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CONTENTS

VOLUME NINE

ISSUE ONE

Anthony Hemingway, producer/director of Treme, on set during the filming of the show’s final season. PHOTO BY PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO

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EXECUTIVE EDITOR Andrew Vogel andrew@louisianafilmandvideo.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Meg Alsfeld Kaul, W. H. Bourne, Bobby Holbrook, Dan Ireland, Liza Kelso, Odin Lindblom, Jean Manino, Jacquelyn Shulman SALES MANAGER Katie Higgins SALES Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER John Rusnak DESIGNERS Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison, Christina Poisal WEBMASTER Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER Lois Sanborn

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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TALKING TREME WITH CO-CREATOR ERIC OVERMYER

Louisiana Film & Video Publications A DIVISION OF MEDIA INDEX PUBLISHING GROUP

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FOOD, FASHION, FUN AND FILM! LOUISIANA FILM LEADERS REPRESENT THE STATE AT SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2013

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CAJUN, CREOLE AND CREATIVE FREEDOM

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TIPS WHEN BUYING TAX CREDITS

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INSIDE NOMPS: AN INTERVIEW WITH TOM CONRAD

P.O. Box 50036 New Orleans, LA 70150 (800) 332-1736 contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com

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www.louisianafilmandvideo.com www.louisianaproductionindex.com

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2013 INTERNATIONAL CES: THE CRYSTAL BALL FOR TECH SAVVY CONTENT CREATORS

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TECH TIPS WITH BOBBY HOLBROOK

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INSIDE THE NOVAC

42 “WE COME TO YOU!” MOBILE REPAIR SERVICE OFFERS CONVENIENCE AND FLEXIBILITY TO PRODUCTION INDUSTRY 44

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ANIMAL ACTORS AND THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY TIMECODE:NOLA PRESENTS INAUGURAL FILM FESTIVAL

Display Advertising: Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Group and will not be returned. Subscriptions, call (800) 332-1736 for information and rates. Copyright © 2013 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be used for solicitation or copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information

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storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher.

ON THE COVER: Actress Khandi Alexander portrays LaDonna Batiste-Williams in an emotional scene from season two of Treme. PHOTO BY PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO

DIGITAL EDITION AVAILABLE AT: WWW.LOUISIANAFILMANDVIDEO.COM 4

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 2 012 was a record-breaking year. The New Orleans Film Office announced that New Orleans-based filming generated nearly $700 million in direct spending for 61 tax credit projects. In comparison, 2011 saw $544 million in direct spending for 46 tax credit projects. This is fantastic, and it’s great for the city. But it’s often been said that the Louisiana film industry would not last without the tax incentives—that perhaps we are riding on the coattails of big budgets funded elsewhere. Well, the city also estimated that production-friendly infrastructure and the state’s skilled crew base have grown by more than 400 percent since 2002. To me this says a lot, but most importantly it says there is an internal, Louisiana-based film industry beginning to emerge. And from the inside looking out, this is no surprise. The creative community is more active than ever. Lafayette, “Louisiana’s best kept secret,” is revealing itself to be a national powerhouse of film technology due to the efforts of LITE (Louisiana Immersive Technologies Enterprise), located on the University of Lafayette’s campus (pg. 20). NOVAC continually trains our workforce for little to no cost and builds up the community with insightful discussions and events (pg. 40). New infrastructure is pouring in with the grand opening of a jaw-dropping new film studio, New Orleans Motion Picture Studios (pg. 30). LIFF (Louisiana International Film Festival) is making the state’s presence felt nationally, most recently holding a Louisiana-style Mardi Gras parade at Sundance Film Festival that

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landed a front page picture in the Park City, Utah, local paper (pg. 12). While our city’s growth is no doubt substantial, it means more to know that there is internationally-recognized proof of Louisiana’s accomplishments. Beasts of the Southern Wild, a Louisiana-based film featuring Louisiana actors, Louisiana crew, and a Louisiana story, was nominated for four Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Actress (Quvenzhané Wallis), Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay. This locally funded project is a golden testament to the strides our Louisiana film community is making, regardless of tax incentives. In short, we may be at a turning point from the mindset that Louisiana can’t stand on its own. And if not, we are definitely pointed in the right direction. Sincerely, Andrew Vogel Executive Editor


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TALKING TREME WITH CO-CREATOR ERIC OVERMYER

(L-R) Creators Eric Overmyer and David Simon on the set of Treme.

STORY BY W. H. BOURNE • PHOTOS BY PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO

H

BO’s Treme has meant many things to many people over the past four years. For those outside of New Orleans, it has offered a glimpse into the rich history and culture of the city, a city worth rebuilding. For many in the city, it was a triumph—finally a TV show that “got New Orleans right.” For some New Orleanians in the industry, it has offered opportunities and paychecks. As Treme approaches wrapping on its fourth and final season, series co-creator, writer and producer Eric Overmyer talks about Treme, New Orleans and his experiences here. “I’ve had a house here since 1989,” says Overmyer. “That’s over 22 years. I thought I knew the city pretty well, but when I started doing the show, I got to know people in a whole different way, and it’s been fantastic. There’s been so many moments on set— particularly with the music. I think that’s been the best thing. It’s just astonishing to work on a show that features live music and a musical 8

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tradition as rich and diverse as in New Orleans. It’s the best job I’ll ever have, I’m sure. It’s so different from doing a cop show or a lawyer show...” Treme is indeed a very unique series in that it isn’t just a show about people who happen to live in New Orleans. New Orleans itself is a character in the series. “We started, really, with the characters, with Wendell Pierce’s character of a trombone player and Clarke Peters’ character of a Mardi Gras Indian chief,” says Overmyer. “Right away, you’re into questions of culture

and politics because of issues. The city has issues, the police department has issues, the musicians have issues with the city trying to make a living. That was kind of woven in from the beginning. I don’t think you can separate (politics and culture) down here.” He continues, “For me, it’s been great getting to know the musicians and the Mardi Gras Indians and the traditions of New Orleans. And it’s been a daily thing. Almost every day, I’ve learned something or had a wonderful encounter with people. It wasn’t a big epiphany, but it’s been just a slow, gradual everyday experience of getting to know the city like I hadn’t (known it) before we started doing the show.” Overmyer gives great credit to HBO for making Treme a reality. “It’s a miracle that they even did the show,” says Overmyer. “It doesn’t have a lot of violence, and it doesn’t have a lot of sex. It’s about people who make art and culture. And it doesn’t have a big audience. But they did support it. I’ve worked with (HBO) for a


season on The Wire and on specs and treatments. They hire the people they want to do business with, and they don’t interfere with them. They let them do their jobs. They don’t micro-manage. That’s the sense they have. They’ve been very supportive. It’s a wonderful environment to work in.” For HBO, the show hasn’t garnered glamorous attention on the award circuit. In fact, Treme has been incredibly overlooked, particularly by the Emmys, receiving only two nominations in 2010 for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series (Agnieszka Holland for the pilot episode) and Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics. “I think Clarke Peters, Khandi Alexander and Wendell Pierce should have all received Emmy nominations by now, but I don’t know why they haven’t. I think you can speculate, but we’re just not on the radar of the Emmy nominators. I feel for the actors, especially those three,” says Overmyer. “Alonzo Wilson, our costume designer, also hasn’t gotten the attention at the Emmys that he deserves. I think they don’t realize all the work he has done. I think they think it’s all documentary; like when the Indians come around, they’re all wearing their own suits. I think when they see a Mardi Gras costume or an Indian costume, they think it came out of someone’s closet, not that Alonzo has designed and created each one. It’s just not obvious. I think he did get recognition this year from the Costume Designers Guild. We also got a Peabody Award last year for the series.” The Peabody Award is indeed impressive. The award recognizes distinguished and meritorious work, including outstanding achievement in radio and television broadcasting. “We only have a million or so viewers, so I’m sure that’s a factor,” says Overmyer of the series’ lack of awards. “But people in the music business like us and that’s gratifying. People in

(L-R) Producer Eric Overmyer and director Jim McKay working on the set.

From season one, the crew prepares a shot with actor John Goodman (far left in the Hawaiian shirt).

the culinary community talk about the kitchen stuff and like us, you know, with Kim Dickens’ character. That kind of feedback is satisfying.” There were rumors after season three that there wouldn’t be a season four. Needless to say, fans were relieved when HBO announced the fourth and final season, even if it has been shortened. “We’ve had to rush some story,” says Overmyer. “We’ve had to drop some story. It’s not the way we wanted to do it ideally, but at least I’m glad to have the opportunity to bring some stories to a different place. I’m not sure we’re resolving them in the traditional way, but there are some things that we’re able to wrap up a little bit. It just requires a different strategy. It’s definitely not as nuanced, maybe, as it would have been if we had 10 episodes to do it in, and we certainly couldn’t introduce

Music is an integral part of the series.

anything new, like we’ve done every season.” Overmyer continues, as he talks about work on this season, “It’s been a little different, and it’s definitely gone quick. Right now we’re shooting the final episode, and we’ve had production challenges. It’s a big episode with traffic, and doing it with a certain amount of time and a certain amount of money, getting everything in that we want to get in, and we’re trying to do it during the middle of carnival. And then the Superbowl’s coming to town this weekend. So we’re trying to navigate all that. But we come back next week for five more days, and then we’ll shoot a couple days at Mardi Gras the following week, and we’ll be done.” Treme will be sorely missed by musicians throughout the city, if not for the work, then for the philanthropy. Treme, in conjunction with HBO, has been responsible for hosting an annual fundraiser each year to benefit a local musicians’ charity. “The first year we did a big benefit for the Musicians’ (Health) Clinic... The second year we did a benefit for Roots of Music, Derrick ISSUE ONE

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(clockwise from foreground) Wendell Pierce, David Simon, Eric Overmyer, and Glen David Andrews take a break between shots.

Tabb’s program to provide musical instruction for middle school kids in the brass band and marching band tradition. This year we did something for the Roots of Music and Tipitina’s Foundation. So each year we’ve done something in that vein—fundraising, trying to keep the musical tradition alive in New Orleans. It’s very gratifying, and it’s been fun for us. That’s something that David (Simon)

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and Nina (Kostroff-Noble) started in Baltimore when working on The Wire. HBO has been generous in being a partner on this… It just feels right to give back to those organizations, especially for our show, which is about that culture and tradition. And, as you know, since Wendell Pierce’s character on the show started teaching band in middle school, many of those kids are involved in the Roots of Music program outside of school and their work on the show. In New Orleans, everybody knows everybody, so in a way, everyone will benefit.” Reflects Overmyer, “I think we’ve done some good work here. We will be shooting on Mardi Gras day for our very last final day, which just seems kind of fitting. This will be (Treme’s) fourth carnival, and I think we’ve done a little bit of filming on every Mardi Gras day. Mardi Gras has been part of our storyline every season, and since this is just a half season, it will be our final episode. I’m really looking forward to Mardi Gras. This may be my last carnival for a while.” Treme and HBO have done good work in New Orleans. In addition to their charitable work, they’ve pumped money into the local economy with companies that provide production support, as well as jobs for crew and day players. “We’re a relatively inexpensive show for HBO, partly because of the kind of show we are. We don’t do big sets or special effects. The tax credit is a big offset,” says Overmyer.

“There’s a ton of stuff going on down here, and I hope it continues. (HBO’s new series) True Detective is down here. They’re not shooting in New Orleans, but in the fringes since it’s not set here. But they will be shooting until May.” As the interview comes to a close, Eric Overmyer has some final thoughts on New Orleans, Treme, and his future. “(Treme) has been a special thing, and it’s going to be hard to adjust to something else,” says Overmyer. “I’m working on a couple of projects that are still in the pilot script stage. I’d love to do another show in New Orleans. That would be a dream. If it happens, that would be unbelievable. If it doesn’t, I’m so very grateful to have done this… We’ve done 36 shows for a small, devoted following. I know it will be around on DVD and On Demand for a while and maybe more people will find it.” He adds, “It’s been fantastic working with people who are from New Orleans and just listening to them talk. There’s a real warmth. I’m going to miss that the most—the friends I’ve made and the people I’ve worked with. The day players and the crew have been remarkable. This feels like home to me. It’s been great being here these last four years. My association with New Orleans began a long time ago, and I don’t plan to give it up. I’m sure I’ll eventually come back here...” LFV


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FOOD, FASHION, FUN AND FILM! LOUISIANA FILM LEADERS REPRESENT THE STATE AT SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2013

Louisiana’s Mardi Gras parade at Sundance 2013. PHOTO BY MILES MORTENSEN

M

ardi Gras was in the air at Sundance this year, as film representatives from all across the state partied—and promoted Louisiana—in Park City. We asked a few of these local industry leaders to recap the event. Read on for their insights: Liza Kelso, Baton Rouge Film Commission I have just returned from a great American experience... Sundance Film Festival 2013. I wish I could tell you that I went there to see the films that the industry is buzzing about— The East, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (shot in Shreveport), or Nicole Kidman in Stoker. I would have loved to see any of these, however 12

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this trip held an entirely different mission. My purpose of this trip was to show the people of Sundance, filmmakers and producers alike, just how great it is to film in the city of Baton Rouge. I was given a great opportunity to do exactly this at the launch of the Louisiana International Film Festival (LIFF). Working alongside LIFF’s founder and creator, Chesley Heymsfield, I helped put on

one of the best parties Park City has ever seen. Other major players involved were actor and producer Shanna Forrestall, Jeff Dowd (a.k.a. ‘The Dude’), Dan Ireland, director and founder of the Seattle International Film Festival, Neil Wells of Vudeaux Entertainment, and my new best friend and indie filmmaker, Clinton H. Wallace. From the moment I arrived, we were planning our strategy for the next day’s events—a live and permitted (very important) Mardi Gras parade down Main Street, and then a party held at Cisero’s from 4 to 7pm. So how do you really gain the attention of the industry elite at Sundance and get them to your party? You bring in world-renowned


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Chesley Heymsfield, LIFF executive director, and Valentina Caniglia, award-winning cinematographer.

Dana Williams, the mayor of Park City, with LIFF’s parade queen Shanna Forrestall. Shanna’s dress by Nola designer John Joseph Delgadillo, jewelry by Shane Scallen of Sellfish Design.

PHOTO BY MILES MORTENSEN

PHOTO BY CLINTON H. WALLACE

“We defrosted Main Street with Louisiana hot saucy-ness.” — Conquistador Alexander Antebi, LIFF Parade King musicians like Jon Batiste and Stay Human to lead your parade, and then you feed them delectable Louisiana cuisine from our very own chef from IPO, Chris Wadsworth, and local food blogger Jay Ducote. To the tune of “You are My Sunshine,” the second line eventually made it to the front door of Cisero’s, with Park City mayor Dana Liza Kelso of the Baton Rouge Film Commission and Neil Wells of Vudeaux Entertainment.

Jonathan Batiste and Stay Human leading the LIFF Mardi Gras Parade at Sundance 2013. PHOTO BY MILES MORTENSEN

PHOTO BY CJ LONGHAMMER

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Williams leading the way. What happened next was a blur... standing room only... entry allowed if you were “on the list”... tons of people lined up outside in the cold waiting to come party. Insanity! Meanwhile, inside, I was able to meet numerous producers who had filmed in Louisiana, including Baton Rouge. Even more

importantly, I spoke with several executives who expressed interest in coming to our city with future productions. Armed with our beautiful office ‘brag book,’ Film Baton Rouge, I was able to market our film-friendly city, with its very own purpose-built soundstages, as the fully capable and experienced ‘sister’ to New Orleans. I am looking forward to following up with many of these individuals soon. Today, as I left Park City, I grabbed the local paper. Imagine my excitement when I saw a front page picture of our very own Mardi Gras parade lined up outside of our party. Representing the Baton Rouge Film Commission at Sundance was truly an honor and I can’t wait to do it again next year. Mission accomplished.

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The King and Queen of the LIFF Mardi Gras Parade at Sundance 2013 were Conquistador Alexander Antebi, musician, and Shanna Forrestall, actor/producer. PHOTO BY CJ LONGHAMMER

Dan Ireland, award-winning director and co-artistic director of LIFF Being the newly appointed co-artistic director of the Louisiana International Film Festival and Mentorship Progam, and having the experience of co-founding and co-directing the Seattle International Film Festival a few

weeks, you can literally walk down any street and see famous actors, directors, producers, agents and managers that you usually only read about, and see films that you might otherwise never see. These are films that the programmers feel will undoubtedly make a lasting impression and linger in your mind

Easy, The Chase, Interview With a Vampire, The Cincinnati Kid, Easy Rider, Pretty Baby, Forrest Gump, A Streetcar Named Desire, and The Long, Hot Summer, and such new potential classics as The Road, Looper, Django Unchained and Beasts of the Southern Wild— we have a lot to live up to when programming

“As a Louisiana native, I was thrilled to be invited to represent Louisiana at Sundance. I was honored to be the Queen of the LIFF Mardi Gras Sundance parade, and to be at the epicenter of this great event celebrating film with a fusion of music, fashion, creative energy and Louisiana culture.” — Shanna Forrestall, Actor/Producer, LIFF Parade Queen simple decades ago, one knows that if you’re looking for films for any reason—distribution, exhibition, etc.—and if you have a lick of sense, you head to the Sundance Film Festival in January. This is where, for the better part of two 16

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until the next festival (including last year’s premiere of Louisiana’s own Beasts of the Southern Wild). Let’s face it, as Louisiana has been the birthplace of so many amazing films over the past 100 years—including such classics as Red River, Wild River, Sounder, The Big

LIFF this year. So why not get inspired by the best festival in the country? Sundance is the place to be if you’re in the business and you want to be up to date on what’s happening in the world of cinema. For filmmakers, to have your film selected by the


St. John Center Soundstage

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Visit ямБlm-louisiana.com or give us a call at 866.204.7782 for more information to start your production rolling today! ISSUE ONE

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Sundance programming committee immediately puts a stamp of approval on your work and tells the world at large that your film is worthy of attention. This year’s Sundance line-up is no exception, and includes films from all over the world—from documentaries to animation to feature narratives—and, more excitingly, a few Louisiana-shot films like The East, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints and Hell Baby. At press time, the acquisition of Sundance films was already at a new record high, including a $9.75-million acquisition for The Way, Way Back, a new American comedy starring Steve Carell; a $6.5-million sale for Don Jon’s Addiction, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Scarlett Johanssen; and a $4-million sale for Lovelace, based on porn star Linda Lovelace’s life, starring Les Miserable’s Amanda Seyfried. Okay, that’s just the cream on top of the dessert. The real beauty of any film festival is that it gives you, the audience, the chance to discover new films you never knew existed, and more importantly, an insight into the film and its creators you might otherwise never have. In other words, you get to communicate with filmmakers about their process, their choices, and more importantly, their passion. And, if the films that I saw during my stay at Sundance Film Festival were any indication, 2013 is going to be an awesome year for both filmmakers and filmgoers alike. A word about LIFF: As this is the inaugu-

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Partygoers get into the Mardi Gras spirit. PHOTOS BY MILES MORTENSEN

ral year of our festival, we want to make a lasting impression that will define who we are in the world of film, and what we stand for in the industry with developing and nurturing talent. One thing we can already promise is that our selection of films and filmmakers this year will be as diversified and vibrant as any film festival in America. We are crafting a year-round celebration for filmmakers and movie-lovers alike, devoted to finding the most interesting and unusual programs of exceptional, distinctive and orig-

inal films from around the world, and at the same time discovering how the filmmakers realized their dreams in a world where it’s getting increasingly difficult to be an original voice. Our ultimate goal is to create a community and a sense of discovery, while enhancing the movie-going experience. So come help us celebrate Louisiana and the world of film at large. We can already promise you the most vibrant festival possible, with the devotion and support of the great state and citizens of Louisiana. LFV


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CAJUN, CREOLE AND CREATIVE FREEDOM Lafayette's diverse locations include (clockwise from top) River Ranch, the swamp at University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and Oak Alley.

STORY BY BOBBY HOLBROOK GUEST COLUMNIST

T

here is a place, one of few in the U.S., with its own true, unique culture, scenery and people. A culture that greets you at the door and makes you the best meal you have ever had. Where kindness, support and hard work are not qualities that are hoped for, but traits that are expected. This one-of-a-kind place is Lafayette, Louisiana.

If you’ve not yet considered Lafayette as a location for your next feature film or commercial shoot, you’re truly missing out on what might be the best kept industry secret in Louisiana. Natural scenery, diverse terrain, architecture, one-of-a-kind locations, and ease of pre- and post-production make Lafayette a producer’s dream. Lafayette is not just a place you visit; it’s a place you never forget. With more talent, more crew and more equipment than you’d ever imagine, Lafayette has played host to several major productions, 20

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including Secretariat, The Apostle, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Magician King, Last Getaway, Jonah Hex, and the classic film Easy Rider, just to name a few. Television productions include major national brand TV spots, several made-for-TV movies, music videos and reality shows. The reason why many majors have found their way down to Cajun Creole country? Diversity. The Lafayette area has everything from sultry Southern mansions to gator-filled swamps, modern landscapes, and urban architecture. Lafayette’s downtown has played parts in many features, doubling for Miami and Washington, D.C., and the town’s farmhouses and fields have stood in for Iowa and Kentucky. Plus, two historic theme parks, Vermilionville and Acadian Village, will cut time and budget in half if 1800s-1930s is what you are looking for. In addition, Lafayette is one of the leading cities in the country in technology with Louisiana Immersive Technologies Enterprise (LITE), a $27-million, 70,000-square-foot complex. LITE is one of the most comprehensive and tightly integrated visualization and high performance computing installations in the world, and Lafayette is becoming one of the most wired communities in the world with city-wide fiber optic connectivity. So sending dailies out around the world is faster

Misty Tally and Natalie Kingston film Ten to Sing, one of several recent Lafayette-based productions. PHOTO BY MATT BELL

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Lafayette is one of the leading cities in the country in technology, thanks in large part to LITE.

than anywhere in the state. The area is complete with several local production companies, including Holbrook Multi-Media Production, one of the largest complete production facilities in the South. On location, Holbrook supports your vision with grip and lighting trucks, Steadicam, and multiple Jimmy Jibs, including a 30-foot Extreme, plus your choice of most every major cinema camera made with partner Division Camera. Under one roof, they serve up 4K edit suites, 4K color grading suites, a major in-house recording studio, ADR services, multiple

DAWs, and more. While there are many places used for soundstages in Lafayette right now, Producer’s Playground, A Holbrook Company, is set to open in 2014 and will offer everything you need for your next project under one roof. Anything you need, Lafayette will have it for you and your project. Lafayette Regional Airport will get your crew and cast in and out fast, and the choice of housing and hotels is limitless. Any and all production amenities are available for you. Restaurants, food trucks and on-site catering are not just plentiful, but will be the best food


DP Bobby Holbrook on the set of one of his many projects.

you have ever had on set. I’m sure of that. Why? Because there’s not many places people will argue for hours over whose momma

Still from recent Lafayette-shot series Vamped.

cooks better, ‘nuff said. This area’s formal accolades include being named one of the best places to open a business, one of the best to raise a family, top ten in creative class, and the best place to eat in the country. But Lafayette is more than a great place to start a business or raise a family—it’s also a great place to produce your next project. On top of the 35-percent state tax credit, Lafayette adds an additional local 2 percent city sales tax rebate, as well as unlimited support from local government, Lafayette Economic Development Authority (LEDA), and Lafayette Entertainment Initiative (LEI). “Lafayette is a great production hub for any size film, but particularly perfect for the micro24

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budget!” says Julie Bordelon, director of LEI. “Located in south-central Louisiana, Lafayette has production facilities and film-friendly, diverse locations, a database with crew, talent and support services, and significantly lower living expenses and cost of doing business. We also offer production office space for qualifying productions, as well as free permitting and locations assistance from LEI. Production interns and continuing education in degree programs related to film and entertainment are available through the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, South Louisiana Community College, and the Academy of Interactive Entertainment. “We as a city can really devote the one-onone time and energy to assist your project so that it’s the best it can be!” Lafayette’s film scene is strong and growing, with film festivals like Southern Screen Film Festival and Cinema on the Bayou, production meet-up groups, and continuing education

with co-ops like Tipitina’s Foundation and AOC Community Media. And local talent exceeds that of many places in the country, with extremely talented filmmakers like twotime Sundance attendee Zack Godshall, Mark LeBlanc, who mixed sound on the Oscarnominated Beasts of the Southern Wild, and fantastic DPs such as Natalie Kingston, Allison Bohl and Brian Richard, to name a few. Local filmmakers are professional and experienced, which makes shooting in Lafayette easy and efficient. And while they all shoot several projects each year, Natalie Kingston and Misty Tally wrapped a short, Ten to Sing, in January. In addition, writer Donny Broussard, director Matt Bell, and I just wrapped a series, Vamped. Good things are always happening here on the local scene. If music for film is what you are looking for, look no further! Local musicians have seen their share of the big screen. For example, singer/songwriter Brother Dege’s song, “Too

Still from recent Lafayette-shot series Vamped.

Still from recent Lafayette-shot series Vamped.


Old to Die Young,” was featured in Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, Dirk Powell scored Cold Mountain, indie pop group Givers’ music has been featured in several commercials, films and TV shows, and native composer Andrew Morgan Smith has written and composed several features and commercials. Lafayette is a great resource for music, and through the music licensing company, Catahoula Music Exchange, anything you need is possible. If you want your project to thrive with emotion and freedom and breathe the realness

Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, located at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

The SyFy Channel movie Weather Wars filmed in Lafayette in 2011.

and passion that you have for it, do it in a place that only adds to that. A place that adds experience and integrity to your set in a professional manner. It’s difficult to explain, but it’s something you feel, something that flows through you, and it gives your project that

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extra emotion that it deserves. It’s seen and felt both on- and off-screen. Our food, music, culture, festivals, work ethic, people and way of life are like nothing in the world! And with the support from locals, LEDA, LEI, and our local talent and crew base, it is truly a producer’s dream. So while your mind wonders of where your next project could be, give your passion a chance at where it should be—Lafayette. LFV Bobby Holbrook, a second generation director, producer and cinematographer, is production manager and part owner of

Holbrook Multi-Media, a 35-year-old major production house in Lafayette. Working on set since he was 7 has allowed him to be involved in most every aspect of the business as producer, grip, gaffer, shooter, DP, director, editor and colorist on countless documentaries, indie and feature films, long form presentations and hundreds of regional and national TV commercials. Bobby spends most of his days editing, color grading, and shooting and operating his Steadicam & 35-ft. Jimmy Jib, but recently, his focus has included reviewing all types of cinema cameras, from DSLRs to the highest end 4K and now 8K units. Currently, Bobby is not only advancing his own skills, but he is working on the advancement of the infrastructure and technology of Holbrook Multi-Media.


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TIPS WHEN BUYING TAX CREDITS STORY BY MEG ALSFELD KAUL GUEST COLUMNIST

with removing them.

B

uying Louisiana tax credits is a relatively easy way to reduce your state income tax liability. The following is a sampling of issues you and your legal or tax professional should discuss when making the decision to purchase tax credits.

The credits must be earned in compliance with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. In certain cases, this may mean the credits are “certified” by a State department, and in some cases your professional may have to review applicable documentation to determine if the credits have been earned by the seller.

viduals selling fake credits or credits they did not own. Therefore, make sure you use a reputable broker and get the advice of an attorney in order to help protect your investment. Ensure you get “clean” title. Tax credits are described as “general intangibles” subject to the Louisiana UCC rules and can be pledged by the person earning the credits as collateral

There have been instances of fraud by individuals selling fake credits or credits they did not own. Therefore, make sure you use a reputable broker and get the advice of an attorney in order to help protect your investment. Reputation matters. Use only reputable brokers or sellers when purchasing credits. There have been instances of fraud by indi-

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for their indebtedness. A professional can perform a UCC check to determine if the tax credits are subject to such liens and can assist

Put it in writing. Put the details of your agreement with the seller in writing. The seller should warrant that it has neither claimed on its own behalf nor conveyed to any other transferee the tax credits transferred to you. Notify the State. Most statutes require state notification of the credit transfer within 30 days of the transaction, but review the statute and rules governing the particular type of credit being purchased to ensure your compliance with the law. Copies of the transfer document and state tax credit certification letter, if applicable, are typically sent in as well. Some credits, like the motion picture tax credits, also require a processing fee for each transfer. Consider transferability limits. Some tax credits have a limit on the number of times they can be transferred. For example, while motion picture credits are not limited, live performance credits may only be transferred once to one transferee. Always check the law and verify with the seller to ensure that you are within any transfer limits. LFV Meg is an attorney in New Orleans at the law firm of Adams and Reese LLP, with experience in media and entertainment law and tax credit transactions. This article is intended for general information purposes only and is based on the laws and regulations in effect at the time of creation, which are subject to change. Application of the information reported herein to particular facts or circumstances should be analyzed by legal counsel.


I.A.T.S.E. LOCAL 4 78

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432 N. ANTHONY STREET SUITE 305 • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70119 OFFICE (504) 486-2192 • FAX (504) 483-9961 • iatse478.org

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INSIDE NOMPS: AN INTERVIEW WITH TOM CONRAD

A peek inside New Orleans Motion Picture Studios. Tom Conrad

“W

e are not like the other studios. We are more like a Hollywood studio. We are a full-service creative entity rather than just a building to rent space from,” says Tom Conrad, president of New Orleans Motion Picture Studios (NOMPS).

In early January, Conrad and associates opened what promises to be one of the biggest and most efficient production studios in the South. Taking over the old Mardi Gras World space and its surrounding areas, the studio now spans over 80,000 square feet of post-free space. “New Orleans is now film-friendly, granted mostly because of the tax credits. But crews are cheaper than in Hollywood or New York. Over and above the cost of crews, you get the tax credits,” says Conrad. “Basically, people 30

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want to shoot their films here. There are currently more films being shot locally right now than in Hollywood and New York.” Conrad is no stranger to New Orleans. Of his 40-plus years of experience in the film industry, he spent 10 years as a casting director in the NOLA area. Because of his firsthand insight into the exponential growth of the city’s infrastructure, Conrad worked for five years to land the lease on this historic building on the West Bank.

“We are 10 minutes from sitting at the Hotel Monteleone in the French Quarter,” says Conrad. Aside from finding a great location in a city with a rapidly growing film industry, Conrad expresses the necessity of having NOMPS in New Orleans. “Our studio is needed down here,” he explains. “We do tax credits, 3D editing, and audio recording. We specialize in music for film. We will have a full 360-degree green screen room, which will help substantially to


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NEW ORLEANS MOTION PICTURE STUDIOS’ OPEN HOUSE PARTY

All photos: To celebrate the grand opening of NOMPS, the studio hosted a major open house party.

cut production costs. We can even help fund your project through our deferral program and through discounts on equipment or services. We will also be opening offices downtown with fiber optic speed in order to bring in CGI and gaming companies.” “What makes us unique is we are fully integrated. Every aspect of filming can be accomplished through us.” NOMPS is currently the only studio in the country with access to MIO-3D. This is a newly invented and patented technology that allows 3D shooting at the speed of 2D, while offering more options and better quality. “There are no moving parts. You don’t have to change lenses for different shots, so there are no alignment issues that waste time and money. You can just grab it and shoot like you would a 2D camera,” says Conrad. “And this is just one of the several new inventions we are working on. We love new technology around here.” Part of MIO-3D is the use of three or more cameras for 3D shooting. Oftentimes, 3D is shot specifically for the theater, rather than for a home television or cell phone screen. Using three cameras allows for adaptability to various screen sizes. “If you shoot for the big screen, it won’t look right on your iPhone, for example. With this, you can go to Netflix and choose the strength of your 3D, depending on the screen you will

be watching it on,” says Conrad. NOMPS is currently hosting a number of projects and expects as many as six major motion pictures to be shooting at the studio in the spring. As of now, projects are averaging in the $15-million range, which is nothing to sneeze at, but can be considered “low-budget.” “We are targeting lower budgets until we have the size to handle $100-million movies,” says Conrad. “It won’t be long, though.” As impressive as the studio is, Conrad has plans for major upgrades in the near future. “I prefer from-the-ground-up-built, real soundstages. Currently, these are retrofitted,” says Conrad. “Our Stage 2 plan is to move into other buildings in the area, but there’s also a lot of property available to us. Very shortly we will be building from the ground up. That’s Stage 3.” NOMPS intends to grow until they reach their goal of over one million square feet and have the ability to accommodate multiple bigbudget films at the same time. With no investors, Conrad is able to enjoy pure creative freedom in his studio. Although housing productions is a major function of the studio, he is excited about shooting and recording his own projects. “Being a musician, I’ve always had my own recording studio,” says Conrad. “It’s all about having the tools you need to pursue your

On Thursday, January 10, hundreds gathered for a memorable grand opening of one of the largest and most functional film studios in the state. “It was probably one of the best parties ever. At least that’s what people were saying,” says studio president Tom Conrad. “Everywhere you looked there was something different.” Owners Blaine Kern, Jr. and Conrad threw a party that rivals the best of Mardi Gras balls. Complete with live performances, a DJ, flashing lights, carnival floats and festive costumes, the event was bursting with the vibrancy of New Orleans. Conrad’s wife, a Chinese film star, performed the ancient art of Face Changing and Opera Sleeve dancing. Food and spirits were plentiful, energy was high, and guests left the party with a sense of awe at the grandiosity of the event. What was once a Mardi Gras landmark in New Orleans has now been transformed into a top-of-the-line film and event studio. This opening night bash is sure to mark the beginning of a new landmark in the Louisiana film industry.

creative endeavors. And it’s the same way with having your own film studio. Whenever I’m feeling creative, I have my own full production studio to work out of now.” According to Conrad, every production that has come to see the studio has left with a more than enthusiastic attitude toward their potential home at NOMPS. LFV For more information on New Orleans Motion Picture Studios, please visit www.NOMPS.com. 32

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2013 INTERNATIONAL CES: THE CRYSTAL BALL FOR TECH SAVVY CONTENT CREATORS

Attendees flock to see the latest in smart watch technology on the CES show floor.

STORY BY W. H. BOURNE AND ODIN LINDBLOM

T

he 2013 International CES (Consumer Electronics Show) was massive, with over 20,000 new products introduced on the Las Vegas Convention Center floor and at events held at hotels throughout the city. This year’s CES ran January 8–12 and had more than 150,000 industry professionals gathered to witness the next generation of consumer technology. For media content creators, CES has become a barometer for potential markets, as well as a source for standards and tools for content creation. The biggest trend for consumers this year at CES was 4K televisions, otherwise known as Ultra HD. Toshiba, Panasonic, Sony, Vizio, LG, and Hisense were all announcing 4K televisions, ranging in size from 50 to over 100 inches. Many of the TVs will come 3D-ready, where the consumer will only have to purchase glasses. “The XT880 series of televisions (Ultra HD/4K) is truly at the cutting-edge of television technology,” said Peter Erdman, Vice President of Consumer Electronics, Hisense USA. Hisense, China’s largest LCD manufacturer, had previously been doing OEM manufacturing for major labels, but decided 34

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to start releasing under their own brand last year. “Hisense has shown that it is not only capable, but ready to jump into the UHD market with televisions that offer every feature a consumer could ask for today, but at a price that won’t cause sticker shock.” Hisense plans to release 4K TVs this spring with prices starting under $10,000. While most consumers probably won’t see 4K television sets in their home anytime soon, the proliferation of 4K sets by manufacturers has serious implications for filmmakers. In the same way that digital films shot on SD now have a very hard time finding buyers, films shot in HD or even 2K may soon experience similar issues. Filmmakers should expect to see an increasing market demand over the next three years for films shot on 4K, as well as 3D films shot on 4K. Sony has already started distributing films in 4K with their 4K TV that started shipping out late last year.

Fortunately for low-budget filmmakers, JVC’s GYHMQ10 4K camera, released last April, was in their booth at CES as a reminder of an affordable solution since it’s priced at only $4,995. You can expect to see more sub$10,000 4K cameras unveiled at this year’s NAB Show. With the challenges of 3D production in mind, JVC unveiled their IF-2D3D1 Stereoscopic Image Processor, which works as a 2Dto-3D converter and as a 3D L/R mixer for video content producers. Compatible with a wide range of HD formats, the IF-2D3D1 is designed to help 3D content producers improve their workflow, whether they are converting archived 2D material or shooting

North American VP of Hisense presents sales figures and their latest technology advancements.


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original content in 3D. “With the public’s renewed interest in 3D for both theatrically released content and beyond, many content producers are looking to repurpose existing 2D materials to meet demand. Meanwhile, other producers creating new content need an uncomplicated way to check their 3D footage on location,” explained Dave Walton, Assistant VP of Marketing and Communication at JVC. “This single unit is ideal for both. The IF-2D3D1 is the key to providing new solutions for virtually any 3D content creation scenario.” Thomas Engdahl, CEO of Magic Ruby, gave his crystal ball explanation of consumer behavior and what pushes them to upgrade to the latest technology: “What drove the HD (television push) was sports. When the NFL started broadcasting the games in HD, sales skyrocketed. When the NFL starts broadcasting games in 3D, 3D will be in every home.” That very night, ESPN carried the BCS Championship game in 3D. Engdahl believes the same could be said for 2nd screen content, which the 2nd Screen Society defines as: “A companion experience in which a consumer engages in relevant content on a second device, such as a smart phone, tablet or laptop while watching something on the ‘first screen’ (typically a television but not limited to the living room).” “At USA, we can get a great call to action

Networking in between sessions at the 2nd Screen Summit

Movies on Blu-ray typically automatically sync 2nd screen content to an external device, whereas live broadcasting will use an audio cue.

to say ‘step away from whatever you’re distracted with and come back to the show,’” said Jesse Redniss, SVP Digital at USA Network. “We utilize these devices to enhance our storytelling.” Proponents of 2nd screen believe that television should be social and interactive. This type of content is not designed to distract or replay, rather it should enrich and enhance. Others contend it should do more than that, advocating for an interactive, social experience. “We pushed our fan base and content to Facebook and Twitter,” said Redniss. “Now we’re trying to migrate them back to the network.” In addition to the 2nd Screen Summit, CES hosted Entertainment Matters, a conference session for Hollywood’s film, television and digital communities. Heroes creator Tim Kring led a session on cross-platform storytelling. Josh Feldman, producer and co-writer for Tom Hanks’ Electric City and executive producer of Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn, shared his perspectives on what happens when technology and content goes terribly right. For most digital content creators, CES is like

Visitors were able to test out Red Touch firsthand, downloading music, books, and movies at CES. 36

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Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory, a candy store of tools to create, display, stream and store your digital content, but monetizing that content has always been tricky. Red Touch was at CES this year offering a solution. “The Red Touch Media brand launch signals the next chapter in our evolution as a company,” said Wayne Scholes, Executive Chairman and CEO for Red Touch Media. “We have a longstanding track record in the industry for helping content owners protect and distribute their content internationally. With our latest distribution options and sophisticated audience targeting technologies, we’re looking to expand upon this reputation and help brands and content owners connect and strengthen consumer relationships around content in new and exciting ways.” NBC Universal, Warner Music Group, Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures, Magnolia, and EMI are early adopters, using Red Touch Media today. The company has established itself as a pioneer in digital content management, being the first to deliver movies to a mobile device. Their new retail kiosks are similar to those used for DVD/BD rental, but instead of renting a disc, the consumer can buy a digital copy to load onto a portable drive or mobile device on-site, or download the file from Red Touch’s Web site. Depending on the film studio’s licensing arrangements with Red Touch, downloaded files can be copied anywhere from one to five devices. All the media files are DRM copy protected. Red Touch plans to begin rolling out the kiosks later this year. You can get more information at www.redtouchmediastore.com. Filmmakers should contact Dave Hubbard at 801-4476860 or daveh@redtouchmedia.com to find out more about distribution at Red Touch. Perhaps Marc Benioff, Chairman and CEO of salesforce.com, summed CES up best: “The mobile revolution has taken over everything. When you walk the show floor like I did yesterday, you see in real-time that everything is connected.” LFV


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TECH TIPS with Bobby Holbrook RAW, LOG, LUTS & GUMBO

H

ungry for clarification? In this edition of Tech Tips is a basic explanation of RAW, LOG and LUTs, Louisiana-style, and how it parallels with gumbo.

When making a gumbo, you start off with raw ingredients, you cook up the foundation of the gumbo (roux), and then you decide what flavor of gumbo it’s going to be (i.e. chicken and sausage, seafood, shrimp and okra, etc.). RAW, LOG and LUTs are the same. You start off with raw sensor data, then you apply a foundation to that information to give you an image (LOG encoding), and then you apply flavor to the image (LUTs). It’s that simple... Mais ca c’est bon!

LOG ENCODING: You can’t have an image from RAW info without LOG encoding, just like you can’t have a gumbo without a roux. The roux is the base of the gumbo, as is the LOG encoding of the RAW image. There are many different types/flavors of LOG encoding (Cineon Log, Sony S-Log/SLog2, Arri Log-C, Canon Log and RED Log),

RAW is just that—information straight off the sensor before any image processing takes place. Below, the image on the left is what a RAW image looks like. It’s just information; it’s not what we know as an image. Just like the raw ingredients you need to start a gumbo, it’s

just as there are many types of roux (dark, medium, blonde, dry). They all start the same and end up different. So now we have an image we can view, but it’s still flat. Why? Because LOG encoding simply compresses the highlights and expands the shadows to make the most efficient use of bandwidth and it also mimics how the human eye works. In addition, it leaves huge possibilities for color grading. Now it’s time to kick it up and decide what flavor of gumbo we want... Here come the LUTs.

The different types/flavors of LOG encoding. CINEON LOG

ARRI LOG-C

LUTs take the flat and unsaturated LOG RAW

LOG

REC709 VIDEO

A look at an image in the RAW, LOG, and LUT stages.

not a gumbo yet—it’s just the beginning. Now let’s add a little LOG encoding to the pot...

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image and add gamma space, contrast, saturation, hue, lift, gamma and gain values, and more. Originally, LUTs were technical translations that converted Rec709 to P3, Cineprint, D65 and others. ‘Looks’ were files created by the cinematographer and would be applied regardless of where the final image was going.

CANON LOG

SONY S-LOG

Now people use the words interchangeably and will apply a LUT that has both a gamma space (Rec709, P3, etc.) and a ‘Look.’ Now that LUTs are more than just translations, you have an unlimited type of LUTs, hence the unlimited combinations of gumbo (chicken and sausage, seafood, shrimp and okra, crab and crawfish, turkey and Andouille, sausage and shrimp, and on and on). This mouth-watering explanation gives you a basic understanding of RAW, LOG and LUTs. While I could go into detail about sensor capture information, demosaic process, LOG encoding origins, and creating LUTs vs. Looks/Grades, we will review that in a future article. Until then, anytime you hear “LUTs,” you’ll get hungry. Now, who’s cooking the rice? LFV If you have any tech tips, ideas or suggestions, send them to me, Bobby@HolbrookMultiMedia.com, with the subject heading “Tech Tips.”


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INSIDE THE NOVAC

Cinema for a New Age: Going HD Panel Discussion Making the Cut: Intro to Editing Class with instructor Christopher C. Brown.

(left to right) NOVAC’s Ashley Charbonnet (director of programs), Darcy McKinnon (executive director) and Abigail Levner (membership and programs coordinator).

T

he New Orleans Video Access Center is a non-profit organization with a mission to help cultivate a sustainable local film community. Forty years in operation, NOVAC is the longest continuously running media-arts 501(c)(3) nonprofit in the Southeastern U.S., and is an extraordinary asset to the New Orleans production community. Read on for more: NOVAC. What does NOVAC do? NOVAC serves the film community immeasurably through educational programs, career development, community outreach, independent production, special events and a wide range of resources. The organization provides workforce training at no cost for crucial subjects like cinematography, screenwriting, grip and electric, and various technical training. In addition to workforce training, NOVAC holds intensive workshops called ‘pop-ups’ at an affordable rate for those looking to further expand their knowledge and creative repertoire. Aside from an active effort to promote education in the community, NOVAC is highly involved in the production of local independent film. In providing access to fiscal sponsorship, low-cost equipment, editing software and rental space, NOVAC has become an indispensable resource for independent filmmakers in the New Orleans area.

sufficient) were the force behind NOVAC’s initial success, and created a media center with borrowed equipment and space and produced an extraordinary body of work that had tremendous community impact. On July 19,

and social action tool for a disenfranchised community. By forming a broad based, racially balanced coalition with the Free Southern Theater, the Urban League and Tulane University, NOVAC’s efforts led to the formation of a mayoral task force to create a plan for involving the community in cable television. “The nature of our archives says a lot about what we came from,” says director of programs, Ashley Charbonnet. “Forty years ago we were somewhat of a grass-roots organization. It was a period when filmmakers were telling their own stories about the community. There were a lot of activist documentaries and Members of NOVAC’s PA Training program.

How did it start? VISTA Volunteers (Volunteers in Service to America, a government agency designed to help low income communities become self40

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1972, the New Orleans Video Access Center was established with the purpose of making the medium of television an effective educational

musicians telling their stories. Over time it developed into a more filmmaker-focused organization, and after the storm [Katrina],


we shifted gears towards workforce training.” NOVAC has continued its efforts to involve racially and economically diverse communities in television production and community programming. In January 2005, NOVAC and the Tipitina’s Foundation of New Orleans Music Office partnered to offer video editing, music recording, mixing, and other training services for video producers, filmmakers and musicians.

In January 2006, NOVAC received a Community Block Development Grant to fund its workforce initiative, the Louisiana Film Crew Training Program. Since 2006, NOVAC has trained and certified over 200 local individuals so that they may obtain entry-level jobs in New Orleans’ booming creative and film industries in key areas such as grip and electric, scenic painting, set design and construction,

NOVAC INTERVIEWS DIEGO MARTINEZ On Tuesday, January 15, the New Orleans Video Access Center (NOVAC) held an intimate conversation with the president of Millennium Studios, Diego Martinez. Local filmmakers and film enthusiasts gathered at the Contemporary Arts Center for an in-depth look into the locally involved and independent film studio. Attendees took away invaluable information on film marketing, distribution and working in a changing climate, among other topics. “Distribution is not always theatrical,” said Martinez. “People think that if it is not theatrical, then it isn’t successful. This just isn’t true.” Adaptability, no matter where you are, was a common theme of the discussion. Said interviewer and NOVAC’s director of programs, Ashley Charbonnet, “The key is being able to adapt to a changing market. Funding models change. Being able to adapt on a local level, regardless of tax incentives, is essential.” Added the Louisiana-grown Martinez, “I want to make sure the industry is here [in Louisiana] in the future for me and for everyone.” To close the discussion, Martinez was asked his pick for the Oscars, and with no hesitation he responded with Beasts of the Southern Wild. The night was capped off with a mouthwatering spread of Sucre chocolates and, of course, some fundamental networking.

NOVAC’s Ashley Charbonnet interviews Diego Martinez of Millennium Studios.

wardrobe, and production assistance.

How can I get involved? “Come to a Third Thursday and meet filmmakers and NOVAC members,” says Charbonnet. “It all starts with having the access to people and networking. Our tagline is ‘connecting filmmakers to the community since 1992’ and this is a great place to start.” As the name implies, ‘Third Thursday’ socials are held on the third Thursday of every month at various locations in the New Orleans area. LFV For more information about NOVAC and NOVAC events, please visit www.novacvideo.org.

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“WE COME TO YOU!” MOBILE REPAIR SERVICE OFFERS CONVENIENCE AND FLEXIBILITY TO PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

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ired of the inconvenience of bringing in your unit for maintenance or repair? Looking for a professional, experienced technician that will come to you and provide the service you are seeking at your location? Operating in the Baton Rouge area, Leo’s RV Service, LLC can come to you and provide maintenance and/or repair to your coach or trailer. Whether you are part of the film and entertainment industry, the healthcare industry, a privately or publicly held corporation, or a privately owned unit, Leo’s is your company. Leo’s RV Service is a duly licensed and insured corporation operating in the state of Louisiana. The company’s lead tech has almost 20 years’ experience and is a nationally certified RV Service Technician. Visit www.leosrvservice.com for details on the types of services they provide, along with rates, scheduling information, and more. Leo’s RV Service has developed a long customer base list, including commercial and individual accounts. Whether the unit is a

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multi-million-dollar 45-foot coach, a makeup/dressing unit, or a diagnostic unit operated by a hospital, Leo’s can assist you. The company also attends to celebrity coaches

when in the area for film or entertainment. Forget having to pick up stakes and bring your unit in to a land-based service shop—call Leo’s RV Service and they’ll come to you. LFV For more information, visit www.leosrvservice.com or call 225-772-4305.

Forget having to bring your unit in to a land-based service shop—call Leo’s RV Service and they’ll come to you.


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ANIMAL ACTORS AND THE PRODUCTION INDUSTRY STORY BY JEAN MANINO JCM’S ANIMAL TALENT

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rom the days of Lassie, animal actors have always been an integral part of filmmaking. Their endearing human-like qualities are nothing short of amazing, and continue to be popular among viewers.

Behind the scenes, the animal wrangler (handler/trainer) is a master of the art of animal communication. Wranglers have a sixth sense when choosing the right animals suited for the entertainment industry, and the particular role intended to be played. Be it dog, cat or horse, the trainer looks for an animal with focus and a willingness to unwaveringly

Behind the scenes, the animal wrangler is a master of the art of animal communication. repeat a learned behavior on cue. Animals provided by the wrangler have already mastered a considerable array of commands, actions and skills. Building on this founda-

tion, the wrangler is able to easily choreograph the necessary behaviors in accordance with the film director’s wishes. Unlike human actors, the animal actor cannot reason or understand directional conversation. Instead, the wrangler is given the required set of directions for the scene. He or she then translates this into a language the animal has been taught to JCM’s roster of talent includes”Glimpy,” who was a featured guest on Imagination Movers. understand. Many times the very Glimpy in the live stage production creative handler has to of “Annie” in June 2011. combine a series of complex individual actions, cleverly giving the appearance of one seamless performance. Ad-libbed or randomappearing behaviors have usually taken many hours, weeks or even months to perfect. The wranglers who lend their talent to live stage productions are at the top of their craft. There are no second chances in theater. However, with the continual repetition required for a stage performance, the animal learns the part, eventually not needing the assistance of the handler at all. JCM’s Animal Talent provides trained dogs, cats and horses for commercials, films, television and live stage. The animals provided are reliable and trained above and beyond what is expected. Our results are always guaranteed. As a professional obedience instructor since 1979, I have worked with thousands of dogs, and have been the official animal wrangler for Walt Disney and Touchstone Studios. Many of my students’ dogs have also appeared in TV commercials, newspaper advertisements and fashion shows. JCM’s trained animals have appeared in feature films such as, but not limited to, Primary Colors, Growing Pains and Infidelity. They have been in multiple live stage theatrical productions, a host of TV commercials, talk shows, and television shows such as Disney’s Imagination Movers. We have also won a televised national pet talent competition. LFV For more information, visit our Web site: www.jcmdogtraining.com. Click on “About the Trainer.”

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ANIMAL TALENT

The Only Motion Picture Automatic Wavemaking Tank of Its Kind in the World

Louisiana Wave Studio Located on approximately 18 acres of open land at the Sealy-Slack Industrial Park Just 6 miles from downtown Shreveport, Louisiana Phone: (323) 932-1685 email: inquiry@thelouisianawavestudio.com ISSUE ONE

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TIMECODE:NOLA PRESENTS INAUGURAL FILM FESTIVAL STORY BY JACQUELYN SHULMAN

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imecode:NOLA’s first annual film festival, FF ONE, was a huge success. The inaugural fest spanned four days across six venues last fall. The opening night bash was held at Siberia and featured the Southern premiere of burlesque documentary Satan’s Angel, from director Joshua Dragotta, playing to a packed house. The following night featured Timecode’s 2nd annual Super 8 One Reel Competition, where Phil and Rhonda Vigeant of Pro8mm presented prizes to the three best Super 8 films, including a brand new RhondaCam to local filmmaker Bruno Doria. All weekend long, Second Line Stages hosted filmmaker workshops covering everything from pre- to post-production, technical, creative, business, and financial aspects of the film industry. Metairie’s own Ken Mowe left his adopted city of Los Angeles to come home and partner with Avid to teach a master editing class using his own MTV award-winning music videos, including Gnarls Barkley’s “Crazy” and “Smiley Faces.” Other highlights were the indie director’s panel, with awardwinning directors Laurie Collyer and Bill Ross, and Pro8mm’s Super 8 workshop. Saturday night was the biggest event of FF A Q&A with Satan’s Angel director Joshua Dragotta (left).

FF ONE’s opening night bash was held at Siberia and featured the burlesque documentary Satan’s Angel.

ONE with the premiere of Where y’at? (hello), a feature film made up of 15 short films by 15 local directors, all taking place in different New Orleans neighborhoods. Over 300 people packed into One Eyed Jack’s to celebrate one of the largest collaborations of New Orleans filmmakers ever on a single project. It told the story of New Orleans through its varied and unique neighborhoods and characters, and brought a huge sense of pride to the local filmmaking community. The festival’s final day, Sunday, included the Docs in the Park series at NOMA, featuring The Farm, a legendary Louisiana doc on Angola State Prison, and 45365, from Tchoupitoulas director Bill Ross. Both screenings were followed by Q&A sessions, the former with exinmate Ashanti Witherspoon and the latter with Ross. The Sunday night closing screening and party ended with travel films by the Nomading Film Fest (NOFF) at the Lost Love Lounge.

Above: Over 300 people packed into One Eyed Jack’s for the premiere of Where y’at? (hello), a feature film made up of 15 short films by 15 local directors. Below: Ashanti Witherspoon (right) participates in a Q&A with Timecode:NOLA’s Jackie Shulman after a screening of The Farm.

The screening of Satan’s Angel also featured a live burlesque performance.

Co-founder Josh Wolff took his fest on the road from Brooklyn straight to NOLA to close out FF ONE with short films from around the world, all the while celebrating the local community. For more information about Timecode:NOLA or FF ONE, visit www.timecodenola.com. 46

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BRIEFS 2013 FEAR FÊTE HORROR FILM FESTIVAL CALLS FOR ENTRIES The third annual Fear Fête Horror Film Festival has opened its early entry period for horror film submissions. During the early submission period, the festival invites all filmmakers from around the world to submit their independent horror films for free until February 15, 2013. Fear Fête is Louisiana’s premier horror film festival, showcasing many of the world’s best independent horror films over the course of three nights in October. Baton Rouge, Louisiana, will host the 2013 festival once again, showcasing short and feature-length films in sub-genre categories of horror. “We are stoked to be kicking off another year of offering film submissions for the 2013 festival. We look forward to seeing all the great films submitted and hope to smash another record for number of submissions once again this year,” stated Derek Morris, Executive Director for Fear Fête. The festival will be held in October 2013. Dates and venue will be announced at a later date. Official entry rules and the entry form can be accessed at www.fearfete.com. The deadline for all submissions for the 2013 Fear Fête Horror Film Festival is June 28, 2013.

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APEX POST NOMINATED FOR MPSE GOLDEN REEL New Orleans-based Apex Post Production has been nominated for a prestigious Golden Reel for Best Sound Editing by the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE). The annual Hollywood awards gala, now in its 60th year, includes many Academy Award-nominated films. Apex Post earned the nomination for their work on the Louisiana-produced indie film El Gringo. Stated Apex Post owner Jon Vogl, “This nomination adds legitimacy to the high quality post production work being done in Louisiana. This nomination also shows that Hollywood South is now being recognized as an equal in the area of post production by the traditional Hollywood filmmaking community.”

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“This nomination adds legitimacy to the high quality post production work being done in Louisiana.” Apex Post Production, located in the Garden District of New Orleans, is a full-service post facility providing sound mixing, ADR and voiceover recording, graphics and titling, and other finishing services necessary for most film, television and advertising productions. Upcoming film projects include 12 Years a Slave, Olympus Has Fallen and Shreveport. For more information, visit www.apexpost.com or call 504-224-2360. ISSUE ONE

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Louisiana Film and Video  

Industry news and information.

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