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CONTENTS

VOLUME NINE

ISSUE ONE 2014

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Andrew Vogel andrew@louisianafilmandvideo.com EDITOR-AT-LARGE Shanna Forrestall CONTRIBUTING EDITOR W.H. Bourne ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dylan Bourne, Wéland Bourne, Maja Holzinger, Odin Lindblom SALES MANAGER Katie Higgins SALES Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER John Rusnak DESIGNERS Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison, Christina Poisal WEBMASTER Jon Hines OFFICE MANAGER Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER Lois Sanborn

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Matthew McConaughey (C) discusses a scene with Louisiana native scribe Nic Pizzolatto (L) and Cary Fukunaga (R). Photo courtesy of HBO

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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TRUE DETECTIVE SHOWCASES OSCAR TALENT IN THE BAYOU STATE

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SCOUTING LOCATIONS FOR 12 YEARS A SLAVE

A DIVISION OF MEDIA INDEX PUBLISHING GROUP

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FILM OFFICE GUIDE

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FINDING FASCINATING PEOPLE AND PLACES FOR YOUR SCENES

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JOHN SCHNEIDER STUDIOS OFFICIALLY OPENS IN HOLDEN

www.louisianafilmandvideo.com

Display Advertising: Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Group and will not be returned. Subscriptions, call (800) 332-1736 for information and rates.

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CAYOUETTE UNCHAINED

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LOUISIANA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL AND FRIENDS SHAKE UP SUNDANCE

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BOB HOLBROOK HONORED WITH SILVER MEDAL AWARD

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TRENDS & TIPS AT CES FOR CAST & CREW

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FALL GUYS: LOUISIANA’S BEST STUNT PROS

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GOPRO IN THE SPOTLIGHT AT NAMM

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FILM OFFICE SPOTLIGHT LF&VM HIGHLIGHTS A CROSS-SECTION OF THE MANY FILM OFFICES THAT SUPPORT PRODUCTION WORK IN THEIR REGION

ON THE COVER: Woody Harrelson films a scene on the set of HBO's True Detective, which filmed throughout Louisiana. Photo courtesy of HBO

DIGITAL EDITION AVAILABLE AT: WWW.LOUISIANAFILMANDVIDEO.COM

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Louisiana Film & Video Publications P.O. Box 50036 New Orleans, LA 70150 (800) 332-1736 contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com www.louisianaproductionindex.com

Copyright © 2014 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be used for solicitation or copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. PRINTED IN THE USA


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR T his past January, I had the privilege of roadtripping from New Orleans to Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Through a partnership with LIFF (Louisiana International Film Festival), I was able to stay in a three-story house on Bobsled Lane with an all-star Louisiana-based team. This was my first year attending Sundance, and I tried to keep my expectations to a minimum. For those who have not been to Park City, the downtown area is reminiscent of a fairytale land with its quaint snow-covered cottages staggered and stacked along the mountainside, perched overlooking the downtown streets. Needless to say, once I overcame the frustration of festival parking, or more accurately trying to park the caterer’s Ford F-150 that I happened to be driving, the view was magical. The festival itself was, I think, everything one could realistically hope for. There were hundreds if not thousands of people walking along Main Street, visiting shops and bars, or trying to convince bouncers that they were in fact on “the list” for a particular party. There were mobs rushing for famous people, paparazzi fighting for position on the red carpet before movie premieres, and occasionally, unassuming A-list actors trying to keep their head down in a heated environment. Though not literally. It was quite cold, at least for a Southerner. I was there to represent LF&VM and distribute our magazine. An added benefit was being a part of the LIFF Voodoo Love 2014 extravaganza. For the party promotion phase, I was awarded the task of wearing an elaborate CFX monster mask and stirring up Voodoo Love excitement in the

downtown area. Before I had fully realized the situation, it seemed, I was hanging down from a rock-wall at a private party positioned to frighten my escort, Voodoo Princess Shanna Forestall, for a photo op that was taking place. Next I found myself stirring up mojitos in costume, taking pictures with the Patrón team, and, well… the day was a blur. The party itself was on Monday evening, my last night in town, and it was indeed a smashing success. The LIFF team decorated Club Epic in full Voodoo fashion complete with masks, moss, and pickled chicken feet. (Check out the spread on pages 22-28.) Now, on to Louisiana film. 2013 was another record-breaking year for Louisiana film production with 53 shows and over $800 million in certified spending, nearly $100 million more than last year. These numbers are causing no small degree of anxiety in the competition. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is quoted in Variety magazine saying the city is in a “state of emergency” regarding the number of film and TV productions fleeing to Hollywood South, among other tax-incentive states. I’d say this means we are doing something right. No surprise, 2014 is projected to be another benchmark year for our evergrowing industry. See what the Louisiana film commissioners are saying in this issue, on pages 36-40. All the best, Andrew Vogel, Executive Editor

Raymond on Film & Photography is a Raymond Creativity publication. Raymond Creativity offers research services, web design, lens-created imagery, and other creative solutions for the new media world. Watch for our new audioseries “Merely Famous.” To find other publications, products, and services offered by Raymond Creativity, see www.raymondcreativity.com. 6

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St. John Center Soundstage

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TRUE DETECTIVE SHOWCASES OSCAR TALENT IN THE BAYOU STATE

(L-R) Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey and Oscar nominee Woody Harrelson on location in Louisiana for HBO's True Detective. STORY BY W. H. BOURNE PHOTOS BY MICHELE K. SHORT & LACEY TERRELL, COURTESY OF HBO

n Sunday, March 2, Matthew McConaughey fans had a tough decision to make: watch Matthew win his Oscar for Dallas Buyers Club in real time or watch the latest episode of True Detective. Awards season may be over, but the buzz hasn’t stopped for the HBO series that features McConaughey and Woody Harrelson as two Louisiana detectives, Rust Cohle and Martin Hart.

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“It’s a very unique look at two state detectives as they track a serial killer over a 17-year span,” says executive producer Scott Stephens (Deadwood, Hung, Enlightened). “But the real story is the journey that these two men go through; the impact they have on the world around them and that impact the world has on them. We believe that True Detective is Matthew’s Oscar campaign every Sunday night at 9pm.” “The project was brought to HBO through a company called Anonymous Content, which is both a management company and a production company, which represents both Nic Pizzolatto, the writer, and Cary Fukunaga, the director,” continues Stephens. “They developed the project and cast Woody and Matthew into it and then brought it to HBO as an entire package. At that point, I got involved with my relationship with HBO, and then a couple months later we were down in Louisiana scouting locations. Normally in Hollywood, these things take a very long time, but this one happened very quickly.” 8

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Stephens explains, “The project was fasttracked because they (Matthew and Woody) had a window of opportunity. Typically with actors of Matthew and Woody’s stature, they’re booked years in advance. A year or two out is not entirely unheard of, so the fact that they both had that window open in the first half of the year, we just had to take advantage of it. I came onto the project in June, and we immediately established a January start date based on Woody and Matthew, and just pushed to get it done.” Any project that is fast-tracked faces challenges, but True Detective faced additional logistical issues since director Fukunaga (Sin Nombre, Jane Eyre) would be directing all eight episodes. “It was challenging on a number of levels,” says Stephens. “Starting a production in a completely different state has its own set of challenges, but the fact that we were doing it with one director forced us to prep the majority of the scripts ahead of time. We had 480 pages of material, and we tried to prep all of

it before we started shooting, but we just ran out of time. To be quite honest, we got about halfway through episode six prepped, and the rest was prepped while we were shooting. We would work weekends. We would scout locations before or after our shooting calls. It became incredibly difficult logistically to pull it off, but everybody felt the material was really worth it. The crew just stepped up and kept their eye on the prize and went above and beyond the call of duty to help us execute the show.” Stephens continues, “One director is unusual because of the logistical load it puts on the program. Typically, you’re prepping, shooting, and doing post-production simultaneously, which means you’re using multiple directors so they can be involved in each phase of the process. By having one director, it forced us to have to try and prep all the material ahead of time. Then we had to shoot all the material and then go into post-production of all the material. Not only did it create a host of logistical challenges for the production, but it extended the prep, shoot, and post time for the entire show. To put it in perspective, we wrapped production at the end of June in Louisiana last year. We are just finishing post. We just delivered episode eight last Friday. Normally, we would be doing that while we are shooting, which helps define what you need to shoot on set, but so far we seem to have gotten through all the logistical challenges okay.” 2012 through 2013 was a particularly busy production period in Louisiana with two fulltime HBO shows in the state, in addition to other TV series. Treme was in their fourth and final season. Being that both shows were filming in Louisiana, one would assume that they would share resources, particularly given the short prep time. “We couldn’t really do any job-sharing with Treme because they were in their last season, and we were shooting simultaneously,” explains Stephens. “Actually, we had offices in the same building on different floors. We shared resources on an information level. The producers and the production team from Treme were very helpful to us because we had never filmed here, and they had already been in Louisiana and in New Orleans for a couple of years. But beyond an information share, all their people were tied up with Treme, so we kind of brought in a whole new team for True Detective.”


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us an edge, as compared to shows that only come in for three or four months,” says Stephens. “That allowed us to hire our key creative team and maintain them for the whole production. There were times when it was busy in the spring, and we had On set filming a car scene with Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson. trouble getting equipment or He adds, “Dallas Buyers Club was also getting day players that you only needed for shooting while we were prepping. They a day or week at a time because it was so busy wrapped production at the end of December, that most of them were tied up on other and we started shooting at the end of January. shows. For the most part, we did okay. We had I knew they were down here, and during that a very positive experience with the crewmemtime we had limited contact with Matthew bers in Louisiana.” because he was so wrapped up in that producLike Treme, True Detective feels authentically tion and so emerged in that character.” local. This is largely due to the storytelling True Detective was crewing up during skills of Louisiana native Nic Pizzolatto, who Louisiana’s busy season, which has been probgraduated from LSU. lematic, at times, for some productions. “The first script I read was set in “We really didn’t have that problem (of Louisiana,” says Stephens. “Nic Pizzolatto is getting crew) because we could offer long-term from Louisiana; he was born and raised in employment. We were in production for about Lake Charles. He had written an early draft six months, so with prep we had people on the in the Ozarks, but to this day, I have never read clock for ten months. I think that really gave it. I think once he wrote the first draft in

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Louisiana, the script was then always going to be in Louisiana. When you read the materials, you see how deeply it is entrenched in the culture and locations of the area. I couldn’t imagine it anywhere else.” He continues, “One thing that we did that I thought was unique was that we tried to feature Louisiana as Louisiana. We were really able to showcase its beauty. It’s a stunningly beautiful state. Although that’s not really written in the scripts, we just kind of discovered that during the scouting process, and when you look at the completed show, it’s stunning footage. It’s a gorgeous part of the country. Our location manager was Batou Chandler and our location scouts were Jimmy Trotter and Win Riley. The three of them did a tremendous job. One of the aspects I’m most proud about is the locations. The things that they found to showcase Louisiana were unique and relevant to the local culture and history. It’s really freeing to be able to shoot the state as the state instead of trying to convince people it’s another part of the country.” The production also received support from the local film office and the state’s incentive program. “As far as the film office, as a producer, they were as helpful as can be,” says Stephens. “We wanted for nothing, and anytime we needed any information, they were very supportive. On a production level, they were


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Executive producer Scott Stephens.

Louisiana detectives Rust Cohle (McConaughey) and Martin Hart (Harrelson).

enormously helpful.” He continues, “Across our business, the incentives in various states have become very important. They drive some projects more than others. As far as the incentive level, I can’t really speak to that because it’s handled by the finance department at HBO. On this project, because it was set in Louisiana, the incentive was secondary to the creative environment in which the show takes place.” Incentives are meaningless if you can’t attract quality talent to your locations. Actors Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey have

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both spent quite a bit of time recently working in Louisiana. Harrelson was in the summer breakout hit, Now You See Me, which did some shooting in the Bayou State. McConaughey has been a much more frequent visitor, working on Killer Joe, The Paperboy and Dallas Buyers Club. “They’ve both spent a lot of time in Louisiana,” notes Stephens. “Knowing that the story takes place in rural Louisiana, they were both like, ‘As long as we can live in New Orleans, we’re down for the struggle.’ My impression is that they really enjoy the town and the environment here. You can’t really ask

for a better place to live than New Orleans. We had a lot of fun. I had never really spent any amount of time there before. I feel like I have lifelong friends there now. As a matter of fact, my daughter came to visit me there. A year later, she’s 18 years old now and a freshman at Tulane and living there and loving it. Now I need to do another show there so I can go see her.” As for a second season of True Detective, Stephens is optimistic. “I can’t imagine that there won’t be a season two, although we’re not officially green lit yet,” he says. “We’re actively working on it, even in the absence of a definite pick-up. I would be surprised if there wasn’t a season two given the success of season one. Here’s hoping!” Catch True Detective on Sundays at 9pm on HBO. LFV


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SCOUTING LOCATIONS FOR 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Iberville Street was transformed into Saratoga, New York, for 12 Years a Slave

ne of the more overlooked jobs in film production is that of a location scout. As outsiders looking in, we tend to forget the amount of effort that goes into matching locations to the director’s visions and then actually securing those locations for use. Location scouts are often the first to hear about new projects.

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One such location scout/manager, Gerard Sellers, is a seasoned veteran with over 27 years in the industry. Sellers has scouted and managed major titles including 12 Years a Slave, Texas Killing Fields, The Skeleton Key, A Little Bit of Heaven, Monster’s Ball and many others. Here, Sellers gives a detailed look into the locations used for Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave, which recently took home the Oscar for Best Picture: 14

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Felicity Plantation was used for Epps Plantation in the film.

Years a Slave was filmed in numerous locations across southeast Louisiana. The movie locations had been scouted by a number of people for months prior to shooting. The original plantation where Solomon Northup was held captive after he was sold at auction in New Orleans was in Bunkie, Louisiana, about 160 miles northwest of New Orleans—too far for a New Orleansbased crew. A number of plantations throughout Louisiana were photographed and considered. Plantations were sought for each of the key slave owners: Epps, Turner, Shaw, and Ford. Production designer Adam Stockhausen worked closely with director Steve McQueen and director of photography Sean Bobbitt to design the best look for the overall movie, and to select the plantations offering the best match. I worked closely with Adam, producer Jeremy Kleiner, UPM Anthony Katagas and production manager Alissa Kantrow to provide the best locations the production could afford within budget. Felicity Plantation in Vacherie, Louisiana,


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was selected for the Epps Plantation because it gave us the most space in fields, crops, Great House, and slave cabins. Felicity and St. Joe Plantation are side by side and part of the same family holdings. We were able to use the fields of both locations for filming. Parts of Destrehan Plantation were used for the Epps cotton gin and Epps kitchen. Judge Turner’s plantation was Magnolia Lane Plantation in Nine Mile Point, Louisiana. The look of Magnolia Lane created a counterpoint to the Epps House. We also found the hanging tree at Magnolia Lane. Bocage Plantation in Burnside, Louisiana, was selected for the Shaw Plantation. Magnolia Plantation in Schriever, Louisiana, was selected for Ford’s Plantation Great House. New Sarpy Swamp was selected for the swamp and woodland scenes. The New York and Washington, D.C., scenes were recreated in the New Orleans area. The Columns Hotel on St. Charles Avenue became an 1840s Washington hotel. Many of the sets needed to be built to resemble city areas in the 1840s and 1850s. Audubon Park was selected for a Saratoga, New York, park. Burch’s dungeon and slave pen were built in an empty lot in the 1800 block of Camp Street in the New Orleans Central Business District. Madame John’s Legacy Museum, part of the Louisiana State Museum, was depicted as a

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A ship set for 12 Years a Slave.

slave pen and auction house. One block of Iberville Street in the French Quarter was shut down and the buildings were designed to look like Saratoga in the 1840s, where Solomon, his wife and child walk down the street on a sunny day. The streets are covered with dirt, showing delivery wagons drawn by mules and families out for a ride in carriages. A courtyard mid-block on Iberville Street was closed down to build Parkers Store, where Solomon comes in to buy supplies and is approached by a slave with questions. There was much studio work done, including the sailing ship and wharf where Solomon is forced on board, as well as the hold of the ship where he and other slaves are chained and beaten. The film crew boarded a paddle wheeler in Madisonville, Louisiana, and sailed out to Lake Pontchartrain to film additional scenes

Solomon Northup's home in the film.

on the water, including the body of a murdered slave being thrown overboard. The biggest challenge to me was the shutting down of one block of the French Quarter in order to build the busy Saratoga Street. We had to contract with each business, provide alternative parking for the tenants, and pay for


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Some of the 12 Years team (l to r): Key grip Nick Leon, location assistant John Collins, director Steve McQueen, location manager Gerard Sellers, and DP Sean Bobbitt.

Judge Turner's plantation, portrayed in the film by Magnolia Lane Plantation.

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disruption for the businesses. We provided the usual parking for work trucks, crew and catering, in addition to providing a place for the livestock, wagons and carts. Setting up filming in the swamp was another challenge, from beginning to end, with the heat and the bugs and the needs of the crew. I had a great locations crew to work with, including Patti Nelkin, John Collins, Ron Uribe, Taylor Newman, Dave Fields and Albert Moten. I have to thank location manager Batou Chandler for calling me to see if I was available for 12 Years a Slave. Batou scouted many of the locations that we used. This was a movie with a crew that became a family before the filming was finished. I think the quality of a film is often determined by the crew that puts it together. I think that it starts at the top with the producers, down the line to the lowest production assistant in each department. Each and every crewmember breathes life into a film. In this film, director Steve McQueen was a delight to work with and set the tone for the movie when he climbed on the scouting bus and began leading everyone on the bus singing Beatles songs. “Yellow Submarine” was the favorite. I’ve worked in this industry for over 25 years, and I have to say that this is one of the finest projects that I’ve worked on in all these years. It is certainly one of the most memorable. LFV


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CAYOUETTE UNCHAINED STORY BY ANDREW VOGEL

aura Cayouette, veteran actress ( Django Unchained, Kill Bill) and author (Know Small Parts - foreword by Richard Dreyfuss), will be honoring her New Orleanian roots by riding alongside Oscar-winning filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, a man who needs no introduction, in this year’s Krewe of Orpheus parade. Tarantino was selected to be the 2014 Celebrity Monarch and will lead the 27-float procession, themed The Enchanted World, on Lundi Gras (the day before Mardi Gras).

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Pussyfooters on parade.

Founded in 1993 by a small group including Harry Connick, Jr., The Krewe of Orpheus is notoriously known for opening its arms to people of all types and personalities. “Orpheus is the God of Music, and it’s an entertainer’s parade with more music and entertainers than any other parade. I’m so proud to have the opportunity to represent my city and be a part of such an all-inclusive krewe that welcomes men, women, black, white, etc.,” says Cayouette. Friends since 2001, Tarantino directed Cayouette in Django Unchained and Kill Bill Vol. 2. The pair produced Quentin Tarantino Presents: Hell Ride, a biker movie starring Dennis Hopper, David Carradine and Michael Madsen. Cayouette also co-starred with Johnny Knoxville in the Tarantinoproduced film Daltry Calhoun. Cayouette approached Tarantino in 2011 to be a Monarch in the 2012 Orpheus parade, but the timing wasn’t quite right. This year, however, it couldn’t have worked out better. “He picked up on the second ring, I asked him, and he immediately said, ‘YEAAAH!!!’ So it was easy to get him on board this year,” says Cayouette on phoning Tarantino with the

Laura Cayouette and Quentin Tarantino at the Kill Bill Vol. 2 premiere party.

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idea. Cayouette was originally planning to dance with the Pussyfooters in the parade (she will be joining her fellow Pussyfooters in both Muses and Thoth this year). And, though it took some hoop-jumping, she will be proudly wearing her Pussyfooter uniform on the Orpheus Monarch float to display her deep abiding love for New Orleans. “Typically you would wear a ball gown. But I wanted to represent the Hollywood South aspect of Quentin’s career and our connection. I wanted to represent New Orleans and not just be another movie star on a float, even though I’m not really a movie star. So instead of doing a glamorous Hollywood thing, I wanted to rep my city. I had it approved by the Pussyfooters, who were thrilled that I’d be wearing the uniform, and had it approved by Orpheus, who agreed. Everyone on the float had to agree, as well, and I’m told they did!” says Cayouette. For those unfamiliar, the Pussyfooters are an all-women, all-over-the-age-of-30, dance group that hosts “pink and fabulous” fundraising events to raise awareness and support for local organizations. This year’s annual Blush Ball, for example, raised $30,000 for METRO (Metropolitan Center for Women and Children), which offers services to victims of domestic abuse. The high-spirited ensemble is made up of local movers and shakers such as the notoriously known “Fleurty Girl,” Lauren Thom, who owns five stores, runs an online business and raises three children. “For women who are out running the world, it’s nice to have a place where we can just be girls, just be silly and wear pink. Many of the women who first joined

didn’t own a thing that’s pink, and they didn’t necessarily identify with that type of femininity. This gives them a place to dive headfirst into it,” says a gleeful Cayouette. Cayouette served as a celebrity judge in the 2013 Greasing of the Poles outside of the Royal Sonesta, and it was there where she was introduced to and recruited by the Pussyfooters. A year later, Cayouette is proudly and pinkly dancing the streets of New Orleans as a member of the team. In her words, “This is my first time being involved in an actual Mardi Gras parade, and it’ll be as a Pussyfooter.” Keep up to date with Laura and her New Orleans adventures at her blog, www.latonola.com. She describes it, saying, “It’s an over-four-year-long love letter to the city of New Orleans that covers Carnival, concerts, cuisine, culture and more.” LFV For more information on Laura Cayouette, go to www.lauracayouette.com. For more information on the Pussyfooters, go to www.pussyfooters.org.

Cayouette in full Pussyfooter fashion.


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LOUISIANA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

AND FRIENDS SHAKE UP SUNDANCE

CC Adcock and the Lafayette Marquis entertain the crowd at Club Epic

he Louisiana International Film Festival (LIFF) returned to Sundance Film Festival this year to host an even bigger and better “Louisiana party,” celebrating the state’s successes in film and television production.

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Chesley Heymsfield, the executive director of LIFF, along with LIFF’s Louisiana liaison Shanna Forrestall, planned a newsworthy Louisiana-themed party, and recruited a “Krewe” of Louisiana representatives to help promote the state and the party in Park City leading up to the event. The VOODOO LOVE celebration, which was held on January 20, featured a special performance by the legendary CC Adcock and the Lafayette Marquis, along with Louisiana cuisine and cocktails prepared by Chefs Cody and Samantha Carroll, “The King and Queen of Louisiana Seafood.” The 22

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Dwight Henry receives a letter of recognition from LIFF Executive Director Chesley Heymsfield and LIFF CoArtistic Director Dan Ireland on behalf of the Office of Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana.


John Schneider, accompanied by the reptilian monsters of the party, puts on his best reptile face for the camera.

CC Adcock puts on a show.

Louisiana Krewe hosted an energetic crowd of over 700 filmmakers and industry guests at Epic Night Club in Park City, Utah. The Louisiana team included honorary hosts and Voodoo Prince Alexander “Conquistador” Antebi (Grammy-nominated artist/actor) and Voodoo Princess Shanna Forrestall (actress/producer, LIFF Louisiana liaison), as well as Andrew Vogel (editor of Louisiana Film & Video Magazine, actor, LIFF Louisiana liaison), several LIFF representatives, a mix of Louisiana industry crew and cast, several Louisiana media, and key Louisiana industry movers and shakers like Dwight Henry (actor, 12 Years a Slave), and John R. Schneider (actor, John Schneider Studios, Fairlight Films). Industry representatives included Julie Bordelon (Lafayette Entertainment Initiative) and Eric Holowacz (chief executive of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge). That evening, proclamations were presented from the Office of Lieutenant Governor of the State of Louisiana to Dwight Henry and John R. Schneider in person, and announced for brothers Mark Duplass and Jay Duplass, as well as Beasts of the Southern Wild producers Michael

Elizabeth Shaw (left) and Shanna Forrestall in full monster costume on the streets of downtown Park City.

Local news station interviews Shanna Forrestall and her monster pets.

“I have been to Sundance many times but can now honestly say that I have ‘arrived’ there! My time with the ‘Lousiana Krewe’ in ‘Redford’s front yard’ was by far the most fun, exciting and memorable time I’ve had up there! Not at all surprisingly... these folks know how to get the job done and have a good time. They worked that festival harder than any group of people I have ever hung out with. I have no doubt that this state will kick and claw and passion its way to the very head of the pack with talented people like this representing it! Count me in next year, too!”—John R. Schneider (Fairlight Films) ISSUE ONE

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Chesley Heymsfield holds the mic for Dwight Henry as he gives his acceptance speech.

“To be at Sundance and to see filmmakers and film lovers from across the country and world reacting so positively and responding with such interest to what Chesley and her LIFF team have going was eye-opening and inspirational. With the Louisiana International Film Festival coming up and two of the nine Best Picture nominees having been shot here, it seems like all eyes are on the Bayou State, and that’s a good thing, because I’m certain we have the creativity and capacity to make an even greater impact on the film industry.”—Jeff Roedel (editor, 225 Magazine) 24

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Waitress preparing to deliver a tray of Bloody Marys with a touch of pickled chicken foot.

Gottwald, Dan Janvey, Josh Penn and director Benh Zeitlin. At the VOODOO LOVE event, LIFF also announced a grant award by JP Morgan Chase Foundation to launch a mentorship program in partnership with the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge for this year’s festival, held May 8-11, in Baton Rouge. The program will host a series of master classes presented by professional filmmakers during the 2014 festival. Chesley Heymsfield, founder of LIFF, commented, “LIFF aims to help build a plat-


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form for those who would not otherwise have access to the film industry. We want to provide people with the training necessary to bridge the gap between their education, life experiences, local employment opportunities and dreams.” Shanna Forrestall added, “As a Louisiana native, I’m always excited to see the development of programs that directly benefit the young people of our state. I was an excellent

“While at Sundance the Louisiana Krewe utilized custom masks made by Baton Rouge’s own Composite FX to promote the Louisiana party. On various days team members donned the masks and went out with street teams to interact with Sundance attendees, and it made for some memorable moments! A special thank you to CFX for allowing us to use a selection of their amazing artwork for our street promotion as well as at the Voodoo Love party! We are so proud of this local company of talented hardworking creatives who have gained an international following for their superior mask work!” —Shanna Forrestall (actress/producer, LIFF Louisiana liaison) 26

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(l to r) Actor Dwight Henry, Voodoo Princess Shanna Forrestall, and actress Sharice Williams pose for the camera.

CC Adcock

“The Lafayette Entertainment Initiative (LEI) had a great experience at this year’s Sundance Film Festival! Solid connections were made at different events throughout the weekend, but the highlight of the trip was the Louisiana party! LEI supplied the soulful musical talent of CC Adcock and the Lafayette Marquis, which got the whole party grooving and wanting more of Louisiana. Lafayette was happy to participate in such a successful event!” —Julie Bordelon (assistant to city-parish president/filmmedia, Lafayette Entertainment Initiative)


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student, and I could have become anything— a doctor, attorney or educator—but I was also a creative and it took me years to find my ‘place.’ I believe the LIFF mentorship program will help a generation of talented, creative young people find possibilities they never knew existed, and I’m looking forward to the results of that investment.” VOODOO LOVE Sponsors: CFX, Lafayette Entertainment Initiative, Louisiana Film & Video Magazine, Hot Tails Restaurant, VBO Tickets, Pixel Magic, Rockitscience, Video Equipment Rentals (VER) and Fletcher Camera & Lenses, and Natalie J. Pierce of High Flying Fancy. Festival Sponsors: Credit Bureau of Baton Rouge, Inc. Foundation, Irene W. and C.B. Pennington Foundation, Innovative Analytics, Baton Rouge Airport, Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Louisiana Technology Park, Lamar, 89.3 WRKF, and Cox Channel 4. Founding Patrons 2014: Winifred & Kevin Reilly, Jr., John Turner & Jerry Fischer, Dee Dee Reilly, Cordell & Ava Haymon, Brian & Barbara Haymon, Jennifer Eplett & Sean E. Reilly, Cathy Coates & Brian Hales, Kathryn & Luke Kissam, Annette D. Barton, Fran & Leroy Harvey, Hugh McIntosh, Cary Seurage, Jo Ellen Kearny, Josephine Nixon, and Mary Ann Sternberg. LFV

Alexander Antebi (left) and Shanna Forrestall introduce themselves as the 2014 Voodoo Love Prince and Princess.

A note from Eric Holowacz, Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge “Over the past few months, the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge staff and I have been thinking a lot about film, filmmakers, and the growing motion picture industry around us. Our building, the street out front, and the neighbourhood I live in have all played host to location shoots and film crews. From the crowds gathered around the grip trucks, and permits taped to parking meters in the capital city, it looks like Hollywood is making a second home in Louisiana. “Actually the Arts Council has a bit of a history nurturing story-tellers, expressive people, and those who make images about our world. When he was a teenager armed with a run and gun Super 8 camera, Stephen Soderbergh screened his first films inside our Arts Council gallery in the city’s old fire station. Thousands of creative people have come through since, and my organization has tried to help them all hone their craft and grow audiences for their work. “So when Chesley and the emerging Louisiana International Film Festival stopped by, and whispered a dream of film industry mentorship in our ears, we began cooking up a partnership. Pretty soon, a pilot program to train local young people in the ways of the film industry was on the drawing board. The local charitable arm of JP Morgan Chase, an already staunch supporter of the arts, answered our 28

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request for support late last year. Industry professionals were invited to share their knowledge, and the little dream of mentorship began to take shape. This year, together with LIFF in May of 2014, we’ll launch the Creative Industries Corps with a distinct focus on helping young people gain knowledge and practical experience in film production. “Roger Ebert once called Stephen Soderbergh the ‘poster boy of the Sundance generation.’ Since then, the annual film festival has become a forge of diverse and exciting new stories, and the bastion of American independent cinema. So when Chesley and her team asked me to join their delegation and bring a bit of ‘Louisiana goodness’ to Sundance, I jumped at the chance. During my three days in Park City, I waited in line and tried to figure out the iPhone app ticketing for the busing main features. I talked my way into a lavish party or two, saw both horrible and wonderful indie filmmaking thanks to the fringe Slamdance Festival, and spent a lot of time immersed in the technology platforms and panel discussions of Sundance’s New Frontiers pavilion. I rubbed shoulders with people who the paparazzi care about, and filled my pockets with swag. I even waited in the bitter cold at midnight, at the request of my three daughters, to get a selfie with belle of the Sundance ball, Anna Kendrick.

“But the highlight of it all was Voodoo Love, the Louisiana International Film Festival industry party at the subterranean nightclub on Main Street, Epic. With the party packed to the gunnels with over 700 people, CC Adcock and the Lafayette Marquis swamped up the stage with blues and Cajun tunes of the most legitimate sort. The culinary wonders of the night came courtesy of Cody and Samantha Carroll of Hot Tails Restaurant, just up the road on the False River. The dance floor was alive, as Hollywood types made their best effort to groove like countrified Zydeco royalty. “In the end, Louisiana proved to be the king of the night, as the Voodoo Love took over Park City. Those leaving Epic re-entered the chilly fray of Main Street and decompressed at the less lively venues of Sundance. Thanks to LIFF, and an amazing crew of local creative people, the spell was set at Sundance. Even the coldest parka-clad executive went away with a Creole song in his head, a belly satisfied with grits and gator grillades, and a heart warmed by the good times that roll only in Louisiana. And me, I flew back to Baton Rouge and returned to work. Here, in the old fire station at the heart of downtown, to try to nurture and support the next 15-yearold kid with a passion for moving images, a borrowed camera and a few talented friends, and more than a few stories that might one day conquer the mountain at Sundance.”


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TRENDS & TIPS AT CES FOR CAST & CREW STORY BY ODIN LINDBLOM & W. H. BOURNE • PHOTOS BY ODIN LINDBLOM

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he Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas once again dazzled with everything from driverless cars to augmented reality. CES continues to remain a barometer for professionals in the entertainment industry, showcasing the new technology that will drive consumer demands. Reporters at CES 2014. Makerbot's 3D printer

Samsung unveils their curved screen Ultra HDTVs.

4K continues to expand into the consumer space as both Sony and Panasonic showed off 4K cameras with price tags under $2,000. All the major TV manufacturers had 4K TV models on display with prices starting below $1,000, but it was the elimination of 3D support in Vizio’s new TV lineup that most dramatically showed the shift in interest away from 3D and toward 4K by TV manufacturers. Sony showed off its 4K media player and

Polaroid's Instant Printing Digital Camera

Camera mount for your pet.

4K streaming media service that launched last year. While Sony’s hardware manufacturing gave them an edge into getting 4K content into the living room, it’s likely that we’ll see other studios releasing films in 4K for home video within the next year. While tablets continue to be more and more useful tools on the set, quality mounts for supporting stands have been limited to 30

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specialty grip items, often costing more than the tablets they hold. A large number of exhibitors at CES showed off an array of tablet mounts and stands in the sub-$100 price range. Some are on the market now and some are expected to release within the next year. Many of the better mounts were designed to work with inexpensive microphone stands like the iKlip Mini. Audio recording interfaces for mobile devices are not new to the market, but the new iRig Pro has some unique features. Designed to work with both Android and iOS, in addition to giving you an XLR jack with 48 volt phantom power and 24bit/96k recording capabilities, the iRig Pro also gives you the ability to record and monitor audio with effects including EQ , compression and reverb in real time. This is a very useful feature for

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iRig

productions on a tight turnaround. There were a number of different manufacturers, including Belkin and Broadcom, carrying wifi or bluetooth-controlled LED lights that are designed to mount into a standard light fixture. On location, these are a good replacement for practicals because they have a 3200K white temperature, and they are wirelessly dimmable, which isn’t always possible to do on location and certainly isn’t as easy as replacing a bulb. They also have the advantage of producing multiple colors. Whereas the color accuracy to match other fixtures or gels may not be that accurate, their color accuracy compared to other bulbs of the same type is pretty good. For location scouting, VOXX introduced the 360Fly, which offers not only a 360degree panoramic video, but it also allows you to create a seamless 360 degree x 270 degree panoramic photo, which can show everything a location has to offer in a single view. It ensures that there are no surprises when the crew arrives to a location. For the cinematographer and gaffer, it’s a great resource because you can take a single picture and see a 360 x 270 view of where every light source and flag and bounce surface is on your set. You can see where everything is in a single image and just

Just add microphones to create your custom studio with iRig.


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pan around. The 360Fly will be available in June. The 360Microfly will be available in May. This smaller camera lens attaches to an iPhone and retails for $99. For casting agents, Polaroid’s Instant Printing Camera provides the convenience of an instant photo to attach to a casting sheet, but it also provides digital files for online sharing. This is a welcome relief for agents who liked Polaroid’s One Step and haven’t been able to get film stock in several years. 3D printers continue to increase in popularity with prices now dropping below $1,000 for units targeted at consumers. As 3D printers become more accessible, they are becoming a valuable asset to art departments by providing a resource for cheap, inexpensive JVC's new 4K camcorder.

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iKlip tablet holder

props that can be fully customized. Backup battery packs are essential now, as most of us must live in a connected world. This is particularly true for cast and crew working in remote locations or places where access to electrical outlets are limited. CES seemed to have every battery pack imaginable, from Mophie’s designs with Swarovski crystals to VOXX’s slimline battery, which features a flashlight and a panic alarm. There were a number of manufacturers that had battery packs that had multiple USB outputs so you could charge multiple devices at once. Battery packs have also finally evolved to be sufficiently powerful to charge tablets, including iPads. Due to their popularity, their prices also continue to decrease. While the digital revolution has truly trans-

formed CES, there was one booth tucked away in a corner that touted their old-fashioned services. Lingualinx has actual translators in every language imaginable. What a novel concept! Real people doing the work instead of computers! Lingualinx claims that computers usually don’t provide accurate translations; only people familiar with the language and culture tend to provide accurate translation, which is important for subtitles and dubbing. Given China’s growing appetite for American film, this service can really help. So if you need subtitles in Thai, no problem. Lingualinx can do the translation for you. If you ask anyone in Vegas, they’ll say CES has something for everyone. Walking around the show floor, I saw enough gadgets to please most everyone I’ve crewed with. LFV

Belkin's remote controlled LED light bulbs.


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GOPRO IN THE SPOTLIGHT AT NAMM STORY BY WÉLAND & DYLAN BOURNE

very year, musicians, audio engineers, and composers flock to the National Association of Music Merchants convention (NAMM) in Anaheim, California. The show features some 5,000 exhibits with more than 95,000 attendees. The show features everything from drum sticks to digital field recorders to stage lighting. NAMM also provides unique opportunities to learn about the latest software upgrades to programs like ProTools or Finale, test out microphones, or even learn business and marketing tips. For anyone in the music industry, it is a must-attend event.

E

If you think this isn’t a place you’d find cameras, you would have been correct until this year. GoPro launched a massive campaign including sponsoring the main concert stage at NAMM. After a conversation with multiple people from GoPro, their heavy presence and campaign was explained to me. “In 2013, three of the top ten most watched videos on YouTube were official music videos. Another two were fan-made music videos. Together they had accumulated over 500 million views. The leader, Ylvis’ ‘What Does the Fox Say?’, accumulated a total of 361 million alone. That’s nothing when you consider music legend PSY’s ‘Gangnam Style’, which hit at over 1.87 billion. Of the top ten all time most successful videos on YouTube, only one of them isn’t a music video and none of them has less than 500 million views,” said a GoPro spokesperson. According to GoPro, we are in a “Golden Age” of music videos. Obviously, they plan to capitalize on this and become the go-to camera for musicians. GoPro announced the HERO3+ Black Edition/Music (MSRP $399.99), which will be available this spring. The 4k camera shoots up to 30 frames per second and has built-in wi-fi and auto low light modes. It is their lightest camera to date, but will now be packaged specifically for musicians 34

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The latest news from Pro Tools at NAMM 2014. GoPro custom mounts included in the new Hero3+ Music package.

by losing the waterproof housing that accompanies the traditional HERO3 package and replacing it with a number of custom mounts, including: • Removable Instrument Mount: An easyto-remove, non-damaging adhesive mount that makes it easy to mount the camera to guitars, drums, turntables, keyboards and other instruments. • Mic Stand Mount: Convenient mount for attaching the camera to a mic stand. Compatible with standard U.S. 5/8”-27 mic stands. Also includes an adapter for European 3/8”16 mic stands. • Jaws Flex Clamp: Opposable flex clamp that simplifies mounting the camera to cymbal stands, drum hardware, turntables and more. The opposable and removable neck delivers a wide range of camera-angle adjustability and can be attached to the other included mounts for increased versatility. “In an era where social media presence and YouTube videos are a requirement, bands can no longer rely on not having camera equipment of their own,” explained GoPro marketing personnel. “Because of this, musicians

GoPro's booth at NAMM 2014.

need something easy, professional and versatile. They need something that they can use to not only record music videos but record live shows and practices.” GoPro claimed to be the answer to those needs as they made their debut at NAMM and rolled out their product line to traditional music equipment vendors. It’s an interesting move that highlights the ever-growing DIY movement that is creating change in both the music and video industry. LFV


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FILM OFFICE SPOTLIGHT

LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE HIGHLIGHTS A CROSS-SECTION OF THE MANY FILM OFFICES THAT SUPPORT PRODUCTION WORK IN THEIR REGION

Louisiana Office of Entertainment Industry Development Chris Stelly, Executive Director www.louisianaentertainment.gov 225-342-5403 What is your forecast for Louisiana film production as a whole in 2014? If I had to make a prediction, I’d say that 2014 is picking up where 2013 left off and will either meet or exceed that year. So far in the first quarter of the year, we are certainly busy with multiple projects setting up and prepping to shoot in the first part of this year. Current films in the state? Now filming: Salem (Fox television series) filming through May 2014 in Shreveport; Bad Ass 3 shooting February 3 – March 1 in Baton Rouge; Wraith shooting February 3 – 28 in Kenner; Zipper filming January 21 – February 21 in Baton Rouge; Mississippi Grind (Sycamore Pictures) filming January 29 – March 6 in New Orleans; and Midnight Special (Warner Bros.) filming January 20 for 40 days in New Orleans. Pre-production: Fantastic Four (Fox) begins shooting March 24 in Baton Rouge; American Ultra will shoot April 14 – June 10 in New Orleans; Mind Puppet (Itaca Films) will shoot March 10 in New Orleans; The Best of Me (Relativity Films) will shoot March 6 for 42 days in New Orleans; Get Hard (Warner Bros.) begins shooting March 17 in New Orleans; Terminator 5 (Paramount) will shoot April 21 – August 1 in New Orleans; and Jurassic Park 4 (Universal) begins shooting June 2 for 11 weeks in New Orleans. Thoughts on the progress of Louisiana? I am proud to say that Louisiana has made significant progress in attracting the motion picture industry. Not only are we one of the top five location destinations in the world, but we are also working towards a permanent, selfsustaining indigenous industry. What message would you give clients looking to potentially house their production in Louisiana? 36

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Louisiana is a pioneer in the motion picture incentive business. We have a permanent program and have built a solid reputation on being reliable and stable. That is one part of our story. Other vital keys to our success include a deep, skilled workforce; ample infrastructure; film-friendly communities; a temperate climate; and a culture that really supports creativity. Baton Rouge Film Commission/ Visit Baton Rouge Liza Kelso, Executive Director Jon Cloud, Production Coordinator www.filmbatonrouge.com 225-382-3563 Current films in your area? Now filming: Zipper (Hush Productions), principal photography January 21 – February 22, and Bad Ass 3: Bad Ass on the Bayou (Ginobi LLC), principal photography February 3 – March 1. Pre-production: Pitch Perfect 2 (Gold Circle Films and Brownstone Productions), shooting estimated to start May 27, and Fantastic Four (20th Century Fox), in the process of casting now. Thoughts on the progress of your area? Baton Rouge has started off 2014 at momentous pace. Two independent features, both Zipper and Bad Ass 3, both currently filming in our city, consist of mostly local hires. This is important as we are seeing a positive growth in our film community. In 2013, Baton Rouge hosted over 20 projects totaling $110 million worth of production spend. Mostly independent features, these films helped bring back our crew base from both New Orleans and Shreveport. We are continuing this trajectory with more crew expected to work on the upcoming large feature, Fantastic Four, as well as other indie projects that will be shooting throughout the summer. What sets your area apart? Baton Rouge has a couple of reasons why it is unique for filmmaking. First, the Film Commission staff make it a priorty to offer customer service to productions from the moment a script is sent for location packages to the logistical needs that arise during film-

making. Productions are encouraged by an engaged Mayor’s office that partner with producers to create long-lasting relationships. Finally, Baton Rouge is home to the largest purpose-built soundstage, Celtic Studios. Celtic is deeply committed to delivering quality service and offering optimal stage space for whatever the project calls for. Any other thoughts/ideas you would like to share? The Baton Rouge Film Commission and Mayor Holden are excited to announce new workforce classes for individuals that want to join the film industry. The first classes offered will be a PA Boot Camp on March 22 and 23. We will be also offering classes for other opportunities later in the spring/early summer. Please keep an eye out for these events on www.filmbatonrouge.com. Jeff Davis Parish Economic Development Commission Tracie D. Fontenot, Executive Assistant www.jeffdavis.org 337-821-5534 Thoughts on the progress of your area? We have a huge expansion about to take place in Lake Charles with about 35,000-plus workers and contractors. What sets your area apart? That our parish is very friendly and you will be treated like family. Any other thoughts/ideas you would like to share? We have a beautiful landscape.

West Feliciana Parish Tourist Commission Laurie Walsh www.stfrancisville.us 225-635-4224 Current films in your area? The last film we had shoot here was Bonnie and Clyde for Lifetime/History Channel. We are currently scouting and location hunting for a couple movies that will shoot this spring. Thoughts on the progress of your area? We are growing with the number of films and TV episodes that are interested in film-


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ing, more and more property owners are interested in the film industry. What sets your area apart? We are 25 miles from downtown Baton Rouge, and we have rural rolling hills, pasture land, historic downtown, prison, creek frontage, sandy beach and dunes. We will work one on one to assist with locations, permitting, etc. Shreveport-Bossier Film Office Arlena Acree, Director of Film, Media, and Entertainment www.shreveport-bossierfilm.com 318-673-7515

our area. No matter what kind of location you’re looking for, the Shreveport-Bossier area can make your production feel right at home. That’s because we have a sincere desire to make every production successful. From the city administration down to support staff, we are here to support your project. We have a local sales tax rebate incentive along with the State of Louisiana’s 30 percent tax credit on the Louisiana spend and an additional 5 percent on Louisiana hires....it doesn’t get any better than that.

Current films in your area? We have Salem, a new TV series, produced by Fox 21 that will air in April on WGN America. Thoughts on the progress of your area? We are receiving a lot of interest for more projects that we hope to announce soon for the spring. What sets your area apart? Diversity… It’s what allows the ShreveportBossier City area to become Anywhere, USA, or the World. Whether your story is set in Portland, New York City, or even Senegal, Africa, it can be and probably has been shot here in

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Lafayette Entertainment Initiative (LEI) Julie Bordelon www.LEI-LA.org 337-291-3456 Current films in your area? A Sort of Homecoming (Believe Entertainment), in production; The Shelter (Holbrook Multi Media), post production; When the

Game Stands Tall (Pixel Magic), VFX post production; 22 Jump Street (Pixel Magic), VFX post production; Selfless (Pixel Magic), VFX post production; Nashville TV Series (Pixel Magic), VFX post production; and Red Zone pilot (Pixel Magic), in production now in North Carolina for VFX post production in Lafayette. Thoughts on the progress of your area? We are happy with the production work we have, but are always happy to have more! Lafayette is continuing to expand and grow our local crew and production services. We are excited and ready for what is coming! What sets your area apart? The entertainment industry is drawn to Lafayette’s dynamic and vibrant creative culture. And the Lafayette City-Parish government and community are always willing to go above and beyond to help a production. Plus, productions that qualify for the state’s tax incentives and spend a minimum of $150,000 in Lafayette can also receive a 2 percent City Sales Tax Rebate. Additional Lafayette resources: • LEI Reel Scout Database provides locations, crew, talent and support services across all four entertainment industries. • Experienced and available crew.


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• Significantly lower cost of living and cost of labor. • Hotel discounts for cast and crew. • Diverse and low-cost locations and venues. • State-of-the-art pre- and post-production companies and rental houses, recording studios and live performance venues. • Access to University-owned locations and production interns. • Film-friendly government and city-owned locations.

Webster Parish Convention and Visitors Bureau Lynn Dorsey, Executive Director www.visitwebster.net 1-800-2MINDEN Current films in your area? Dark Places starring Charlize Theron filmed at Camp Minden and downtown Minden in September of 2013.

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Thoughts on the progress of your area? From a tourism standpoint, the Webster Parish Convention and Visitors Bureau is currently completing a new brochure with the Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau, the “Northwest Louisiana Film Trail,” which will include listings of movies with brief descriptions and a map of film sites from Shreveport to Minden. It will be complete in the next few weeks and available at the Shreveport-Bossier Tourist Bureau and the Minden Visitors Bureau. They can also be mailed by calling 1-800-2MINDEN. What sets your area apart? Webster Parish has always been perfect for rural locations with rolling hills, pine trees, Kisatchie National Forest, 17,000-acre Lake Bistineau with moss-covered ancient cypress trees, and beautiful Bayou Dorcheat that is protected by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ “Scenic Streams Program.” I think the original brick streets and the timeless architecture of downtown Minden has been the huge appeal for filmmakers. Minden is a perfect setting for Small Town, USA. As I entertain travel agents from other countries, they always say Minden is how they had envisioned a small town in America would look. Camp Minden, just outside of Minden, is

the 15,000-acre industrial park, formally the Louisiana Ammunition plant. This vast facility is fenced and guarded 24 hours per day and includes: • Underground bunkers • Vacant hospital • Quonset huts • Warehouse & manufacturing facilities • Office buildings • 65 miles of railroad tracks and rail access from many buildings on site • 107 miles of paved and unpaved roads • 15,000 acres of land within the secured compound • Multiple ponds Airports: Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (200 miles west), Shreveport Regional Airport (30 miles west), Minden Airport (10 miles east). Any other thoughts/ideas you would like to share? I just returned from Germany and the United Kingdom. American movies are almost all they have available and they love them. As I promoted our parish and the movies filmed here to travel agents in both countries, they were very knowledgeable of the film titles, plots and especially the stars. They were truly excited to add the Northwest Film Trail to their customers’ travel itineraries.


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FILM OFFICE GUIDE

YOUR RESOURCE GUIDE TO THE FILM OFFICES, CHAMBERS, VISITORS BUREAUS AND FILM LIAISONS THROUGHOUT THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.

STATE OFFICE Louisiana Office of Entertainment Industry Development Chris Stelly 225-342-5403 1051 North 3rd Street, Ste 173 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 www.louisianaentertainment.gov

REGIONAL FILM OFFICES Abbeville Film & Visitors Commission 337-740-3636 907 Veterans Memorial Drive Abbeville, LA 70510 www.abbevillefilm.com Baton Rouge Film Commission/ Visit Baton Rouge Liza Kelso 225-382-3563 359 3rd Street Baton Rouge, LA 70801 www.filmbatonrouge.com Central Louisiana in Film Richard Johnson 318-449-5028 P.O. Box 71 Alexandria, LA 71309 www.cityofalexandriala.com Film New Orleans Katie Williams 504-658-0923 1340 Poydras Street, Ste 1000 New Orleans, LA 70112 www.filmneworleans.org Jeff Davis Parish Economic Development & Film Commission Tracie D. Fontenot 337-821-5534 500 North Cary Avenue, 2nd Floor Jennings, LA 70546 www.jeffdavis.org Jefferson Parish Film Office Dominique Rotolo 504-364-2706 200 Derbigny Street, Ste 6100 Gretna, LA 70053 www.filmjeffersonla.com Lafayette Entertainment Initiative Julie Bordelon 337-291-3456 705 West University Avenue Lafayette, LA 70502 www.lei-la.org Northeast Louisiana Film Commission Sheila M. Snow 800-843-1872 601 Constitution Drive West Monroe, LA 71292 www.nelafilm.com Shreveport-Bossier Film Office Arlena Acree/Pam Glorioso 42

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318-673-7515/318-741-8503 505 Travis Street, Ste 200 Shreveport, LA 71101 www.shreveport-bossierfilm.com St. Bernard Parish Office of Film and Television Ryan Fink 504-650-1010 8201 West Judge Perez Drive Chalmette, LA 70043 www.stbernardfilm.net Southwest Louisiana Film Commission Megan Monsour Hartman 800-456-7952 1205 North Lakeshore Drive Lake Charles, LA 70601 www.shootlakecharles.com

REGIONAL CHAMBERS/ VISITORS BUREAUS Alexandria/Pineville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau Sherry Smith-Ellington 800-551-9546 P.O. Box 1070 Alexandria, LA 71309 www.theheartoflouisiana.com Arnaudville Area Chamber of Commerce Brandy Perdikis 337-754-5316 P.O. Box 125 Arnaudville, LA 70512 www.arnaudvillechamber.org Gretna Office of Tourism Bernadette Guarino 504-363-1500 2nd Street and Huey P. Long Avenue Gretna, LA 70053 www.gretnala.com Houma Area Convention and Visitors Bureau Kelly Kraemer Gustafson 800-688-2732 114 Tourist Drive Gray, LA 70359 www.houmatravel.com Iberia Parish Convention & Visitors Bureau Fran Thibodeaux 337-365-1540 2513 Highway 14 New Iberia, LA 70560 www.iberiatravel.com Jefferson Convention & Visitors Bureau Linda Maher 504-731-7083 1221 Elmwood Park Blvd., Ste 411 Jefferson, LA 70123 www.experiencejefferson.com Lafourche Parish Government Brittany Aucoin 985-446-8427 P.O. Box 5548

Thibodaux, LA 70302 www.lafourchegov.org Natchitoches Area Convention & Visitors Bureau Farrah Reyna 800-259-1714 781 Front Street Natchitoches, LA 71457 www.natchitoches.net River Parishes Tourist Commission Jo Banner 985-359-2562 2900 New Highway 51 LaPlace, LA 70068 www.film-louisiana.com St. Landry Parish Tourist Commission Celeste D. Gomez 337-948-8004 P.O. Box 1415 Opelousas, LA 70571 www.cajuntravel.com St. Martin Parish Tourist Commission Dona Degatur Richard 337-442-1597 P.O. Box 9 St. Martinville, LA 70582 www.cajuncountry.org St. Martinville Office of Tourism Michelle Verret Johnson 337-394-2233 P.O. Box 379 St. Martinville, LA 70582 www.stmartinville.org St. Tammany Parish Tourist Commission/Louisiana’s Northshore Loren M. Legendre 800-634-9443 68099 Highway 59 Mandeville, LA 70471 www.louisiananorthshore.com Tangipahoa Parish Convention & Visitors Bureau Emily McKneely 985-542-7520 13143 Wardline Road Hammond, LA 70401 www.tangitourism.com Webster Parish Convention and Visitors Bureau Lynn Dorsey 1-800-2MINDEN P.O. Box 1528 Minden, LA 71058 www.visitwebster.net West Feliciana Parish Tourist Commission Laurie Walsh 225-635-4224 P.O. Box 1548 St. Francisville, LA 70775 www.stfrancisville.us


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FINDING FASCINATING PEOPLE AND PLACES FOR YOUR SCENES STORY BY MAJA HOLZINGER

I

’ve always wondered why there are such “pretty” people in Hollywood films. Do they not have those fascinating people who have their life stories written on their faces? Having grown up in Poland, I was used to a cinema style where our cameras highlighted the average workingclass people instead of crowds of extras all recruited by some Hollywood casting agency.

I decided to make Call Me Cappy, about a bowling alley worker from a small town in Nebraska, here in Louisiana because we had scenes that take place inside a municipal pool, bingo hall, and bowling alley. A greatlooking house owned by Mr. Steve Bertucci in the New Orleans suburb of Westwego served for a midwestern neighborhood. I was lucky when it came to finding a pool to film. The U.N.O. Arena pool manager, Janice Roth, immediately agreed to let us use the pool for free. To find the other locations, I ventured into the world of bingo halls and bowling alleys, entering a Louisiana I didn’t know. The Bingo Hall I never knew that bingo was a culture on its

Andy Stark (supporting actor), Marie Lirette (the bowling alley owner), Ritchie Montgomery (lead), Maja Holzinger.

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own. Rather than just call and arrange a meeting, I wanted to explore the scene in person. Melissa Remark, the film’s screenwriter, accompanied me to all the bingo halls in Metairie and Kenner. Those places have an absolutely extraordinary atmosphere. They were totally packed with people and filled with cigarette smoke and noise. People are so much into bingo and take it seriously. Since bingo’s technically gambling, I worried we wouldn’t be allowed to film inside a hall. However, everywhere we went, we got an encouraging welcome. In fact, one owner told us they’d like to give their regular customers the opportunity to be in the movie’s scene. We filmed inside the Bingo Palace on Airline Highway in Metairie during Lion’s

Club Bingo. The players you see in the bingo hall are actual bingo players mixed with our actors. We avoided sound issues from the noise by shooting twice: once with just the actors in the hall, then during actual bingo games. This brought an amazing level of reality into the film. The manager, Mr. Jim Caruso, didn’t ask for compensation and allowed us to film during their busiest day. We got some wonderful-looking people in the scene and it shows that they are not just invited extras, but real bingo players. The Bowling Alley It proved almost impossible to find a bowling alley suitable for our project. We looked for somewhere that would let us shoot for free and control the entire bowling alley at a reasonable hour to have unpaid, but interesting-looking extras show up. My husband and I were pretty discouraged after visiting huge bowling alleys in Baton Rouge. The last bowling alley on my list sat in Houma, Louisiana, a two-hour drive from Baton Rouge on tiny, dark roads. Bowl South turned out to be a unique, small, family-run bowling alley. It’s very “vintage,” old-fashioned and really about bowling, not so much the flashy screens,


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Ritchie Montgomery (main actor).

drinks and all that. Being in Houma, where there’s a huge bowling culture, it didn’t have the “chain” bowling alley look at all. We immediately loved the look of the place. When I told the owner, Marie Lirette, about the project, she looked at me and said that the bowling alley is our place and asked me not to look anywhere else. She’s worked at Bowl South since she was 16, eventually becoming the owner. She and her husband are both professional bowlers and take bowling very seriously. As a very spiritual lady, she felt that nothing happened without a reason and

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it’s that faith that brought us to her bowling alley. She loved the story of Call Me Cappy, and really wanted to be a part of the film. Marie even appears in the movie bowling a strike. What is more, she invited all the members of her large family and people from Houma’s bowling community to participate. Being simply excited to be doing something new and involved in a fun event, they worked with us like a team. It was an instance of great collaboration between Houma’s people and my crew. I loved that while it was such a huge favor for us, it was also something cool for their community. Thanks to Marie, I found a place to film that

Andrea Kuehnel (producer), Trenton Mynatt (DP), Maja Holzinger.

is something more than just a bowling alley. It’s like a family. They just had to be in a movie filmed in their favorite bowling alley, and I have people excited to see Call Me Cappy. I feel extremely lucky to have met Marie, and my advice when scouting locations is to find similar people. What she did for our film was just amazing. I don’t know how else this could have worked out if we hadn’t met her. LFV To learn more about Maja Holzinger and her movie Call Me Cappy, visit www.facebook.com/callmecappy2013. Louisiana Film & Video has a profile of Maja with a behind-the-scenes video on its website at www.louisianafilmandvideo.com.


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JOHN SCHNEIDER STUDIOS OFFICIALLY OPENS IN HOLDEN

Overlooking the lake at Schneider's studio in Holden.

J

ohn Schneider Studios officially opened in January 2014, offering a production studio conveniently located in Holden, Louisiana, just one hour from the New Orleans Airport, and less than 45 minutes from Baton Rouge.

quarters for key crew, which would assist with project flow and consistency, allowing staff to live on premises in a focused and convenient working environment with minimal distraction. LFV

The studio, owned by John R. Schneider (of Dukes of Hazzard, Smallville and Have & Have Nots), currently offers a 5,000-square-foot soundstage with 20-foot ceilings, and a variety of interesting locations for filming, including a river location, a lake location, a swamp location, and a Southeast Asia-style bamboo forest. The property also boasts two homes (circa 1910 and 1950) suitable for location filming both inside and out, and has outbuildings that include an enclosed cafeteria/production office and a covered eating area. The property also has a 250,000-gallon swimming pool with a diving board at 14 feet deep. Plans are in place to add post-production sound (from pre-mix to final) and editing

For more information info@fairlightfilms.com.

capabilities (Final Cut and Avid) by May of 2014, along with an on-site chef and living

about

the

studio,

email

Surrounding area on the property.

“As the first producer to utilize the camp, I have to say it rocked! Plenty of parking, easy access from Baton Rouge, a mess hall and pavilion that was great for cast and crew, and total cooperation from local law enforcement. The total package.” — Doug Blake, producer of The Sessions and John Schneider’s Smothered 48

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BOB HOLBROOK HONORED WITH SILVER MEDAL AWARD ob Holbrook joins the ranks of distinguished advertising professionals as the 2014 Silver Medal Award recipient. Holbrook Multi Media’s founder and CEO received the honor at Acadiana’s 2014 American Advertising Awards for his outstanding work in the advertising community.

B

“I deeply appreciate the recognition from the Advertising Federation, and my peers,” said Holbrook. “In my opinion, the award reinforces that a client-centric ethic works! It’s the client’s success that makes Holbrook Multi Media

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Holbrook Multi Media CEO Bob Holbrook holding Silver Medal Award presented at 2014 American Advertising Awards.


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successful, and to me, this award really speaks to that.” Bob recognized his wife, Kim Holbrook, as the co-recipient of the award for her selfless financial guidance and unique creative strength. Established in 1959, the Silver Medal Award Program is the highest accolade presented by the American Advertising Federation on the local level. Annually, AAF member clubs bestow this honor upon outstanding members of the local advertising community. In a video tribute to the award winner, quotes from past and present clients were featured, including Van Eaton and Romero, the Louisiana Community and Technical College System, PR firm Irving Morris, and attorney Glenn Armentor. Dr. Natalie Harder, chancellor of South Louisiana Community College, said, “On top of the external recognition, his work raised pride levels within our own people. Everything he did was priceless for SLCC.” Bob Holbrook consults for companies worldwide and is a guest speaker for a number of universities. The Silver Medal Award is presented to men and women who have made

Holbrook production manager and DP, Bobby Holbrook II, utilizes a Red Epic to capture Holbrook’s latest campaign for the state's Louisiana Community and Technical College System.

Upon presentation, CEO Bob Holbrook (r) dedicated the award to wife and business partner Kim Holbrook (l), thanked sons Donnie, Bobby II and Sammy, and daughter Robyn, who have each stepped out on their own or have taken up various roles in the business. He also thanked his gifted team members.

outstanding contributions to advertising and who have been active in furthering the industry’s standards, creative excellence and responsibility in areas of social concern. The AAF also presented the 2014 Gold Addy for Self-Promotion Campaign to Holbrook Multi Media. Previous awards for the company include over 100 Addy Awards, Telly Awards, 2013 Copywriter of the Year, 4-time producer of the year, cinematographer of the year and multiple Pelican awards for healthcare marketing. LFV For more information, visit www.holbrookmultimedia.com.

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FALL GUYS: Danny Cosmo 504-481-9482 cosmostunts@gmail.com www.cosmostunts.com Danny Cosmo, born Danny Higginbottom, was raised in New Orleans. When Danny was two years old, his father threw him off the diving board and told his mom he would either sink or swim. He swam to the side and has been diving ever since. Danny told his father at the age of 10 that he wanted to be a stuntman in the movies, after watching the greatest stuntman, Dar Robinson, test an air bag from 80 feet off the old Security Homestead building in Metairie for Air Pak (aka Space Walk of Metairie). Danny’s dad told him that he could do anything that he wanted to do, if he studied hard in school and followed his dreams and never gave up. Danny graduated from John Curtis Christian School in 1980, and was ranked second in the state of Louisiana in high school diving.

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After graduating, he told his dad that he didn’t want to go to college, that he still

wanted to be a stuntman, something his dad thought he had forgotten about. His dad made some phone calls to some Los Angeles stunt schools, and talked to a well known stuntman and stunt school owner, Kim Kahana, Sr. Mr. Kahana explained to Danny’s dad that the stunt business is very hard to break into, regardless of how good his son would be, and told him to have his son get a trade in something. That way, after he finished and couldn’t get a job, he would have a trade to make some money while trying to break into the stunt biz. So Danny’s dad made a deal with him: that if he went to trade school and finished that he would send him to Los Angeles and pay for stunt school and pay all his living expenses for a whole year, and then he was on his own. Danny agreed and enrolled in carpentry and painting at a local trade school. He had two weeks left to graduate from the two-year program and leave for Los Angeles to live his dream.

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On May 26, 1983, Danny came home to find his dad having a massive heart attack. He did everything he could, giving CPR until help arrived. Danny’s dad passed away that day, and from Danny’s heart and soul his dreams were shattered; he lost his best friend and dad. Danny decided it wasn’t the right time to move to Los Angeles and wanted to stay home to be with his mom, Charlotte. So he took what he learned in trade school and started his own painting business. In 1984, Danny was at the World’s Fair in New Orleans, and watched the Aquacade show, which had diving and synchronized swimming. After the show was finished, he met some friends that he had dove with when he was a kid, and they asked him if he wanted to join the show. After finishing up some jobs he had, he jumped at the chance, thinking this was the closest thing to the stunt biz he was going to get. Danny performed at the World’s Fair doing

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the diving part of the show and even made it to the top of the high dive ladder in a few weeks, which was 96 feet. After the World’s Fair ended, the company that ran the show asked Danny to travel, performing in diving shows all over the world. He jumped again at this offer and started traveling around the states and world performing shows. In 1994, Danny was invited to compete in the World High Diving Championships in Silver Springs, Florida. He competed and won the bronze medal, beating out 58 other high divers from around the world. This by far was the crowning moment in his life, so he thought. There was another diver there taking photos of all the divers for a stunt coordinator in New York for a movie that they were shooting. Danny got picked for the movie and was Leonardo DiCaprio’s stunt double for Basketball Diaries, diving from a cliff in New York as his double. This put him on his path to his acting and stunt career. In 1998, Danny met his wife-to-be, Lotus Yip. He had fulfilled his dream and met his soulmate. In 1999, Danny was called by Guinness World Records in Los Angeles to attempt to break a record that was 25 years old, diving 28 feet into 12-1/2 inches of water. Once again, he jumped at this chance and trained for six months for this amazing world record attempt. On September 27, 1999, Danny broke the record in Los Angeles by bellyflopping 29 feet into 12-1/2 inches of water. He went on to break his own record five more times throughout the world. In May of 2000, Danny was setting up a high diving show in Florida and met Elmore Leonard while he was researching for a book he was writing called Tishomingo Blues, which had some high diving in it. Danny soon became friends with Elmore and gave him advice and technical terms for high diving and worked with him and his researcher Gregg Sutter over the next year or so. Their friendship continued ‘til the day Elmore passed away in August of 2013. In 2001, Danny was featured on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno doing an exhibition bellyflop on the show. Danny now works in the film and TV business here in Louisiana and has worked on some of the top movies and TV shows that were shot in and around Louisiana. Most recently he had an acting part on the TV show American Horror Stor y: Coven, and is moving up as a stunt coordinator and actor in this business he dreamed of as a small child. Danny now is married to Lotus and they have a wonderful threeyear-old grandson, Blake, who Danny hopes one day will follow in his Paw Paw’s profession. However, he said he will support his grandson in anything he wants to do in life and will tell him what his father told him years ago: Stay in school, study hard and you can do whatever you want to do. But never give up on your dreams, no matter what life throws your way.


ACTRESS SPOTLIGHT: KIM BAPTISTE Kim Baptiste is a film and television actor in New Orleans, Louisiana. Originally, from Queens, New York, Kim lived a couple of years in Los Angeles where she did some modeling and was a Soul Train dancer for two and a half years. When she moved to New Orleans over 20 years ago she signed with an agency and began modeling, print and commercials. Kim got an exhilarating taste for working on film when she worked as a stand-in for Paula Patton in the film Déjà Vu, starring Denzel Washington and directed by the late Tony Scott. Kim’s background includes Human Resources Management. In 2011 she expanded her horizons to embark on an acting career. Kim has been studying with Jerry Katz (Ivanna Chubbuck Technique), Lance Nichols, Jim Gleason and J. Patrick McNamara. She has worked on several independent projects and Kim’s most recent role can be seen in the new sci-fi series Star-Crossed, airing soon on the CW Network. Kim remains committed and focused on growing as a professional actor and having a lot of fun. Del Corral & Associates 504-324-3782 delcorralandassoc@msn.com www.Kim-Baptiste.com

ANIMAL TALENT

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FALL GUYS: LOUISIANA’S BEST STUNT PROS Nicolas Bosc 818-268-6022 nicolasbosc80@gmail.com www.nicolasbosc.com I am a professional stuntman. Born in the south of France, I worked for the Cirque du Soleil show, KA, in Las Vegas for over 7 years! (I was part of the original cast.) I also went on a world tour with the world famous Australian singer Kylie Minogue, for the X Tour! Also worked at Universal Studios Singapore! I started my career as a professional Parkour and Freerunning athlete and participated in both competitions the Red Bull Art of Motion in Vienna and the Barclays Freerun world championships in London, representing France. I worked on many feature films and TV shows including Jack Reacher, RED 2, Man from U.N.C.L.E., Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Revolution and many more. I also spend my free time making films from directing to editing.

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Jeff Brockton 818-822-9930 bpistunt@gmail.com Born as Jeffrey Brockton Zaremba in Hollywood, California, and raised in Villa Park, California, Jeff was a Radio Television Film Major at Cal State University Long Beach. He was involved in numerous sports including gymnastics, football, track and field, swimming, jet ski racing and downhill snow skiing. He was hired at Universal Studios Hollywood in the late ‘80s as the Don Johnson/Crockett character for the Miami Vice Live Stunt Show, and then as the Kevin Costner/Mariner in the Waterworld Stunt Spectacular. Jeff has been a stunt coordinator, stuntman and actor for feature films, television shows, live shows and commercials for the last 20-plus years. Jeff recently moved from Southern California and now resides 30 minutes north of New Orleans in Slidell on the north shore in Louisiana. He enjoys family time with his two wonderful children, Jackson, 10, and Julia, 3. Since he has arrived here in Louisiana he has worked on such shows as G.I. Joe: Retaliation, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Star Crossed, Olympus Has Fallen, The Butler, Beautiful Creatures, Looper, 22 Jump Street, Escape Plan, The Fields, The Courier, Ice Man and many others. He has had the pleasure of doubling many actors including George Clooney, Ray Liotta and currently Jeffrey Dean Morgan.


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