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St Steven Scaffidi S ffidi LLaunches h Mission Media Productions

KIDNAP NOLA-shot Film Set For Release

Louisiana Production Update Equipment Rental Lists


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CONTENTS

VOLUME 13 ISSUE THREE ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro GENERAL MANAGER John Rusnak SALES MANAGER Katie Higgins SALES Steve Joseph PRODUCTION MANAGER Sonjia Kells PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Kelly Baker DESIGNERS Michelle Hatcher, Sam Rockwell, Liz Weickum WEBMASTER Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER Lois Sanborn

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The Mission Media Productions team at the Rock Bottom and Back premiere party. Mission Media Productions, which co-produced the film with BIC Media Solutions, is The New Orleans Mission’s very own media department.

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Louisiana Production Update

31 Louisiana Film Prize Announces Finalists

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Kidnap Set for Release

33 Location Spotlight: Natchitoches Parish

13 Celtic Media Centre Hosts Baton Rouge Evacuees 15 A Man on a Mission 20 ‘Rock Bottom & BackTM’ Unveiled at World Premiere Event 24 NOFF Preview: Documentary, Narrative, and Louisiana Feature Competition Lineup 27 NOFF Partnership Offers Micro-Grants for Socially Progressive Filmmaking 29 Spotlight On: Local Actress Deanna Meske

35 Meet the Landrums and Landrum Arts LA Talent Agency 43 Behind the Scenes with Nola Slates 47 Coming Attractions: Lake Charles Film & Music Festival 49 Pelican Events Handles the Louisiana Heat 53 Louisiana Production & Post Equipment Rental 59 Louisiana Support Equipment Rental

ON THE COVER: The Mission Media Productions team at work on a recent project. Based at The New Orleans Mission, Mission Media Productions gives homeless men and women the opportunity to work on films and other creative projects.

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LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO PUBLICATIONS A DIVISION OF MEDIA INC PUBLISHING GROUP (800) 332-1736 whbourne@media-inc.com olindblom@media-inc.com www.louisianafilmandvideo.com www.louisianaproductionindex.com Display Advertising: Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Group and will not be returned. Subscriptions, call (800) 332-1736 for information and rates. Copyright ©2016 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be used for solicitation or copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher.

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LOUISIANA PRODUCTION UPDATE Halle Berry in Kidnap. PHOTO BY PETER IOVINO (C) 2015 KIDNAP HOLDINGS, LLC

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ver since major changes were made to the state’s tax incentive program in 2015, the Louisiana film industry has been experiencing a downturn. But state officials and industry insiders say things are starting to look up.

On July 1, after a one-year moratorium, the state resumed accepting the transfer of eligible motion picture tax credits. Less than a month later, the credits had all been claimed. Insiders say this is a sign that Louisiana is regaining stability and confidence within the film industry at large, and that “Hollywood South” may soon return. There are already a number of projects slated to film in Louisiana later this year, including Rob Reiner’s journalism drama Shock and Awe, starring big names like Tommy Lee Jones and Woody Harrelson, and Benji, a reboot of the original 1974 film about the lovable stray dog. The Beguiled, from director Sofia Coppola, is also set to shoot in Louisiana this fall. A remake of the 1971 Clint Eastwood film, the new rendition will star Colin Farrell, Kirsten Dunst and Nicole Kidman. Also in the works is the second season of the FX anthology series American Crime Story. While the first season tackled the O.J. Simpson trial, the second season will reportedly cover Hurricane Katrina

and the ensuing devastation. According to Deadline, Katrina: American Crime Story was just entering the writing phase as of early August, so no word yet on when the show might begin filming. A number of other projects have recently wrapped in Louisiana and are scheduled to be released this year. The New Orleans-shot series Queen Sugar will premiere on the OWN Network in September. Created by Ava DuVernay (Selma) and executive produced by Oprah Winfrey, the 13-episode series follows the lives of two estranged sisters who reunite in New Orleans after a family tragedy. The sequel to Jack Reacher, Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, will hit theaters October 21. Starring Tom Cruise and Cobie Smulders, the film shot in New Orleans, Baton Rouge and St. Francisville last fall and winter. And Kidnap, starring Halle Berry, is finally set to hit screens in December. The film shot in New Orleans in 2014 but sat dormant, along with several other films, after distribution company Relativity Media went bankrupt. When Relativity emerged from Chapter 11 earlier this spring, the company announced release dates for those films left in limbo. In Kidnap, Berry is a mother who will stop at nothing to rescue her kidnapped son, including, as filmgoers will see, a car chase on the Huey P. Long Bridge. LFV

Visit www.louisianaentertainment.gov for more information on filming in Louisiana. ISSUE THREE 2016

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The first independent green film studio in New Orleans with three stages built to industry standards. 800 Richard Street | New Orleans | 504.528.3050

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KIDNAP

LONG-AWAITED NOLA-SHOT FEATURE TO HIT THEATERS IN DECEMBER PHOTOS BY PETER IOVINO (C) 2015 KIDNAP HOLDINGS, LLC

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fter a long, tumultuous journey, Kidnap, starring Halle Berry, is finally being released in theaters this winter.

SET FOR RELEASE

Shot in New Orleans in the fall of 2014, the film was originally scheduled for an October 2015 release but was put on hold because distribution company Relativity Media was facing bankruptcy. Kidnap sat in limbo as its release date was pushed back further and further. After Relativity emerged from Chapter 11 protection in April of this year, the company announced release dates for its backlog of films, including horror films Before I Wake and The Disappointments Room (September 9), comedy Masterminds (September 30), and NOLA-shot thriller Kidnap (December 2). Directed by Luis Prieto and written by Knate Gwaltney, Kidnap stars Berry as Karla, a mother whose perfect life is upended when her son, Frankie (Sage Correa), is abducted in a park. She will ISSUE THREE 2016

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stop at nothing to ďŹ nd him, including death-defying car chases in her Chrysler minivan and frightening encounters with Frankie’s abductors. Kidnap was a very emotional ďŹ lm for Berry, as the mother of an 8-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son. “Being a parent, I understood this in a very visceral way. I play an ordinary mom forced to act in extraordinary ways,â€? Berry told USA Today in August. “I got to put in a little of what Halle Berry would do in this situation. That was fun.â€? The production utilized local cast and crew, and ďŹ lming locations such as City Park in New Orleans and the Huey P. Long Bridge, where Karla throws her van into reverse and hurtles backward as oncoming cars y toward her. According to USA Today, Berry was in the driver’s seat during these chase sequences, with a stunt driver controlling the van from a roof pod, but her terriďŹ ed reactions were real. “Driving backward in highway trafďŹ c, that was a ďŹ rst for me,â€? Berry said. “That looking-back visual of cars speeding toward you at 80 miles per hour, your heart leaves your body.â€? LFV

Be sure to check out Berry in action when the heart-pounding thriller Kidnap hits theaters December 2.

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CELTIC MEDIA CENTRE HOSTS BATON ROUGE EVACUEES

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n August, after Baton Rouge was besieged by massive ďŹ&#x201A;ooding, production facility Celtic Media Centre opened its doors to nearly 3,500 displaced residents who were forced out of their homes. It was reported by Deadline that Celtic Media Centre took in more evacuees than any other facility in the area.

Celtic Media Centre is the largest ďŹ lm and television production studio in the state of Louisiana, with 150,000 square feet of stage space. In recent years, Celtic has hosted such blockbuster ďŹ lms as Fantastic Four, Battleship, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Part 1 and 2, and television series like MTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scream.

However, cuts to the ďŹ lm tax incentive program, coupled with misunderstandings about the current state of the Louisiana ďŹ lm industry, has left Celticâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Louisiana as a wholeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with plenty of space to ďŹ ll, as productions choose to ďŹ lm in neighboring states like Georgia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a lot of misconceptions about what is going on with the tax incentive program,â&#x20AC;? Celticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director Patrick Mulhearn told Deadline. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of business has left because of those misconceptions. The fact is that you can monetize your credits in less than a year after the moment they are issued for all new projects going forward.â&#x20AC;? But as Baton Rouge rebuilds, so too will the ďŹ lm industry in Louisiana. The misconceptions are being cleared up by industry representatives like Louisiana Entertainmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chris Stelly, the state has a very pro-ďŹ lm governor in John Bel Edwards, and productions are slowly returning to Louisiana to take advantage of the infrastructure, crews, talent and, yes, tax incentives. LFV

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A MAN ON A MISSION STEVEN SCAFFIDI FORMED MISSION MEDIA PRODUCTIONS TO PRODUCE HIGH QUALITY AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING FILMS, TELEVISION AND OTHER CREATIVE PROJECTS THAT INSPIRE.

Photographer Devin Black holds up a photo from the series “Homeless Not Hopeless,” produced by Mission Media.

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teven Scaffidi has been in the production business for 30 years, writing, directing and producing films and commercials for his company, Ghost Rider Pictures. His vast catalogue of work over the years has garnered national attention and accolades, but his latest venture, Mission Media Productions, means more to him than any award ever could. Mission Media is a production company based at the New Orleans Mission, the largest faithbased private service provider to the homeless population of New Orleans. The company gives these homeless men and women, called Mission Disciples, the opportunity to work on actual films and other creative projects, “Hard Times Don’t Hit Me No More” jam session at the New Orleans Mission.

and to learn all aspects of film production. The idea to form Mission Media Productions was conceived late last year. Scaffidi was producing a music series/fundraiser at the New Orleans Mission, where he met and collaborated with an audience of more than 100 homeless men and women to write a song, “Hard Times Don’t Hit Me No More” (which would later be considered for a Grammy). After meeting many incredible people and learning their stories, Scaffidi knew that he wanted to become more involved with the Mission. “When I came to the Mission, I got to meet people that I never really met before,” says Scaffidi. “I saw a whole different side of life, and I really liked what I saw.” He had the idea to start a full-fledged production company at the Mission, and brought the idea to Mission Director ISSUE THREE 2016

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Mission Media Productions shooting the music video “Sing, Pledge & Pray” for The Eli Seals Band.

David Bottner. “I told David I could envision a production company here,” explains Scaffidi. “They had a video department when I walked in the door, and I said with a little guidance this could go a long, long way. They had talent to begin with—people that loved shooting and editing and being part of the creative process. My idea was to take it to the next level and come up with some real projects that the Mission could own. I brought the same skill set that I use in my production company to the Mission.” Mission Media’s first production project came about thanks to what Scaffidi calls a “genius idea.” On November 11, Veterans Day, the Mission hosted a gala honoring New Orleans veterans. The gala featured a silent auction, with proceeds benefiting the Mission facility’s renovation. Two days before the event, Scaffidi came up with the idea to auction off a documentary that Mission Media would produce.

“David said, ‘Who’s going to bid on something that doesn’t exist?’” recalls Scaffidi. “But they did, and we were in business!” The winning bidder was Earl Heard of BIC Media, who was looking to make a DVD companion to the book Rock Bottom and Back. Mission Disciples made up the entire production crew. “I had to force myself not to edit, not to shoot,” says Scaffidi, recalling Mission Media’s first project. “I’ve learned to back away more and more. When I first started, I was hands-on a lot. But I can honestly say I’ve never edited anything at Mission Media. How are you going to be authentic with us claiming we’re giving back when I’m doing all the work?” As far as training, Scaffidi will demonstrate different lighting or camera techniques and give advice based on experience, but mostly, the crew learns by doing. “As they grow and as they get better, they’re given more opportunities and given more freedom to do things,” he explains. He continues, “Our crew is really talented. Our editor, Devin Black, when I met him he had been at the Mission just a few months after living under a bridge. That’s the phenomenal story right there. It gives me joy.” Currently, Scaffidi and a crew of Mission Disciples are working on Desperate Reality, a radio show on WWL where homeless people are rescued live on the air. The Mission Media team is shooting episodes for a potential television series. “We have two camera crews on the street, journeying into the city,” explains Scaffidi. “We rescued two people off Bourbon Street last weekend live on the radio. Johnny Lonardo, the host, talks to them, prays with him, and we’re filming the whole time.” He continues, “My goal is to create creative content through the Mission staffed by Mission Disciples, every Mission Disciples at work on set.

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one of whom were at one time homeless or hurting—drugs, prison, everything you can imagine—and that’s our crew, that’s our staff. So when we’re out ministering to people, the guys behind the camera and the crew, they have been there. I’ve never been there. So it’s a completely different dynamic when someone comes up and says, ‘I’ve been there.’ That’s what I think is amazing. “My other goal is for our crew of Mission Disciples to get paid so they can become productive citizens—that’s the re-engagement side of things. Our staff is getting paid bonuses on every production we get hired for and we are buying new equipment to grow our department.” Scaffidi has no shortage of goals for Mission Media Productions, but he says he has no grand plan, “other than to push a little more every day.” “So far we’ve written original music, been considered for a Grammy, we have a TV series in production, we worked on Rock Bottom and Back. And we have other projects in the works,” he says. “We’re not hitting singles, we’re hitting grand slams. That’s the scary part. Should we bunt every now and then? No, we’re aiming for the fences.” Mission Media Productions had its official public launch on August 18 at the Rock Bottom and Back premiere party at the Prytania Theatre, and the phone is already ringing off the hook with potential projects. But Scaffidi wants to be selective.

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“I don’t want to overwhelm my guys just to be busy,” he explains. “When I first started Ghost Rider, I took everything. I don’t want to do that here. I’m looking for great projects, not just any project. For example, we just completed a job with Iberia Bank and we are now working on multiple projects with Troy Duhon, owner of Premiere Automotive and Executive Producer of God’s Not Dead.” He continues, “There’s a fine line between doing projects for money and doing things that uplift. The latter is much more rewarding. I want to be able to look back and say I was able to make a contribution, make an impact. I want these people to be successful and to inspire others. I want the guy under the bridge to see one of our guys and that inspires him to get out from under the bridge. Then I feel like I’ve accomplished something.” Scaffidi pauses, then adds with a chuckle: “And winning an Academy Award would be nice!” “But in all seriousness, I’ve been in the business a long time and over the years I’ve learned a lot of things that have made me a better filmmaker. Most importantly, I’m letting God drive the bus and I’m happy to ride shotgun. He’s a much better producer than I am and He’s taught me more than I ever learned in film school.” LFV

For more information, visit www.neworleansmission.org, www.desperatereality. com, and www.ghostriderpictures.com.


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Celebrating the DVD and book release of “Rock Bottom and Back — From Desperation to Inspiration” at the Prytania Theatre in New Orleans are, from left, David Bottner of The New Orleans Mission; Steven Scaffidi of Mission Media Productions; Troy Duhon, executive producer of the “God’s Not Dead” series; Dan Borné of the Louisiana Chemical Association; and Earl Heard of BIC Media Solutions.

‘ROCK BOTTOM AND BACK™’ UNVEILED AT WORLD PREMIERE EVENT BIC MEDIA SOLUTIONS’ ‘ROCK BOTTOM AND BACK™’ SHARES STORIES OF HOPE

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IC Media Solutions recently held its world premiere event for “Rock Bottom and Back — From Desperation to Inspiration” in front of a packed house at the Prytania Theatre in New Orleans. BIC Media Solutions and The New Orleans Mission came together to celebrate the power of personal transformation in the oldest single-screen theatre still operating in Louisiana. “Rock Bottom and Back™,” a docu-drama co-produced by BIC Media Solutions, YASNY Entertainment and Mission Media Productions—The New Orleans Mission’s very own media department—takes viewers on a journey through incredible hardships, from the struggles of everyday citizens to those of celebrities. During the New Orleans premiere, attendees experienced firsthand accounts of significant issues—including addiction, sexual trauma

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and abandonment—highlighting the unthinkable pain that can lead anyone to reach rock bottom. As a locally renowned treasure, the Prytania Theatre provided the perfect backdrop to showcase a film created by individuals who have been given their own second chance to return from difficult situations. Mission Media Productions gives homeless individuals the opportunity to develop artistic talents through the creation of viable media products in the form of film, photography, a live rescue radio program and more. Under the direction of longtime producer Steven Scaffidi, Mission Media participants hone natural talents to shoot, edit and develop beautiful productions. “Rock Bottom and Back” is one such project. As guests arrived at the historical theatre, a photo-op greeted them via a step-and-repeat banner highlighting The New Orleans Mission, BIC Media Solutions and Mission Media Productions. Attendees enjoyed the chance to capture the impactful moment by posing for group photos prior to the premiere. In keeping with rich New Orleans tradition, a wealth of authentic jambalaya was prepared and served to guests by New Orleans


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Mission Chef and Director of Operations John Proctor. Proctor, who is responsible for providing over 700 meals to homeless men and women each day, is himself an example of overcoming adversity and using this struggle to touch the lives of those who need a helping hand the most. As guests trickled into the theatre, Scaffidi welcomed everyone to the world premiere of the first documentary produced by homeless individuals, while BIC Media Solutions’ Earl Heard shed light on the inspiration behind it. “The idea for this project sprang from my own experience,” Heard said. “I have hit rock bottom several times both professionally and personally, so I know how hard it is to come back. I wanted to create something that would show everyone that hitting bottom is tough, sometimes life-shattering, but we can come back to be happier and more successful than we could imagine by learning from those who have faced overwhelming adversity. This book reminds us that we are never alone; God and people who care are always available if we reach out for help. The stories of the people we have featured in the book and DVD are a shining example of that.” Devin Black, Mission Media’s cinematographer, recounted his journey from living in a box under a bridge to becoming a talented film specialist and an integral member of a small, interconnected team. Before the film kicked off, The New Orleans Mission Executive Director David Bottner—also a subject of the documentary— reinforced the project’s goal to help people who are overcoming insurmountable adversities recover and give back to others. A special Q&A was held after the credits rolled, during which Black, Heard, Bottner and Scaffidi answered questions surrounding the inspiration and production of the innovative project. Scaffidi also introduced the audience to the entire Mission Media team, who earned a round of applause for their dedication to the creation of “Rock Bottom and Back.” As the session wrapped, guests retired to the lobby, where DVDs and books were available for purchase. Attendees could have their books signed by those involved in “Rock Bottom and Back.” A special book cover featuring Bottner was created for the event; proceeds directly benefitted The New Orleans Mission. The “Rock Bottom and Back” book—written by The New York

Haleigh Dean of BIC Media Solutions greets guests at the event. Copies of the “Rock Bottom and Back™” DVD and book were on hand for purchase. Proceeds from the sales of books and DVDs went to The New Orleans Mission.

Times-bestselling author Susan Mustafa with Earl Heard—depicts the incredible lives of 22 people who hit rock bottom and then came back from profound despair to help others in extraordinary ways. While certainly inspirational in tone, “Rock Bottom and Back” also offers hope to those who have hit bottom and a David Bottner, left, executive director of The roadmap to wellness, re- New Orleans Mission, signs a copy of “Rock Bottom and Back™” for Dan Borné, president of demption and ultimately the Louisiana Chemical Association. a successful life. The book features several heroes who reside in Louisiana and, despite having lost their homes and personal belongings to “The Great Flood of 2016,” are helping others in their times of need and demonstrating what living in service to others is all about. Mustafa has lost everything, and after writing about stories of others who have hit rock bottom, she is experiencing this trauma firsthand. Heard has been forced out of his home due to the flood and is now working out of a trailer and providing shelter to others in his comAfter the screening, a Q&A session was held with, from left, The New Orleans Mission’s David Bottner, BIC Media Solutions’ Earl Heard, and Mission Media Productions’ Devin Black and Steven Scaffidi.

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The Christian Motorcyclists Association attended the event to support one of its own, Billy Rivers, who is featured in the “Rock Bottom and Back™” project.

From left, Tracy Balsz of YASNY Entertainment, Earl Heard of BIC Media Solutions, David Bottner of The New Orleans Mission, Billy Rivers of the Christian Motorcyclists Association and Naren Aryal of Mascot Books visit at the premiere event for “Rock Bottom and Back™.”

Rose Gladner, right, of BIC Media Solutions welcomes Deena Burnett Bailey, second from left, and her family to the “Rock Bottom and Back™” premiere. From left are Anna Claire Burnett, Madison Burnett and Cindy Burchfield.

From left, Deena Burnett Bailey, Billy Rivers, Jerry Strickland, Whitney Strickland and David Bottner are all featured in the “Rock Bottom and Back™” project. 22 LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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pany who were without it. Proceeds from the launch of this book will also be provided to local charities in the Baton Rouge area to help those in need. “The timing of this book’s release is a gift from God,” explained Heard. “This project has a definite purpose, even more so after what’s happened in Louisiana.” The companion DVD—narrated by actor Danny Trejo—features interviews with Jerry Strickland, Whitney Strickland, Tonja Myles, Stanley Roberts, David Bottner and Billy Rivers, whose stories are highlighted in the book. To coincide with “Rock Bottom and Back,” BIC Media Solutions will also launch its own inspirational speakers bureau (ISB) and events featuring celebrities From left, Billy Rivers, who is featured in BIC Media as well as ordinary Solutions’ “Rock Bottom and Back — From Desperation to Inspiration,” Lisette Borné, Dan Borné of the people. Among Louisiana Chemical Association and Earl Heard of BIC other topics, these Alliance visit at the world premiere and book signing for “Rock Bottom and Back™” in New Orleans. speakers will provide inspiration and hope by illustrating recovery and success are possible through living in service to others. With a theme surrounding powerful experiences from hardship to triumph, the New Orleans premiere of “Rock Bottom and Back” set the framework for telling the story of one truly unique project. The “Rock Bottom and Back” DVD and book are now available online from Amazon and on the official website. LFV For more information about “Rock Bottom and Back” or BIC Media Solutions’ ISB, visit www.rockbottomandback.com or call (800) 460-4242. Bulk order discounts are available for “Rock Bottom and Back.”


NOFF PREVIEW: DOCUMENTARY, NARRATIVE, AND LOUISIANA FEATURE COMPETITION LINEUP

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he New Orleans Film Society (NOFS) has announced the feature competition lineup for the 27th annual New Orleans Film Festival (NOFF), taking place October 12 – 20 at venues across New Orleans, with an increased presence in the downtown area. As such, the festival’s main hub will be the Ace Hotel New Orleans.

“The incredible growth the New Orleans Film Festival continues to experience translates into a more dynamic and diverse lineup each year,” says New Orleans Film Society Executive Director Jolene Pinder. “This year, we are excited to introduce new venues that will create a walkable downtown campus for the festival, giving our audiences the chance to see even more films.” The 2016 festival lineup was chosen from almost 4,000 submissions from NOFF’s open call for submissions from independent filmmakers, an increase of about 14% from 2015. Entries came from 115 different countries. Louisiana-made film submissions increased this year by 43%. Of the final selections, 45% of films are from female directors, and 36% are from directors of color.

“This year’s lineup typifies the festival’s strong commitment to supporting new cinematic voices,” says New Orleans Film Society Director of Programming Clint Bowie. “Film is an art, and this year’s selections make that hard to deny. Festivalgoers should be prepared to be challenged, moved, and awed by the bold and confident storytelling in this year’s lineup.” Below lists all 2016 Documentary, Narrative and Louisiana features in competition:

DOCUMENTARY FEATURES Farmer/Veteran | dir. Alix Blair, Jeremy M. Lange One veteran’s mission to find healing through farming is haunted by the wounds of a family lost and the soldier he still yearns to be. Jackson | dir. Maisie Crow Set against the backdrop of the fight to close the last abortion clinic in Mississippi, Jackson captures the hard truth of the lives at the center of the debate over reproductive healthcare in America. Jonas and the Backyard Circus (Jonas e o Circo sem Lona) | dir. Paula Gomes U.S. PREMIERE. Jonas is 13 and his passion is running a neighborhood circus he created in his backyard—but as adolescence sets in, what will become of Jonas’s childhood circus dreams? The Nine | dir. Katy Grannan Modesto, California’s notorious South Ninth Street—the Nine—is a no-man’s-land where the rules of polite society do not apply, a ravaged micro-community whose Darwinian existence is a dayto-day hustle. Painted Nails | dir. Erica Jordan, Dianne Griffin Follows a Vietnamese immigrant’s life-changing journey from her vibrant nail salon to the steps of Congress, becoming the first

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person to testify for safe cosmetics in over 30 years. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes | dir. Brett Story A meditation on the prison’s disappearance in the era of mass incarceration through a series of places across the U.S. where prisons do work and affect lives. Shelter | dir. Brent Renaud, Craig Renaud WORLD PREMIERE. Filmed over the course of a full year, the film tells the raw and emotional stories of the incredible kids who seek shelter at the Covenant House, located on the outskirts of the New Orleans French Quarter, and the staff struggling to work miracles everyday on their behalf. The Shelter (Panahgah) | dir. Abbas Sendi Against a backdrop of desolation along the outskirts of Rasht, Iran, one woman exudes compassion and hope as she establishes a shelter to care for injured animals. You and Me (Tú y Yo) | dir. Natalia Cabral, Oriol Estrada A 70-year-old widow and her young maid live in isolation in a house in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. The minutiae of their daily lives is captured, speaking volumes about race, class, and culture.


NARRATIVE FEATURES

LOUISIANA FEATURES

72 Hours: A Brooklyn Love Story? | dir. Raafi Rivero A bright, charismatic Brooklyn teenager has a ticket out of the projects and 72 hours to decide if he’s up to the challenge all while fending off a rival who’s after his girl.

Back Story | dir. Iman Shervington WORLD PREMIERE. Five young black men from different backgrounds and areas of New Orleans filmed their lives for six months, sharing their personal views on everything from education to criminal justice.

Are We Not Cats | dir. Xander Robin Fired, dumped, evicted Eli leaps at the chance to escape the city on an errand upstate. Plagued by strange illness, his sojourn culminates in an affair with a woman who shares his habit of eating hair.

Before the West Coast | dir. Oyd Craddock WORLD PREMIERE. The story of Coach Otis Washington’s St. Augustine High football team during the years after the court ruling admitting them into Louisiana’s all-white high school sports association.

Daddy’s Boy | dir. Daniel Armando Led by its lush black-and-white photography and a frank portrayal of male sexuality, this lyrical film tells the interlocking stories of four men on the fringes of the gay porn industry.

Bookie | dir. Michael Yusko WORLD PREMIERE. A New Orleans man attempts to make a feature film to satisfy the Kickstarter backers who invested in him.

Fugue | dir. Jorge Torres-Torres WORLD PREMIERE. A woman takes flight to a tiny island, where she chases after wild horses and carouses with drunken revelers. As memories of her past close in, the line between freedom and madness becomes blurred.

Forgotten Bayou | dir. Victoria Greene WORLD PREMIERE. Follows five families from the quaint Cajun community of Bayou Corne, whose survival was thrown into question four years ago by the 24-acre sinkhole that opened up on its outskirts.

Hearts of Palm | dir. Monica Peña An intimate documentary-style portrait of a collapsing relationship opens up deep questions about the space between languages, the nature of artist-muse pairs, and the pain and fecundity of romantic loss.

One Note at a Time | dir. Renee Edwards WORLD PREMIERE. An homage to the musicians who returned to their hometown after the devastation following Hurricane Katrina, told through the prism of the heroic New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic.

Hara Kiri | dir. Henry Alberto WORLD PREMIERE. August and Beto, two hard-up skate punks, decide to prove their love by following in the steps of Romeo and Juliet, wandering across LA as they celebrate their last day on earth.

My Father, Die | dir. Sean Brosnan Deaf and mute since the age of 12, Asher has been training for almost two decades to avenge himself on the man that killed his older brother, who also happens to be his father.

A Morning Light | dir. Ian Clark After they reconnect by chance, Zach and Ellyn’s peaceful summer of camping is gradually distorted by a foreign presence that vibrates through the woods around them. My First Kiss and the People Involved | dir. Luigi Campi Sam, a non-verbal young woman living in a remote group home, becomes obsessed with the mystery of her missing caretaker Lydia. No Light and No Land Anywhere | dir. Amber Sealey Leaving her own family on a moment’s notice, an enigmatic British woman embarks on a journey through a strange and shadowy Los Angeles with hopes of finding her long-lost father. The Other Kids | dir. Chris Brown The struggles of six small-town teens on the verge of high school graduation, told in a doc/fiction hybrid style in which real teenagers collaborated with the filmmakers to tell their own personal stories.

People | dir. Shane McGoey A pitch-black comedy composed of six intertwined vignettes and an ensemble of characters grappling with each other in a vain attempt to gain control over their lives. A Quiet Storm | dir. Jason Affolder WORLD PREMIERE. A musically gifted teenage girl from New Orleans’ 9th Ward is torn between family loyalty and doing what she knows is right after discovering her older cousin has become a violent criminal. She Was Famous | dir. Kenna J. Moore A widowed college dropout finds herself going down a rabbit hole inspired by her recent discovery of Karl Marx and the German language, only to learn that things have become a bit mental.

For more information on the New Orleans Film Festival, including full festival schedule of screenings and panels and ticket information, visit www.NewOrleansFilmFestival.org.

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NOFF PARTNERSHIP OFFERS MICRO-GRANTS FOR SOCIALLY PROGRESSIVE FILMMAKING

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he New Orleans Film Festival (NOFF) recently announced its partnership with a new slate of filmmaker micro-grants as part of the Strange Fruit Fellowship.

The purpose of this fellowship is to assist micro-budgeted, expediently produced progressive or radical short films that aggressively investigate social injustice. Ideal projects will run 2-5 minutes in length and require no more than $2,500 in total budget. Projects may broach a number of larger issues, including those of violence, racism, sexism, homophobia, and gun control, but the ideal proposal will be deeply specific. Projects applying in this granting cycle must plan to be widely accessible via social media or other means. With a total granting budget of $10,000, these grants aim to support projects about or made by individuals living or working in Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, or Indiana. The New Orleans Film Festival, Atlanta Film Festival, Oxford Film Festival (Mississippi), Indie Memphis Film Festival, and the Documentary Institute at Indiana University will act as the granting agents. The program consists of at least (1) $1,000 grant and (2) $500 grants

FILM POINTE Film Industry Resource Center

awarded individually to (3) filmmakers in each location. Prospective filmmakers should submit a one-page treatment, an expected total budget for their project, a description of intention for funds awarded, key crew bios, a prior sample work no more than 5 minutes in length, and an outreach strategy. Preference will apply to filmmakers who are invested in documenting oppressed communities of which they are a part. While all involved organizations champion creative allyship, these grants seek to support the lenses of those who know injustice firsthand and are able to quickly bring awareness to specific injustices within these communities. Applications are currently being accepted for short films about or made by individuals living or working in Louisiana or Georgia. Application deadlines for films about or made by individuals living or working in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Indiana will be announced in the coming months. To be eligible for the Strange Fruit Fellowship, your project must be completed by early October 2016. Selected projects from Louisiana will be featured at the 2016 New Orleans Film Festival. LFV Visit artlessmedia.com/the-magnifying-glass/ to apply.

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SPOTLIGHT ON: LOCAL ACTRESS

Deanna Meske

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ince launching into the Louisiana production scene a number of years ago, local actress and filmmaker Deanna Meske has made a name for herself on such major productions as Elsa & Fred, NCIS: New Orleans, Here Comes Rusty and Entourage. And after launching her own production company, Outlook Productions, Meske is as busy as ever, producing, directing and acting. Louisiana Film & Video recently caught up with her to find out more. LFV: Tell us what you have been up to the last year. DM: A feature film I booked will wrap up this year, it’s called Holding St. Peter’s Conquest. I have one of the leads in this film. It’s a super funny religious comedy with some very talented actors like Chip Carriere, Jerry Lopez, Escalante Lundy and others. After that, I booked a few feature films, one in Mississippi, one in Alabama and one in Tennessee, and then I also booked a guest starring role on NCIS: New Orleans, which is the Mardi Gras episode, so that was pretty cool. I’ve worked on some other short films and have been directing my own web series when I’m not working on others’ films. I was also fortunate to win the Best Actress Award at the 2015 48 Hour Film Project for a film I also directed. LFV: What are you working on now? DM: I’m in post production on my web series called Government Lies and just wrapped up a lead role in a comedic, scripted reenactment show. I’ll be wrapping up another film in Louisiana this fall and have a few more lined up for the end of the year. I’ve also

been doing a lot of training and reading books on my craft. When I’m not booked on a job, I like to create monologues and work with friends on auditioning and character development. LFV: What projects do you have coming up in 2016/2017? DM: I have a lead in a TV series pilot, which goes into production soon, called Atonement. That one is in Atlanta. I also have a supporting role in a feature film called Anna and another film on the horizon called Vendetta Vette. A short film I had a crazy role in as a disgustingly ugly homeless drug addict comes out this year; that was shot in Florida and that was a lot of fun to really step outside of my type and dig into something else. I was so gross in that film that one of the production guys said he just couldn’t look at me or talk, and he meant it! Actress Deanna Meske gets into character. I know things slowed down a bit in Louisiana and I’m thankful for the people who are keeping the ball rolling, like Meagan Lewis, Lisa Marie, Brent Caballero, Ryan Glorioso and Liz Coulon, who have been able to continue to help lots of people forward their careers and bring more jobs to Louisiana, not to mention all of the hard-working production companies fighting for new films in Louisiana! LFV For more information about Deanna Meske, visit www.deannameske.com. ISSUE THREE 2016

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Pam Glorioso, CFC gloriosop@bossiercity.org


LA FILM PRIZE FINALISTS

NORTHWEST LOUISIANA FOCUS

The 30 Year Deal American Pride Apocalypse Later Cookie Jar The Fallen Hangman He Could’ve Gone Pro The Importance of Sex Education The Man from Mars Memoir Memorial Drive Native Ruthless: A Hip Hopera Sid and Marge Have a Problem Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell The Spot St. Jude’s Crossing The Stand The Root Cellar The Verses Ya Albi (My Heart)

Louisiana Film Prize Announces Finalists

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he Louisiana Film Prize, a short film competition taking place in Shreveport-Bossier City, has announced the 21 finalists who will compete for the grand prize of $50,000—the largest cash prize for a short film in the world.

Over the past 6 months, more than 125 participating filmmakers were tasked with making a short film between 5 and 15 minutes long. The catch? The film had to have been produced entirely in Northwest Louisiana using the area’s locations, vendors, equipment and crew, where applicable. Out of those 125 films, the finalists were chosen to screen at the Louisiana Film Prize Festival Weekend, taking place September 30-October 2. One of the unique aspects of this competition is the way in which the winner is decided. Audience members and celebrity judges alike see all 21 films and vote for their favorites. The judges’ votes account for 50 percent of the total, and the audience vote makes up the other 50 percent. Finalists receive $500 just for making it into the festival. This prize can be used to finish post production, promote your film, buy tickets to the festival, etc. The Film Prize also distributes $15,000 in filmmaking grants to films of their choosing, as well as $1,000 “Best Actor” and “Best Actress” awards. But only one film can win the grand prize of $50,000. LFV Make your vote count! Find out more at www.lafilmprize.com.

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NORTHWEST LOUISIANA FOCUS

LOCATION SPOTLIGHT: Natchitoches Parish

Cane River Lake in Natchitoches is an idyll setting for a film or television production.

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stablished in 1714, Natchitoches is the original French Colony in Louisiana, boasting a unique heritage and history that is reflected in the architecture, from French Creole to Queen Anne. Coupled with amazing scenery, film-friendly hospitality and extensive accommodations—Natchitoches is the Bed & Breakfast Capital of Louisiana—and this could be the perfect place to film your next project.

Louisiana Film Prize entry The Forest films in Natchitoches.

Case in point, eight of this year’s Louisiana Film Prize entries were filmed in Natchitoches Parish, and the most famous movie filmed here, Steel Magnolias, still draws tourists to the area every year. LFV Find out more at www.Natchitoches.com.

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NORTHWEST LOUISIANA FOCUS

MEET THE LANDRUMS AND LANDRUM ARTS LA TALENT AGENCY

The Landrum family.

The Landrum group in Shreveport.

Dawn began hiring actors within the tri-state area and kept them busy. Actors started asking her to represent them, as she was getting them so much work. Her reply: “Thank you, but no way! I am from California and know that an agent only earns 10% and I’m doing just fine being a photographer.” Actors kept asking her to be an agent and each time she voiced the same response. Then Hurricane Katrina hit. Everyone evacuated to North Louisiana, where The Guardian moved and was now filming! By word This all began in 2004 when Dawn was an international proof mouth, actors, casting directors and movie professionals started fessional commercial photographer and artist. She was hired by phoning the Landrum home day and night for assistance. overseas and American clients to do photos for their businesses. “I don’t know how they even knew I was from California and Her reputation and business grew and she was soon being scouted had any knowledge of this industry. My phone number wasn’t even to do photo shoots for American national companies. This job listed in the phone book, so my kids told me this had to be a sign required her to have models within her photos for ads, menus, billfrom God that we are to help actors and productions in Louisiana,” boards, signs, etc. The only problem was she could not get models says Landrum. “So we decided to put our best foot forward and to pull off all that was needed for the more realistic shoots. start Landrum Arts LA Talent Agency, aka LALA (pronounced “I started seeking actors as my models because I could get them eLL-Ayy eLL-Ayy) in its abbreviation. We were instantly busy. My to appear to be laughing and crying around a kitchen table for entire family assisted, as it was a big job that fell into our laps very a sincere phone ad… I couldn’t get models to do that,” she says. quickly.” The Landrums set out to help anyone and everyone and decided to donate three years to this effort of building the film industry and assisting displaced actors in Louisiana. After their three-year Katrina effort, the Landrums decided to pattern the agency after Dawn’s favorite California agency, William Morris. “Growing up in California I always heard Actor Ramsey Anderson at one of the availhow the William Morris able working desk terminals. LALA has an Child actors give their stats to CSR BettyAnn Jones. (l to r) Arabella open-door policy and actors may come and Agency was so professional Landrum, Zoe Blakely, and Ever Landrum. work and study anytime the office is open. yet maintained a kindness

BY DOEY PARKS

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andrum Arts LA Talent Agency was established in Bossier City, Louisiana, in October 2005. From that moment on, agent/owner Dawn Landrum set out to change the way actors were represented in the Southeast.

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Actor Heather Bloom demonstrating LALA’s full-service video studio auditioning.

LALA takes actors of all ages. Featured here are some of their child actors, Ever Landrum, Braelynn Brooks, Zoe Blakely, Arabella Landrum and Hugh Hough.

do it… why not us?” says Landrum. It was expressed that the actors and an integrity that I desired to match.” LALA soon became a very they took on during the Katrina effort were still kept on roster if sought-after agency and the waiting list grew tremendously from they so chose to remain in the group. Those who didn’t want to actors all over the country who wanted to be a “Landrum” actor. step up their game to meet the new requirements of the quickActor Clare Masa writes, “I came into the industry knowing who ly-evolving agency were given a choice to either remain and work Landrum was right off the bat. A lovely woman I’ll never forget, the beautiful Jane Ryder, told me that if I wanted to get anywhere in this business, I needed to get with Landrum Arts. Landrum’s reputation precedes them and I am humbled and deeply grateful to count myself a member of the Landrum family. Because it’s not just a talent agency. Landrum is family. I am learning and growing as an actor every day under their guidance and tutelage. No one else can compare.” It was decided that the agency would be a one-of-a-kind agency in the Southeast in that they would specialize and concentrate efforts on representing lead and supporting quality actors to book bigger roles in major films, television shows and commercials. “We noticed that there wasn’t an agency of this type in the Celeste Malmay, Ariane Perideaux, Christopher Alan Weaver, Clare Masa and agency CSR and office Southeast, so we decided to make a mark for administrative assistant BettyAnn Jones in LALA’s “Moon Room,” a work area that is also open to all actors and staff during business hours. ourselves in a different way. Someone had to 36 LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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hard to be able to handle at least supporting roles, or Landrum could help place them with a smaller starter agency until they built up their ability and career a bit. Landrum assisted them in either decision. They offered free classes, interviews, tutorials, workshops, seminars and were asked to speak at schools and other functions to help everyone learn about what it takes to make it in this industry and how to avoid being taken advantage of. This education sparked a lot more attention, as many actors started phoning the agency for help. All of the attention on Louisiana brought in some sharks and fake experts posing as talent scouts and professionals. Actor friends were being taken advantage of and the Landrums made it a point to warn the public about what is okay to do and what is not. “My father told me when I counseled with him about becoming an agent that it is very difficult to stay a good person in this business,” says Landrum. “I said, ‘Challenge accepted.’ Someone had to be an advocate for good people and we set out to be there for them.” Landrum Arts LA has grown within the last 12 years. They have worked hard to prove that a talent agency can be very successful and still maintain their ethics and integrity. One of their Los Angeles actors, Joshua Carpenter, states, “Landrum changes the industry because as much as they care about your career, they care about you. You are enveloped in truth, love, joy, support and most important, an acting family! The relationships they create are not a ‘15 minutes of fame’ type relationship, but one that will last a lifetime.” What sort of actor does Landrum Arts LA accept? Because Landrum books mostly actors who can go to work right away in great roles in great projects, most of the actors who are accepted are already very well educated and skilled. Amber Dawn Landrum, the managing director of the New Talent Division of Landrum Arts LA, responds, “Almost all actors who are accepted into our agency are seasoned veteran actors who come with impressive careers, references and referrals.” Does Landrum ever accept new clients without a lot of experience? “If an actor is very unusual or has something tremendously interesting about him/herself and comes with high recommendation, we sometimes will take a chance on them and invest in their development. We don’t do that often, though,” she says. What is the process to apply? “Email headshot,

Jeff Baker, Shawnia Willson, Anthony Kung, Hugh Hough and agency CSR BettyAnn Jones working at the “Box Office,” LALA’s main desk for information and assistance.

Hugh Hough and Celeste Malmay are child actors going over their lines for an audition. LALA provides several comfortable areas for actors to rehearse and study.

Jeff Baker and Shawnia Willson run lines for a training session in the commons area, where LA Prep Actors Lab training is held each week.

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resume, reel, referral and references to NewTalentDivision@LALATalent.com. Put who referred you and what state you live in subject line. That subject line is what catches our eye, so make yourself stand out.” What is a reel? “A performance reel is video proof of what you have already done. It’s a short clip of your best acting scenes proving positive your resume is 100% accurate.” Who can refer an actor to LALA? “Anyone we hold in high regard and who knows you not only as a quality actor but as a great person and can vouch for you. We often get referrals from casting directors, producers, celebrities, other Landrum actors, managers, other agents, etc.” Agent George Landrum states, “It’s important to show the world that you can live virtually anywhere and still be a success if you

Sarah Eilts and Jevon Miller go over a tense scene in rehearsal within StudioLand, LALA’s full-service video studio.

Anthony Kung and Vernae Ewing enjoy social time in the commons area.

Eric Gibson and Finch Nissen study lines before their audition.

Eric Gibson and Lorna Street Dopson go over a dramatic scene in rehearsal within the video studio. 38 LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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apply a lot of work and dedication.” The Landrums run a tight ship in that they insist actors be fully educated, not only in acting but also in the business part of this career. They have a strict Code of Ethics that not only the actors must follow but also the Landrums and their staff follow. “Reputation is everything in all business. Every facet of the entertainment industry consists of working with many other people on a daily basis, so it’s crucial that agency and actors all be on the same page.” Landrum also provides their actors with an Audition Etiquette. This is a success guide to help actors be most successful and also to educate them on what to do and what not to do. Dawn Landrum reflects, “I recall several years ago—after I


instituted our strict Audition Etiquette—we had multiple auditions occurring around the state. My phone rang and a movie director was on the phone. For a moment I felt panic because directors don’t typically call an agent in the middle of auditions. The director asked me what Agents Dawn Landrum and George Landrum I did to my actors to make them behave in the manner my actors were displaying at his audition. I told him that I counsel them on how to prepare and how to present themselves. He then thanked me and said that when he looked out into the audition waiting area that this was the first time after a long day of auditions, that he was able to take a breath and get a cup of coffee because when he opened that door my actors were all sitting calmly and professionally. No one was on their phone, no one was saying their lines out loud, no one was eating or fussy, there was no stress or unruly children, everyone was on time, everyone was dressed appropriately. I tell my actors that each audition is a job interview and even if they attend 10 a day, each one should be treated with the same respect. We booked a lot of actors on that movie and got several repeat bookings on following movies.” Agent Dawn Landrum, Jevon Miller, Anthony Kung, Winston Hall, Ariane The Landrum family works diligently to make a difference. Perideaux, Sarah Eilts, Heather Bloom and Jimmy Lee Jr. socialize after a busy work day as everyone gathers to go to the LA Film Prize event down Affectionately inspired by Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the the street. Landrum Arts LA company motto is “Mankind is our business” and they truly work to follow the words. They often encourage their actors to participate in charitable events and they actively participate in donating to those in need. “Actors cannot simply concentrate on themselves 24/7 or they can self-destruct,” says Landrum. “Everyone needs more to include in their life goals to succeed. They must have others to care for to find their own worth.” The Landrums can often be seen walking downtown with a wagon filled with bottled water, food and necessities for the homeless. They donate to relief efforts for humans and animals and many of their actors follow suit. Actor Rob Mello reiterates, “Landrum accepted me into their fold based on who I was as a person first. Truth be told, when I first met Dawn and George we didn’t speak a word about the industry. They asked me about my family. They know that peoAriane Perideaux, Eric Gibson and Finch ple can look a part, but are they a good Nissen going over the events of the day. person? Their actions require one to be ISSUE THREE 2016

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diligent and goal-driven, yet above it all they recognize the humanity of their clients. They lead by example, which is the only way to lead. A personal reference: I got word on Thanksgiving that my dad had literally zero time left in this world. I called Dawn on Thanksgiving, and even though they were out of state they managed to get the word out that I needed help to get to Boston from New Orleans. The next morning I was on a plane to say goodbye to my father, and thank him for everything he’d done for me. I’ve been around a lot of institutions that have made the claim that they are a ‘family.’ In my experience there have been only two examples that have actually borne this objective verity. The United States Marine Corps, and Landrum Arts. I’ll forever be grateful. Semper Fi.” You may recall daughter Tia Landrum, who made national news for her humanitarian efforts helping create clinics and working with orphans in Haiti, followed by her stint in Africa of which she saved the life of a little orphan girl—almost losing her own life in the process with cerebral malaria. Tia was given the Hero of the Year Award in 2012 locally, regionally and nationally by the American Legion. Because Georgia has become another hot spot of the South, Tia Landrum resides in Ray City, Georgia, and spearheads that market. Landrum goes where the work is. Even before Georgia was an industry hub, Landrum was working and booking actors there. “To truly best represent talent in the strongest industry locations, an agency needs to be on the ground in those locations. This is why we are so successful…we are where the action is. Our agency has actors who live within the state of Georgia and we also have actors who live in all surrounding states. So essentially we give ATL/GA casting directors several options who will work as local hires to wherever the project needs to film.” Tia Landrum adds to the success of the Landrum family and continues to grow the presence in the Southeast. Dawn and George often travel and visit when necessary, but primarily work the Shreveport location with the utmost current technology to bring the best quality to all of their clients. Landrum Arts LA’s home office is based in beautiful downtown Shreveport. The office is artistically decorated in an eclectic style within a historic building. “We chose downtown Shreveport because the location is fantastic! We are seconds from the interstate and right around the corner from production studios and the Robinson Film Center,” says Landrum. “We are across the street

New Talent Division managing director Amber Dawn Landrum chats with actors Anthony Kung, Vernae Ewing, Winston Hall and Sarah Eilts.

from ArtSpace and there are events downtown every month. We are also within close walking distance to the magnificent Strand Theater and just a hop, skip and a jump from the Capri Theater where the LA Film Prize has been hosted.” What the Landrums truly want everyone to realize is that you can live anywhere and still be successful in this industry. They have booked actors in great roles in major productions such as Jurassic World, the Hunger Games franchise, the Divergent series, The Walking Dead, American Horror Story, 12 Years A Slave and too many others to list. “You can live in the South and still be booked in major productions in major roles if you have what it takes and the right agent with the right connections and a top reputation,” says Landrum. “These projects are not local indies (although we also support indie films). These are huge multi-million-dollar projects and we booked local and non-local actors in all of them. We started in our Bossier City home and now have grown to a wonderful office in downtown Shreveport and in Georgia.” She continues, “It is a wonderful job to be able to wake up each day telling people how great other terrific human beings are—sharing their gifts and abilities with those who can potentially hire them and change their lives. We are truly blessed and I thank God each day for allowing me to work with so many of his unique and talented people.” LFV For productions and casting directors to contact

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Actor Jevon Miller in the photography studio that was designed to help actors get quick, affordable headshots as needed.

LALA Agents about booking actors please email Agent@LandrumTalent.com or call the agent’s cell numbers or any of the office numbers between 1:00-5:00 CST.


Chateau Suite Hotel 201 Lake Street Shreveport, LA 71101

A 0.6-mile walk from Eldorado Resort and Casino Shreveport, this modern hotel is a 1.2mile drive from the Louisiana Boardwalk Shopping Center. The bright rooms have free WiFi, TVs and desks, as well as mini fridges, microwaves and tea and coffee make equipment; some have river views. Suites add kitchenettes, sitting areas with pull-out sofas and fireplaces; plus whirlpool tubs. Children 17 and under stay free with a parent. Amenities include free parking and a country-style buffet breakfast, as well as an outdoor pool and a 24/7 fitness center. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an airy lobby with seating, a business center and laundry facilities.

BOOK NOW (318) 222-7620

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CRESCENT CITY CONSULTING, LLC Law Enforcement Detail & Security

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BEHIND THE SCENES WITH NOLA SLATES

S

arah Bowman, a Local 600 2nd AC for over 20 years, started making slates as a pet project for low-budget indie productions. Just five short years later, her company, Nola Slates, has taken off, providing custom slates to huge films like the Divergent series and to popular shows like The Walking Dead, Gotham and Daredevil. Louisiana Film & Video talked to Bowman to find out a little more about her company and custom slates. LFV: How did you get started making slates? SB: I was working on a low-budget show that could not afford to get custom slates, so I decided I would make some. The director was so thrilled with them that I made (some) on the next show I did. Not long after that, a friend asked me to make slates for his upcoming show. They were still pretty crappy, but I decided to take it seriously and put the research into making a better slate. That was five years ago.

LFV: How many slates do the bigger productions order? SB: I have had orders that were quite large. For the Divergent films, they would get a round of slates with the working title on them and then later in production, they would order all new ones with the real title. Sometimes orders include a 2nd unit as well, which can double the order. LFV: What about low-budget movies? SB: Usually, low-budget shows will get at least two faceplates—the plate that will attach to a timecode slate. I keep my prices reasonable since not all productions have a lot of money to spend on things like slates, but I believe it is something that all productions should be able to have. It raises the level of professionalism and looks great in EPK packages. LFV: What are the slates made of? SB: I make the faceplates out of acrylic because it scratches less easily than Lexan. The standard slates and insert slates are made out of Lexan since they need the durability that only Lexan can provide. The bases of all of them are Tyvek. It is solvent-proof, weather-proof, rip-proof—everything but bullet-proof—and holds ISSUE THREE 2016

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up after a 10-month TV show. I am the only company that makes them this way.

Nola Slates’ credits include:

LFV: What about the digital slates. How does that work? SB: The faceplates are made to go over the slate with a cutout for the timecode readout.

Gotham

LFV: Your slates are cool-looking. Do directors and producers ever take them as souvenirs? SB: Yes, I have made lots of slates for directors, producers, directors of photography and sometimes actors and crew. The director of Sinister 2, Ciarán Foy, loved the slates I made so much, he gave me thanks in the credits. LFV

Daredevil

For more information on Nola Slates, visit www.nolaslates.com.

The Walking Dead

12 Years a Slave Dallas Buyers Club The Divergent series Big Bang Theory Salem John Wick 1 & 2 and hundreds more.

nola slates NEW ORLEANS

SOME OF MY CREDITS The Walking Dead • Gotham Daredevil • 12 Years a Slave Dallas Buyers Club • The Divergent series Big Bang Theory • Salem •John Wick 1 & 2 and hundreds more NOLASLATES@GMAIL.COM | 281-772-4915 | WWW.NOLASLATES.COM 44 LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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JCM’s Animal Talent Promotional Video

WE PROVIDE: Dogs, Cats, Horses: For Movies, Commercials & Live “Stage.” USDA Licensed

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Our current working canine actors are specifically trained for film and television work. They have an outstanding repertoire of notably funny routines. They are also seasoned Thespians.

CONTACT JEAN MANINO AT: 504.838.8605 OR 504.717.0303 • WWW.JCMDOGTRAINING.COM • JEANMANINO@AOL.COM

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COMING ATTRACTIONS:

LAKE CHARLES FILM & MUSIC FESTIVAL MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THE 5TH ANNUAL LAKE CHARLES FILM & MUSIC FESTIVAL, SCHEDULED FOR OCTOBER 7 – 9, 2016.

F

ounded and produced by non-profit organization Louisiana Film & Video Art, Inc., the Lake Charles Film & Music Festival brings the very best of independent film and video to Calcasieu Parish in Southwest Louisiana and celebrates the filmmakers behind them. The festival features three packed days of independent film screenings, seminars and workshops, celebrity appearances, parties, Cajun food, live music, and more.

This year’s event includes a seminar with award-winning writer/actor/director Larry Wade Carrell, best known for cult horror film Jacob, among many other well-received indie films. Carrell will be putting on a seminar about making films from script to screen to distribution. Also on the docket this year is a low-budget filmmaking seminar with Christopher R. Mihm, the writer, director and producer of the films of the “Mihmiverse,” a series of award-winning, loosely interlinked feature-length films styled after 1950s-era “drive-in cinema.” Mihm has successfully produced one feature film every year since 2006, and during this seminar he will teach attendees his formula. Ed and Susan Poole from Hollywood on the Bayou will be presenting a fun and informative seminar on Louisiana film history, as well. This seminar will include rare film trailers, posters, trivia, and some humorous stories about what went on during the production of some of these great Louisiana films. LFV

Stay tuned to www.lakecharlesfilmfestival.com for the full schedule of films and events.

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The 143 room boutique hotel mirrors the culture of fun and genuine individualist of one of American’s most fascinating destinations. Located on the edge of the Central Business District just a block from the rocking French Quarter and Canal Street, the Royal St. Charles Hotel is a perfect headquarters for your exploration of New Orleans. The hotel’s name honors two of New Orleans’ most historic thoroughfares in Royal Street and St. Charles Avenue. The music of Bourbon Street is a short stroll away, and just outside the hotel entrance is the St. Charles Streetcar Line which takes you uptown to the Garden District. Royal Street turns into St. Charles Avenue once crossing over the major thoroughfare of Canal Street. Royal Street is one of the oldest streets in the city of New Orleans, which dates back to the French Colonial era. Renowned for antique shops, art galleries, and stately hotels that line its sides as it runs through New Orleans’ French Quarter and tourist district, Royal Street is the most identified street in the French Quarter besides Bourbon Street.

Tiffany Kilbourn, Director of Sales | 504-207-8907 tkilbourn@destinationhotels.com

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royalsaintcharles.com | www.destinationhotels.com


Pelican Events Handles the Louisiana Heat WHAT’S BETTER THAN COOL, AIR-CONDITIONED RELIEF ON A HOT, SWELTERING LOUISIANA SUMMER DAY ON SET? ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

D

olph Federico, owner and founder of Pelican Events, knew this all too well, which is why he designed a portable restroom specifically to beat the Southern heat. Federico tells Louisiana Film & Video how his design has changed the way local productions operate.

LFV: How did you get started in the film business? DF: We’re long established in the music and festival market and the films eventually came looking for us. When the films really started popping in Louisiana, we didn’t actively seek out their business. Every service in town proclaimed themselves “film experts” in various applications. It was kind of a big game of musical chairs. All the local vendors tried to find niches before the music stopped. We just sat it out. We had heard the Hollywood guys were super demanding customers, so we really stayed focused on music festivals. When the first tier of vendors failed to give the films what they wanted, the films found us. So it was with a little hesitation that we stepped into the film market. Once we started working with the producers and locations people, we found out the film guys couldn’t be better clients. Their schedules and expectations were a breeze. We are accustomed to ridiculous hours in extreme conditions with impossible deadlines. At music festivals we typically deal with extreme weather, trucks buried in the mud, 200-mile drives to a jobsite, 24, 36, sometimes even 48 hours of continuous duty time, huge egos and tiny budgets… We’re a battle-tested company and my guys thrive on pressure. Film work is like a day off for us. So we welcome anything they want to throw on our shoulders; we’ll take it. LFV: I know it’s critical that the restrooms need to have air conditioning, but your units seem to be of higher quality. Please tell us more about that. DF: We approached restrooms the way we approached festivals: What do you hate about the gig and how can we do it better? We’ve used all other local restrooms at our festivals and they were OK, but not really pleasant places to hang out. They usually are hot and they stink. We came up with a few solutions to deal with the unique, jungle-like heat and humidity in New Orleans. Number one: More air conditioning… lots more. Pretty much all of the restroom manufacturers are in the Midwest or northern third of the country. They cannot fathom 105 degrees and 100

Pelican Events’ portable restrooms have made a huge difference for production crews working in the Louisiana heat.

percent humidity. We found a builder that was willing to alter the standard package and we told them to double the AC. At first they resisted—you need more power, heavier wiring, bigger breakers— but they did as we asked. Now while other people sweat in a sticky, wet stall, our customers relax in real cool, dry comfort. Those exterior doors open continuously all day long. You must compensate for the heat and humidity that surges in each time. Double the AC and get a bigger generator. Number two issue (no pun intended) was the sometimes horrific odors. I’ve watched vendors flush out their units and scrub and spray the interiors with every chemical they can find. They smell like perfumed urine. Awful. Being a boat owner, I knew I wanted our trailers to be 100% wood-free construction. Wood is porous. It does not matter how many times you paint, pressure-treat, fiberglass encapsulate or whatever, moisture will get into the wood. Sometimes it’s a pretty disgusting type of moisture. Bacteria, mold, mildew… over time, if you have wood in your construction and you’re collecting and transporting liquids, that wood will be penetrated with liquid. If it’s treated it may not rot, but it will stink. Then of course the big problem, the waste tanks. Most companies use poly tanks. This is a major design flaw. There’s no way to clean a poly tank. Old paper and waste builds up over time. It’s like the devil’s Papier-mâché—no amount of rinsing will ever get the solids out. The tank eventually gets chock full of years’ old waste and it can’t even hold much fluid anymore. We strictly use steel tanks with 6” clean out hatches. I’ll spare you the details, but after a run ISSUE THREE 2016

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on a film, the tanks get opened and pressure-washed from the inside out. There is no residual waste, there is no wet wood, there is no foul odor. The units are ready to go. LFV: What kind of feedback are you getting? DF: Locations people love us. When we were working on a big multi-set show with several other restroom vendors, a couple of the crew were arguing over who would get the Pelican PMO and who got the “other one.” Keep locations happy. Do not give them a reason to complain. We had a set this summer five hours away, about as remote as you can get. The set was live for five weeks and they were running the genny 24/7. A locations manager advised me, “This thing better not quit on us; it’s the only plumbing within 25 miles.” So we dropped a second, brand-new Honda putt-putt, and stored extra supplies in every nook and cranny. We packed it with extra everything. Transpo had a pump truck doing daily service, but I made the 10-hour round trip every week to do a thorough cleaning, restock and perform service on the gennys. When we finally demobbed, the construction crew that was restoring the farmhouse

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was left with a couple of port-a-pots and they looked very sad. You just never know who might have an opinion of your gear on set, and they might be a major decision-maker. I had an assistant director grab me once and ask me, “Do you know why you have to come move this unit every night?” I answered, “Because you’re the director and you say so?” He responded, “No. It’s the nicest damn bathroom on the show and it will follow me to whatever set I’m working.” That sort of let me know we had their attention. LFV: What are you working on now? DF: We just finished a major Marvel Comics film for Fox and as I’m sitting here, I’m unwrapping a very cool wrap gift (Thanks Jim!). For them to include the restroom guys in wrap gifts says a lot about the producers and hopefully a lot about us. We are starting a small-budget show in New Orleans next week and festival season kind of explodes mid-September. We are staying busy. We just ordered some extra units too. They are being built right now, so we will be able to service any size show when they come to Louisiana. LFV Visit www.pelicanusa.com for more.


SUBSCRIBE TODAY WWW.LOUISIANAFILMANDVIDEO.COM

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LOUISIANA PRODUCTION & POST EQUIPMENT RENTAL 3rd Coast Digital Films Baton Rouge, LA 225-413-6051 www.3cdf.com 444 Camera Harahan, LA 504-734-3973 www.444camera.com Atherton Pictures New Orleans, LA 504-818-2190 www.athertonpictures.com Available Lighting, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-831-5214 www.availablelighting.com Berning Marketing & Productions Metairie, LA 504-834-8812 www.berningmarketing.com CamTrek New Orleans, LA 310-800-2226 www.camtrek.net Center Staging, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-247-0020 www.centerstaging.net Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-731-6050 www.chapman-leonard.com Cinelease New Orleans, LA 504-267-9075 www.cinelease.com CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com Cineverse New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-322-4180 www.cineverse.net Composite Effects, LLC Baton Rouge, LA 225-756-7875 www.compositeeffects.com Covert Camera Bikes Prairieville, LA 888-761-6664 www.covertcamerabikes.com The Creative Bloc Baton Rouge, LA 225-266-0100 www.thecreativebloc.org Digital FX Baton Rouge, LA 225-763-6010 www.digitalfx.tv Event Rental New Orleans, LA 504-433-2624 www.youreventdelivered.com Full Motion Productions Harahan, LA 504-220-2129 www.fullmotionproductions.com Gulf Coast Tent Rentals Harahan, LA 504-229-6501 www.gulfcoast-tent.com Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Holbrook Multi Media Lafayette, LA 337-989-2237 www.holbrookmultimedia.com

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LOUISIANA PRODUCTION & POST EQUIPMENT RENTAL Hollywood Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-729-5090 www.hollywoodrentals.com Iron Grip, LLC New Orleans & Baton Rouge, LA 504-450-1721 www.irongripllc.com LA Post, Inc. Baton Rouge, LA 225-303-0165 www.lapostgroup.com Louisiana Public Broadcasting Baton Rouge, LA 800-272-8161 www.lpb.org M&M Sound and Media Alexandria, LA 318-452-2958 www.mandmsoundandmedia.com M3 Systems Folsom, LA 504-616-3999 www.m3systems-jibs.com MBS Equipment Co. New Orleans: 504-734-3403 Baton Rouge: 225-663-2527 www.mbsequipmentco.com NOLA Film Logistics Metairie, LA 504-710-3626 www.nolaï¬&#x201A;.com Ophion Entertainment Abita Springs, LA 501-772-8078 www.ophionentertainment.com Panavision New Orleans New Orleans, LA 504-733-3055 www.panavision.com Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com Paskal Lighting, A PRG Company New Orleans, LA 504-602-9510 www.prg.com Pro-Cam Louisiana New Orleans, LA 877-773-2266 www.procamrentals.com Production Plus Studio Rentals Shreveport, LA 310-321-7813 www.productionpluss.com Production Zone/Media 2-Way Radio Dallas, TX 214-935-3800 www.media2wayradio.com www.productionzone.com Quixote Studios LLC Saint Rose, LA 504-465-8321 www.quixote.com Ragtime Rentals Baton Rouge, LA 225-330-6902 www.ragtimerentals.com Reece Cinematography LLC New Orleans, LA 504-390-7781 www.davidreecejr.com Rhino Staging Gonzales, LA 225-644-5600 www.rhinostaging.com RZI Lighting, LLC New Orleans, LA 504-525-5600 www.rzilighting.com

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LOUISIANA PRODUCTION & POST EQUIPMENT RENTAL Second Line Stages New Orleans, LA 504-528-3050 www.secondlinestages.com Solomon Group New Orleans, LA 504-252-4500 www.solomongroup.com Soupfactory Digital Metairie, LA 504-813-7856 www.soupfactorydigital.com Spectrum of NOLA (Spectrum FX) Harahan, LA 504-322-7236 www.spectrumeffects.com StageLight New Orleans, LA 504-818-1880 www.stagelight.com Story Teller Effects Group LLC Jefferson, LA 504-832-9800 www.storytellerfx.com VER - Video Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-831-6966 www.verrents.com Vidox Motion Imagery Lafayette, LA 337-237-1700 www.vidox.com YES Productions Metairie, LA 800-736-8812 www.yesproductions.com

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LOUISIANA SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL Aggreko, Inc. Baton Rouge: 225-751-3525 • Lake Charles: 337-625-3450 New Iberia: 337-365-5479 • New Orleans: 504-461-0556 Shreveport: 877-603-6021 www.aggreko.com Atmosphere Aerial Baton Rouge, LA 323-510-6339 www.atmosphereaerial.com Available Lighting New Orleans, LA 504-831-5214 www.availablelighting.com Barnstorm Cinema New Orleans, LA 504-458-4665 www.barnstormcinema.com Berning Marketing & Productions Metairie, LA 504-834-8812 www.berningmarketing.com Blueline Rental Harvey: 504-303-4267 • Geismar: 225-744-4116 Youngsville: 337-445-3373 • Alexandria: 318-619-8433 www.bluelinerental.com Briggs Equipment New Orleans: 504-733-5640 • Baton Rouge: 225-926-9206 Broussard: 337-839-1600 • Sulphur: 337-583-8100 www.briggsequipment.com Camera Copters, Inc. Miami, FL 888-463-7953 www.cameracopters.com Carruth Brothers Lumber Co., Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-522-1113 www.carruthlumber.net CAT Entertainment Services Baton Rouge, LA 225-205-9004 www.es-cat.com Center Staging, Inc. New Orleans, LA 504-247-0020 www.centerstaging.net Chaps Party Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-944-2536 www.chapspartyrentals.com Cinelease New Orleans, LA 504-267-9075 www.cinelease.com CineSouth Lighting New Orleans, LA 318-426-8014 www.cinesouthlighting.com Digital FX Baton Rouge, LA 225-763-6010 www.digitalfx.tv Encore Event Rentals Shreveport, LA 318-222-2000 www.encoreeventrentals.com Event Rental New Orleans, LA 504-433-2624 www.youreventdelivered.com Event Restroom Gretna, LA 504-838-0358 www.yourrestroomdelivered.com Exchange Communications New Orleans, LA 888-679-6111 www.exchangecom.net Full Motion Productions Harahan, LA 504-220-2129 www.fullmotionproductions.com

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GraciHart Electric Metairie, LA 504-832-7997 www.gracihartelectric.com

Gulf Coast Tent Rentals Harahan, LA 504-229-6501 www.gulfcoast-tent.com Hertz Entertainment Services Kenner, LA 877-HES-7320 www.hertzentertainment.com Holbrook Multi Media Lafayette, LA 337-989-2237 www.holbrookmultimedia.com Hollywood Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-729-5090 www.hollywoodrentals.com Hollywood Trucks Baton Rouge: 225-330-6126 • New Orleans: 504-528-2480 www.hollywoodtrucksllc.com Home Team Productions New Orleans, LA 504-733-8326 www.hometeamproductions.net Hotard Coaches & Calco Travel New Orleans, LA 800-356-6831 www.calcohotard.com J Custom Supply Co. Baton Rouge, LA 800-226-5657 www.jcustom.com Jefferson Battery Co. Jefferson, LA 504-833-2400 www.thebattman.com LAcoptercam, LLC Metairie, LA 504-656-4649 www.lacoptercam.com Louisiana Lift & Equipment Inc. Alexandria: 318-448-3877 • Baton Rouge: 225-753-5700 Shreveport: 318-631-5100 • St.Rose: 504-463-3400 www.lalift.com Louisiana Public Broadcasting Baton Rouge, LA 800-272-8161 www.lpb.org Max Air Helicopters, LLC Lake Charles, LA 337-802-4209 www.maxairhelicopters.com MBS Equipment Co. New Orleans: 504-734-3403 • Baton Rouge: 225-663-2527 www.mbsequipmentco.com Millennium Studios Shreveport, LA 318-841-3599 www.millenniumstudios.net NES Rentals Geismar: 225-673-3155 • Sulphur: 337-625-4446 Harvey: 504-368-4277 www.nesrentals.com New Orleans Moving Pictures Co., LLC Terrytown, LA 504-533-8638 www.nompco.com NOLA Film Logistics Metairie, LA 504-710-3626 www.nolafl.com Panther Helicopters, Inc. Belle Chasse, LA 504-394-5803 www.pantherhelicopters.com Paramount on Location New Orleans, LA 504-736-2177 www.paramountonlocation.com

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Pelican Events Kenner, LA 504-464-4436 www.pelicanusa.com Pro-Cam Louisiana New Orleans, LA 877-773-2266 www.procamrentals.com Production Plus Studio Rentals Shreveport, LA 310-321-7813 www.productionpluss.com Production Zone/Media 2-Way Radio Dallas, TX 214-935-3800 www.media2wayradio.com www.productionzone.com Professional Restroom Solutions, LLC Benton, LA 318-965-0211 www.professionalrestroomsolutions.com Quixote Studios LLC Saint Rose, LA 504-465-8321 www.quixote.com Rhino Staging Gonzales, LA 225-644-5600 www.rhinostaging.com RZI Lighting, LLC New Orleans, LA 504-525-5600 www.rzilighting.com Second Line Stages New Orleans, LA 504-528-3050 www.secondlinestages.com Silver Screen Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-737-0555 www.silverscreensupplies.com Solomon Group New Orleans, LA 504-252-4500 www.solomongroup.com South Coast Helicopters, Inc. New Orleans, LA 888-836-0882 www.southcoasthelicopters.com Southern Helicopters Sunshine, LA 225-642-0075 www.southernhelicopters.com StageWorks of Louisiana Shreveport, LA 318-221-3175 www.stageworksla.com SunCruisin’ RV Baton Rouge, LA 281-548-7878 www.suncruisinrv.com The Tent Man New Orleans: 504-780-8368 • Northshore: 985-624-7368 www.tentmantents.com That’s A Wrap Slidell, LA 504-952-9662 www.thatsawrapservices.org VER - Video Equipment Rentals New Orleans, LA 504-831-6966 www.verrents.com Vidox Motion Imagery Lafayette, LA 337-237-1700 www.vidox.com Workbox, LLC Port Allen, LA 888-528-1605 www.workboxllc.com

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COMPANY CITY, STATE PHONE WEBSITE

EQUIPMENT RENTED HE SE LICO RV PT ICE ER S/D S/A RO VIA NE TIO EVE S N FUR NT E Q NIT UIP UR ME E NT/ TEN TS/ COM EQU MUN IPM ICA ENT TION

LOUISIANA SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL


ISSUE THREE 2016

LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE 63


72 LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

ISSUE THREE 2016

Lm 3 16 web  
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