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CONTENTS FEATURES

VOLUME 25 • ISSUE 2 2013

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR

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VICTORY IN SALEM

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BACKING THE FUTURE

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LOCATION VOCATION Location Manager Q&A

Katie Sauro SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

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WHY STORYTELLING IS THE NATURAL NEXT STEP IN B2B CUSTOMER MARKETING

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CREATIVE TRENDS IN PRINT: GREAT PRINT SELLS IN OUR DIGITAL WORLD

Dawn Carlson Beth Harrison Christina Poisal WEBMASTER

Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn

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WHO’S NEWS

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WA INCENTIVE FILMS WRAP PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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CHANGE AGENTS: CMD CREDITS ABILITY TO STAY AHEAD OF RAPID CHANGE AS KEY TO SUCCESS

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AD AGENCY Q&A

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BEYOND CUSTOMER SERVICE

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PRR’S RITA BROGAN RECEIVES AWARD FROM THE PORT OF SEATTLE

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WHAT POWERS YOUR DIGITAL MEDIA? PERSONAL PUBLICITY STUNTS DESIGN Q&A

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FINDING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY NICHE ON THE RECORD: PARKS CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

COVER

On the set of Lucky Them at Corban University in Tacoma this past February. The film, directed by Megan Griffiths, stars Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church. (Photo by Dave Drummond, location manager. See more from NW location scouts/managers on pages 22-25.)

Media Index Publishing Group P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com

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MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS

Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publish-

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ing Inc. and will not be returned.

PRODUCTION COMPANIES

Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50

CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS

(+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Pub-

GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS

lishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus tax. Copyright © 2013 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means,

PHOTOGRAPHERS

electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA

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WHO’S NEWS Check out the latest hires and promotions throughout the Northwest’s media companies. If you would like to submit an announcement and photo for Who’s News, e-mail them to the editor at editor@media-inc.com, or mail to P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124. Photos should be 3” x 5” at 300 dpi, tiff or jpeg, labeled as the person’s name. ADVERTISING/MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Anvil Media/Portland Jeff Bedford promoted to Digital Strategist

Anvil Media/Portland Niki Grambo hired as Digital Analyst

Anvil Media/Portland Brandon Zienowicz hired as Digital Analyst

Hodgson/Meyers/ Kirkland, WA Paul Suttell added as Account Director

Hydrogen Advertising/ Seattle Danielle Wakatsuki promoted to Senior Account Executive

Hydrogen Advertising/ Seattle Kim Yale joined as Director of Accounts

JayRay/Tacoma, WA Rob McNair-Huff added as Advisor

Leopold Ketel/Portland Stephanie Howe promoted to Account Manager

Leopold Ketel/Portland Kelly Williams Brown added as Copywriter

Leopold Ketel/Portland Renee Wilkinson added as Strategist

PRR/Seattle Anne Broache hired as Associate

PRR/Seattle Kate Elliott hired as Project Coordinator

PRR/Seattle Lynsey Gilchrist Burgess promoted to Associate III

PRR/Seattle Kirsten Hauge promoted to Senior Associate II

PRR/Seattle Myra Keovilayhong hired as Accounts Receivables Specialist

PRR/Seattle Laura LaBissoniere Miller promoted to Associate II

PRR/Seattle Haley Reutimann hired as Project Coordinator

PRR/Seattle Diana Steeble hired as Director of Public Relations

Phinney Bischoff/Seattle Michelle Anderson joined as Director, Strategic Marketing

Printing Control/Tukwila, WA Carl Vonder Haar appointed as President

CREATIVE

PRR/Seattle Britt Thorson promoted to Account Executive

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Electric Pen/Seattle Rima Sinno added as Creative Director

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Y R O T C I V in Salem LANDMARK LEGISLATIVE SESSION BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO OREGON PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

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t was a bumpy, exhausting, arduous ride—but for those in the Oregon production industry, it was well worth it.

On July 8—the final day of the 2013 legislative session—the House of Representatives passed House Bill 3367 to increase the state’s film incentive, known as the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF), from $6 million a year to $10 million. This is $2 million less than what Governor John Kitzhaber, an ardent supporter of the bill, had been pushing for, but is still a major win for the local film industry. The journey wasn’t smooth sailing for HB 3367, which was comprised of several expiring tax credits, including the film incentive, the earned income tax credit, and the Oregon Cultural Trust tax credit, among others. continued on page 12

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(Above) Surrounded by supporters, LAIKA's ParaNorman stands front and center during Oregon's Industry Day at the Capitol. (Below) The rally featured guest speakers, celebrities, politicians, and even Sasquatch.

INDUSTRY DAY at the Capitol T

his legislative session was long and hard-fought by so many in the Oregon production industry, from the Governor’s Office of Film and Television and the Oregon Media Production Association, to local cast and crew, to the untold number of supporters who called and e-mailed their legislators. On May 2, OMPA hosted a Media Production Industry Day at the state capitol to rally in support of the bill, then known as HB 2267. Film and media industry professionals came from all corners of the state to take part in the event, which featured speakers such as Governor Kitzhaber, appearances by major industry players, informational booths and a reception, all to get the word out about how much the Oregon media industry means to the state. The hard work and enthusiasm demonstrated by so many throughout the state played no small part in the outcome of the 2013 legislative session.


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Just six days prior to its passage, the bill appeared dead when Senate lawmakers failed to reach a “grand bargain” on increasing tax revenue and cutting pension costs, which would have helped fund the tax credits. But during a meeting of the Senate Finance and Revenue Committee a few days later, several local industry professionals spoke of the film incentive’s importance to the state, helping to change many committee members’ minds. The Senate amended the bill from $12 million to $10 million, and the bill was passed by a vote of 22 to 8. The following day, the last day of the legislative session, the House of Representatives concurred by a vote of 50 to 9. Since its inception, OPIF has attracted many productions to the state, such as Grimm, Leverage, Portlandia and ParaNorman, among others, but a higher incentive cap means more—and bigger—productions, which equals more jobs. And not only does the bill increase the annual cap of OPIF, but it expands the local filmmaker program (Indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund, or iOPIF) to include “Media Production Service Companies,” such as post-production and video game development projects. It also lifts the threshold for out-of-state projects to $1 million of spend in Oregon. For iOPIF, the spending threshold will now be $75,000 on the low end, and up to the first $1 million of a project. The bill will become law on the 91st day following adjournment

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sine die (early October). Two other bills passed during the session will also positively impact the local industry. HB 2505 directs money to the Oregon Business Development Department, including a program called the Oregon Innovation Council. The Oregon Innovation Council provides funding for several initiatives, such as the Oregon Story Board (OSB), which is designed to grow and incubate the state’s digital media industry. Funding for OSB should begin later in the fall. Finally, the passage of SB 836 means that film, TV and theatrical professionals are no longer required to obtain a cosmetology license as it applies to working on productions. Vince Porter, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Film and Television, called the legislative session “transformational.” “This past legislative session will prove to be a very important one for Oregon’s film, TV and digital media industry,” said Porter. “Not only will we be able to attract more productions with the increase in the incentive, but we will also be able to further work with the local digital media industry through the creation of the Oregon Story Board. More jobs, more local infrastructure and hopefully more local entrepreneurial developments.” For more information, visit www.oregonfilm.org.


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425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com

3357 SE 22nd Ave Portland, OR 97202 503-542-3990 gearheadgrip.com ISSUE TWO 2013 MEDIA INC.

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Backing the Future

Washington Filmworks executive director Amy Lillard announces the funding assistance recipients for the most recent cycle of the Filmworks Innovation Lab.

By Jessie Wilson Programs & Communications Coordinator, Washington Filmworks

n June 8, Washington Filmworks publicly announced funding assistance recipients for the Innovation Cycle of the Filmworks Innovation Lab. The program, which is part of a long-term economic development strategy, is designed to invest in the future of film by tapping into Washington’s creative community and encouraging original storytelling that capitalizes on new forms of production and technology. The Board of Directors of Washington Filmworks may allocate up to $350,000 per year in funding assistance support to projects that apply to the Innovation Lab. Unlike the standard incentive program, the Lab is a competitive and juried process.

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Filmmakers and supporters alike gather to celebrate the winning teams.


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“The entertainment industry is shifting and adopting alternative distribution paradigms,” says Amy Lillard, Washington Filmworks Executive Director. “Washington State is uniquely positioned to capitalize on this digital revolution, and create revenue streams that integrate our in-state technology resources. Washington Filmworks is passionate about developing programs that empower our local storytellers to lead the innovation revolution. Using our creative capital and technology expertise, we can create a new economic development model for the world to follow.” This cycle of the program was designed to challenge local filmmakers to create motion picture content that traverses multiple delivery platforms. Washington Filmworks was thrilled to receive a diverse pool of 25 quality applications to the program. For this cycle of the Lab, Washington Filmworks worked with a jury of industry experts to evaluate projects and make funding assistance recommendations to the Board. The jury represented all facets of motion picture production, multiplatform storytelling, and emerging entertainment models. Serving on the jury were Kraig Baker, Jane Charles, Scott Macklin and Matt Vancil. The jury members share a deep understanding of the business of film. Ultimately the jury chose finalists to pitch and made recommendations to the Board about the level of funding assistance for each project. The Board voted to allocate funds to five projects and decisions were based on the Lab’s selection criteria, as well as the merits of each project and its investment in Washington State. The Innovation Cycle of the Lab encourages these filmmakers to present new business and revenue models that leverage Washington’s film infrastructure in the digital era. The filmmaking community joined Washington Filmworks at the 2013 Seattle International Film Festival to acknowledge the achievements of all Lab applicants and celebrate with the funding assistance recipients as the results were revealed. The following is a list of projects that received funding assistance and the key creatives who pitched each project: • The Maury Island Incident – Steve Edmiston (Writer/Producer) and Scott Schaefer (Director/Co-Producer) • Science-Trak (formerly referred to as Project Pluto) – Kevin Maude (Executive Producer) and Graeme Lowry (Producer) • Rocketmen – Alycia Delmore (Producer/Actor) and Webster Crowell (Writer/Director) • Salish Sea – Tracy Rector (Producer/Director) and Lou Karsen (Producer/Co-Director) • Emerald City – Lacey Leavitt (Writer/Director) and Eric Stalzer (CoWriter) Congratulations to all filmmakers who participated in the Lab and a special thank you to our remarkable jury for all their hard work and dedication to the evolution of motion picture storytelling in Washington State. 16

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(All photos) The filmmaking community gathered to celebrate the announcement of this cycle’s funding recipients.


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Filmworks in the Community his spring the Washington Filmworks team was busy traveling throughout the state, promoting the local film industry at various events. Among the many events Filmworks attended was the 39th Annual Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF), where Filmworks executive director Amy Lillard gave a State of the Industry presentation. In addition, Filmworks also partnered with SIFF to present the 2013 Fly Filmmaking Challenge, a competition for local filmmakers. The 2013 program featured four narrative short films by Seattle-based filmmakers Ben Andrews, Amy Enser, Lulu Gargiulo, and Curtis Taylor. Lillard was also part of a panel—along with IATSE 488 president Greg Smith, costume designer Ron Leamon, and SAG-

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AFTRA Seattle Local president John Patrick Lowrie—at Seattle’s annual Folklife festival. Entitled “Washington Filmworks: Careers in Film,” the panel answered questions about their experiences working in the industry and attendees learned ways to build their own film career in Washington. Also this spring, Filmworks made visits to a couple of new film offices, one located in Walla Walla and the other in Shoreline, to meet with local representatives and discuss the potential economic benefits of increased motion picture production in their area. For more information, visit www.washingtonfilmworks.org.

SEATTLE TELEPROMPTER Maia McQuillan // www.seattleteleprompter.com // CELL 858.945.2076

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WF Incentive Films Wrap Principal Photography wo Washington Filmworks production incentive projects wrapped principal photography this summer.

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The first, 7 Minutes, wrapped in June after shooting in Everett, Washington. Written and directed by first-time feature filmmaker Jay Martin, the action-drama stars an exciting mix of up-andcoming talent such as Luke Mitchell (Neighbours), Leven Rambin (The Hunger Games), Zane Holtz (The Perks of Being a Wallflower) and Brandon Hardesty (Bucky Larson), as well as seasoned pros Kris Kristofferson (Blade), Kevin Gage (Heat) and Jason Ritter (Parenthood). The film was produced by Jacob Estes, Jacob Mosler, Jim Hart and Rick Rosenthal, in association with Whitewater Films. This production is the second feature film that Whitewater Films has brought to Washington State in the last two years. 7 Minutes tells the story of a once-promising college athlete, his drug-dealing brother and their ex-con friend who embark on an ill-fated heist. As each minute of their simple plan unfolds, the action spirals closer to a tragic conclusion. “The production was based in Everett, where the combination

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Washington State Senators and Representatives were invited to the set of Laggies on July 1. (l to r) Rep. Reuven Carlyle, Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, Rep. Ed Orcutt, WF Board Member Becky Bogard, and director Lynn Shelton. (Courtesy of Washington Filmworks)

of urban and rural settings within minutes of each other made for a very attractive production center and central location,” said producer Rosenthal. “Everett city officials were incredibly helpful. Their positive attitude and unbelievably proactive cooperation made the budget of our indie film go a long ways. With picturesque locations and solid film crews, the lure to shoot in the Pacific Northwest is strong, but it was the 30-percent incentive from Washington Filmworks that helped make an unbeatable case for filming in the state.” Meanwhile, another WF incentive project, Laggies, wrapped after


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filming in the Puget Sound region throughout June and early July. Laggies is a feature film directed by Seattle-based Lynn Shelton (Touchy Feely, Your Sister’s Sister) and written by Andrea Seigel. The project stars Chloë Grace Moretz (Dark Shadows), Keira Knightley (Pirates of the Caribbean), and Sam Rockwell (Iron Man 2). Laggies is produced by Alix Madigan, Rosalie Swedlin and Steve

ipalities, including Seattle, Shoreline, Kenmore, Lynnwood, Mill Creek, Renton, Bellevue and Bothell. The bulk of production took place in Seattle and featured numerous locations and neighborhoods in the Emerald City. “I have been delighted, in every respect, by the experience of shooting Laggies in the beautiful city of Seattle. Everything—from

“With picturesque locations and solid film crews, the lure to shoot in the Pacific Northwest is strong, but it was the 30-percent incentive from Washington Filmworks that helped make an unbeatable case for filming in the state.” - Rick Rosenthal, Producer, 7 Minutes Golin from Anonymous Content, and Myles Nestel from The Solution Entertainment Group. The film tells the story of a woman who dodges her long-term boyfriend’s marriage proposal by pretending to be at a weeklong seminar, but she is actually hanging out with high school girls. The woman must struggle to decide what will really make her happy while reliving the highlights of her high school days. This production is the first feature film, and third project, that Anonymous Content has brought to Washington State since 2009. Laggies filmed key scenes in several Puget Sound region munic-

the application for funding assistance, the support of Washington Filmworks, through the actual shoot—was an effortless, joyous experience. I loved shooting in Seattle. The crew was simply outstanding in every aspect and the locations we secured were perfect,” said producer Madigan. “It was also wonderful to spend time in this great city, which has much to offer.” 7 Minutes and Laggies are two of 90 projects WF has approved through the standard funding assistance program. These productions represent an estimated $213-million economic impact statewide since the Washington Legislature created WF in 2007.

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LOCATION VOCATION Some of the state’s most seasoned location scouts and managers talk to Media Inc. about their careers, their on-set experiences, and their favorite Northwest locations.

What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? I just finished working on a Chevy Silverado music video for Tool of North America with Bob Richardson directing. The story we had to tell was about America, so we scouted from the Washington coast beaches, to the Canadian border, to the rolling hills of the Palouse near Idaho. When I have the chance to show film crews what Washington has to offer for locations, they are always surprised and end up changing their schedule, shooting more days here than they planned. When we drove through Eastern Washington on this scout, the crew, like most, had no idea that Eastern Washington could double as Utah, Arizona, or New Mexico. We shot fishing boats for coastal, wheat fields and a dairy farm for Middle America, a waterfall for the Rockies, and a cattle ranch in one of Eastern Washington’s coulees for the Southwest United States. They left Washington with more than they expected. What kind of tech gear (i.e. cameras, computers, gadgets) are you currently using? I try to keep it simple. I shoot with a Canon 5D, process my pictures on a MacBook Pro and load all locations to my Web site. On my Web site, I have access to my library of locations and organize each project into scenes or location categories and attach the relevant notes for each location. These days a Non Disclosure Agreement is more common than not, so when I work for companies like Microsoft, Amazon, Nintendo and Starbucks, my Web site provides a secure link to each project with a username and password.

Craig Stewart Craig Stewart Locations, LLC 206-818-6357 www.craigstewartlocations.com How long have you been in the industry and how did you get into this field? I started at the University of Washington Extension Film Program and got a job on a movie with my teacher, Laszlo Pal, and his friend, Vilmos Zsigmond, in 1987. I did everything from projecting the dailies at night to driving wardrobe trucks to set in the morning and volunteering for every department possible. I was fortunate to have Chuck Fey show me how to load a Panavision mag under Vilmos Zsigmond’s camera department. Back then I was more interested in the camera department. Along the way, I worked for Alan Siegel Films/November Films for about 15 years. We were like a family, traveling all over the country making car commercials. I started as a production assistant, then started scouting and coordinating transportation, then became assistant director. The scouting part stuck. 22

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What do you think makes a good location manager or scout? Location managing is mostly about people skills. Hearing what the production company wants to accomplish in terms of tone, look, and feel of the overall story. Finding the locations that are needed that fit into the schedule and communicating clearly with each property owner and the immediate community. Developing true and honest relationships is the key. You can’t cut corners here! You have to do your homework. If the shoot requires a lastminute location need, I will have a better chance to solve the issue because I did my homework and developed relationships in the immediate community. If you listen closely to people you meet, the information they offer can often solve issues because of the people they know. It’s not what you know… it’s who you know.


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Alissa Desler A Hidden Location NW 509-531-5454 www.ahiddenlocation.com How long have you been in the industry and how did you get into this field? I’ve been in film about five years. I first started out as an extra in TNT’s Leverage and NBC’s Grimm. Then, through Denise Gibbs at Foreground Background, I moved up in the world to feature films such as Late Autumn, filming a scene locally here in Pasco, Washington. The other two feature films were filmed in Seattle. I have been Tri-Cities, Washington involved in film locations for three years. My first location position was for an independent film out of Portland, Oregon. The film was Sister Mary’s Angel and soon to come, Sticks and Stones, both written and directed by Mary Knight.

I found myself driving to Portland, then to Seattle, and maybe home for a day—maybe. It was at this point in my travels I thought to myself, “Why hasn’t there been much filming here in Eastern Washington?” That was when I decided to start promoting this beautiful side of the state. I take great pride in the Tri-Cities; we’ve stood tall throughout the economy and its downfall. We are a very strong community and we thrive to invest into our community. What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? Nature Valley Soft Baked Oatmeal Squares commercial, at Skamania Lodge. Cysco Systems New York for a print ad involving apples, at Columbia Fruit Pickers. A feature film written and directed by Travis Zariwny titled Intruder. What are some of your most exciting discoveries as a location scout/manager? I’d have to say areas of Tri-Cities, Washington land I haven’t yet discovered in my travels, I like to go home and research them. I love to learn about our history, especially the Columbia River and The Flood.

Location Management and Production Support Creative & Thorough Location Scouting Friendly & Reliable Service 425.269.3396 • dave@drummondmedia.com • www.drummondmedia.com

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What is your most memorable experience on the job? I’d have to say that would be on our own land here in Kennewick, Washington. My husband and his family are farmers and we own land stretching the Columbia River starting in Kennewick wrapping around to the McNary Dam; we own just over 20,000 acres. Well, one time while out scouting on our property for a Seattle-based t-shirt company, I stumbled upon a metal box that had just been tossed alongside the road. Well, I picked it up and opened it. Needless to say, I threw it right back down; I hadn’t stopped to think what could be in that box before I opened it. But as I pulled it open, for some reason I thought to myself, “this could be ashes!” Sure enough, it was, but now I had thrown it down so hard and fast I spilled most of the ashes out. I ran back to my truck faster than I have ever ran before. I called my husband, who then called Benton County Sheriff and they came out and retrieved the ashes like it was something that they dealt with often. I still get goosebumps telling that story.

What kind of tech gear (i.e. cameras, computers, gadgets) are you currently using? I do most of my shooting on a Canon DSLR, but also use some of the new features of the iPhone quite a bit, the including panorama feature and the ability to shoot short videos. Both give clients the ability to see a bit more of a particular location, or to get a sense of potential camera movement. What are some of your most exciting discoveries as a location scout/manager? I love discovering hidden or forgotten parts of the region. On a recent job I was given a tour of some of the basements and lost underground spaces within Seattle’s International District— many of which haven’t changed since the 1930s.

Dave Drummond Drummond Media 425-269-3396 www.drummondmedia.com

On the set of Lucky Them.

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What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? I recently wrapped on Lynn Shelton’s latest feature, called Laggies. Earlier this year I did some work for a TNT pilot called Lost & Found, and also worked on the feature film Lucky Them.

What is your most memorable experience on the job? A few years ago I worked on a commercial that involved a large herd of goats. The scene involved the goats jumping out of a truck onto Pine Street in the middle of the city. The shoot took place the day after one of Seattle’s freak snowstorms in December, and the entire set was covered with ice. Trying to keep the goats from escaping was a weird but very memorable experience. What do you think makes a good location manager or scout? Finding the right balance between the creative and the practical is the essence of location management. A good scout first needs to learn how to notice interesting places that others might miss. It requires a good creative eye, but also an ability to look at a location pragmatically, to determine how a film crew would operate there. You also need to be persuasive, with the ability to convince location owners to allow filming on their property. Sometimes that is the trickiest part.


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What is your most memorable experience on the job? Marlboro projects and working with Cowboys.

Mark Wygant and the creative director from John Deere.

What do you think makes a good location manager or scout? Attention to detail, staying on task and working fast.

Wygant’s Montana Crew.

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Mark Wygant Mark Wygant Productions 206-679-3072 www.markwygant.com

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W Y G A N T productions Ne v e r Ha d A Ba d D ay 50 States & International Experience



Complete production services 

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Detailed Nationwide Locations



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What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? John Deere, Chase Bank, Microsoft.

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How long have you been in the industry and how did you get into this field? 25 years right out of college, I did some basic scouting for still photographers in the late ‘80s while working as a freelance assistant. In 1990 a photographer from L.A. referred me to a large production company and a scout job involving aerials. The phone hasn’t stopped ringing since for locations.

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Large Crew & Resource Database

Past productions include: Anheuser Busch, AT&T, Blue Cross, Boeing, General Motors, Jaguar, John Deere, Microsoft, Nike

What kind of tech gear (i.e. cameras, computers, gadgets) are you currently using? Lumix, Mac, Photoshop. What are some of your most exciting discoveries as a location scout/manager? Underground rivers and villages in Mexico, Moab, and all the interesting sub-cultures around the U.S.

S e a t t l e , WA s h i n g t o n markwygant.com • Tel 206.679.3072 Email wygant1@mac.com A Monkeys With Footballs Production

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BRIEFS

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Digital One Puts the Right Edge on Mutt Industries’ Gerber Spot, Wins 2013 Communicator Award Por tland’s Digital One has earned an Award of Excellence in the category of Video & Commercial: Sound Design at the 2013 Communicator Awards. Mutt Industries tapped Digital One for the Gerber Knives project, “The Instant.” Sound designer Chip Sloan worked closely with art director/editor Adam Long, writer Mike Houston, creative directors Scott Cromer, Steve Luker and Mike McCommon, and producer Chris Lawson. The goal of the audio was to create not just footsteps, but the ominous feeling that Trouble is a living thing—a thing that stalks us—and that part of preparing for Trouble is having the proper weapon to drive it away. Throughout the spot, Trouble is heard just a split second before it arrives, maintaining a feeling of adrenalized anxiety throughout. No strangers to the great Northwestern outdoors themselves, Sloan and Houston left the studio to do Foley work for the spot. The project was also lent a gritty, folksy vibe with the accompaniment of an original song by Charlie Campbell. Adam Long sewed the whole thing together to effectively capture the instants in which Trouble arrives, and the essence of the people who stand nose to nose with it. To view the award-winning spot, visit www.digone.com.

AUDIO POST PRODUCTION MUSIC COMPOSITION | ISDN SOUND DESIGN | MUSIC LICENSING VOICE RECORD | ADR | SOURCE CONNECT

503.236.7829 info@sonicmediastudios.com www.sonicmediastudios.com 2211 NE Oregon St. Portland, OR 97232 26

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Spin’s Matthew Billings Teams Up with Tom Skerritt Tom Skerritt lent a hand and a voice-over for Treehouse, which helps level the playing field for foster youth by providing educational and essential supports. The organization’s new image video premiered at their Annual Champions for Foster Kids Luncheon at the Seattle Sheraton this spring. The commercial was directed by Matthew Billings of Spin Creative and written and produced by Jim Lombardo. The session marked a reunion of sorts for Skerritt and Billings. They both starred with Linda Evans in the 1990 TV movie She’ll Take Romance, which was shot in Seattle. For more information, visit www.spincreativegroup.com.

The Digits Now Available in PBS LearningMedia Portland-based Web series The Digits recently joined forces with education icon PBS to offer educators a free teacher-tested math resource for their elementary school students. Created by Scotty Iseri, The Digits became part of PBS LearningMedia in April, offering teachers 10 appisodes (Web episode that’s also available as an app) of The Digits. “I have been watching PBS from before I can remember so you can imagine how proud I am that PBS has acknowledged the educational value of The Digits,” said Iseri. “The Digits has been in development for years, and this new partnership is the most important one we’ve secured so far. The Digits helps older kids learn math just like Sesame Street


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helps younger kids with their ABCs and 123s—using fun and practical situations requiring problem solving—and I am thrilled for this content to be available to educators nationwide through PBS LearningMedia.” Now in its second season of filming, The Digits is available on YouTube for Schools and as an app on all tablet devices and phone platforms including iTunes, Amazon, Android and Kindle. For more information, visit www.watchthedigits.com. Martin Model Management Open for Business Martin Model Management, a full-service management company representing men, women, and children ages 8 and older, is now open for business in Bellevue, Washington. The new agency offers amazing talent, including new models and new actors/actresses, for print, fashion shows, promotional events and broadcast work. For more information, visit www.martinmodeling.com.

Marc Bowen Productions Update 2013 brings several new clients and some great projects for Portland-based film and video production company Marc Bowen Productions. Current and recently completed projects include: • Learning.com – A series of Web-based tutorials for teachers and students. • Port of Portland – Video production for display in an upcoming OHS exhibit. • Portland Community College– A series of informational productions for the Bond program, showing ongoing construction projects at several PCC campuses. Featuring the many benefits the program provides for the community as well as the college and students. • Blount International, Inc. – Ongoing quarterly reports for employees. For more information, visit www.marcbowenproductions.com.

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LAIKA/house; Portland, OR 503-225-1130; fax 503-226-3746 ask_house@laika.com www.laika.com/house

Lourri Hammack, president/EP

WND

VODA Studios; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158; fax 866-626-8973 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

WND

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP sales Mike Pool, managing director

$6.5m

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO

$6.5m

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, EP/director

$3.89m

Cesari Direct; Seattle, WA 206-282-1492; fax 206-284-1281 tobrien@cesaridirect.com www.cesaridirect.com

Rick Cesari, president Tim O’Brien, VP

$1.5m

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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SERVICES PROVIDED

20 12 RE VE NU CO E MM ER CI CO AL RP OR AT E DI GI TA L DO CU ME NT AR DI RE Y CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO N C FE AT TIONAL/ UR A EF L ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE R DC A A CT VI ST/WIVE/ DE EB OON CAS -D T S EM ST OUN AN UD DS D I T OT O AGE HE / R

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ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348; fax 206-493-2987 info@promotionarts.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director Drew Witt, managing producer

$987k

Clatter&Din, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-464-0520; fax 206-464-0702 tickle@clatterdin.com www.clatterdin.com

Peter Barnes, president Leigh Eckert, EP Vince Werner, CD

WND

Limbo Films; Portland, OR 503-228-0844; fax 503-228-0857 kelly@limbofilms.com www.limbofilms.com

Gary Nolton, owner/director

$759k

Media Arts, Inc.; Redmond, WA 206-281-8811 scott@mediarts.com www.mediarts.com

Scott P. Munro, president

WND

Blue Plate Digital; Seattle, WA 206-388-0174; fax 206-299-3376 brian@blueplatedigital.com www.blueplatedigital.com

Brian Pelzel, producer/director/owner Doug Cooper, creative strategist/ producer/director Bruce Towne, president

WND

Persistent Image, Inc.; Langley, WA 360-321-8252; fax 360-321-8262 persistent.image@gmail.com www.persistentimage.com

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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SERVICES PROVIDED

20 12 RE VE NU CO E MM ER CI CO AL RP OR AT E DI GI TA L DO CU ME NT AR DI RE Y CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO N C FE AT TIONAL/ UR A EF L I L TE M LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE DC RA A CT VI ST/WIVE/ DE EB OON CAS -D T S EM ST OUN A ND UD DS I T OT O AGE HE / R

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$560k


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Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/EP Debbie Mann, office manager

WND

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin

WND

Production Partners; Seattle, WA 206-441-3773; fax 206-443-5402 john@productionpartners.cc www.productionpartners.cc

John Douthwaite, president

$325k

GoodSide Studio; Seattle, WA 206-322-1576 studio@goodsidestudio.com www.goodsidestudio.com

Matt Krzycki, CD

$300k

Rocket Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Les Fitzpatrick

$270k

CineMonster, Inc.; Poulsbo, WA 206-953-1946/206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, owner

$250k

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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Redstone Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-999-0490; fax 206-783-1535 info@redstonepictures.com www.redstonepictures.com

Cass Redstone, principal Jessie Redstone, principal

$203k

EMA Video Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-241-8663 emellnik@emavideo.com www.emavideo.com

Ed Mellnik

WND

KTVA Productions; Portland, OR 503-659-4417 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips

$112k

Adams Creative & Production Services; Des Moines, WA 206-824-6970; fax 206-824-7036 adamscreative@isomedia.com www.adamscreative.net Blu Room Advertising, LLC; Steilacoom, WA 253-241-8912 charles@bluroomadvertising.com www.bluroomadvertising.com

Dan Adams, president/CD

WND

Charles Davis, owner Russell Silva, co-owner

DND

Charles Core Scott Douwes Troy Murison

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n/fek/tious; Seattle, WA 206-956-0902; fax 206-624-3854 contact@nfektious.com www.nfektious.com

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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SERVICES PROVIDED

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McDONALD INSURANCE GROUP, INC. SPECIALIZED INDUSTRIES Special Effects Wa r d r o b e

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Stages

Music Videos

V i d e o D u p l i c a t i o n B r o a d c a s t i n g A u d i o, S o u n d, V i d e o Fe a t u r e F i l m s S h o r t Te r m P r o d u c t i o n s D o c u m e n t a r y I n f o m e r c i a l V i d e o g r a p h y OFFERING COVERAGE FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS.

Call John R. Gunn ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TOLL FREE: 1.888.827.7400 DIRECT: 425.897.5956 D I R E C T FA X : 4 2 5 . 8 9 7 . 5 9 5 7 johng@mcdonaldins.com 6 2 0

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Pal Productions, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-361-9366 lazpal123@gmail.com www.paladventurevideos.com

Laszlo Pal, president

DND

Matthew Billings, president/CD

DND

Spirit Media; Clackamas, OR 503-698-5540; fax 503-698-8408 info@spiritmedia.com www.spiritmedia.com

Bill Dolan, president Anne DeRock, creative services director

DND

White Rain Films; Seattle, WA 206-682-5417; fax 206-682-3038 bill@whiterainfilms.com www.whiterainfilms.com

Brad Bolling Bill Phillips

DND

Zupa Films LLC; Portland, OR 503-860-0921; fax 503-501-4849 zupafilms@mac.com www.zupafilms.com

Adele Amos, EP

DND

Spin Creative; Seattle, WA 206-686-1090; fax 206-686-1091 contact@spincreativegroup.com www.spincreativegroup.com

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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SERVICES PROVIDED DO CU ME NT AR DI RE Y CT RE SP E ON IN DUC SE ST A RU TIO FE CTI NAL O AT UR NAL/ EF ILM TE LE VI SI ON AN IM AT IO N IN PO TE R DC A A CT VI ST/WIVE/ DE EB OON CAS -D T S EM ST OUN A N UD DS D I T OT O AGE HE / R

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Why Storytelling is the Natural Next Step in B2B Customer Marketing By Mandy Emel Guest Columnist

eople are natural storytellers. For centuries, storytelling was the primary way that cultures around the world preserved their traditions and kept their customs alive. Over the last few years, B2B marketers have strayed from one of the most natural, easy ways to influence an audience—the art of storytelling. It is as though metric-packed case studies have replaced the purposeful narrative. Many marketers have been so focused on metrics, proof points, efficiency and buzzwords that they’ve lost sight of the fact that customers are human beings who crave a good story. It is no surprise when they stop reading. Good news. The art of storytelling is making a big comeback and regaining relevance in B2B marketing. Major corporations and marketing professionals are realizing that metrics and value propositions alone will not resonate powerfully with their customers. Customer engagement begins with emotion, and there is no better way to make that happen than by telling a meaningful story. One sign of the shift to storytelling is the blurring of lines between B2B and B2C marketing. Storytelling requires human-to-human—rather than human-to-product— connection. Most professionals who market directly to consumers understand that we live in an “attention economy.” You have to give the customers something they can relate to on an emotional level, and you have to do it early in order to have a fighting chance of holding their interest. B2B buyers are not so different from consumer buyers— both demand that your story is “better” than the previous brand’s story, more so than ever before. This is why B2B marketers must change the way they engage their customers. To be clear, purchasing decisions in B2B marketing are not purely emotional. Rational buying triggers are still important, and savvy marketers know that buying decisions are not made in an emotional vacuum. But storytelling can provide an essential human context, so that a customer who is leaning toward making a rational purchase decision also gets the sense that it “feels right.” Let me illustrate with a telling example—the Halo 4 Big Data story. The Halo franchise is an award-winning global entertainment phenomenon. Halo 4 is the latest release of an epic sci-fi adventure that achieved more than $220 million in global sales in its first 24 hours, and attracted more than 4 million players in its first five days after launch. The Halo case study focuses on data mining to gain insights into player preferences and behavior. This could easily have been a dry, jargonistic and data-driven story, but marketers were able to turn the case study into a huge success by making a few tweaks to the

P

format and highlighting the dramatic and emotional elements that epitomize a good story. The focal point was a five-week, free-to-enter online tournament with 2,800 prizes at stake. The marketers emphasized the big challenge faced by Microsoft’s 343 Industries team, which needed to quickly process and analyze massive amounts of raw data in order to be able to produce stats, update player rankings and support a daily email campaign designed to increase player retention. Could they succeed? Read the customer story to find out. Compared with the next most popular case study published by Microsoft on the same day, the Halo 4 customer story received 3,357 percent more views: 3,995 views vs. 119. Of the 102 case studies published by Microsoft in March 2013, the Halo 4 story was viewed 7.5 times more than the second-mostviewed case study. The Halo 4 customer story also accounts for 26 percent of all views for all 102 case studies published by Microsoft during that month. The lesson the Halo 4 story teaches us is clear: Proof points and metrics are important, but marketers shouldn’t let them consume the entire tale. Purely rational stories, absent of the human elements of dramatic tension and emotional impact, are forgettable and do little to build loyalty to your brand.

Here are five rules to help you bring your customer stories to life:

1

Tell your story the same way you would tell it to a friend or a colleague.

2

Don’t just tell your customer’s story. Tell their customer’s story.

Too many B2B writers revert to formal corporate language. Instead, write as though you are having a conversation with an old college friend. Use buzzwords and jargon sparingly; make the story fun to read. It’s not a matter of “dumbing down,” but rather a matter of being approachable and establishing a connection.

In B2B marketing, there’s an unfortunate tendency to focus on your customer. Remember that your customers have customers of their own. How does the use of your products and services impact your customers’ customers? If your customer is saving money by using your solution, why not highlight how that is also benefiting their customers?

3

Create suspense.

“Once upon a time, everything was perfect, then it got even more perfect.” Is that what engages readers? Not likely. Tension is part of everyday life, and readers expect it in a good story. You don’t have to advertise your company’s shortcomings in order to create tension. Instead, talk about real business challenges where the outcome is uncertain, and then bring us along as you overcome those challenges. continued on page 43 ISSUE TWO 2013 MEDIA INC.

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Change Agents: CMD Credits Ability to Stay Ahead of Rapid Change As Key to Success

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difficult economy. A rapidly changing industry. An everevolving business model.

For any agency, trying to survive the turmoil of the past few years has been challenging at best. Yet CMD, one of the leading marketing agencies on the West Coast, credits these factors as key to its success. CMD recently reported one of its most successful quarters in the company’s 30-plus-year history, achieving record-setting revenue and profit since the beginning of 2013. In the past three months, the agency has added 10 new hires and promoted 6 employees. CMD continues to expand its regional presence, with offices in Seattle and in San Francisco. It has added top talent and new services, including a strategy and solutions group, responsive design capabilities and a metrics and analytics division. Most importantly, CMD has broadened its client portfolio, netting a number of new accounts and clients. With roots working with some of the largest global technology brands and experience in the housing and manufacturing segments, the agency has used its knowledge to the benefit of new tech sector clients such as ASUS and leading consumer brands such as Expedia. “Rather than resist change, we’ve embraced it,” said Phil Reilly, president of CMD. “Our success can be credited to the fact that we’ve never been afraid to evolve our model to fit what clients need.”

to be nimble when it comes to instituting change rapidly. Today, the agency offers digital, advertising, design, social media, PR, paid media, film and video, events, promotion and content marketing, and metrics and analytics. “We’ve always been a big believer in having more than one arrow in our quiver,” said Reilly. “We invest in and build out areas that we believe will have growth potential and the biggest impact on clients’ marketing strategies. It’s easy Phil Reilly to get distracted in an industry that’s changing so rapidly, so we focus on how to deliver the most effective campaigns possible for the client’s investment.” Increasing Competitiveness in a Tough Economy CMD credits a tough economy for being a catalyst for change and helping the agency succeed. The agency moved from being heavily concentrated in the housing segment before the economic downturn to effectively broadening its client base and concentrating on technology and other leading business-to-business and consumer brands. Additionally, CMD saw early on that data and analytics would play an important part in how marketing expenditures would be budgeted for and determined moving forward. “Every client looks for return on marketing investment and how it impacts the bottom line—and that becomes especially important in a down economy. That’s why we’ve focused on things like adding a strong analytics department, which put us way ahead of the competition and helps reassure clients that their dollars are working as hard as possible for them,” said Reilly. According to Reilly, it’s that ability to maintain a competitive edge and focus on the company’s core values that has allowed the agency to grow and change the definition of what it means to be a “creative” agency. “In the old definition, being a ‘creative agency’ meant producing creative ads,” said Reilly. “At CMD, we believe the true meaning of creative is the ability to understand and implement the right combination of effective solutions that motivates an audience to take action. It’s a balance of both art and science. And that’s the agency of the future that CMD is excited to help pioneer.”

“Our success can be credited to the fact that we’ve never been afraid to evolve our model to fit what clients need.”

Change Comes Second Nature Change comes naturally to CMD, which was founded in the days when CD-ROMs were considered innovative, and at the time, the agency focused heavily on providing training services. As marketing strategies evolved and technology increased, CMD stayed on the forefront by working with clients considered leaders and innovators in their respective fields. The agency began incorporating new services, increasing its creative talent pool and shedding old ways of doing things. Constant evolution became part of its DNA. Now with approximately 150 employees, Reilly says CMD is big enough to invest and build out services that have the most significant impact on clients’ marketing needs, but small enough 38

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Media Inc. spotlights two Northwest ad agencies directly by the client or from their dealer/store/field agent distribution partners. The end result is quicker time to market, volume scaling that affords more efficient pricing, and a flexibility that allows for client or partner-specific messaging.

www.hmgseattle.com What would you say are your company’s specialties? HMG is laser focused on direct marketing solutions that help our clients generate leads, acquire new customers, and grow in an accountable, measurable and cost-effective way.

What makes you stand apart from your competitors? We wholeheartedly embrace the science, art and methodology of direct marketing, and bring large-agency experience, small-agency flexibility and a strong sense of partnership to every project.

How has your company adapted to the increasingly digital and mobile advertising landscape? Much of what gets labeled “digital” along with mobile are relatively new tools, but the principles of our business have remained the same for many years. Our job is to find customers and prospects in the medium and channels they are most likely to respond, whether that’s through the mail, on a computer, phone or tablet. Every client situation is different and we resist any jump into the latest tool or technology, preferring to first test our way into both traditional and new channels to deliver on our campaign objectives.

Is there a project you’re working on currently that you’d like to tell our readers a little about? HMG is working on a series of projects that aim to fill the wide gap between traditional campaign executions and ad-hoc (and more expensive) one-off projects. These projects come in the form of web-based “marketing closets” which hold tested and proven creative templates and best practice list/offer/timing guidelines developed and housed for specific client objectives. Once the creative assets have been developed, closet engagement and execution can be initiated

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www.jonesadvertising.com What would you say are your company’s specialties? We specialize in telling client stories with video in digital and traditional media.

How has your company adapted to the increasingly digital and mobile advertising landscape? We have been working in digital and social media for about ten years, and mobile for about five, so it’s not new to us. What is new is that we are no longer throwing token amounts of media behind digital, in many cases digital vehicles are our primary media. Each campaign we create has to center around a concept that can work in virtually any medium, and digital and mobile are now integral parts of our campaigns.

What is one recent advertising trend you are excited about (or wary of) and why? The six-second Vine videos is a fun trend. We regularly do five-second TV ads and actually did a four-second ad in the Super Bowl to announce the Washington State Fair, so we’re used to creating short messages. It will be interesting to see what people create, and how it applies to advertising.

Is there a project you’re working on currently that you’d like to tell our readers a little about? We’re rebranding the Puyallup Fair to The Washington State Fair. Look for our multi-media campaign running in late August.


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Relax. Relax e Targeted marketing is our specialty.

www.gcdirect.com www.gcdirect.com 206.262.1999 2 06.262.1999 x 205 205

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Beyond Customer Service GROW YOUR BUSINESS BY LEVERAGING YOUR ENTIRE ORGANIZATION TO EXPAND CURRENT ACCOUNTS By Lisa Magnuson Guest Columnist

re all your customer-facing employees armed to sell? Are you attracting expansion business on a regular basis through your front-line people? Is your company thinking beyond customer service to win more business? If you want to grow top line revenues and attract more customers, then everyone on your crew must get in the boat, grab an oar, and begin to row. Yes, we mean everyone—from the CEO to account managers to customer service to marketing and

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PR. If you’re a university, then we mean the folks in the admissions department, too. From stem to stern, it’s all hands on deck, and everyone is pulling for the team like they mean it. Leading organizations, both in the private and public sectors, are seriously re-thinking their sales assets. In short, they believe that if you engage or impress the customer in a meaningful way, you can make a difference. Combine this idea with another, such as it’s much easier to expand business with current customers than to land new ones. This synthesis means you have the opportunity and obligation to influence the customer’s perception of value and their willingness to invest additional dollars in your

Sales Management Guide for Non-Sales Leaders Building a top-notch sales force is a dynamic endeavor. It requires a solid foundation of leadership, market focus, sales process and ongoing management. However, what if you’re not a sales leader and you don’t manage salespeople, yet find yourself in the position to contribute to revenue growth? Maybe you are in charge of a group of account managers, marketing personnel, field service folks, customer service reps, admissions or intake people. Finally here’s a guide for non-sales leaders designed to help arm their front line people to contribute to the top line and bottom line results. Leadership • Can your people articulate the link between their role and the organization’s goals for growth? • Do your people have written strategies and goals for contributing to the company’s revenue targets for the year? • Do your people have clearly defined and documented expectations for behaviors, skills and results as it relates to expanding business? • Have you set aside time on a regular basis to observe your people’s interactions and conversations with customers related to expanding business? • Do substandard results trigger a corrective action process? • Does your organization have a pro-active, consistent, thorough approach to recruiting top-notch talent including skills associated with account development? • Does your department have a working process to encourage employee input, share ideas and reinforce best practices associated with growing business? • Have you invested in training specific to outreach and are resources for support available on an ongoing basis? • Does your group have simple tools available to help expand business? • Does your leadership style promote a winning, can-do attitude for sales expansion? • Do you recognize and celebrate successes to reinforce successful habits?

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Market Focus • Have you identified all the customer touch points and tested them for quality and consistency of message? • Do your people understand the ‘value proposition’ of your products or services? • Do your resources have a clear understanding of how to ‘differentiate’ the company and its products or services? • Has your group reviewed emerging market trends and how to capitalize on them? • Does your department have effective customer feedback mechanisms in place? • Are your people empowered to make decisions that enable them to respond to customers and opportunities in a timely manner? • Are your people clear on the marketing efforts underway within the organization? Development/Outreach • Are the steps to expansion documented specifically for your department? • Does each of your people have a basic understanding of a typical sales cycle? • Do your employees have access to helpful talking points, questions or checklists designed to guide them through the expansion process? • Do you have an automated method to collect and share sales information? • Is there a process in place to ensure cooperation and communication between your department and sales within your company? • Does your organization have an active referral and reference program? • Is there an efficient way for your people to pass or transmit sales leads or sales intelligence to the sales force? • Is there a solid reward system that tracks your people’s contributions, and provides a means for rewarding them for their successes?


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products and services.

The Struggle However, many organizations struggle to make the transformation. Non-salespeople just don’t want to sell. For most, it’s not part of their calling, mission, or skill-set ‘profile’ in the business world. They don’t see themselves in a revenue-generating role, and may even carry a negative impression of selling. Let’s face it, in this extremely competitive, high-definition age, we almost have to be ‘born’ to sell, or at least be ‘wired’ for it these days. Besides, most departments are (or will surely claim to be) overworked with the task at hand; they don’t believe they have any additional bandwidth to take on more duties, let alone be interested in trying their hand at ‘sales,’ even if it’s only part-time.

Be in Front of Your Competition There’s a fine line between asking everyone to be a salesperson and arming all customer-facing resources with the necessary focus, direction, knowledge and tools to help grow the company. Thriving organizations are rapidly making the transition from the traditional ‘sales as a single department model’ to ‘empowered employees’ who are informed, motivated, and enthusiastic enough to make a real (and permanent) difference to the top and bottom line. If you want to be out front, begin your transformation now or your competitors may cross that finish line first.

7 Easy Steps to Get Moving 1. Evaluate all your human touch-points. These are all the people in your organization who ‘touch’ the customer in some way. They can include delivery people, reception, field employees, customer care resources, and so on. Most companies have a virtual army of folks who touch or engage the customer, yet they remain an under-utilized resource without any ‘sales’ interaction, training, or relationship-building efforts. 2. Prioritize the non-sales group having the largest, most significant, or greatest long-term impact on your customer. (Don’t stop here but it’s a smart place to begin.)

4

3. Start to create or build awareness and expectations around just how important their role is in growing the company, and what it takes to sustain that growth. Point out the links between their job and all the possibilities that exist to positively influence the customer into expanding their business. 4. Invest in training, development, and ongoing support initiatives to move beyond a customer service/problem solving mentality into a pro-active, pro-‘public relations’ approach to build customer awareness, brand loyalty, and potential expansion. 5. Offer simple but effective tools and best practices such as talking points, sample questions, guides, real-world examples, and even focus groups to help them move beyond customer care to customer development. 6. Measure progress and highlight and reward accomplishments—both big and small—to ensure a positive, sustainable, company-wide attitude of achievement. 7. Expand to the next group until the entire organization is rallied around company growth goals, and your employees (along with the customers they touch) become a virtual army of well-informed, mission-ready, and market-savvy brand ambassadors. Although this approach may seem simplistic or even impractical, it can be both powerful and transformational, and perhaps even downright game-changing to your competition. In this techhungry, ultra-connected, and data-driven marketplace, sometimes the difference between tapping into additional revenue (or not) is asking your customer just one simple question: ‘What else can we do for you, today?’ Lisa Magnuson, founder of Top Line Sales, LLC helps high potential sales people, business owners who sell and VPs of Sales win more sales. She works side by side with her clients to navigate through their most complex sales cycles and sales challenges with remarkable results. A recent accomplishment was helping one client secure 44m in contracts last year using her proven framework for landing large opportunities.

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Encourage readers to see themselves in your story.

Even the traditional case study can engage readers if it’s a personal account of what “someone like me” experienced. If buyers can see themselves as the protagonist, they’re more likely to take action. One way to make that happen is to incorporate universal themes to connect with your reader—overcoming adversity, or the perseverance and ultimate triumph of the underdog. Give readers a reason to see how your story ends, and give them a reason to cheer when it’s over.

5

Get out of your comfort zone. Try something new.

Yes, it’s easy to structure the customer stories the same way again and again, but that isn’t likely to ignite curiosity or evoke a strong emotional response. Even if it’s the same story, it’s possible to tell it in a new way. Keep those “messaging” documents in

the drawer and focus on writing the story you want to tell. Why are you passionate about your organization? Why should others care? How is your product transforming the industry? There’s a reason storytelling is one of the most ancient forms of communication. People not only connect to good stories— they remember and retell them. If you make your customers the heroes of the stories you tell them, your products will sell themselves. Mandy is an account director specializing in digital projects, content creation and customer experiences at Metia in Seattle. She has developed relationships with clients around the world, and has experience managing digital tool development and global launch programs. Mandy’s team has worked with thousands of customers on clients’ behalf, and manages customer-facing projects across multiple channels, industries and geographies. In addition, Mandy has been recognized by the Microsoft Enterprise Partner Group for best practices in the customer reference field. ISSUE TWO 2013 MEDIA INC.

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PRR’s Rita Brogan Receives Award from The Port of Seattle eattle-based communications agency PRR was recently the recipient of The Port of Seattle’s Office of Social Responsibility’s 3rd Annual Small Business Champion Award. The awards recognize a Port employee or team who has championed increased small business participation at the Port, and a small business that has provided outstanding goods or services to the Port.

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PRR’s CEO Rita Brogan was recognized for the latter, thanks to her work as a facilitator between the Port and a group of local concessionaires, architects and contractors to examine the Port’s requirements for the design and construction of new concessions at Sea-Tac Airport. The effort, designed to save time and money for concessionaires while maintaining standards of safety and design, is critical to assuring the accessibility of concession oppor-

Celebrating

tunities for small businesses. “PRR is fantastic at keeping us all on the same page,” said Port of Seattle commission president Tom Albro. “It’s a ton of work to coordinate communications between Port staff, concessionaires, and their designers, architects and builders. Without PRR, we wouldn’t have great successes like Beecher’s Cheese.” Mike Rosen, managing principal at PRR, says that both he and PRR are “very proud of the work Rita has done for the Port, and that we are excited to see her recognized for it.” PRR is certified as a Minority Women’s Business Enterprise (MWBE) and a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE). PRR is also nationally recognized by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as a certified Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB). For more information, please visit www.prrbiz.com.

24 Years @ErniePino_

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DNA Debuts “SHARE” Advertising Campaign for BECU This spring, DNA, a Seattle-based full-service agency with expertise in brand strategy, advertising, digital strategy and media, launched a new advertising campaign for BECU, the country’s fourth largest credit union. The campaign shares actual member comments that have been posted in social media about their experience and satisfaction with BECU, that reinforce the BECU brand as a member-driven, member-inspired financial institution. BECU is a not-for-profit credit union, owned by its members, and as social media posts attest, is also truly loved by its members. DNA has brought to life the social media conversations surrounding BECU and is taking those conversations to broadcast, outdoor, digital, print and radio. “This kind of member (customer) advocacy is non-existent at the big banks, and is rare to find with any brand these days,” said Alan Brown, principal and managing director of DNA. “Our approach couldn’t be more appropriate, because we’re listening to what members are already saying, then putting it verbatim into the advertising. There isn’t any spin here—it’s just a reflection of the reality that is happening. And, unlike others who are creating content for digital media, we’ve taken what is happening online and we’re sharing it broadly through traditional media.” For more information, visit www.dnaseattle.com.

Hodgson/Meyers Awarded New Projects Kirkland, Washington-based ad agency Hodgson/Meyers Communications was awarded a rebrand project for Mobile Structures of Chehalis. Pacific Mobile Structures leases and sells mobile office space, and specializes in modular construction in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Alaska, Montana and California. Hodgson/Meyers was selected from five agencies in a review. The client noted Hodgson/Meyers’ “innovative B2B creative examples and branding strategy.” The ad agency was also recently selected to create a national business brand awareness campaign for Windstream Communications, a $6-billion telecommunications and technology company in Little Rock, Arkansas. Again, Hodgson/Meyers was chosen from a field of five agencies, based on initial campaign creative. For more information, visit www.hodgsonmeyers.com.

Anvil Media Expands Service Offerings as Marketing Consultancy Anvil Media, Inc., a Portland marketing consultancy specializing in search engine, social media and integrated marketing, has announced expanded service offerings and the addition of marketing industry veteran, Mike Terry, as vice president. Anvil has been laser-focused on search engine marketing since its inception in 2000, but saw an opportunity to meet the evolving needs and sophistication of clients by expanding services to include traditional and integrated marketing services. The marketing consultancy will focus

on moving clients’ business forward by identifying new opportunities across the digital, marketing and business landscape. “After nearly 13 years in business, it was time for a reboot,” said Kent Lewis, president and founder of Anvil Media. “Our new services allow more room to excel at our passion: delighting and elevating our clients by solving their unique business problems and challenges. Focusing solely on search marketing was limiting our ability to deliver results.” The expansion of Anvil’s services will be directed by industry veteran, Mike Terry, who will join the consultancy with 17 years of agency and corporate marketing experience. For more information, visit www.anvilmediainc.com.

Mediability Celebrates a Decade of Success Mediability, Inc., a Seattle-based media planning and buying agency, recently celebrated its 10-year anniversary. Co-owned by Jennifer Witsoe and Michelle Sawyer, Mediability has grown at the right pace, providing its clients with traditional and non-traditional advertising options including television, radio, print, out-of-home and interactive marketing with personalized one-on-one service. Witsoe, a resident of West Seattle, and Sawyer, from Maple Valley, met 13 years ago at Clear Channel Outdoor (formerly AK Media) where they worked in sales in the Seattle/Tacoma market. The pair ventured outside of the “think big” world of outdoor advertising to start their own version of a client-centered media management business where all types of media could be offered. “We started with just two desktop computers, two donated desks, a printer, no clients and our headquarters in our parents’ houses,” said Jennifer Witsoe, co-founder of Mediability. “Talk about a giant leap of faith!” Mediability has accomplished great things, including working with a wide variety of local, regional and national clients and embracing the media industry and its constant changes every day. The Mediability team has expanded service offerings to include social media management and all things digital. For more information, visit www.mediability.net. Atomic Wins Three Awards Brand DRTV advertising agency Atomic Direct won three awards for Kobalt Tools fall 2012 campaign, and Teho Tools spring 2012 campaign. Jordan Whitney Inc. awarded their annual “Best Branded Short-Form Presentation” Greensheet Award to Atomic Direct for its Kobalt DoubleDrive Ratchet campaign. Atomic also won the “Best Hardware Infomercial” Greensheet Award for its work on the Teho Garden Maintenance Kit. Along with the Greensheet Awards, Atomic won a Telly for another shortform project for the Kobalt brand—their fall 2012 campaign for Kobalt’s Magnum Grip, self-adjusting pliers. “At Atomic, it’s all about delivering results for our clients. So it’s an honor when organizations like Jordan Whitney and the Tellys choose to recognize what we’ve done,” states Doug Garnett, president of Atomic Direct. For more information, visit www.atomicdirect.com.

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NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS COMPANY NAME

CONTACT

WEB SITE

LOCATION

Alaska Airlines

Halle Hutchison, Managing Director, Brand & Marketing Communications

www.alaskaair.com

Seattle, WA

Amazon.com

Jeffrey M. Blackburn, SVP, Business Development

www.amazon.com

Seattle, WA

American Airlines

Robert Johnston, General Manager

www.aa.com

Fort Worth, TX

Amgen Inc.

Robert A. Bradway, President & CEO

www.amgen.com

Seattle, WA

AT&T Wireless

Catherine M. Coughlin, Senior EVP & Global Marketing Officer

www.att.com

Dallas, TX

Bank of America

Brian T. Moynihan, President & CEO

www.bankofamerica.com

Charlotte, NC

Banner Corp.

Mark J. Grescovich, President & CEO

www.bannerbank.com

Walla Walla, WA

Bartell Drug Co.

Theron Andrews, VP of Marketing

www.bartelldrugs.com

Seattle, WA

Boeing Company

W. James McNerney, Jr., Chairman, President & CEO

www.boeing.com

Seattle, WA

BridgePort Brewing Co.

Stacey Williams, National Director of Marketing

www.bridgeportbrew.com

Portland, OR

Burgerville

Sean Blixseth, Director of Marketing

www.burgerville.com

Vancouver, WA

Car Toys, Inc.

David Drew, President & COO

www.cartoys.com

Seattle, WA

Century Link

Meg Andrews, Media Relations & Marketing Manager

www.centurylink.com

Seattle, WA

Chase Bank

Joe Evangelisti, Media

www.chase.com

Seattle, WA

Cmedia

Michelle Cardinal, Group President & CEO

www.cmedia.tv

Portland, OR

Coinstar Inc.

Marci Maule, Director of Public Relations

www.coinstar.com

Bellevue, WA

Columbia Sportswear Co.

Timothy P. Boyle, President & CEO

www.columbia.com

Portland, OR

Comcast Spotlight

Whitney Joy, Marketing Manager

seattle.comcastspotlight.com

Seattle, WA

Costco Wholesale Corp.

Ginnie M. Roeglin, SVP Ecommerce & Publishing

www.costco.com

Issaquah, WA

Cutter & Buck Inc.

Jens Petersson, CEO

www.cutterbuck.com

Seattle, WA

Dell Inc.

Michael Dell, CEO

www.dell.com

Round Rock, TX

Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Richard H. Anderson, CEO

www.delta.com

Atlanta, GA

Draper Valley Farms, Inc.

Richard Koplowitz, CEO

www.drapervalleyfarms.com

Mount Vernon, WA

Eddie Bauer Inc.

Kristen Elliott, Director, Marketing Programs

www.eddiebauer.com

Redmond, WA

Emerald Queen Casino

Tonia Coffee, Marketing Director

www.emeraldqueen.com

Tacoma, WA

Experience Music Project/Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame Mandy Davis, Marketing & Promotions Manager

www.empsfm.org

Seattle, WA

FedEx Corp.

Steve Pacheco, Advertising Director

www.fedex.com

Memphis, TN

Fisher Communications, Inc.

Colleen B. Brown, President & CEO

www.fsci.com

Seattle, WA

Fluke Corporation

Leah Friberg, Public Relations Manager

www.fluke.com

Everett, WA

Fred Meyer Stores, Inc.

Kaci Cooney, Print Procurement Assistant

www.fredmeyer.com

Portland, OR

Full Sail Brewing Co.

Sandra Evans, Marketing Coordinator

www.fullsailbrewing.com

Hood River, OR

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Sylvia Mathews Burwell, President, Global Development

www.gatesfoundation.org

Seattle, WA

Group Health Cooperative

Mike Foley, Media Relations Manager

www.ghc.org

Seattle, WA

Haggen, Inc.

John Boyle, SVP, Sales & Marketing

www.haggen.com

Bellingham, WA

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NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS CONTACT

COMPANY NAME

WEB SITE

LOCATION

Heritage Financial Corp.

Donald V. Rhodes, Chairman of the Board

www.heritagebankwa.com

Olympia, WA

Holland America Line-Westours Inc.

Mark Kammerer, SVP Marketing & Sales

www.hollandamerica.com

Seattle, WA

Home Depot, Inc.

Joe McFarland, President, Western Division

www.homedepot.com

Atlanta, GA

Intel Corp.

Kim Miller, Online Marketing Manager, Sales & Marketing Group

www.intel.com

Hillsboro, OR

Gene Juarez, Inc.

Leanne Siguenza, Marketing Manager

www.genejuarez.com

Bellevue, WA

Kmart Corp.

Louis J. D’Ambrosio, CEO & President

www.kmart.com

Royal Oak, MI

Lithia Motors, Inc.

Bob Striplin, VP Marketing

www.lithia.com

Medford, OR

Live Nation

Dave Aust, VP, Sponsorship Sales

www.livenation.com

Seattle, WA

Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse

Kevin S. Measel, SVP of Store Operations, West Division

www.lowes.com

Mooresville, NC

Macy’s

Noelle LaDuca, Newspaper/ Mixed Media Manager

www.macys.com

Seattle, WA

Microsoft Corporation

Rich Glew, Director of Marketing

www.microsoft.com

Redmond, WA

Muckleshoot Casino

Wayne Shadd, Marketing Director

www.muckleshootcasino.com

Auburn, WA

Nike Inc.

Cheryl Hunter, Marketing Operations Director, North America

www.nike.com

Beaverton, OR

Nintendo of America Inc.

Scott Moffitt, EVP, Sales & Marketing

www.nintendo.com

Redmond, WA

Nordstrom

Linda Toschi Finn, EVP Marketing

www.nordstrom.com

Seattle, WA

O’Reilly Auto Parts

David O’Reilly, Chairman

www.oreillyauto.com

Springfield, MO

Office Depot

Neil Austrian, Chairman & CEO

www.officedepot.com

Boca Raton, FL

OfficeMax Inc.

Ravi K. Saligram, President & CEO

www.officemax.com

Naperville, IL

Oregon Lottery

Chuck Baumann, Sr. Comm. Spec.

www.oregonlottery.org

Salem, OR

PACCAR Inc.

Mark C. Pigott, Chairman & CEO

www.paccar.com

Bellevue, WA

Papa Murphy’s International Inc.

Jenn Lovelace, Marketing Manager

www.papamurphys.com

Vancouver, WA

PCC Natural Markets

Laurie Albrecht, Marketing Director

www.pccnaturalmarkets.com

Seattle, WA

Pierre Enterprises, Inc.

James P. Pierre, President & CEO

www.pierreautocenters.com

Seattle, WA

Premera Blue Cross

H. R. Brereton Barlow, President & CEO

www.premera.com

Seattle, WA

Public Storage

Ronald L. Havner, Jr., Chairman, CEO & President

www.publicstorage.com

Glendale, CA

Puget Sound Energy Inc.

Philip Malkin, Manager Creative Services

www.pse.com

Bellevue, WA

Pyramid Breweries, Inc.

DND

www.pyramidbrew.com

Seattle, WA

QFC/Quality Food Centers

Kristin Maas, Public Affairs Director

www.qfc.com

Bellevue, WA

RealNetworks Inc.

Dan Sheeran, SVP Marketing

www.realnetworks.com

Seattle, WA

Red Lion Hotels Corporation

Pam Scott, Director, Corporate Communications

www.redlion.com

Spokane, WA

Redhook Ale Brewery Inc.

Craft Brands Alliance

www.redhook.com

Woodinville, WA

REI/Recreational Equipment, Inc.

Tom Vogl, VP of Marketing

www.rei.com

Sumner, WA

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NW CORPORATE MEDIA BUYERS CONTACT

COMPANY NAME

WEB SITE

LOCATION

SAFECO Corp.

Michael Hughes, President

www.safeco.com

Seattle, WA

Safeway Inc.

Steven Burd, Chairman, President & CEO

www.safeway.com

Pleasanton, CA

Schwab Tire Centers, Les

Brian Capp, VP Marketing

www.lesschwab.com

Bend, OR

Seattle Art Museum

Matthew Renton, Director of Communications

www.seattleartmuseum.org

Seattle, WA

Seattle Mariners

Gregg Greene, Director of Marketing

www.seattlemariners.com

Seattle, WA

Seattle Opera

Ed Hawkins, Advertising Manager

www.seattleopera.org

Seattle, WA

Seattle Seahawks

Stephanie Gray, Marketing & Sales Manager

www.seahawks.com

Renton, WA

Seattle Sounders FC

Adrian Hanauer, Owner/General Manager

www.soundersfc.com

Renton, WA

Seattle Storm

Shannon Burley, VP Marketing

www.storm.wnba.com

Seattle, WA

Sleep Country USA

Terry Horsley, VP Brand Strategy

www.sleepcountry.com

Kent, WA

Sound Transit

Tim E. Healy, Marketing & Creative Services Manager

www.soundtransit.org

Seattle, WA

Southwest Airlines

Dave Ridley, SVP & CMO

www.southwest.com

Dallas, TX

Space Needle Corp.

Mary Bacarella, Director of Marketing

www.spaceneedle.com

Seattle, WA

Sprint Nextel Corp.

Dan Hesse, CEO

www.sprint.com

Dallas, TX

St. Helens Beef

Robert Rebholtz, Jr., President & CEO

www.wabeef.com

Toppenish, WA

Standard TV & Appliance

Daniel Reese, Director of Marketing

www.standardtvandappliance.com

Portland, OR

Sterling Financial Corp.

Cara Coon, Communications & Public Affairs Director

www.bankwithsterling.com

Spokane, WA

T-Mobile USA, Inc.

Philipp Humm, CEO

www.t-mobile.com

Bellevue, WA

Taco Time Northwest

Gretchen Everett, Director of Marketing & Advertising

www.tacotimenw.com

Renton, WA

Target Stores Inc.

Jeffrey J. Jones II, EVP & CMO

www.target.com

Tukwila, WA

Thriftway Stores of Washington

DND

www.thriftway.com

Portland, OR

Tillamook County Creamery Association

Harold Strunk, President & CEO

www.tillamook.com

Tillamook, OR

Ron Tonkin Dealership

Ron Tonkin, President & CEO

www.tonkin.com

Portland, OR

Trader Joe’s

Joe Coulombe, Founder

www.traderjoes.com

Monrovia, CA

Tulalip Resort Casino

Juan Echevarria, Marketing Director

www.tulalipcasino.com

Tulalip, WA

Tully’s Coffee Corp.

Diane Geurts, Director of Marketing

www.tullys.com

Seattle, WA

United Airlines Corp.

Jeffery A. Smisek, President & CEO

www.united.com

Chicago, IL

UPS/United Parcel Service

Scott Davis, Chairman & CEO

www.ups.com

Atlanta, GA

Verizon Wireless

Greg Haller, President, West Area

www.verizonwireless.com

Bellevue, WA

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

Michael Duke, CEO

www.walmart.com

Bentonville, AR

Washington Lottery

Jean Flynn, Director of Marketing

www.walottery.com

Olympia, WA

Wells Fargo & Company

John G. Stumpf, Chairman, President & CEO

www.wellsfargo.com

San Francisco, CA

Weyerhaeuser Co.

Frank Mendizabal, Director, Media Relations

www.weyerhaeuser.com

Federal Way, WA

Whole Foods Market, Inc.

John Mackey, CEO

www.wholefoodsmarket.com

Bellevue, WA

Windermere Real Estate

Reilly Schanno

www.windermere.com

Seattle, WA

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Creative Trends in Print GREAT PRINT SELLS IN OUR DIGITAL WORLD By Jules Van Sant Executive Director, PPI – The NW Visual Communications Industries Association

Experimental distortion approaches show just how much impact print design can have. Example shown illustrates distorting pre-existing artwork to create large-scale posters.

3.

es, I look up restaurants on my phone. Yes, I source locations to stay at on my laptop. And yes, I shop for new shoes on my iPad. But as we become savvier online consumers, we become aware that we are getting information that is streamlined for us based on our online habits, purchases, searches, and comments on social media channels. So how do we gain exposure to new thoughts, new ideas, new places to shop and eat? Print is the medium that is starting to emerge as the driver to new or renewed interest by the buying community. As I have stated in the past, print offers a different multi-sensory experience than a screen with sound, print tends to be more trustworthy, and print is able to be placed on a desk, stuck on a wall or shoved in your purse for later reference. It is a complementary, different medium with the ability to create highly increased results in market adoption, purchases, loyalty, branding… you name it. Really, it’s not just me saying this! Given the importance print still has in the marketing mix, let’s take a page from the Creative Bloq post “Top Trends in Print Design for 2013” by freelance graphic designer and art director Aaron Kitney. He also feels that “far from being stuck in a timewarp, print design seems to be more vibrant than ever.” Don’t hold back—maximize the impact by considering these hot trends in print design, get noticed, and more importantly, get your message seen:

Y

Flat design is a simplistic design form in which 3D effects such as drop shadows, bevel and textures are purposely excluded, therefore making it stylistically 2D.

1.

Using unusual types of paper stock is a great way to boost your print designs. Interesting paper stock will entice your target audience to interact with the outcome.

4.

Finally, a playful approach doesn’t just work for child-oriented print design—it can be incorporated into many brands and campaigns.

5. Typographic contrast is difficult to pull off, but when done well the results can be spectacular, as evidenced here with Laura Meseguer’s cover for I Also Cook!, written by chef and cooking teacher Eulàlia Fargas.

2.

(Source: Computer Arts: Design Matters)

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Taking It to a Whole Other Level! When I worked at Saatch & Saatchi on the Toyota business in the mid-‘80s, we went big on a magazine insert with 3D glasses (long before it was a little more common in print and movie theaters). It received some of the highest recognition ever for an advertising blow-in. Why? Because it was different. Because it was interactive. Because it made you stop and think. Because it was fun, and it worked. It is so important when concepting a printed piece to think


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Many printing companies use the term marketing service provider to describe their relationships with agencies and design firms.

We prefer “best friend.� Stevens Integrated Solutions 4101 SE 26th Avenue, Portland Oregon 503.233.5746 | www.stevensIS.com

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beyond the paper and the ink and address the experience of your target audience. Also remember that the interaction doesn’t always have to be specific to the end service or product, but it should be memorable to the recipient. Winning the “OMG this is awesome” category is a magazine ad created by Giovanni + Draftfcb in São Paulo, Brazil, for Nivea. The ad promotes Nivea’s Sun line, and includes an ultra-thin solar panel and phone plug. The panel on the sunscreen ad is made of solar material that captures the sun’s rays, converting it into energy for your phone, which plugs in via the port. It takes the traditional print campaign and makes it useful. See a video showing how it works at tinyurl.com/solarad.

Content is King We hear it, SEO it, blog it, post it, tag it—content matters to make great design work. Copywriters of the world rejoice— designers, you need to embrace them. The CMO Council conducted a study of B2B content seekers’ information gathering attitudes, such as what they are seeking from B2B content and the characteristics most valued. The study found B2B buyers are “turned off by self-serving, irrelevant, over-hyped and overly technical content. They’re migrating to peer-based communities and new sources of trusted, relevant and credible content and conversation.”

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The findings include: Characteristics Most Valued in B2B Content • Breadth and depth of information (47%) • Ease of access, understanding, and readability (44%) • Originality of thinking and ideas (39%) Characteristics Most Disliked in B2B Content • Too many requirements for download (50%) • Blatantly promotional and self-serving (43%) • Non-substantive and uninformed (34%) Source: CMO Council, “Better Lead Yield in the Content Marketing Field” paper. See more at tinyurl.com/printinthemix-B2B.

So don’t lose faith in the printed piece, but rather take it to the next level. Never underestimate how well print works. It differentiates, legitimizes, drives traffic to digital devices, drives sales, and even solves the “age-old” (ha!) problem of how to charge your phone on the beach! Stay creative, my friends.


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Produce, protect, and deliver your brand.

Offset Printing

Digital Printing

Fulfillment

Envelope Manufacturing

Specialty Bindery

Direct Mail

DCGWest.com 206.784.6892

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What Powers Your Digital Media? By Lauren Sigel Guest Columnist

lease consider the environment before printing this e-mail.� But what about before reading one on-screen?

“

P

Public opinion polls show that concern about the negative impacts associated with using paper and printing continues to rise, according to PBS. Most people want to make an “environmentally friendly� choice by choosing to not print an e-mail. After all, print uses paper, which consumes trees, one of the primary sources of oxygen on the planet, which in turn produces billowing clouds of smoke and ash from paper mills’ giant towers. So, users decide to save it on a cloud storage service instead. But there is no friendly reminder to “consider the environment� when they send their e-mail into “The Cloud.� There is no one standing over their shoulders reminding them that even reading that e-mail does just as much damage as saving it on a storage network. Print is powered by trees, which are a renewable resource that, when responsibly managed, promote the planting of forests and tree farms. Digital media is primarily powered by coal-powered electricity, a fossil fuel that has no renewable

 , 1 3 5 * * $-

FACEBOOK at

aspect. Power sources for digital media may not be symbolized by smoke rising from stacks, but they should evoke mountains in West Virginia peeled like oranges to reveal their black coal cores. By creating demand for products from responsibly managed forests, consumers actually help protect forests for future generations. In fact, “to address climate change, we must use more wood, not less. Using more wood sends signals to the marketplace to grow more trees,� says Dr. Patrick Moore, Greenpeace co-founder. According to the Forest Stewardship Council, most of the forestland in the U.S. is privately owned. If landowners can’t earn a living from these forests, they will cut them down for farms, ranches, or real estate development. But in the end, it’s hard to directly compare what industry is better or worse than the other. Paper uses additional energy by burning pulp waste and transporting products. Data centers involve millions of laptops, personal computers and mobile devices. The issue at hand isn’t to force anyone into making a seemingly “responsible� decision, but only to promote awareness. Educate yourself on how electronic media is powered and actions you can do. Turn off your computer each night instead of putting it to “sleep.� Try to use Cloud services that are powered by renewable energy.

By creating demand for products from responsibly managed forests, consumers actually help protect forests for future generations.

facebook.com/MediaIncMag If you’re going to look at the print industry with an increasingly analytical eye, turn that eye on electronic media as well. Lauren Sigel is leadership development associate/project manager at Printing Control (a Consolidated Graphics company). Visit www.printingcontrol.com.

TWITTER at twitter.com/MediaIncMag

Sources:

ngm.nationalgeographic.com/geopedia/E-Waste,

us.fsc.org/

why-forests-matter.188.htm, www.pbs.org/mediashift/2010/03/is-digital-mediaworse-for-the-environment-than-print090,

www.printisbig.com,

www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/campaigns/toxics/hi-tech-highly-toxic/e-waste-goes/, www.nytimes.com/2012/09/23/technology/data-centers-waste-vast-amounts-ofenergy-belying-industry-image.html?pagewanted=all.

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Personal Publicity Stunts By Maria Scheleen Guest Columnist

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usiness is improving for your employer, and you’re certain you’ll receive the long-delayed promotion you’ve been coveting. But when the announcement is made, you find out a colleague was given the opportunity to move up. What do you do?

If you possess similar design skills and experience as your coworker, you may have been passed over because he or she does more to get noticed at work. One of the biggest career mistakes you can make is to sweat and slave over your projects, and then let your contributions go unnoticed. You may think your work speaks for itself, but sometimes you have to toot your own horn to gain recognition and move forward in your career or land choice design projects. Here are five tips to raise your visibility:

1.

Conduct a self-assessment. Before you look for ways to self-promote your work, take an honest look at your professional abilities. Are you committed to continual learning? If so, what steps have you taken to keep current on creative and design trends? Make sure you are always striving toward excellence and improving any weaknesses. The more effective you are in your role, the more opportunities there are to be recognized for your contributions.

2.

Show initiative. Volunteer for new projects, even those considered unpleasant or risky. Sometimes these offer the best opportunities to showcase your abilities. Perhaps the creative director has just requested help with an important internal initiative and no one is willing to take charge. This is an excellent opportunity for you to assume a leadership role and secure a solid platform for your ideas. Your efforts to become involved when others are reluctant will be both appreciated and acknowledged.

3.

Speak up. Demonstrate your enthusiasm and interest in the company by actively participating in office discussions. Before you attend meetings, review the agenda and prepare a few points of interest on the topic at hand. While you don’t want to talk just to hear yourself speak, don’t hesitate to share your ideas when you have something valuable to add. Also look for opportunities to present on topics. You might, for example, volunteer to serve as a trainer during new-hire orientations, providing an overview of the creative department and how people in other areas of the company can work with your team effectively.

4.

Exercise your bragging rights. You may have heard the phrase, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” But in many cases, it’s more important who knows you. Imagine that the creative director is hosting a meeting to decide who will work on an exciting new project. Would anyone in the room mention your name? Do key people know who you are and what you’ve accomplished? If your name doesn’t ring a bell, you’ve got some self-promoting to do. Getting on the radar screen of the company’s leaders can be difficult or nerve-racking, so take small steps. Can you email a weekly status report to your boss detailing major accomplishments and upcoming projects? Can you be responsible for sending update memos for your team or volunteer to present your group’s milestones at a meeting? All of these activities can help increase your visibility.

5.

Accept credit graciously. When someone compliments you for doing an outstanding job on a project, how do you react? If you typically shrug it off and say, “It was nothing,” you may be leaving the door wide open for someone else to steal your thunder. A much better response would be “Thank you. I’m really glad the hard work paid off,” or “Thanks. I’m pleased with the way it turned out, too.” Just be careful about accepting credit that’s not yours—it’s a surefire way to create tension and animosity among your teammates.

Working hard will always be critical to your success, but you will never achieve your full potential unless others are aware of your expertise and accomplishments. Pursuing new challenges and getting involved in team and cross-departmental activities will help you steadily build awareness and better position you for future advancement opportunities. Maria Scheleen is branch manager of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing firm placing interactive, design, advertising and marketing professionals on a project and full-time basis. The company has offices in major markets across the United States and in Canada, and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com. Contact the Seattle branch at 206-749-9046. 56

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LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS TALK TRENDS, TECHNOLOGY, AND MORE

Synchro Creative www.synchrocreative.com What do you feel it takes to be an elite graphic design firm or designer? A thorough understanding of, and the ability to execute, brand building principles, marketing strategies and top-level designs that engage the public and get results for our clients. What is the most exciting aspect of your job? Creating creative solutions and watching them build business for our clients in unique ways, each time. How has changing technology affected your company and the way you do business? More time spent training and/or finding new business partnerships in new media, means being able to offer more to clients. Is there a project you’re working on currently that you’d like to tell our readers a little about? Most current project is a campaign for a medical doctor’s clinic. The clinic was adding a new branch of cosmetic surgery services. They needed a new brand that would encompass both sides of the practice. We created a brand “New Beginnings” (www.newbeginnings.pro) which accomplished a new strategic positioning in their market with creative graphic design to create trust and clarity.

RocketDog www.rocketdog.org. What is the most exciting aspect of your job? For me it is the challenge of starting with a blank piece of paper and turning it into something amazing for a client. For some it can be intimidating, but I find you have to just be open and jump in—whether that is searching online for inspiration, taking a walk in nature, doodling, talking to people, flipping through a magazine, watching a movie… whatever it may be, creative inspiration can hit at any moment and I love that about what I do. What is one recent graphic design trend you are excited 58

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about (or wary of)? I have always found logo trends to be fascinating. Even though they are supposed to be symbols of a unique brand, more often than not we find elements within a logo popping up over several industries in different executions. Some of my favorite logo trends right now are badges, written and iconic map pins. A great source for tracking logo trends is www.logolounge.com. How has changing technology affected your company and the way you do business? It hasn’t changed our company per se, what it has done is given us the ability to see our creative vision for a client expand exponentially. We are now able to roll out our creative solutions in a variety of destinations. It is exciting to see multiple ways the end customer will interact with our client’s brand. Is there a project you’re working on currently that you’d like to tell our readers a little about? We have a number of great things going on at the moment, but one in particular is a new blog/website for Microsoft Recruitment. Originally it was a site that was not getting much creative love. Then RocketDog jumped in. Now the site has been completely overhauled and has received great reviews! We are so happy for our client.

CKA Creative www.ckacreative.com What do you feel it takes to be an elite graphic design firm or designer? One-of-a-kind talent, great listening skills, the vision to view the forest from the trees, and the self-discipline to never burn bridges. . What is the most exciting aspect of your job? Creating things that never existed before. What is one recent graphic design trend you are excited about (or wary of)? Infographics—I love them and at the same time I’m very cautious about them. Is there a project you’re working on currently that you’d like to tell our readers a little about? CKA Creative has been asked to develop a permanent installation for the REACH interpretive center in the Columbia Valley. It gives us a chance to mix our 2D and 3D skills to tell a story about one of our favorite subjects—Washington wine!


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GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP sales Dan Hergert, VP/COO

$19m

VODA Digital; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158; fax 866-626-8973 info@vodadigital.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

WND

Methodologie, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-623-1044; fax 206-625-0154 joan.latham@methodologie.com www.methodologie.com

Janet DeDonato, CEO Dale Hart, CCO

$4.2m

HB Design; Portland, OR 503-944-1000; fax 503-944-1030 gail@hbdesign.com www.hbdesign.com

Noma Hanlon Gail Snow Leslie Worth

$3.3m

Turnstyle; Seattle, WA 206-297-7350; fax 206-297-7390 info@turnstylestudio.com www.turnstylestudio.com

Matt Diefenbach Ben Graham Steve Watson

$2.2m

Blankslate Creative; Seattle, WA 206-378-0026; fax 206-378-0027 dave@blankslatecreative.com www.blankslatecreative.com

David Blank, president Melinda Torres, principal

$2.1m

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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Ad Ventures; Seattle, WA 206-282-1719; fax 206-282-4795 ventures@adventuresdesign.com www.adventuresdesign.com

Alex Howard, president Karen Skeens, CD

$1.9m

Arscentia; Bellevue, WA 425-454-8006; fax 425-454-1022 gcummings@arscentia.com www.arscentia.com

Grant Cummings, principal Lennie Lutes, CEO Lee Ater, CD/partner

$1.6m

Artitudes Design; Issaquah, WA 425-369-3030; fax 425-369-9609 gerri@artitudesdesign.com www.artitudesdesign.com

Andrea Heuston, creative principal

$1.6m

RocketDog Communications; Seattle, WA 206-254-0248; fax 206-254-0238 info@rocketdog.org www.rocketdog.org

Susan Elliott Michael Elliott

$1.5m

Golden Lasso; Seattle, WA 206-838-3170 info@goldenlasso.com www.goldenlasso.com

Philip Shaw, president Bridget Culligan, CEO

$1.2m

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, EP/director

$1.18m

(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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WE’LL L MAKE E YOU YOU SO SO HAPPY PPY Y, W ’LL WE LW WISH ISH WE WERE W YOU Y OU. O MARKETING M A RKETING :: BRAND BRANDING ING :: DESIGN

LIFESTYLE L I FES T Y L E A AND ND CULTURE C U LT U R E

Quesinberry Q uesinberry a and nd Associates, Associates, Inc. Inc. [p p]] 2 206 06 323 323 11 1173 73 [ w ] qu quesinberry.com esinberry.com S Seattle eattle :: San San FFrancisco rancisco

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Electric Pen; Seattle, WA 206-528-1207; fax 206-631-8451 john@electricpen.com www.electricpen.com

John Pletsch, president

$1.14m

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Funk/Levis & Associates; Eugene, OR 541-485-1932; fax 541-485-3460 info@funklevis.com www.funklevis.com

Anne Marie Levis, CD/president

WND

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Rusty George Creative; Tacoma, WA 253-284-2140; fax 253-284-2142 rusty@rustygeorge.com www.rustygeorge.com

Rusty George, principal Kitura George, operations manager

$1.01m

16

Art4orm; Portland, OR 503-228-1399; fax 503-224-0229 kevin@art4orm.com www.art4orm.com

Kevin York, principal/CD

$950k

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CKA Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-448-9274; fax 206-728-1125 mark@ckacreative.com www.ckacreative.com

James P. Carey, president

$863k

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Hammerquist Studios; Redmond, WA 425-869-0191 fred@hammerquist.net www.hammerquist.net

Fred Hammerquist, president

$725k

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Smith/Walker Design; Seattle, WA 253-872-2111; fax 253-872-2140 jeff@smithwalkerdesign.com www.smithwalkerdesign.com

Jeff Smith & Robin Walker, co-CDs

WND

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Creative Company, Inc.; McMinnville, OR 503-883-4433; fax 503-883-6817 jlmorrow@creativeco.com www.creativeco.com

Jennifer Morrow, president

$560k

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Stafford Creative Inc; Edmonds, WA 425-412-1550 inquire@staffordcreative.com www.staffordcreative.com

Sid Stafford Tina Stafford

$400k

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO

$350k

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(WND: Will not disclose publicly DND: Did not disclose)

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Synchro Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Bonnie Chelini Candy Young

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Glitschka Studios; Salem, OR 971-223-6143 info@glitschka.com www.vonglitschka.com

Von Glitschka, CD/owner $200k

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Moto Interactive; Portland, OR 503-914-5832 letsgo@motointeractive.com www.motointeractive.com

Dru Martin, CD

$170k

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Sakkal Design; Bothell, WA 425-483-8830; fax 425-483-8830 mamoun@sakkal.com www.sakkal.com

Mamoun Sakkal, principal

$120k

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Buoyant Creative USA; Point Roberts, WA 360-945-0488; fax 360-945-0488 spama@buoyantcreative.com www.buoyantcreative.com

Darrell Cassidy, president $100k

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Design Hovie Studios, Inc.; Seattle & Chelan, WA 206-669-2894, site@hovie.com www.hovie.com

Hovie Hawk, president/CD

$100k

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Sinclair-Creative; Mill Creek, WA 425-531-0925 holly@sinclair-creative.com www.sinclair-creative.com

Holly Sinclair

$50k

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Blu Room Advertising, LLC; Steilacoom, WA 253-241-8912 charles@bluroomadvertising.com www.bluroomadvertising.com

Charles Davis, owner Russell Silva, co-owner

DND

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Hornall Anderson; Seattle, WA 206-467-5800; fax 206-467-6411 us@hornallanderson.com www.hornallanderson.com

Jack Anderson, CEO John Anicker, president Lisa Cerveny, president

DND

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Oakley Design Studios; Portland, OR 971-221-5023; fax 503-241-3812 info@oakleydesign.com www.oakleydesign.com

Tim Oakley

DND

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Quesinberry and Associates, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-323-1173; fax 206-323-1296 info@quesinberry.com www.quesinberry.com

Wendy Quesinberry

DND

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SERVICES PROVIDED

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GRAPHIC DESIGN FIRMS $240k


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Finding Your Photography Niche By Daven Mathies Guest Columnist

photographer is not just someone who knows how to use a camera, control light or frame a shot. Photography, like any artistic discipline, is all about vision. Sure, the technical side of exposure, lighting and composition are important to achieving your vision, but it is crucial to know which to put first. Becoming a strong photographer is all about finding your niche, which generally starts with asking yourself, “What do I want to shoot?”

A

There is nothing wrong with experimenting and trying new things, but once you find your passion, stick to it. Develop it. Refine it.

At first, asking this question may seem too easy; it sounds like a no-brainer. But if your goal is to turn your passion into a profession, sticking with what you love may prove difficult. When you think about a professional photographer, who do you picture? I’m guessing that wedding photographer and commercial photographer are probably on most people’s lists. Since most people have been to a wedding or read a magazine, these two types of photography are perhaps the most publicly visible. This makes for a gross misunderstanding of what it means to be a professional photographer, however, and can be intimidating for someone seeking a photography career who doesn’t particularly enjoy the above types of photography. The solution? Shoot what you want! If you enjoy taking photos of your kids, focus on that. Photographing what you love will keep you engaged and you will naturally be encouraged to improve your skills. Child portraiture is completely different from any other type of portrait photography, and if you take the time to develop the skills it requires, people will look to you as an expert in that field. The same goes for other types of photography: landscape, wildlife, street, etc. Whatever motivates you most to take out your camera, keep at it. Don’t try to be a wedding photographer just because you think it would be an easy way to make some quick cash (hint: it’s not). Even if you have an incredibly strange or unique photographic passion, and you can’t possibly see how to monetize that now, stick to it. Success is not guaranteed, but failure certainly is if you try to focus on anything but your passion. Now, if you really love weddings, then wedding photography might be a great option for you. But your decision doesn’t end 66

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there. What type of wedding photographer do you want to be? Do you want to shoot exotic destination weddings or would you prefer to work solely within your local area? There are benefits to both, and both require a different type of specialization. What type of client do you want to serve? Personality is not to be underestimated in wedding photography; if you don’t “connect” with your clients, you will be asking for more hardship than you need. Make it known on your Web site, blog, Facebook page and business card what type of photographer you are and what kind of person you are. Don’t worry about limiting your exposure and reach; instead, think of this as making yourself more visible to the people you most want to reach. These are questions that apply to other types of photography, as well. It may take time to figure out what you really want to do. Maybe that means shooting a wedding or a football game only to realize you hate it, and that’s fine. There is nothing wrong with experimenting and trying new things, but once you find your passion, stick to it. Develop it. Refine it. Maybe you’ll love weddings and football, and that’s fine, too—so long as you realize the extra work required to specialize in multiple areas. Plenty of established photographers take on a variety of jobs and excel at all of them, but do yourself a favor and start with what you know and enjoy most. Building a business around photography is an incredibly challenging undertaking, but it’s a challenge well worth it when you truly love what you are doing. Daven Mathies is multimedia producer at Pro Photo Supply in Portland. www.prophotosupply.com.


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Phinney Bischoff Awarded New Accounts

Phinney Bischoff, a Seattle-based brand design firm, recently began working on initiatives with multiple new accounts, local and national, including: • The Dispatch Printing Company (Columbus, Ohio). Research and brand strategy for a complex portfolio of brands ranging from TV, radio, newsprint, magazines, news and information Web sites, digital solutions, and event and shows group. • Foster Pepper (Seattle). Research and Web site design and development for a premier law group. • Kennewick General Hospital (Tri-Cities, Washington). Research, creative development and execution of comprehensive advertising campaign for a community hospital. • Robert Leonard Salon (Seattle). Research and Web site design and development for a luxury salon. • Midwestern Higher Education Compact (Minneapolis, Minnesota). Research, brand strategy and platform development for a higher education organization. For more information, visit www.phinneybischoff.com.

Sandstrom Partners Announces New Clients Portland brand design agency Sandstrom Partners announced it has begun brand strategy and design for Scotts Whitney Farms and Cocona, according to Sandstrom president Jack Peterson. Whitney Farms is a line of organic and all-purpose plant food from Marysville, Ohio-based ScottsMiracle-Gro. Cocona, headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, makes fiber for performance gear and materials for sports brands. Sandstrom Partners is a strategic brand design firm special-

izing in the creation and revitalization of thought-leading brands. For more information, visit www.sandstrompartners.com.

Wright Enterprises Adds HP Indigo 5600 Wright Enterprises recently added an HP Indigo 5600, 7-color, digital press to its Kent, Washington, facility. HP Indigo technology allows: • Up to 7 on-press ink stations including HP ElectronInk White, Digital Matte or UV Red • Invisible inks to produce security features on short run applications • The ability to achieve true spot colors for perfect PANTONE® certified solids • More than 2,500 certified substrates including synthetics, transparent, dark, metallic and recycled media “Our decision to invest in the HP Indigo 5600 Digital Press was based on our proven success in the Portland market with the HP Indigo 7600. We recognized our customers’ needs for a trade-only manufacturer to meet the growing demand for variable, high-quality, digital printing with quick turnaround requirements and we have responded with the latest in HP digital technology in both our Portland and Kent facilities,” said Dan Adkison, president and COO of Wright Enterprises. “Our new HP Indigo 5600 Digital Press is the perfect complement to our growing line-up of commercial and digital capabilities in the Northwest.” For more information, visit www.wrightbg.com.

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aftertheimage; Seattle, WA 206-283-9383; fax 206-283-5686 kathy@aftertheimage.com www.aftertheimage.com

Kathy Fridstein, owner/principal

Allegory - commercial photography; McMinnville, OR 971-237-2513 allegory-photo@comcast.net www.allegory-photo.com

Bill Miller, owner/photographer Cindi Miller, marketing

Appeal Studios/Linna Photo; Seattle, WA 206-683-9203 jim@appealstudios.com www.appealstudios.com

Jim Linna, owner/president

Adam Bacher Photography; Portland, OR 503-281-3777 adam@adambacher.com www.adambacher.com

Adam Bacher, owner

Kate Baldwin Photography, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-284-5678 kate@katebaldwinphotography.com www.katebaldwinphotography.com

Kate Baldwin

Gary Benson Photography; Seattle, WA 206-242-3232 gl.benson@comcast.net www.garybensonphoto.com

Gary Benson

Bernstein Productions; Seattle, WA 206-708-6686 studio@bernsteinproductions.com www.bernsteinproductions.com

Darryl Bernstein

Blackstone Edge Studios; Portland, OR 503-234-4883 pizzithompson@comcast.net www.blackstoneedge.com

Donna Pizzi Philip Clayton-Thompson

Brofsky Productions, LLC; Bainbridge Island, WA 206-842-0756; fax 206-842-0756 keith@brofsky.com www.brofsky.com

Keith Brofsky, owner

Bob Byrd Photography; Vancouver, WA 360-906-0597 bbyrd@wa-net.com

Bob Byrd

Melanie Conner Photography; Seattle, WA 206-499-7359 melanie@melanieconner.com www.melanieconner.com

Melanie Conner, president

Conrad & Company Photography; Seattle, WA 206-284-5663 www.conradfoto.com

Christopher Conrad, chief image creator

Michael Craft Photography; Seattle, WA 206-282-7628; fax 206-282-6713 michael@michaelcraftphotography.com www.michaelcraftphotography.com

Michael Craft, owner

Jared Cruce Studio; Ashland, OR 541-944-5453 jared@jaredcruce.com www.jaredcruce.com

Jared Cruce

Rick Dahms, Photographer; Seattle, WA 206-463-3328; fax 206-463-3506 rick@rickdahms.com www.rickdahms.com

Rick Dahms

G S DeBré Imaging; Rogue River, OR 541-299-0022/800-540-6795 greg@gsdebreimaging.com www.gsdebreimaging.com

Greg DeBré, owner

DeGabriele Photography; Seattle, WA 206-938-9400 www.degabrielephoto.com

Dale DeGabriele

Flying Trolley Cars; Puyallup, WA 425-829-6737 andrew@flyingtrolleycars.com www.flyingtrolleycars.com

Andrew Jacobs, owner

Harper Studios, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-763-9101 info@harperstudios.com www.harperstudios.com

Earl Harper, president

Ben Kerns Photography; Seattle, WA 206-910-9007 ben@benkernsphoto.com www.benkernsphoto.com

Ben Kerns, owner

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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Lance Koudele Photography; Hood River, OR 503-544-6387 lance@ionimagery.com www.lancekoudele.com KRAYS Productions Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-622-5275; fax 206-878-1053 kevin@krsmith.com www.kraysproductions.com LensSmith Photography; West Linn, OR 503-539-7496 bruce.macgregor@comcast.net www.brucemacgregorphotography.com Lommasson Pictures LLC; Portland, OR 503-939-1939 jim@lommassonpictures.com www.lommassonpictures.com

PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALTIES/SERVICES

OD ING OT . / HE R

AD VE RT IS IN G CO RP OR AT E ED ITO RI AL /FA PE OP SH LE IO N PR OD UC TS FO OD /B EV ER LIF AG ES E TY LE FIN EA RT AR CH ITE CT UR DI E GI TA LS ER ST VI OC CE K S IM AG VI E S DE O PR OD V UC PO IDEO ST E TIO PR DIT N

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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Lance Koudele, owner/photographer Kevin Ray Smith, president

Bruce MacGregor

Jim Lommasson, owner

Don Mason Photography, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-409-6180 don@donmasonphotography.com www.donmasonphotography.com

Don Mason

McGowan Photography; Tacoma, WA 253-383-4724; fax 253-473-0117 kevin@kmcgowanphoto.com www.kmcgowanphoto.com

Kevin McGowan, owner

Jeff Miller Photography; Seattle, WA 206-323-3370 jeff@jeffmillerphoto.com www.jeffmillerphoto.com

Jeff Miller

Rosanne Olson Photography; Seattle, WA 206-633-3775 rosanne@rosanneolson.com www.rosanneolson.com

Rosanne Olson

Timothy J. Park Photography; Redmond, OR 541-526-3034 info@timothypark.com www.timothypark.com

Timothy Park

Parks Creative, Inc.; Bellevue, WA 425-562-0816 brian@parkscreative.com www.parkscreative.com

Brian Parks

Pixel Light Studio; Portland, OR 503-241-5005 christie@pixellightstudio.com www.pixellightstudio.com

Christie Hazen

David Putnam Photography, Inc.; Tacoma, WA 253-905-2312 dave@davidputnamphoto.com www.davidputnamphoto.com

David Putnam, president

Redstone Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-999-0490; fax 206-783-1535 info@redstonepictures.com www.redstonepictures.com

Cass Redstone, principal Jessie Redstone, principal

Kenneth Benjamin Reed Photography; Portland, OR 503-877-4041 ben@kennethbenjaminreed.com www.kennethbenjaminreed.com

Kenneth Benjamin Reed, photographer

Jeff Romeo Photography; Seattle, WA 206-601-9995 jeff@jeffromeo.com www.jeffromeo.com

Jeff Romeo

Smith/Walker Design and Photography; Seattle, WA 253-872-2111; fax 253-872-2140 jeff@smithwalkerdesign.com www.smithwalkerdesign.com

Jeff Smith Robin Walker

Straub Collaborative, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-331-1002; fax 503-331-1007 david@straubphoto.com www.straubphoto.com

David Straub, president

Studio 3, Inc.; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR Seattle: 206-282-0939 Portland: 503-238-1748 jim@studio3.com; www.studio3.com

Jim Felt

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us Dean Zulich Photography LLC; Seattle, WA 206-353-0706 info@deanzulich.com www.deanzulich.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO David Mangone, partner/EP/director Andrew Watts, partner Dean Zulich

ISSUE TWO 2013 MEDIA INC.

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D T AN S E AT TIN HE L E, CON T S US SSU DISC EACH I E W Y HICHCOMPAN W IN T IES, THWES HY. R E S R P A W NO RVIE ERENT HOTOGR E T N F EP ’S I DIF INC. ITH A REATIV A I MED TEST W ARKS C A GRE WITH P UES

he Bellevue, Washington-based photographer has provided architectural and product photography to surrounding Eastside communities of Redmond, Kirkland, Issaquah, Renton, and Woodinville, as well as the Greater Seattle area, for nearly 30 years. Here is Parks, on the record: TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND HOW YOU GOT STARTED AS A PHOTOGRAPHER. I took a series of college-level classes at Tillicum Junior High! We did color processing and printing as well as Ansel Adams Zone-System B&W as young teens. Then out of high school I assisted at DH&Y fulltime, Seattle’s largest commercial studio in the early ‘80s. I completed a degree in Commercial Photography when they reopened Seattle Central’s program. WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT YOUR JOB? It’s exciting to help promote new inventions, products, and places into the market. TELL US ABOUT A RECENT MEMORABLE PROJECT. A national apartment developer wanted to incorporate people in their advertising; I suggested motion-blurs to de-emphasize the people, so their communities remained the focus. (Ed. note: Pictured here.)

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOU AS A PHOTOGRAPHER TO CONNECT AND ENGAGE WITH YOUR SURROUNDING COMMUNITY? Very much so, thus I’ve always focused mainly on the Eastside business community.

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU, EITHER PERSONALLY OR PROFESSIONALLY? All of Creation we are immersed in.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST GRATIFYING PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS? Anytime I can help my clients be a success. IF YOU COULD BE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD RIGHT NOW, WHERE WOULD YOU BE? My wife and I both grew up here and don’t plan to go anywhere; love raising our boys on the Eastside. IF A GENIE GRANTED YOU 3 WISHES, WHAT WOULD YOU WISH FOR? Well, for starters, we once had a 10th anniversary cruise planned, then found out we were due to have another baby right then, so I owe my wife that first.

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