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esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design


group projects

individual projects

table of contents

.01

about me

.02

Besseha

.03

Quirk

.04

theLab

.05

UCLA Student Union

.06

Hearts of Palm

.07

ISIS

.08

Versus

.09

Whole Foods

.10

sketches, models

moroccan restaurant STIR Design Competition, Fan Favorite, 2012 toy boutique a media arts company Kimball Office, Design Excellence, 2011 new student center senior living center new york university student center seattle art gallery studio competition, first place, 2012 office of the future


MND


.01 about me My name is Minh Tue, otherwise known as Tini (tee-nee). I am currently a 22 year old interior design student at Virginia Tech. I enjoy pushing boundaries, especially when it comes to space planning and creating forms that help define the interior. As a designer, I strive to combine function with aesthetics; adding purposeful elements to the space. I became interested in architecture and design back in high school. I remember sitting in my art history class watching slides ranging from Gothic to Postmodern architecture. Art has greatly shaped the way I view buildings. I used to think little of them as nothing more than shells for us to take solace in from the outside world. Now I see it as tangible art, a type of art that is completely and fully experienced. Instead of being tucked behind a velvet rope, or viewable only hung from a wall, we live in this art. Once I graduate, I hope to work at an architecture and design firm where I can earn a living doing what I love. In the future, I wish to further my education and earn a Master’s Degree and also become NCIDQ and LEED certified.


Minh Tue

Nguyen Duong

Cell: 804-909-7893 Email: tinid@vt.edu or minhtue.duong@gmail.com

Objective To obtain an entry level position as a designer in a commercial architecture and/ or design firm

Education Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University B.S. Interior Design Minor Industrial Design Expected Graduation: May 2013 GPA: 3.4

Related Experience Baskervill Architects, Richmond, VA

Intern, May 2012-August 2012 - Hospitality design intern - Worked on construction documents - Picked out finishes and materials NBJ Architecture, Richmond, VA Intern, June 2011-August 2011 - Created finish boards - Shadowing architects to on-site jobs - Renderings

Other Experience Richmond Metropolitan Habitat for Humanity, Richmond, VA

Intern, May 2012-August 2012 - Volunteered on build projects - Picked out furniture and finishes for habitat model homes Dave Duong Agency, Richmond, VA Office Assistant, June 2011-August 2011 - Worked at front desk with the receptionist - Scanned and filed papers into database


curriculum vitae

Awards One Week Art Gallery Group Project

Studio Competition First Place, 2012

Sherwin Williams STIR Design Competition National Competition Fan Favorite, 2012 Kimball Office Studio Sponsored Competition Design Excellence Award, 2011

Related Skills Autodesk Revit

Autodesk Autocad Google Sketchup Pro

Adobe Photoshop Adobe InDesign Adobe Illustrator Adobe Flash

Microsoft Word Microsoft Powerpoint Microsoft Excel

Other Skills 3-D Hand Modeling

Drawing (charcoal, markers, oil pastels, pen, pencil) Painting (acrylic, oil painting, watercolor) Vietnamese - conversational

Activities ASID, student member (2012-present)

IDEAS, member (2010-present) Habitat for Humanity, Volunteer, Roanoke & Richmond


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individual projects .02

Besseha

.03

Quirk

.04

theLab

.05

UCLA Student Union

moroccan restaurant toy boutique a media arts company new student center


.02

Besseha

Moroccan Restaurant

Besseha (“to your health”) to be truely happy for another regardless of your own situation Besseha is a Moroccan Arabic phrase. I chose to name my restaurant Besseha because it reflects my philosophy on food; we eat in order to survive and be healthy, but we should enjoy what we eat. Moroccan culture is very vibrant and full of color, and I wanted to design a space that reflected it. Besseha is a space filled with color and detail inspired by Moroccan aesthetics. By combining functionality with decoration, an enjoyable space is created where nothing is placed without a reason.

I was inspired by Moroccan embroidery because of all the detail and technique that is required. Due to Islamic culture, it is forbidden to depict any living man or animal. Because of this, they created stylized plants, flowers, and rhythmic repetitions of geometry. Color is very important in the art and architecture of Morocco and is used to bring the embroidery to life. The art of embroidery is strictly a woman’s work. Moroccan women apply a practical purpose to what they embroider; they only embroider that which is necessary (such as the bottom of a curtain to make it hang better or the ends of napkins to prevent them from fraying).


Besseha

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The methods of embroidery vary from city to city; they each have their own distinct style due to the rich culture of Morocco. After doing the initial research on Moroccan embroidery, I started to research their mosaics. I found that their mosaics, or zellige, are used for practical decoration also. The tiles protect the walls from moisture and provide a cooling effect during the summer. There is also a grid system to creating mosaics, just like there is a system prior to creating embroidery. Their mosaics are very geometric and sometimes show cuneiform writing.

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FLOOR PLAN

In the beginning stages of my space planning, I dissected the space in order to find the geometries within. Like the techniques involved with making embroidery and mosaics, I developed a grid pattern off of which I based my walls and furniture placements.

LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Entrance Main Dining Private Dining Public Restroom Bar Kitchen Private Office


.02

This rendered perspective shows one of the private dining rooms. Here, I emulated the feeling of dining in a tent. I used Armstrong Canopies to create the illusion of draped fabric and 3form Wovin Wall to mimic threading.

I designed my own Moroccan inspired pattern to use as privacy screens in the main dining render. The grid on the ceiling is derived from my original dissection of the floor plan.


The privacy screens can also be seen in the bar perspective. Since alcohol is viewed as unclean in Islamic culture, I wanted to make the space seem less forbidden and more welcoming with bright colors and fun shapes.

Detail of Screen Privacy Screen

Close Up Detail


.03

Honeycombs are a central part in the design. I experimented with many ways to design the honeycomb motif and ways to incorporate the honeycomb into the space.

QUiRK Children’s Toy Boutique

Quirk is a toy boutique inspired by a whimsical forest. The space evokes a natural sense while still maintaining a playful aesthetic to attract children. It’s simple design allows customers to clearly understand the purpose of the space. Eye-catching and thought-provoking, Quirk fills the imagination of children by emulating a fantasy world through the use of shadow and line play and bright colors.


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The center has curved shelving displays that circle around a small play area. This mimics the rings of a tree and represents the mystical tree of life in this forest. The pattern on the floor is a custom design of a sun and moon motif that is also reflected in the ceiling. By combining organic forms with angled lines, a contrasting harmony is created.

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FLOOR PLAN Level 1

LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Entrance Cash Wrap Private Office Public Restroom Storage Toy Display Play Area

OPEN TO BELOW

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FLOOR PLAN Level 2

Quirk

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.03

A custom design of the sun and moon motif can be seen in the ceiling. The design itself lights up and adds to the whimsical, fairytale nature of the boutique.

Honeycombs are highly evident in this perspective. The honeycombs act as the windows that allow sources of natural light to enter the space. As sunlight changes throughout the day, different shadows and lines are cast within, adding to the whimsical effect. Honeycombs also act as shelving display on the side of the store. Each shelf is strategically placed so that children of certain ages can only reach the high areas, and younger children can only reach the areas lower to the ground -- this both combines and separates simple from complex toys.


A clearer image of the central tree display can be seen here. At this angle, the viewer can also see that the top of the stairs are the same material, as to not cause confusion even though the steps are of different widths. The edge of the store looks out into the streets as to attract attention from the outside and draw customers inside to browse and even play in the area. Viewers can see how balanced, yet contrasting the space is designed to spark interest and curiousity.


.04

thelab

a media arts company

theLab prizes itself on being a “media arts symphony.� The workers are comprised of experts in the field of imagination and cutting edge technology. Naturally, such an artisticly driven company deserves a workspace that is as dynamic as the people themselves. By integrating bold uses of color and lines, a playful atmosphere is created where the artistic mind is nourished and teamwork is vitalized.


theLab FLOOR PLAN

The floor plan is inspired by thelab’s logo. Since they refer to themselves as a “media arts symphony,” the red center represents the composer. Other surrounding circles signify the different categories of media in which they provide services. Using this knowledge, I designed the floor plan using the resource library as the center, so all can easily access the space for inspiration.

Workstations are open in order to promote collaboration and easy for everyone to share ideas. The support areas are centralized for ease of access, and the private offices are evenly spaced throughout to balance the space. Angled and curved walls add to the dynamic and playful concept.


.04

Part of the project requirements were that we had to use Villa and Priority by Kimball Office. In the reception perspective, I arranged the space so that it curves along with the walls in order to frame it. The feature wall behind the reception desk also support the idea of the curve.

The brainstorming area is my favorite perspective of this space. The furniture is arranged so that it follows the curves of the wall. Glass panels are put over the walls to allow people to write on them as they come up with ideas -- a graffiti inspired space.

I decided to maintain an urban feel since the office is inside of a brick warehouse. By juxtaposing a wood panel wall across from a brick wall, the eye is drawn towards the conference screen. Texaa panels run across the ceiling and down the walls to provide both acoustics and line play.


Playful elements in the break room include the “waffle� grid pattern and the floor design, which is based off of a circuit board. The circle are points of interest (the tables) and the lines connect them.

This arrangement of workstations strays away from cubicles. Instead, it represents electrons firing neural signals as a visual metaphor for minds hard at work. In between each set of desks, there are collaboration spaces for easy and quick access when the workers need to break off and group up. Ceiling colors add a fun, playful element to the workspace. Graphic images on the walls help remind thelab employees the philosophy of their company.


.04

Board Room

Reception

Kimball Office Configuration Table

Kimball Office Villa Furniture

honey

hydrengea

Kimball Office Silver Chairs

glass

red leather

ice

Texaa Panels -Vert Kiwi MR760 Mannington Flooring - Framework in Mineral Gray designer white

chamois

Mannington Flooring

niagra

chocolate

haunted jack


Break Room

Brainstorming Area

Kimball Office Villa Lounge Seats & Priority Tables

Kimball Office Villa

Kimball Office Bingo Chairs

vital

twilight

buff

zephyr

Workstations

Kimball Office Priority Desks & Hero Chairs

Mannington Flooring

white

mosaic berry indigo

Texaa Panels Violet MR740

bass yellow

black mesh

Scrap Lights by Gray Pants made from recycled cardboard

carrara white

Armstrong Metalworks Ceiling

materials & finishes


.05

New Student Center University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) already has two student centers in existence, Ackerman Union and Kerckhoff Hall. However, Ackerman Union consists mainly of fast food chains and Kerckhoff Hall caters to the student government. Upon knowing this, I decided to design a new student union for them that caters to the students as a place for studying, casual hangouts, and relaxation. This new student entertains the students while also fostering a safe environment. Instead of focusing on the vendors, I focused as the individuals within the school community. Landmark spaces are created inside of the building that interests the students, and also creates a sense of community by promoting interaction and catering to the population.


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UCLA Student Center

Since Los Angeles is such a big city, the student union becomes a mini city. Here I situated the busier foot traffic area and public gathering spaces.

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Welcome Desk ATMs Lost & Found Gaming Lounge Theatre Convenience Store (NIC) Storage Post Office Restroom Smoothie Shop Dining Kitchen Laptop Charge Stations Casual Study Lounge Coffee Stand

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FLOOR PLAN Level 1 LEGEND

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The second level contains quieter work areas. These areas are more private; the “apartment” or coporate spaces of the union.

OPEN TO BELOW

FLOOR PLAN Level 2

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Student Government Private Office Private Study Collaboration Room Study Area Restroom Computer Kiosk


.05

This study lounge on a second floor has many different options for the student to chose from; whether they want to sit down at a desk, lounge on soft seating, or get together in one of the numbered private study rooms.

The student government has more permanent workstations for returning officers. Private staff offices are right next to the workstations and offer both privacy and a view to the outside so natural sunlight is able to flow through.


The dining area mimics the city life and is very open to the rest of the building. As the students move towards the center of the building, the setting gradually opens up towards the outside.

A coffee station sits right next to the large atrium study area for quick access. The atrium area is open and airy and serves as the public park space of this mini city.


.05

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PLAN VIEW

B

FRONT ELEVATION

LEFT ELEVATION


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coffee stand details


esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design esign design design


group projects .06

Hearts of Palm

.07

ISIS

.08

Versus

.09

Whole Foods

senior living center new york university student center seattle art gallery office of the future


.06

Hearts of Palm

About 5.4 million people have Alzheimer’s Disease in the United States. Alzheimer’s Disease is the fifth leading cause of death in people age 65 and up. Some services needed in an Alzheimer care facility include bathing, dressing, and feeding. Hearts of Palm is meant to be a luxurious care facility where patients can feel right at home. Implementing the five sense is important in order to create an environment that engages all of the senses while providing a serene space without the loss of identity.

Hearts of Palm is divded into three phases based on the needs of its patients. Level One is designated as Phase Three, the highest level of care required. As you move up to the second and third floors, the needs of the patients lessen, making the third level the most independent. The first level houses Phase Three patients, those who are in the seventh and final stage of Alzheimer’s. These individuals need constant assistance with day-to-day activities. Level 2 houses Phase 2 patients, those who are in the fifth and sixth stages of Alzheimer’s. These individuals need assistance with most day-to-day activities. Level 3 houses Phase 1 patients, those who are in the third and fourth stages of Alzheimer’s. Their have mild to moderate cognitive decline. These patients are the most independent in the facility since they do not require extensive assitance.


When guests enter the reception, they are immediately hit with a warm, beach inspired setting. This creates a “home away from home� feeling. Family and friends can rest assure that their loved ones are getting the best care in this luxurious facility.

Hearts of Palm

Residents located on the first level require the most attentive care and surveillance. Here, patients are supplied with hospital beds. Rooms like these are much more restricted and have limited space compared to the other floors. Each room has windows to allow natural light to flow in and lounge ares for them to spend time with those they care about. ~3 week group project - 3 members


.07

Approaching a new paradigm, Iris aims to: 1. Create a cohesive space that allows creativity and productivity to flow within each individual to further academic achievements in the collegiate setting, 2. Create a sustainable interior through materials, finishes, lighting choices, and overall design, 3. Further design in higher education by converting the traditional classroom into a more innovative and technologically advanced space, thus creating an advanced learning environment solution to the current pedagogy, 4. Meet the needs of today’s generation by providing what they want in a space; flexibility, mobility, the need for control and collaboration, and comfort, 5. Use relationships between the human body and technology as a source of inspiration.


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FLOOR PLAN Level 1 LEGEND Reception Private Office Restroom Meeting Room Study Room Cafe Lounge Study Lounge Computer Kiosk Game Lounge Storage

FLOOR PLAN Level 2 LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Private Study Restroom Meeting Room Private Office Classroom/Multipurpose Room Casual Soft Seating Storage

IRIS

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2 week group project - 2 members


.08

To design a contrasting environment that incorporates the industrial culture of Seattle and the surrounding Georgetown neighborhood, yet still creates an intimate and comfortable gallery space.

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN Symbol

RENDERED PLAN

Fixture ArtLuce Rail System Pendant Lamp Jumbo Spot Pendant Lamp Sparkling Dining Avenue D Groove

Company Amount Hamptstead Lighting 14 Kare

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Focal Point Lighting 14 Focal Point Lighting 47


In this space customers are greeted by a receptionist and provided information about the gallery. Here, customers are also informed about the featured artist and encouraged to walk throughout the space. Within this area people can sit and wait for others members of their party to arrive, they can reflect on what they’ve seen or are about to see, and relax.

VERSUS

This executive office space is conveniently located adjacent to the entry space. The desk is made of similar materials like the reception desk. The back wall is painted with unique graffiti to add to the industrial feel of the gallery.

1 week group project - 5 members


.09

WHOLE FOODS

OFFICE OF THE FUTURE It’s human nature to want ownership and personal space -- this office pushes for the release of that selfish desire and learning to cohabitate for the enrichment of the organization and ultimately the environment. Individuals must coexist with the earth and bring it into the spaces they occupy. This office incorporates the natural elements with design technology and pushes for the release of permanence. Whole Foods -- Office of the Future is a one week long project involving five people. With such little time to fully develop a space, work was delegated according to each person’s strength. I thoroughly enjoy space planning and took the task of laying out the majority of the office.


In House Recycling

Food and other biodegradable waste is turned into compost and used in the community garden. Recycled aluminum trash bins collect other recyclable items as well as electronics and ink cartridges. To further reduce landfill waste, resusable and compostable dishware is used by all team members.

Greenwalls

Living walls offer health and wellness to the employees while reducing energy costs by naturally cooling the surrounding area. These plants also absorb and clean pollutants from the air while softening the hard, built environment

Legend:

Repurposing Furniture

About 85,000 tons of furniture and furnishings are tossed into landfills each year. Most of the furniture in the space is repurposed in order to recognize and bring awareness towards reuse and recycle.

Reception/Waiting Area Conference Room Private Office Workstations Kitchen/Break Room Employee Lounge Think Tank

1 week group project - 5 members

Whole Foods

The floor plans breaks away from typical layouts of boxes within a larger box. Angled and curved walls delegate points of interest and in doing so calls for attention. Sustainability played a huge role in designing the space and goes along well with Whole Food’s holistic philosophy.


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Thank you for taking the time to look through samples of my work. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.


MND

Cell: 804-909-7893 Email: tinid@vt.edu or minhtue.duong@gmail.com


Portfolio 2013