seattle, WA 206-722-2846; fax 323-446-7178 michael@kontentpartners.com www.kontentpartners.com

Michael Bini Courtney Clarke

KTVA Productions; Portland, OR 503-659-4417 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips

Limbo Films; Portland, OR 503-228-0844; fax 503-228-0857 kelly@limbofilms.com www.limbofilms.com

Gary Nolton, owner/ director

Lotus Motion Pictures; Medford, OR 541-941-1623 info@lotusmotionpictures.com www.lotusmotionpictures.com

Tyrel Stumpff, owner

Lyon Films; Lake Oswego, OR 503-990-9080 devon@lyonfilms.net www.lyonfilms.net

Devon Lyon, partner

Maddox Visual Productions; Jacksonville, OR 541-899-1456/541-261-4396 tyler@maddoxvisual.com www.maddoxvisual.com Martin Arts; Sammamish, WA 425-269-2729 smartin@martinarts.com www.martinarts.com

Tyler Maddox, owner

Media Agents Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-932-2030; fax 206-381-9600 hq@mediaagentsinc.com www.mediaagentsinc.com

Andrew Bradner, EP Mike Sunseri, director

64 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Anne Lundgren Gary Lundgren

Scott Martin

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

SERVICES PROVIDED CO RP OR ATE

CO MM ER CIA L

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


PR

ION & ODUCT

POST

N& O I T C U ROD VICES ! P O I D SER $8',2 & AU VIDEO RODUCTION POST P

ing nd Mix nd Sou d Design n Sou ing weeten Audio S nd Effects Sou s Music / ition / Jingle ch pos t a m P o C e Music nect / Phon oping on Lo ADR / uction ourceC S / N d o ISD r P / slation e Tran g a u g n eign La rou 5.1 Sur

For

9,'(2 ction

tion Produ Color Correc Effects / l g a u in is it V Ed ation / les 3D Anim raphics / Tit g G n o thorin u A Moti y a Blu-r DVD / oding on c uplicati DCP En D / Blu-ray D ge ta V S CD / D reen Sound Sc Green

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 65


NW

Media Arts, Inc.; Redmond, WA 206-281-8811 scott@mediarts.com www.mediarts.com

Scott P. Munro, president

Mighty Media Studios; Bellevue, WA John Moffitt Mark Stendal 425-615-7183 Pauls Zommers info@mightymediastudios.com www.mightymediastudios.com Multimythic Media; Azalea, OR 541-778-6626 sangye@multimyth.com www.multimyth.com

Sangye Ince-Johannsen

n/fek/tious; Seattle, WA 206-956-0902; fax 206-624-3854 contact@nfektious.com www.nfektious.com

Charles Core Scott Douwes Troy Murison

Odyssey Productions, Inc.; Beaverton, Adam Heiser, president/ director OR 503-223-3480; fax 503-223-3493 adam@odysseypro.com www.odysseypro.com Pal Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-361-9366 lazpal123@gmail.com www.paladventurevideos.com

Laszlo Pal, president

Persistent Image, Inc.; Langley, WA 360-321-8252; fax 360-321-8262 persistent.image@gmail.com www.persistentimage.com

Bruce Towne, president

Pilot Rock Productions; Medford, OR Roger Harris, GM 541-776-5802 info@pilotrockproductions.com www.pilotrockproductions.com Playfish Media; Seattle, WA 206-455-5783 info@playfishmedia.com www.playfishmedia.com

Jillian Suleski, owner/ producer

Pro Voice Productions; Medford, OR 541-732-3095; fax 541-732-3095 info@provoiceproductions.com www.provoiceproductions.com

Derek Shetterly

Production Partners; Seattle, WA 206-441-3773; fax 206-443-5402 john@productionpartners.cc www.productionpartners.cc

John Douthwaite, president

ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348; fax 206-493-2987 info@promotionarts.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director Drew Witt, managing producer

The Ranch Studios; Seattle, WA 425-780-5897 danny@theranchstudios.com www.theranchstudios.com

Danny Lund, owner/DP

Red Door Films/David Poulshock Productions; Portland, OR 503-872-9280 office@reddoorfilms.com www.davidpoulshock.com

David Poulshock, president/CEO

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin

66 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

SERVICES PROVIDED CO RP OR ATE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

CO MM ER CIA L

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


What’s all the Hullabaloo? Whether it plays in HD or on the web, from feature films to commercial spots, Hullabaloo tells stories that get results. Creative. Engaging. Serving Your Business Needs. THAT’S HULLABALOO. Clients include: Top Pot Doughnuts, Nordstrom, Amazon.com, Starbucks, MTV, National Geographic, PBS, and Microsoft. 20 years of award-winning experience.

JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 67


NW

Redstone Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-999-0490; fax 206-783-1535 info@redstonepictures.com www.redstonepictures.com

Cass Redstone, principal Jessie Redstone, principal

Reel House Films; Ashland, OR 541-201-8911 sean@reelhousefilms.com www.reelhousefilms.com Rocket Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Sean Nipper

John Sabella & Associates, Inc.; Port Townsend, WA 360-379-1668; fax 360-379-5148 info@johnsabella.com www.johnsabella.com

John Sabella

Les Fitzpatrick

Sights & Sounds Unlimited; Grants Pass, OR Jes Webb, owner 541-476-8558; fax 541-476-8575 info@ssounds.com www.ssounds.com Spin Creative; Seattle, WA 206-686-1090; fax 206-686-1091 contact@spincreativegroup.com www.spincreativegroup.com

Matthew Billings, president/CD

Spirit Media; Clackamas, OR 503-698-5540; fax 503-698-8408 info@spiritmedia.com www.spiritmedia.com

Bill Dolan, president Anne DeRock, creative services director

Starfire Animation and VFX; Seattle, WA 206-225-8369 contact@starfireanimation.com www.starfireanimation.com

Coleman Smith

Stevenson Advertising; Lynnwood, WA 425-787-9686; fax 425-787-9702 brett@stevensonadvertising.com www.stevensonadvertising.com

Brett Stevenson Tim Grand Kathy Balcom

Studio 3, Inc.; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-282-0939; fax 206-282-0413 jessica@studio3.com www.studio3.com

Jim Felt, president Jessica Lynes, marketing David King, director

Studio216 Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-718-9798 info@studio216.com www.studio216.com

Jamie Fleming, CEO Charles Choo, CMO Boaz Ashkenazy, CMO

Talk It Up Productions; Seattle, WA 360-815-3916 anny@talkituptv.com www.talkitupproductions.com www.talkituptv.com

Anny Havland, EP/ president/CEO Rick Walters, director/producer

unclebob.tv; Seattle, WA 206-383-8222 branson@unclebob.tv www.unclebob.tv

Branson Veal, owner/director

Urban Legend Productions; Seattle, WA 206-618-9777 info@urbanlegendproductions.com www.urbanlegendproductions.com

Jack Barrett, director

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com VODA Studios; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158; fax 866-626-8973 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO

68 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

SERVICES PROVIDED CO RP OR ATE

CO MM ER CIA L

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

PRODUCTION COMPANIES


Pat Barber

First

Film 16/35mm

Then

TV/Movies

Editing

206.914.5204 pbedit@comcast.net

Video Tape

Compters Streaming

Now

åFeatures Mobil In çDocumentaries Your Hand éShort Dramas èTelling Seattle Direct Stories For Brain Over 3 Decades Implants

Digital

Location Management and Production Support Creative & Thorough Location Scouting • Friendly & Reliable Service

425.269.3396 dave@drummondmedia.com • www.drummondmedia.com JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 69


NW

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, EP/ director

White Rain Films; Seattle, WA 206-682-5417; fax 206-682-3038 bill@whiterainfilms.com www.whiterainfilms.com Workhouse Creative; Seattle, WA 206-402-4889 info@workhousecreative.com www.workhousecreative.com

Brad Bolling Bill Phillips

World Famous; Seattle, WA 206-328-3881 alan@worldfamousinc.com www.worldfamousinc.com

Alan Nay, founder Daniel Brown, director/ECD Stephanie Peirolo, president

XRATS Productions; Talent, OR 541-326-6235 xrats2@gmail.com www.xrats.net

Ross Williams

Yes And Video; Seattle, WA 917-501-2546 kevin@yesandvideo.com www.yesandvideo.com

Kevin Lyons, president/CD

Yoyostring Creative; Seattle, WA 206-683-3847 jae@yoyostringcreative.com www.yoyostringcreative.com

Jae Macallan, owner

Zupa Films LLC; Portland, OR 503-860-0921; fax 503-501-4849 zupafilms@mac.com www.zupafilms.com

Adele Amos, EP

VID EO -ON -DE MA ND OTH ER

IN P TER CAODCA ACTI ST ST/ VE WE / B-

AN IMA TIO N

TEL EVI SIO N

DIR ECT RES PON SE EDU INS CA TR TION UC A TIO L/ NA L FEA TU RE FIL M

DOC UM ENT ARY

DIG ITA L

CO RP OR ATE

SERVICES PROVIDED CO MM ER CIA L

COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE E-MAIL WEBSITE

TO EX P LO ECU CA TIV L ES

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Keith Rivers, owner/ principal Eli Martin, EP

For All Your Production Catering Needs

where food celebrates life

70 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015

‹-YLZOSVJHSPUNYLKPLU[ZTLL[NSVIHSÅ  H]VYZ ‹*\Z[VTTLU\ZMVYL]LY`[HZ[LHUKI\KNL[ ‹-\SSZLY]PJLJH[LYPUNZ[HMÄUNHUKYLU[HSZH]HPSHISL

(206) 781-8149 • CameronCatering.com


JULY/AUGUST 2015

MEDIA INC. 71


72 MEDIA INC. JULY/AUGUST 2015


Media inc july 2015 web