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Cool cactus toy

LEARN CROCHET STEP BY STEP

+ master the boxed bead stitch

SPECIALIST INTEREST MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR

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25

summer t o p in si es 8-22

SIZZLING PATTERNS

you'll love to make! Gorgeous shawls

Fin-tastic shark blanket

TRENDY PROJECTS FOR YOUR HOME! USE YOUR CHUNKY HOOKS!

3 inspiring

blankets to try

5

cute toys to make

ISSUE 30 UK £5.99

Inspire Imagine Create

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14

Issue 30

California Dreaming

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I

’ll be the first to admit that I love to hibernate with my crochet, but even I am absolutely in love with the amazing weather that we’ve been experiencing this summer here in the UK. Luckily, there is still plenty that we can crochet in the sunshine! This month we’re bringing the sunny Pacific coast of the USA right to your lap with dreams of California! To kick off our ‘summer holiday’, Ruby McGrath has designed a trendy oversized granny square jumper (page 16), which has jumped right to the top of my to-do pile! Not far behind that is Anna Hooker’s Surfin’ USA scarf (page 30) that has a beautiful edge, replicating the waves of the sea. For the young at heart, Zoë Potrac doesn’t disappoint with her Flamingo Rattle (page 32) and ridiculously cute cactus specs holder (page 76) – guaranteed to put a smile on your face! I hope that you will absolutely love your three glitter chunky hooks, and to get you started we have a cut-out-and-keep section in the middle of the magazine, featuring quick chunky makes for the home from some of my favourite designers, and tips on how to make your own chunky yarn (page 52). If you only have time to read one thing this month though, I encourage you to find out about how artists across the globe are making their hobby into a creative, expressive and emotional artistic outlet – find out more on page 34.

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Goodbye for now!

Help us continue the conversation about mental health on page 56 Editor

jenny.riley@practicalpublishing.co.uk

Subscription enquiries

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For subscription enquiries please call 01858 438899 or email practicalpublishing@subscription.co.uk www.facebook.com/crochetnowmag @crochetnowmag

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Contents

16

22

38

24 Projects 14 SWAY SHAWL ThIs gorgeously light shawl is perfect for summer 16 SUMMER BOX JUMPER This jumper is designed to have a boxy fit and lets your love for granny squares shine 24 CALIFORNIA BABY Create a fresh, modern C2C baby blanket in lovely bright colours 30 SURFIN’ USA Hook up a narrow scarf inspired by the beautiful seas of the Pacific Coast 32 FLAMINGO RATTLE This cute baby rattle is made in baby-safe cotton

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42 FIZZ THE UNICORN We continue the Rico Toy Box with a new magical friend

58 COTTON CANDY DRESS Pinafore dresses are great for growing little ones

48 RUG & ROOM TIDY Inspired by American folkloric coiled rugs, this colour version is fun and quick to make

70 SWEET SUMMER ICES These three ice creams look almost good enough to eat!

50 TUNISIAN LEAVES BOLSTER Make this chic bolster cushion for your home, including a Tunisian crochet hook hack! 54 YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE Bust your stash with homemade chunky yarn and this cute piece of art

74 CANDY STRIPE COWL We have an exclusive preview pattern from our new sister magazine 76 COOL CACTUS SPECS HOLDER Never lose your sunnies again 78 SHARK ATTACK Did you ever think you could be so comfy while being eaten by a shark?


Contents

30

48 Need some help?

70 Regulars 7 WHAT’S NEW? Here are the woolly things that have made our month 20 DESIGNER SKETCHBOOK Make and Do Crew founder Jess Coppom shares her crochet journey, and a pattern for trendy slippers 26 DISCOUNTS & GIVEAWAYS We have over £300 of crochet accessories to give away this month! 28 SUBSCRIBE TODAY Subscribe to Crochet Now for less than £1 per week! 34 THE ART OF CROCHET We speak to three artists from around the globe who express their creativity through crochet

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Our patterns go through several checks for accuracy, but sometimes errors do slip through the gaps. Before contacting the editor, head to www.crochetnow.co.uk/category/errata to see if there’s already a fix – if not, let us know by email at contact@crochetnow.co.uk

38 STITCH MASTERCLASS Practice your boxed bead stitch with Sherrie’s helpful how-to guide

85 THE NOTICEBOARD This month’s Shop Local news, interview and workshops

40 KERRY’S JOURNAL Is knitting making a comeback? TOFT founder Kerry discusses why it should

86 HOW TO READ A PATTERN Learn how to tackle a Crochet Now pattern and hints on reading crochet charts

47 QUICK MAKES FOR YOUR HOME Cut-out and keep our chunky home section, complete with how to make your own chunky yarn

89 THE BASICS Basic stitches for most of our patterns

56 HEART TO HEART Help us continue the conversation about crochet and mental health 62 RISE AND SHINE CROCHET-ALONG Part 4 of Lucia’s CAL uses lots of bright colours in stripes and a mandala design 67 THE BOOK CLUB This month we read Crochet in the City by Annemarie Benthem

95 ABBREVIATIONS Learn your dc from your BLO with Crochet Now’s abbreviation guide 96 COMING NEXT ISSUE Clean lines and modern shapes are the stars of our geometric issue 98 CROCHET 101 WITH THE BLOGSTAR Sandra ‘Cherry Heart’ Paul makes changing colours so easy with her how-to guide www.crochetnow.co.uk | 5


News

What’s

NEW? These are the yarns, patterns, books and tidbits of woolly wonder that will make your month

Classical cotton

on Cotton Crochet is the latest collecti e Jan and from designers Lisa Richardson and Crowfoot. Featuring 11 brand-new s ude incl on ecti coll unique designs, this tel pas and y gre a soft palette of cream, cate to produce a stunning range of deli s and wraps, scarves, summer garment inner beg from ging ran s more. With pattern for ing eth som is to intermediate, there every level of crocheter. www.knitrowan.com

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News

Pin perfection We’re always looking for ways to show the world just how much we love all things yarn. This month we’ve been looking at enamel pin badges to shout about our passion for crochet TOFT Superhero, £6 You might recognise this superhero from the Edward’s Menagerie collection by TOFT. Designed by Kerry Lord, this bright badge is the perfect gift for any TOFT fan or super crocheter. www.toftuk.com Knitter Girl Enamel Pin, $11 We love this stylish soft enamel pin from Wild Hunt Design. The simple design perfectly illustrates a clear passion for yarn and is available in a choice of two soothing colours. (UK shoppers will need to email directly for special orders.) www.wildhuntdesign.com Alpaca Pin, £8.50 Let’s face it, we all love alpacas, right? Their fleeces produce super-soft yarn with an incredible sheen, so it’s no wonder we love this pin from Not On The High Street. It’s a perfect gift for yarn lovers and animal lovers! www.notonthehighstreet.com Knitting and Gin, £7 This quirky design is great for anyone who loves yarn and gin! It’s one of many fun pins from Sue Stratford and you can sign up now for her brandnew Pin Badge Club to receive a monthly subscription and build your collection. www.suestratford.co.uk

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New at Deramores The range from Cygnet Yarns is now available to buy online at Deramores! The shop now stocks a selection of Cygnet’s most popular yarn, including Boho Spirit, Cottony DK, Seriously Chunky and Kiddies Super Soft DK, you’ll find a yarn suited for every knitting project www.deramores.co.uk

PLAY A YARN

We just might be convinced to put our hooks down to play the new yarninspired game from EA. Unravel Two for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, tells an evocative story, filled with energy, intrigue and inspiration, all centred around little creatures made from yarn! Play as your own Yarny, or join with others to jump, slide, swing and run along this charming and beautiful adventure. Unravel Two is about the new bonds that form when we cut ties to the past and is a deeply personal game about the unbreakable bond between friends and how hope and love can make the world around us a better place. Unravel Two is available now, RRP £15.99


News

BLOGSTARS BATIK

Turn to page 98 for Sandra’s helpful crochet hints

Sandra Paul (Cherry Heart) has created a brand-new blanket and cushion combo using one of Stylecraft’s most successful semisolid yarns, Batik. The granny square crochet patterns feature many of the cool pastel colours that Sandra is so fond of, put together in her own unique way. www.stylecraftyarns.co.uk

Oh ewe! Dear Ewe is an exciting new company created exclusively for crafters. Launched in May 2018, Dear Ewe is operated by blogger and crochet designer Heather Gibbs alongside graphic designer Rebecca Kerr. The duo has teamed up to combine their passions of stitching and graphics to bring you a variety of fantastic products ranging from ceramics to crochet patterns and much more! www.dearewe.com

Nicki’s

CORNER

Every month, Nicki Trench brings us her words of crochet wisdom www.nickitrench.com

Since opening my crochet club four years ago, I have designed many things, but sometimes I find it hard to think of something original. I’ve been looking back on my club project list for inspiration and it’s been very nostalgic. I remember exactly what inspired me to create each design; the dreamcatcher for above my bed when I’d just moved house, a baby cardigan for when my daughter announced she was pregnant. One of my favourites is Golden Blaisdale, a crochet toy I based on a very good friend of mine. I met him at tango classes and he is always very well turned out, with beautiful jackets, jewellery and cologne. I made

“I’ve been looking back for inspiration and it’s been very nostalgic” one big mistake with my design when I made his hair grey. I’d spent hours carefully looping the yarn through each follicle, but Golden had just bleached it and when he saw the toy, he insisted I take all the hair out, order white yarn in the exactly right shade and do it over again! I’m off to make some squares for next month’s project: a blanket. Easy to pick up or down, not too hot on the lap and perfect for crocheting on an aeroplane or in a car and it can all be put together at the end of summer ready for winter. What will this remind me of I wonder? You can join Nicki’s Crochet Club for a subscription of £3.50 per month at www.nickitrench.com/#/ knittingandcrochetclubs

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SHOW US your makes

WIN ME!

Send us a photo of your Crochet Now project and if we feature it in the next issue you will win two balls of Rowan Handknit Cotton www.knitrowan.com

Ju Sher lie Wy at bet t t he U , Rainbo w nicor n, iss ue 26

O ve r t h e , d n o lm A 7 A il s a w l, is s u e 2 a h S w o b R a in

Jul ie Ma rsh all, Ch ubb y Bu nny Cus hio n & Pad din gto n, issu es 26 & 23

R a c h S lo ane, Mr. Men b la n k e t , Is s u e 2 6

m a p t e d f ro d a , is ll a h 7 Mand y C u r , is s u e 2 lo o C g in in It ’s R a 12

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Mart ine C ole issue , Mopsy, 28

Tag us with your Crochet Now makes on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, or send them by email to contact@ crochetnow.co.uk for your chance to win!


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Accessory

SWAY SHAWL

This gorgeous shawl is light enough for summer evenings, but keeps off the chill when needed

Don’t worry, the plain section of the shawl is meant to ‘sway’ while you work – hence the name

Anna Nikipirowicz 14

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Accessory 4-ply

next ch-sp, *3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp; rep from * to centre st, 4 ch, **1 dc in next ch-sp, 3 ch; rep from ** to last st, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 93 ch-sps Row 6: 1 ch, 1 dc in first st, *3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 tr3tog into next chsp; rep from * to centre 4ch-sp, 4 ch, 1 dc into centre 4ch-sp, 4 ch, 1 tr3tog into next ch-sp, **3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 tr3tog into next ch-sp; rep from ** to last ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 dc in last ch-sp, 3 ch, miss next st, 1 dc in last st. Turn. 46 tr3tog, 49 dc Row 7: 1 ch, 2 dc in first st, 3 ch, 1 dc into first ch-sp, *3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp; rep from * to centre st, 4 ch, **1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch; rep from ** to last st, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 95 ch-sps Row 8: 1 ch, 2 dc in first st, 1 dc, [3 dc into next ch-sp, 1 dc] 5 times, * 2 dc into next ch-sp, 1 dc; rep from * to centre 4ch-sp, 5 dc into centre 4ch-sp, 1 dc, **2 dc into next ch-sp, 1 dc; rep from ** to last five ch-sps, [3 dc into next ch-sp, 1 dc] 5 times, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 303 sts Row 9: 1 ch, RhtrF across. Fasten off.

4 times, 1 tr, pm on this centre stitch and move it up every row, [2 tr in next st] 5 times. Turn. 21 sts Row 4: 1 ch, RhtrF across. Turn. Row 5: 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, [2 tr in next st] 3 times, tr across to 2 sts before centre st, [2 tr in next st] twice, 1 tr, [2 tr in next st] twice, tr across to last 4 sts, [2 tr in next st] 4 times. Turn. 33 sts Rep rows 4-5 nineteen more times. 261 sts

4mm

★★ Take your time Yarn used West Yorkshire Spinners Signature 4-ply (Florist Collection) 2 balls in Violet Available from www.knittingwool.com

Lace Section

About the yarn

Keep moving the marker up to centre st or ch-sp each row. Row 1 (WS): 1 ch, 2 dc in first st, 3 ch, *miss 2 sts, 1 RhtrF, 3 ch; rep from * to centre st, [1 RhtrF, 3 ch, 1 RhtrF] in centre st, **1 RhtrF, 3 ch, miss 2 sts; rep from ** to last st, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 89 ch-sps Row 2: 1 ch, 1 dc, *3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 tr3tog into next ch-sp; rep from * to last ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch, miss next st, 1 dc. Turn. 44 tr3tog, 47 dc Row 3: 1 ch, 2 dc in first st, 3 ch, 1 dc into first ch-sp, *3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp; rep from * to centre st, 4 ch, **1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch; rep from ** to last st, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 91 ch-sps Row 4: 1 ch, 1 dc in first st, 3 ch, 1 dc into first ch-sp, *3 ch, 1 tr3tog in next ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp; rep from * to centre 4ch-sp, 4 ch, 1 tr3tog into centre 4ch-sp, 4 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, **3 ch, 1 tr3tog into next ch-sp, 3 ch, 1 dc into next ch-sp, 3 ch; rep from ** to last 2 sts, Plain Section miss next st, 1 dc. Turn. 45 tr3tog, 48 dc Row 5: 1 ch, 2 dc in first st, 3 ch, 1 dc into

4-ply; 400m per 100g ball; 75% wool, 25% nylon

Tension 18 tr x14 rows = 10cm measured over plain section after blocking

Hook used 4mm

Other supplies locking stitch marker

Sizing 137cm wingspan, 53cm deep

Special abbreviations

Raised half treble front (RhtrF): Yrh, insert around post of next st from front to back to front again, yrh, pul, yrh, draw through all 3 loops on hook Treble 3 together (tr3tog): [Yrh, insert hook into ch-sp, yrh, pul, yrh, draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times into same ch-sp, yrh, draw through all 4 loops on hook. 2 sts dec’d

Making up Weave in all ends. Wet block the shawl by soaking it in lukewarm water, gently squeeze the water out or roll it in dry towel to remove excess moisture. Pin it out to the finished measurements. Allow to dry Stitch Key naturally. Make three tassels approximately ch 7cm in length and attach each one to each dc corner of shawl. RhtrF

Plain section

Stitch Key tr

Plain Section

Stitch Key

Plain Section

5

3

1

2

4 Rep for Rows 6-43

ch dc

ch dc

tr3tog

RhtrF

RhtrF

Start crocheting

tr tr

tr3tog

tr3tog

The centre of the plain section of the shawl will sway (hence the name) while it is worked, but it will all straighten out when the lace section is worked and the shawl is blocked.

5 5

3 3

1

1 2

Motif Rep for Lace

Lace section

2 4 Rep for Rows 6-43 4 Rep for Rows 6-43

Lace Section

Plain Section Row 1 (RS): Working into a magic ring, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr here and throughout), Lace Section 10 tr, cinch ring closed. Turn. 11 sts Lace Section Row 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st here and throughout), RhtrF across. Turn. Row 3: 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, [2 tr in next st]

7 5 7 5

3

9

Motif Rep for Lace

Motif Rep for Lace

7 5

9

8 6

3

4

1 Row 43

2 Continue Motif Rep along diagonal edge as established

centre tr

continue along other diagonal edge in a mirror image manner

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6 1

4

4

continue along

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Garment

If you want an oversized look, opt for the bigger size. You can add squares or change the sleeve length if you prefer

Frank & Olive 16

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Garment

SUMMER BOX JUMPER Designed to have a boxy, oversized fit, this trendy jumper is a joy to make and the light cotton makes it perfect to wear in warmer weather

Aran

4mm

★★ Intermediate Yarn used Rico Creative Cotton Aran 8 (12, 16) balls in Silver Grey 22 (MC) 3 (3, 4) balls in Banana 68 (CC3) 2 (3, 4) balls in Candy Pink 64 (CC2), Violet 16 (CC4) 1 (2, 3) balls in Tangerine 76 (CC1) Available from www.blacksheepwools.com

About the yarn Aran; 85m per 50g ball; 100% cotton

Tension 14 sts x 9 rows = 10cm measured over tr 1 square = 11cm

Hook used 4mm

Other supplies wool needle

Sizing S/M (M/L, XL) UK size: 8-12 (14-18, 20-22) See schematic for finished measurements Shown in S/M on Lana, who is UK size 10

Special stitches

Puff stitch (PS): [Yrh, insert hook into st, yrh, pul] 5 times into same st, yrh, draw through all 11 loops on hook, 1 ch to lock st in place. This locking ch counts as part of the PS and not the following 2ch-sp in the pattern

Start crocheting This top is designed to have an oversized boxy fit so exact measurements aren’t crucial. Where possible, crochet over the loose end when you start a new colour, it saves so much time weaving in the ends!

*[3 tr in next 1ch-sp, 1 ch] 3 times, [3 tr, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp, 1 ch; rep from * twice, join with sl st in top of beg 3 ch. 60 sts Fasten off.

Assembling squares Block squares to 11cm. Lay the squares out with 4 (5, 6) rows and 5 (6, 7) columns. With MC, stitch squares together as laid out with whipstitch, using the photo as a guide. After assembly, continue with Front.

Square [make 20 (30, 42)] Rnd 1: With CC1 and working into a magic ring, 3 ch (counts as first st now and throughout), 11 tr, join with sl st in top of beg 3 ch. Fasten off. 12 sts Rnd 2: Join CC2 with sl st in any st, 1 ch, *1 PS, 2 ch; rep from * around, join with sl st to beg puff stitch. Fasten off. 12 sts Rnd 3: Join CC3 with sl st in any 2ch-sp, 3 ch, 2 tr in same beg 2ch-sp, [3 tr in next 2 ch-sp] 11 times, join with sl st in top of beg 3 ch. Fasten off. 36 sts Rnd 4: Join CC4 with sl st in any sp between 3tr-groups, 2 ch (counts as first htr), 2 htr in same beg sp, 1 ch, 3 htr in next sp, 1 ch, [3 tr, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next sp for corner, 1 ch, *[3 htr in next sp, 1 ch] twice, [3 tr, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next sp, 1 ch; rep from * twice, join with sl st in top of beg 2 ch. Fasten off. 48 sts Rnd 5: Join MC with sl st to first 1ch-sp after any corner, 3 ch, 2 tr in same beg 1ch-sp, 1 ch, [3 tr in next 1ch-sp, 1 ch] twice, [3 tr, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp, 1 ch,

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Garment Each square needs to be 11cm. If yours are small, go up a hook size, or down if your squares are too big

Front Rnd 1: With RS facing, join MC with sl st to centre ch of 3ch-sp at top right corner of Front, 3 ch, [*1 tr in 3ch-sp, 15 tr 1 tr in next 3ch-sp; rep from * to last square of side; 15 tr, 3 tr in corner 3ch-sp of side] 4 times omitting last 3 tr, 1 tr in beg corner, join with sl st to top of beg 3 ch. 310 (378, 446) sts Rnd 2: 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, tr across to next corner st, *3 tr in corner, tr across to next corner st; rep from * to beg corner, 1 tr in beg corner, join with sl st to top of beg 3 ch. 318 (386, 454) sts Row 3: 3 ch, tr across to corner st, 1 tr in corner st. Turn. 89 (106, 122) sts Rows 4-6: 3 ch, tr across. Turn.

Neck Opening / Back You may adjust the number of chs/missed sts in the next row to customise the neck opening. Remember to keep the number of sts on each side the same. Row 1: 3 ch, 28 (37, 45) tr, 31 (32, 32) ch, miss 31 (32, 32) tr, 29 (37, 45) tr. Turn. 58 sts Row 2: 3 ch, tr in each st and ch across. Turn. Rows 3-45 (55, 65): 3 ch, tr across. Turn. Add or subtract rows if necessary so Back is same length as Front. Fasten off.

Sewing up Fold top in half with neck opening at top and Front facing. Whipstitch sides together, leaving bottom 9cm and top 10 (12, 14) cm unjoined for bottom slit and armholes. Leave more space for armholes if desired, just adjust your stitch count on Sleeves.

Sleeves Sleeves are worked in a spiral without slip stitching or turning chs. Use a st marker or waste yarn to keep track of the first st of each rnd. Rnd 1: Join CC2 with sl st to a sp at bottom of armhole, 3 ch, tr evenly around arm opening. Rnds 2-9: Tr around. Rnd 10: Tr around to last 6 sts, 2 htr, 2 dc, 2 sl st. Fasten off. With CC3, rep for 2nd sleeve.

Finishing Weave in any loose ends, and block to finished measurements.

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Schematic

SAVE 10% and save up to the cost of four balls of yarn when you buy the yarn for this project! Black Sheep Wools is offering 10% off Rico Creative Cotton Aran* Enter discount code CNOW30 at www.black sheepwools.com to receive your discount! *Saving is equivalent to one ball when purchasing 14, three balls when purchasing 20 balls, or four balls when purchasing 27. Offer expires on 20/08/18


Giza Cotton 4ply 50g Ball – Perfect for Crochet Available from all good Yarn Retailers

Pattern 5144 T: 01756 703670, E: enquiries@kingcole.com, W: kingcole.com


Jess’s versatile Greyscale poncho

Designer sketchbook W Jess Coppom Jess is the creative mind behind Make & Do Crew, an online hub filled with patterns, tutorials and yarn inspiration! www.makeanddocrew.com

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e live in Colorado, USA, myself with my two young daughters who love to unravel yarn for me, and my patient husband who doesn’t mind living in an ever-growing yarn web. We love to take bike rides together and test our kids’ road trip skills with mini adventures around our corner of the country. My mum taught me how to crochet when I was young and I passed the skill along to my sisters and cousins. I would hold Crochet Club, complete with mandated goals and homework, such as ‘how many rows will you finish before tomorrow?’ I’ve always loved creating things and talking about creative projects, but it took me a long time to get up the courage to share my ideas with the world. I started Make & Do Crew in November of 2015 and it definitely satisfies my crochet club yearnings, although I’m not quite so strict about crochet homework anymore. While I had no idea how to write patterns when I started the blog, I quickly realised that it was an essential skill if I ever wanted someone else to be able to recreate my projects. I still think of myself as much more of a crochet enthusiast than a fancy

‘designer’. I don’t think I’m very different than most other creative crocheters, I just share my success (and failures) publicly. Before starting the blog, I worked as an advertising copywriter, making commercials, print ads and websites. I was surrounded by such a high calibre of creative talent that I think some of their clean aesthetic rubbed off on me. An art director professor I had in college taught us to take everything unessential away until only the most impactful, communicative parts of a layout were left. That concept has stuck with me and informs a lot of my crochet design decisions. I use a lot of natural colours and mixed materials like leather and buttons. I want someone who invests the time in making one of my patterns to feel assured that they’ll actually want to wear it or use the project when it’s finished. As a kid, geometry was a subject that always really interested me. Now I find myself the most lit up by projects that have a creative construction or interesting use of basic shapes. Crochet is so flexible in how it easily allows us


Designer sketchbook I’m fascinated by the idea that we can use our hands to make something that is both beautiful and useful in modern society

Adorable girls’ cardigan

to make simple shapes. For me, the magic comes in bringing those pieces together to create a really wearable garment or accessory. Garments tend to be the most motivating projects for me as a crocheter. I’m fascinated by the idea that we can use our hands to make something that is both beautiful and useful in modern society. For that reason, I also love crocheting slippers and shoes on top of flip-flop soles. The online crochet community is so wonderful. I’m inspired daily by the creativity shared on blogs and Instagram. Two crochet bloggers who will forever hold a place in my heart are Tamara Kelly from www.mooglyblog.com and Sarah Zimmerman from www. repeatcrafterme.com. They were the first people who got me thinking that maybe someday I could leave advertising to pursue crocheting and not have to be a starving artist in the process. Make & Do Crew is my fulltime job now and this is by far the most satisfying work I’ve ever done

and I put together a free guide on how to start a blog, which can be found at www.makeanddocrew.com/HowTo-Start-A-Blog The big reveal of Jess’s first book! It’s pretty hard for me to choose a favourite pattern of mine, mostly because I see beauty and flaws in each of them. I recently released a pattern called the Day Date cardigan that’s made from two hexagons. There was a fortunate intersection between the yarn drape, the colour and the style of the cardigan. I’m really happy with how it turned out because it’s super wearable, while remaining easy enough for a confident beginner. I’ve spent the last several months working really hard on a new book that will be released toward the end of this year. Corner to Corner Crochet is a contemporary collection of – you guessed it – c2c patterns that are designed with modern homes and women in mind. My mum was able to help crochet many of the designs in the book, which was a really fun and adventurous journey to take together.

Turn over to make Jess’s comfy slippers

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Designer sketchbook

LIGHTWEIGHT SLIPPERS Cotton yarn and a flip-flop sole make these slippers, perfect for wearing around the house!

Aran

2.25mm, 4mm

★★ Try something new Yarn used Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton 1 ball in Mint 156 Available from www.loveknitting.com

About the yarn Aran; 170m per 100g; 100% cotton

Tension 7 sts x 12 rows = 10cm over dc with larger hook

Hooks used 2.25mm 4mm

Other supplies 1 pair of flip flops, one size smaller than you wear normally tapestry needle stitch markers tape measure strong glue sharp tool to poke holes in flip flop, such as a skewer

Sizing To fit any size of flip flop

Special stitches Cluster: 4 tr in next st Half Cluster: 2 tr in next st

Start crocheting For help with FAQs and how-to guides and videos to make the slippers, visit www.makeand docrew.com

Slipper sides and heel are worked in a spiral in the amigurumi style, so you will not chain 1 at the beginning of each round. Make a deliberate effort to keep stitches tighter than normal. Both left and right shoes are worked the same.

Slipper sides & heel Before you start: Trim straps off the

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Designer sketchbook

1 flip flops by cutting the mid-foot straps at an extreme angle so you can keep them in place without feeling them inside the shoe. Save the rubber plug from the strap between the toes to glue later. With a sharp tool, poke holes 7mm apart around flip flop soles. Pierce the hole at an angle about halfway down the sole to approximately 1cm into top of the sole. 1 2 Tie slipknot around smaller hook. Insert hook at back of heel (6 o’clock position) from the top of the flip flop toward the bottom of the sole, grabbing the yarn and pulling through to the top of the flip flop and through the slip knot to attach the yarn to the flip-flop. Work over the tail of this yarn as you work Rnd 1. Rnd 1: Dc in each hole around sole, join with a sl st to first dc. Do not turn. Pm in first st of round and move it up as each round is worked. Rnds 2-9: With larger hook, dc around sole. Do not turn. 3 Remove marker. Place stitch markers at 4 o’clock and 7 o’clock positions. This is where back heel ‘lip’ of your slipper will taper to (see The Slipper Clock, right).

2 Do not turn work. Continue with next instruction that will count as end of Rnd 9. Rnds will now be worked between the markers. Rnd 9 cont: Dc across until 1 st remains before next marker, sl st in next dc. Turn. Rnd 10: 1 ch, miss first sl st, sl st in next dc, dc around to 1 st before next marker, sl st in next dc. Turn. Rnds 11-12: 1 ch, miss first sl st, sl st in next dc, dc around to 3 sts before next marker, sl st in next dc. Turn. Row 13: 1 ch, miss first sl st, sl st in next dc, dc around to back of heel, sl st in next dc. Fasten off. Do not weave in (the tail will be crocheted over later).

Slipper top Note: In rows 2-5, clusters are worked between the two middle tr of the cluster in the previous row. Find the approximate midpoint of the front of the slipper. Place stitch markers at the 1 o’clock and 11 o’clock positions with 11 dc between them. Join yarn in 11 o’clock marked st. Weave in the tail from attaching yarn now before this section is worked. Row 1: With the toe facing toward you, [miss 3 dc, cluster in next dc] twice, miss 3 dc, sl st in next marked st, sl st in next 3 dc of Rnd 9 (up left edge of slipper). Turn. 2 clusters Row 2: Cluster in centre of each of next 2 clusters, miss 2 dc in Rnd 9, sl st in next dc of Rnd 9 to join, sl st in next 3 dc (up right edge of slipper). Turn. 2 clusters Row 3: Half cluster in sl st where Row 2 joins Rnd 9, cluster in centre of each of next 2 clusters, half cluster in last sl st of Row 1, miss 2 dc in Rnd 9, sl st in next dc of Rnd 9 to join, sl st in next 3 dc (up left edge of slipper). Turn. 2 clusters and 2 half clusters

3 Row 4: Cluster in sl st where Row 3 joins Rnd 9, cluster in centre of each of next 2 clusters, cluster in last sl st of Row 2, miss 2 dc in Rnd 9, sl st in next dc of Rnd 9 to join, sl st in next 3 dc (up right edge of slipper). Turn. 4 clusters Row 5: Cluster in centre of each of next 4 clusters, miss 2 dc in Rnd 9, sl st in next sc of Rnd 9 to join. Do not turn. 4 clusters Rnd 6: Dc around entire shoe. Do not turn. Rnd 7: Dc in each st around heel, stopping once you reach the slipper top section, sl st 1 into edge of top. Fasten off. Weave in ends. Repeat pattern with second flip-flop sole.

The Slipper Clock The pattern refers to locations on the flip-flop as if it’s a clock, where the top of the toe is 12 o’clock and the heel is 6 o’clock.

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 23


Blanket

For an adult size blanket (120x170cm), repeat rows 28-55 once more (83 squares wide). To alter the length, repeat rows 15-42 (112 squares long)

Blazenka Simic-Boro 24

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Blanket

CALIFORNIA BABY

This beautiful blanket is a fresh and modern design with simple triangular motifs that make this pattern perfect for beginners to C2C

Chart DK

5mm

★ Stretch your skills Yarn used Scheepjes Soft Fun 8 balls in 2496 (MC) 2 balls each in 2518 (CC1), 2495 (CC2), 2615 (CC3) Available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

About the yarn DK; 140m per 50g ball; 60% cotton, 40% acrylic

Tension 7 x 7 C2C squares = 10cm

Hook used 5mm

Sizing 82x108cm after blocking

Start crocheting Start at the bottom-right corner and continue diagonally, following chart for colour changes. When you change colour, join the

new colour in the last yarn over of the treble before and continue work with new colour. With CC1, chain 6. Row 1: Starting in 4th ch from hook, 3 tr. Turn. 1 square Row 2: 6 ch, starting in 4th ch from hook, 3 tr, [sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp of prev row. Turn. 2 squares Row 3: 6 ch, starting in 4th ch from hook, 3 tr, *[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp of prev row; rep from * once. Turn. 3 squares Row 4: 6 ch, starting in 4th ch from hook, 3 tr, *[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp of prev row; rep from * across. Turn. 4 squares Rows 5-55: As Row 4, following the chart for colour changes. 55 squares Row 56: Sl st across to 3ch-sp, [sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp, *[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp of prev row; rep from * across. Turn. 55 squares Row 57: As Row 4 to last square, sl st in 3ch-sp of last square. Turn. 55 squares Rows 58-70: Rep rows 56-57 six times, then Row 56 once more. Row 71: Sl st across to 3ch-sp, [sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp, *[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in next 3ch-sp of prev row; rep from * to last square, sl st in 3ch-sp of last square. Turn. 54 squares Rows 72-124: As Row 71. 1 square Fasten off.

Finishing Weave in all ends and block.

Start here

SAVE 10% and save the cost of a ball of yarn when you buy the materials for this project. Wool Warehouse is offering 10% off Scheepjes Softfun.* Enter discount code CN30 at www.woolware house.co.uk to receive your discount! *Saving is equivalent to one ball free when buying 14 balls

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 25


DISCOUNTS & GIVEAWAYS Enter today for your chance to win fab yarn goodies, and you can also use our exclusive discounts to save on your next project!

OVER

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This month we have fantastic prizes worth over £300 to give away to three lucky readers! Each winner will receive an essential crochet accessory kit that has been provided by some of our favourite brands including Clover, Berisfords Ribbons and Hobby Gift. For stockist enquiries, visit clover@stockistenquiries.co.uk grove@stockistenquiries.co.uk berisfords@stockistenquiries.co.uk

YOU WILL WIN

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Accessory

Make sure you count your row stitches regularly – it is easy to miss out one of the increases

Special stitches

Herringbone treble (hbtr): Yrh, insert hook into st indicated, yrh, pul through work and first loop on hook, yrh, draw through 1 loop, yrh, draw through 2 loops

Anna Hooker 30

| www.crochetnow.co.uk


Accessory

SURFIN’ USA

This narrow scarf can be worn on cooler summer days and was inspired by the beautiful blue green seas off the coast of California 4-ply

3.5mm

This scarf increases by 1 stitch every row and decreases 4 stitches every 8 rows. Turning chains count as a stitch throughout.

★ Try something new Yarn used Cascade Heritage Paints 1 skein in Coastal 9785 Available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

About the yarn 4-ply; 400m per 100g; 75% Merino wool 25% nylon

Tension 17 sts x 14 rows = 10cm measured over hbtr

Hook used 3.5mm

Sizing See diagram

Start crocheting

Chain 3. Row 1 (RS): Starting in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hbtr. Turn. 2 sts Row 2: 2 ch, 2 hbtr in next st. Turn. 3 sts Row 3: 2 ch, 1 hbtr in same st, 2 hbtr. Turn. 4 sts Row 4: 2 ch, hbtr to last st, 2 hbtr in last st. Turn. 5 sts Row 5: 2 ch, 1 hbtr in same st, hbtr to end. Turn. 6 sts Row 6: 2 ch, hbtr to last st, 2 hbtr in last st. Turn. 7 sts Row 7: 2 ch, 1 hbtr in same st, hbtr to end. Turn. 8 sts Row 8: 2 ch, hbtr to last st, 2 hbtr in last st. Turn. 9 sts Row 9: 2 ch, 1 hbtr in same st, hbtr to last 4 sts, leave last 4 sts unworked. Turn. 6 sts Row 10: 2 ch, hbtr to last st, 2 hbtr in last st. Turn. 7 sts Rows 11-16: Rep rows 7-8 three more times. 13 sts Rep rows 9-16 sixteen more times. 77 sts

Need an alternative? Why not try these other great yarns, available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

Stylecraft Life SymbolWYS Key Signature 4-ply, Blue 4-ply, chLagoon 831 Cascade 2308 hbtr

Chart

17

16 15 14

Finishing

13

Fasten off. Weave in ends. Block to finished measurements. When blocking ensure you keep the curved shape of the shawl and that each point (or ‘wave’) is pinned out.

Working the herringbone trebles asymmetrically creates an unusual shape with great texture that is easy to wear.

King Cole Bamboo Cotton 4-ply, Opal 1016

Fyberspates Vivacious 4-ply, Blue Lagoon 608

12 11 10 9 8 7 6

151cm 54cm

5 Symbol Key

4 3

ch hbtr

2 1

115cm 17

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 31 16 15


Baby

FLAMINGO RATTLE

To give a dangling effect, the legs don’t need stuffing. Folding the wings keeps them stiff enough, so they don’t need stuffing either

Zoë Potrac 32

| www.crochetnow.co.uk


The narrow dangly legs and ring on this rattle give baby plenty to hold onto with their tiny hands and the bright colours are sure to make this a favourite

DK

3mm

★ Quick & easy Yarn used Three Bears Yarn Cotton DK Supima 1 ball in each in Candy 37 (A), Hot Pink 48 (B), Optic White 43 (C), Slate Grey 10 (D) Available from www.threebearsyarn.co.uk

About the yarn DK; 125m per 50g ball; 100% cotton

Tension 18 sts x 26 rows = 10cm over dc

Hook used 3mm

Other supplies toy stuffing wooden teething ring, 70mm rattle disc insert, 22mm

Sizing 30cm from head to toe

Start crocheting Make sure all parts are securely stitched on before giving to a little one!

Main Body Worked around wooden ring With A, chain 10. Placing ch around wooden ring, sl st to join, enclosing wooden ring. Adjust ch count as necessary to fit around ring. Working in a spiral, dc in each st around until entire wooden ring is enclosed. Fasten off. Use tail to sew last row to first, completely covering wooden ring.

Neck & Head With B, chain 6. Row 1: Starting in 2nd ch from hook, 5 dc. Turn. 5 sts Rows 2-13: 1 ch (does not count as a st now and throughout), 5 dc. Turn. Check that strip fits snugly around covered ring and ends can be fastened together. Add or subtract rows as necessary. Row 14: Holding strip around covered ring, 1 ch, dc in each st AND through each adjacent beg ch at the same time to fasten ends together. Row 15: 1 ch, 4 dc in FLO, 3 dc in FLO of next st, turning as you go, continue around to work into the unused back loops, 4 dc in BLO, 3 dc in BLO of last st. 14 sts From next rnd to end, work in the amigurumi style, in a spiral without slip stitching or turning chains. Use a st marker or waste yarn to keep track of the first st of each rnd. Rnds 16-22: Dc around. Rnd 23: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st, 3 dc, 2 dc in next st] twice. 18 sts Rnds 24-28: Dc around. Stuff gently and insert rattle disc, ensuring it is padded by stuffing on all sides. Rnd 29: [1 dc, 1 dc2tog] 6 times. 12 sts Rnd 30: 6 dc2tog. 6 sts Fasten off. Weave in ends. For all following pieces, work in the amigurumi style, in a spiral without slip stitching or turning chains. Use a st marker or waste yarn to keep track of the first st of each rnd.

Nose Rnd 1: With C and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: Dc in BLO around. Rnd 3: Dc around. Rnd 4: Change to D, dc around. Rnd 5: 3 dc2tog. 3 sts Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Legs (make 2) Rnd 1: With B and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnds 2-16: Dc around. Rnd 17: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Rnd 18: Dc in BLO around. Rnd 19: 6 dc2tog. 6 sts Rnds 20-34: Dc around. Rnd 35: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] 3 times. 9 sts Rnd 36: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st] 3 times. 12 sts Rnd 37: [3 dc, 2 dc in next st] 3 times. 15 sts Rnd 38: [4 dc, 2 dc in next st] 3 times. 18 sts Rnd 39: Flatten the end of the toes, 9 dc through both layers to close. Fasten off. Weave in end tail (at toe), leave beg tail for sewing. Wings (make 2) Rnd 1: With A and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Rnd 3: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 24 sts Rnd 5: [3 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 30 sts Rnd 6: [4 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 36 sts Rnd 7: Change to D, [5 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 42 sts Rnd 8: Fold circle in half, 21 dc through both layers to close. Fasten off. Weave in ends. Making up Using photo as a guide, sew Nose onto Head. With D, embroider eyes. With A, sew Wings onto Body. Sew Legs onto Body opposite Wings.

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 33


Artists feature

The Art of

Crochet

Have you ever considered crochet as art, and not just a hobby? We speak to three crochet artists from across the globe about their inspiration, creativity, and each of their unique approaches to crochet as a work of art

M

y name is Kelly Lim, and I go by the artist name Kelly Limerick. I was born in Singapore, where I am currently based. I first started crocheting when I was seven. My mum went to a crochet class and took me along. I was intrigued by how cute cartoon characters like Hello Kitty could be made from a shapeless ball of yarn. After begging her for ages, she finally allowed me to attend a crash course to make my first amigurumi project.

Kelly Limerick

I call myself a crochet artist because I view art as something that is the purest form of www.kllylmrck.com expression- one that cannot be replicated @kllylmrck – which is what I do. While I started crochet with amigurumi and followed charts, I soon observed how certain stitches made certain Kelly’s shapes, and began to crochet freeform. creations I create directly into 3D crochet work, grow improvising as I go along. Much like a living organically creature, the work grows with my thoughts and time, sometimes taking a few days, and others, a few months. When I was much younger, it was quite expensive to acquire crochet pattern books, so I would go to the yarn store, pick up a pattern book and try to memorise as much as I could to try out at home. Of

Don’t let the fear of making mistakes put you off

“I view art as something that is the purest form of expression – one that cannot be replicated” course, I forgot a lot of it along the way and had to improvise! I think this helped me get a head start on creating my own patterns. But it was not till I was about 17 that I consciously tried to create my own designs. Breaking away from patterns was a struggle – I would find myself being afraid of making something that did not turn out nice and having to frog it – but I had to force myself to just dive into it and play along. Although I enjoy a lot of support online, my parents were never really supportive of me


Artists feature

Working on a crochet installation

pursuing an unconventional career and always felt crochet was simply a hobby. My mother was the one who inspired me to crochet, but she stopped soon after and often blamed herself for introducing me. When I create something, I try to get to know the person better who has ordered a piece from me (favourite food? personality?) so as to gauge what they might like. Whether commercial or personal, I would create an image and draw

inspiration from it. I usually start on the base of the work, keeping the image of the client or myself in mind, and adding on as I go till the point I feel it is finished. I get kind of a ‘eureka’ moment when it’s finished! With each piece, I try to do something new that I have yet to try, and that difference makes it hard to choose one particular piece. I see crochet potential in anything that’s long and thin! I’m constantly thinking of new materials I could use. Most recently, I stripped the paper off traditional Chinese

calendars and spun paper yarn out of it. Other materials have included fishing rope, plastic bags, and rubber tubing. If you want to try, I would say just be unafraid and jump right into it! Us crochet people frog all the time anyway, so don’t let the fear of making something ‘wrong’ scare you. Keep all your patterns, think of something familiar to you, and just let your work lead you. Don’t try to control it, and it could show you many different possibilities!

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 35


Artists feature

London Kaye www.londonkaye.com @madebylondon

M

y name is London Kaye. I am from Los Angeles, California and moved to NYC in 2007. I lived in New York City and Brooklyn for 10 years and just moved back to California a few months ago. I learned to crochet when I was 13 from my best friend’s mum. I had no idea it would stick with me for so long!  I am a crochet street artist and I crochet wild things, like mermaids and whales and hang them up on the street and leave them there for people to enjoy. It’s now getting to be known as yarnbombing. I like this form of street art because it is a soft graffiti, it does not hurt the environment or leave a permanent mark. It sure does brighten people’s day though! When I first learned to crochet I would make scarves, hundreds and hundreds of scarves. I grew up dancing ballet and I would sell my scarves to the girls at my dance studio and my friends at school. I

London calls her work ‘soft graffiti’

Different brands and companies work with London

sold so many scarves I bought my car when I was 16 with the money I had earned. After I graduated university, I got a regular job, but a couple of years later I started putting up street art made of yarn. It was like a light bulb went off: I could make something besides scarves out of yarn! I never follow patterns, I kind of just figure out through trial and error. It is all single crochet (UK double crochet), even today! Over time different brands and companies started reaching out wanting to pay me to crochet

for them. I was able to quit my 9-5 job about two and a half years ago and now I crochet all day, every day. When I start a new project my creative approach generally is well thought out. I will take inspiration from a current event or things going on in pop culture. Once I have an idea of what I want to crochet I will draw it out to water down all of the shapes to the most basic level. Other times though, my creative process has to do with what colour yarn I have in my stash. Usually I use Lion Brand Yarn. I have my own line of yarn and crochet hooks with Lion Brand that is made for both indoor and outdoor projects, so that would be my first choice. One of the craziest things I have crocheted with is 20-metre Ethernet cables.  For my first crochet art piece I took a scarf I had made and wrapped it around a tree outside my apartment in Brooklyn. I think that is a good first project for anyone who would like to start making crochet art of your own!

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Artists feature

“For me, creating crochet art is the meaning of life”

Katika www.katika-art.com @katikaart

M

y art is paintings made of yarn by crochet hooks. Sometimes my pieces have practical applications – they can be used as rugs, shawls, appliqués etc. They are primarily made for being admired though. I put a lot of effort and a lot of myself into my art pieces. For me, creating this crochet art is the meaning of life. My mother taught me to crochet when I was a child. I decided to combine it with my other artistic passions after I had finished 12 years of art education. Once, I had a dream about paintings made of yarn and how everything in the world is connected through string. Soon after, I started using yarn for portraits. This was a revelation for me in 2014, when I was just a young girl looking for my own path. My first endeavours in the field of crochet art were awful. I never used patterns. I

always tell people to never use patterns or count stiches but ‘paint’ with hooks. After years of practice my pieces are in private collections and decorate walls of hotels, and I can do so much more with my tools and materials of choice! I get a lot of online support, though on the other hand since I’m pretty closed off, I feel like I don’t get enough support in real life. People I’m close with think of my art as a whim, something childish and futile. I live in Russia where being a freelancer – not to mention a selfemployed artist – is still not socially acceptable for many people.   Personal art pieces require preparation, introspection, intensive sketching and searching for the perfect way to explore themes. I’m working on a series that will help me explore my own psychological

A crochet portrait of South African band Die Antwoord

problems. As for commissioned works, they are much easier to work on. They still require a lot of time and sketching, as in preparation to making someone’s portrait I’m trying to make the person familiar to me, to know them better through studying their photo. These pieces become very personal and dear to me. I mainly use acrylic yarn, though I mix acrylic with wool, cotton, etc to create new textures and colour combinations. My best work is a portrait of my daughter Sophie on the wall above my bed. It pulls all the right strings in my heart; I’m very happy with it.   I encourage anyone who wants to try making crochet art to study books on art, especially colour theory and composition. I’d also advise them to look into themselves and find a bit of madness, as in my opinion art needs at least a tiny bit of madness.

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 37


How to…

STITCH MASTERCLASS

BOXED BEADS

Master the extended double crochet and slanting cluster stitch to create a pretty repeating box pattern, great for home projects

Sherrie Yabsley 38

| www.crochetnow.co.uk


How to…

S

ometimes it takes a couple of stitches to make a pretty pattern, which is what we have for you today with the Boxed Bead pattern. A quick project like a table runner means you can practise your stitches and new techniques easily, building your confidence as you go ready to incorporate them into your bigger projects. Sherrie of www.ollieand bella.co.uk takes us through what we need to know!

Aran

Slanting Cluster (SCL)

1 Yrh, insert hook around stem of previous tr from right to left.

2 Shown with hook behind stem of previous tr.

4.5mm

★★ Try something new Yarn used Caron Simply Soft 2 skeins in Blue Mint Available from www.woolwarehouse.com

3 Yrh, pull up loop. 3 loops on hook

4 Rep steps 1-2 twice more. 7 loops on hook

About the yarn Aran; 288m per 170.1g ball; 100% acrylic

Tension 5 sts x 5 rows = 10cm measured over SCL

5 Yrh, pull through first 6 loops on hook.

6 Yrh, pull through both loops on hook.

Hook used 4.5mm

Extended Double Crochet (exdc)

Sizing 31x126cm

Start crocheting Chain 47 Row 1 (WS): Starting in the 3rd ch from hook, 2 dc, *exdc, 2 dc repeat from* exdc in last ch. Turn. 45 sts Row 2: 2 ch, miss 1st st, * tr, SCL, miss st, exdc, repeat from * exdc in 2 ch. Turn. Row 3: 2 ch, miss 1st st, * dc in scl, dc in tr, exdc in exdc, repeat from *, finish exdc in top of 2nd ch. Turn. Repeat rows 2 and 3 until work measures approximately 125 cm. Next Row: 1 ch, dc to end. Weave in ends and block to finished measurements.

1 Insert hook into st, yrh pull up loop.

3

2 Yrh, pull through only 1 loop on hook.

Remember to work into your turning chains for a neat edge

Yrh pull through both loops on hook.

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 39


KERRY’S JOURNAL We all know and love how amazing crochet can be, but Kerry and the team at TOFT want us to know that knitting can be just as amazing www.toftuk.com

“I knit to create I something I want to wear, but I crochet when I want to enjoy the process of working a few stitch stitches to relax”

learnt to knit before I was even tempted to try and learn to crochet. Very unlike how I learned to crochet (in my own living room, using videos on YouTube), I had the pleasure of being taught to knit by a very talented and experienced knitter keen to pass on her enthusiasm. Very early in my TOFT journey I was invited to spend the weekend with a lady who would not only teach me the basics of knit and purl, but also introduce me to her network of knitters and share her design and business style! Although I am now more well known for my crochet design, I still create and collaborate on dozens of knitting patterns every year for the TOFT Quarterly magazines. I love to crochet, but I will still always turn to my knitting needles if I am in need of warm ears! I simply like wearing knitted fabric rather than crochet, as the fluidity, stretch and patterned surface texture you can create with the stitches are hugely diverse.  Knitting has enjoyed a huge resurgence in popularity that started 10 years ago

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at the beginning of the UK craft revival, which has now flowed through pottery, colouring, sewing and many other crafts. And here we are at crochet’s zenith! Rather than burning hard and bright as crochet has done in recent years however, knitting is glowing in the background as a strong established industry, now with a vibrant, dynamic and dedicated group of followers. Knitting has been resurging for years, perhaps with a slower pace, but as an even larger and more established force than crochet. So this year TOFT will be revisiting its roots and focusing on knitting as we move into the autumn/winter 18 season! Our yarn was originally designed and developed to create luxury knitwear, the same kits that also happened to be perfect for hooking up lots of that double crochet stitch into animals! We are very pleased to see our knitting kits joining our #edsanimals crochet kits on the shelves of John Lewis, and keep your eyes peeled for some big news as we approach the


Kerry’s Journal Knitting a shawl is a great first project

15% OFF

www.toftuk. com www.edwar ds crochet.com

Use code: CN PP5972 Expires 9th Au gust 2018

Have you ever wanted to knit?

Knitting and Stitching Show in October! Expect lots of geometric colourwork, tips and tricks on mastering the basics and some designs that really showcase the TOFT natural colour spectrum. We are aware that many crocheters have never knitted, and so we will be focusing on beginner projects that deliver quick results. To accompany that we’ll be adding lots of new learn-to-knit workshops onto our programme at HQ, while also hosting some on techniques such as cables, colourwork and lace. 

With lots of my work time being taken up holding onto my knitting needles, it makes me even more eager to return to my crochet hook in the evening. I am busy with all the TOFT subscription animals and lots of plotting and planning for possible big new projects in 2019. I am enjoying working with The Knitting and Stitching Show to plan a world-first exhibit of all of my Edward’s Crochet designs at the Alexandra Palace show in October. TOFT will also be hosting a meet and greet area and potential gin bar! Watch this space.

Interested in knitting? Why not try our sister magazines Knit Now and Your Crochet & Knitting? www.moremags.com

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 41


The Rico Toy Box

FIZZ THE

UNICORN

Val Pierce 42

| www.crochetnow.co.uk


The Rico Toy Box We’ve made half of the toys in our toy box now, and what collection would be complete without a magical friend? DK

3mm

★ ★ Take your time Yarn used Rico Essentials Cotton DK 1 ball in white 80 (MC) Few metres of black 90, Rose 01, turquoise 33, Banana 63, Pistachio 86, purple 18, Violet 20, Candy Pink 05, fuchsia 14 Rico Essentials Cotton Glitz DK 1 ball in white 001 (CC1) Why not try NEW Ricorumi? 2 balls in white 001 (MC) 1 ball each in black, Rose 008, fuchsia 014, turquoise 039, yellow 06, Pistachio 047, Berry 015, Violet 018, Candy Pink 012 Available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

About the yarn Essentials Cotton: DK; 130m per 50g ball; 100% cotton Glitz: DK; 130m per 50g ball; 78% cotton, 19% viscose, 3% polyester

Tension 10 sts x 12 rows = 5cm

Hook used 3mm

Other supplies toy stuffing tapestry needle sewing thread in colour to match spiral on horn

Sizing Approximately 23cm tall

Start crocheting Each round is joined using a sl st. When joining each round, sl st to first dc, work 1ch (which is not counted as a st), then always work the first dc of the following round in the same st as join. This will maintain the correct number of stitches. When stuffing the toy, tease out little bits of stuffing at a time, this will ensure a smooth and lumpfree shape to the finished project. If you intend to give the toy to a young child, then please make sure all parts are sewn on very firmly and regularly check that parts are fully attached.

Head Remember to start stuffing when you begin the decreases and shape the head as you continue to make. With MC, chain 2. Rnd 1 (RS): 6 dc in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in first ch to join into a circle. 6 dc Rnd 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 2 dc in each st to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnd 3: 1 ch, *1 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnd 4: 1 ch, *2 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Rnds 5-10: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 11: 1 ch, 7 dc, [2 dc in next st] 10 times, 7 dc, sl st to first dc. 34 dc Rnds 12-20: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc.

Decrease for back of head Rnd 21: 1 ch, 2 dc, [1 dc, 1 dc2tog] 10 times, 2 dc, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Rnd 22: 1 ch, *2 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnd 23: 1 ch, *1 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnd 24: 1 ch, 6 dc2tog, sl st to first dc. 6 dc Fasten off.

Horn With CC1, chain 15. Join to work in the rnd, being careful not to twist. Rnd 1 (RS): 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 15 dc, sl st to first dc. 15 dc Rnds 2-3: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 4: 1 ch, *1 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 10 dc Rnd 5: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 6: 1 ch, 5 dc2tog, sl st to first dc. 5 dc Rnd 7: 2 ch, 2 dc2tog, 1 dc, sl st to first dc. 3 dc Fasten off.

Ears (make 2) With MC, chain 2. Rnd 1 (RS): 6 dc in 2nd ch from hook, sl st to first dc. 6 dc Rnd 2: 1 ch, 2 dc in each st to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnds 3-6: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 7: 1 ch, *1 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnds 8-9: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Fasten off.

Body Remember to start stuffing when you begin the decreases and shape the body as you continue to make. With MC, chain 2. Rnd 1 (RS): 6 dc in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in first ch to join into a circle. 6 dc Rnd 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 2 dc in each st to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnd 3: 1 ch, *1 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnd 4: 1 ch, *2 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 24 dc

Neck With MC, chain 24. Join to work in the rnd, being careful not to twist. Rnd 1 (RS): 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 24 dc, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Rnds 2-3: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 4: 1 ch, *2 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnds 5-6: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Fasten off.

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The Rico Toy Box Rnd 5: 1 ch, *3 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 30 dc Rnd 6: 1 ch, *4 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 36 dc Rnd 7: 1 ch, *5 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 42 dc Rnds 8-27: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 28: 1 ch, *5 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 36 dc Rnd 29: 1 ch, *4 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 30 dc Rnd 30: 1 ch, *3 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Rnd 31: 1 ch, *2 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnd 32: 1 ch, *1 dc, 1 dc2tog; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnd 33: 1 ch, 6 dc2tog, sl st to first dc. 6 dc Fasten off.

Legs (make 4) With MC, chain 16. Join to work in the rnd, being careful not to twist. Rnd 1: 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 16 dc, sl st to first dc. 16 dc Rnds 2-13: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Fasten off MC and join in CC1. Rnd 14: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Rnd 15: 1 ch, *1 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Rnds 16-18: 1 ch, dc to end, sl st to first dc. Fasten off. Foot Base (make 4) With CC1, chain 2. Rnd 1 (RS): 6 dc in 2nd ch from hook, sl st to first ch to join into a circle. 6 dc Rnd 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), 2 dc in each st to end, sl st to first dc. 12 dc Rnd 3: 1 ch, *1 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 18 dc Rnd 4: 1 ch, *2 dc, 2 dc in next st; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc. 24 dc Fasten off.

Mane & Tail (make 12) With colour of choice, chain 24. Row 1: Starting in 2nd ch from hook, 3 dc in each ch to end. 69 dc Fasten off. Twist the spiral to make it tighter if desired. Making up Fold Ears flat, pleat the base to give shape and then pin to each side of the top of

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The twists for the Mane and Tail are so easy to crochet

Head, making sure they are level and angled slightly forward. Sew in place. Add some stuffing to horn to pad out. Place in centre of forehead, just below Ears, sew in place. Take a length of coloured yarn and wind around the horn in a spiral, catch in place as you do with matching sewing thread. Embroider eyes and nostrils onto Head. Pin Neck in place on front of Body, add stuffing to pad it out. Sew in place, leaving top open. Place Head onto the open edge of Neck, making sure that it will balance. When you are happy with the position, sew Head to Neck and add more stuffing before closing up if necessary to create a firm neck. Stuff legs, leaving tops open. Pin Foot base in place inside the base of Leg. Sew in place all around the outer edge. Add extra stuffing from the top if needed. Repeat with the other legs then pin the legs in place onto Body. Sew in place. Take six coloured spirals, weave in ends then sew spirals together to form

the mane. Sew to top of Head between Ears. Take the remaining spirals and join them in the same way. Sew to back of Body for tail.

Coming soon! We are delighted to introduce you to the remaining toys in the toy box, including Alfie the Alpaca who you will find in issue 31, on sale 2nd August


ts i n e m r a G

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SIZE6S! 6-3

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Packed with patterns YOU’LL LOVE TO KNIT

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Anti-pilling, anti-bacterial baby yarn – perfect for newborns and premature babies

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Grown on our farm, washed and spun in Yorkshire

Contact your Cygnet stockist for details

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46

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We are delighted to offer for sale: Genuine Wensleydale and Bluefaced Leicester worsted spun wool Unique hand spun wool from the Woolly Wizzard Exquisite hand sorted raw, washed and dyed fleece/locks Pure Wensleydale combed tops Wool in kits for knitting and crochet Home Farm, Arlescote OX17 1DQ Tel: 07762 787836 Email: homefarmwensleydales@gmail.com www.homefarmwensleydales.com


Chunky home

QUICK MAKES FOR

YOUR HOME

Cut out and keep these three stylish projects for your home, all using chunky yarn and your glitter hooks, meaning they work up in no time or bust your stash with our how-to guide to making your own chunky yarn

Summer make

Use your hooks

Great for kids’ rooms

Bolster cushion

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 47


Chunky home

Use your

12mm hook 10% OFF

e this the yarn to mak e back rug! Turn to th ils de cover for ta ture ou lc oo www.w om .c ny pa com

Jacinta Bowie 48

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Chunky home

RUG & ROOM TIDY A traditional technique for rug making uses recycled yarn to make American folkloric coiled rugs

Bulky

12mm

★ Beginner friendly Yarn used Wool Couture Cotton Tape One ball each of Mustard (A,) purple (B), orange (C), Damson (D) Available from www.woolcouturecompany

About the yarn Bulky; 130m per 250g ball; 80% cotton, 20% recycled fibre

Tension 9 sts x 10 rnds = 10cm measured over dc

Hook used 12mm

Sizing Rug diameter 64cm Bag height 24cm Width at base 25cm

Start crocheting Fasten off each colour before joining new, weave in ends as work progresses. Join each rnd with a sl st in the top of beg ch. Join new colour with sl st in first st, or as indicated.

Rug With B, chain 4, sl st to first ch to form a ring. Rnd 1: Working into ring, 2 ch (counts as first htr now and throughout), 5 htr, join. 6 sts

Rnd 2: 3 ch (counts as first tr now and throughout),1 tr in same st, 2 tr in each st to end, join. 12 sts Rnd 3: Join D, 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, 2 tr in each st to end, join. 24 sts Rnd 4: Join C, 3 ch, tr around, join.  Rnd 5: 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, 2 tr in each st to end, join. 48 sts Rnd 6: Join A, 1 ch (counts as first dc now and throughout), dc around, join.  Rnd 7: [12 ch, miss 3 sts, 5 dc] 6 times. 30 dc Rnd 8: [12 htr in 12ch-sp, miss 2 dc, 1 dc, miss 2 dc] 6 times, join with sl st to first htr. 78 sts Rnd 9: Join D, 2 ch, 11 htr, miss 1 dc, [12 htr, miss 1 dc] 5 times, join. 72 htr Rnd 10: Join C between 6th and 7th htr on 12-htr arch, [8 ch, 1 dtr in gap between next two 12-htr arches, 8 ch, sl st between 6th and 7th htr on next arch] 6 times, join with sl st to first ch. Rnd 11: 4 ch (counts as first dtr), 8 dtr in first 8ch-sp, *9 dtr in next 8ch-sp; rep from * to end, join. 108 sts  Rnd 12: Join A, 1 ch, dc around, join. Rnd 13: Join D, 1 ch, dc around, join. Rnd 14: Join B, 1 ch, dc around, join. Rnd 15: *5 ch, miss 1 st, 1 sl st in next st; rep from * around, join with sl st to first ch. 54 5ch-sps Rnd 16: Join D in top of 5ch-sp, *4 ch, sl st in top of next 5ch-sp, rep from * to end, join with sl st to first ch. Rnd 17: Join A in top of 4ch-sp, *4 ch, sl st in top of next 4ch-sp, rep from * to end, join with sl st to first ch.  Rnd 18: 3 ch, 1 dc in first 4ch-sp, *3 dc in next 4ch-sp; rep from * to end, 1 dc in beg 4ch-sp, join. 162 dc Rnd 19: Join C in centre dc of any 3dcgroup, 4 ch (counts as first tr and 1 ch), miss 1 st, *1 tr, 1 ch, miss 1 st; rep from * around, join with sl st in 3rd of beg 4 ch. 81 tr

Rnd 20: Join D in any ch-sp, 1 ch (does not count as a st), 1 dc in same sp as join, *1 dc, 1 dc in next ch-sp; rep from * to last st, 1 dc, join with sl st to first st. 164 sts Rnd 21: Join B, 1 ch (counts as a st), dc to end, join. Fasten off.

Room Tidy Work as given for first three rnds of Rug. Rnd 4: 3 ch (counts as first tr now and throughout), tr around, join.  Rnd 5: 3 ch, 1 tr in same st, 2 tr in each st to end, join. 48 sts  Rnd 6: Join A in any st, 3 ch, tr around, join. Rep Rnd 6 another 4 times using the following colour sequence: Two rnds with D, one rnd with B and one rnd with C. Rnd 11: With B, 1 ch (counts as first dc now and throughout), dc to end, join. Rep Rnd 11 another 7 times using the following colour sequence: [One rnd with B, one rnd with A, one rnd with D] twice, one rnd with A. Rnd 19: With B, as Rnd 6.  Rnd 20: 4 ch (counts as first tr and 1 ch), miss 1 st, *1 tr, 1 ch, miss 1 st; rep from * around, join with sl st in 3rd of beg 4 ch. Rnd 21: 1 ch, *1 dc in ch-sp, 1 dc; rep from * around, join. Rnd 22: Join A in any st, 1 ch, dc around, join. Rnd 23: With D, as Rnd 22.  Fasten off.

Drawstring With C, chain a length 80cm long. Weave in and out of the 1ch-sps of Rnd 19.

Making up Wet block to finished measurements.

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Chunky home

TUNISIAN LEAVES BOLSTER

Use your

10mm hook

Alison Holloway 50

| www.crochetnow.co.uk


Chunky home

This project creates a chic cusion for the home, and is a clever way to make any regular crochet hook into a Tunisian hook!

Chunky 10mm, 7mm, 4mm

★ Stretch your skills Yarn used Hayfield Bonus Chunky 2 balls in Amber 0670 (MC) Hayfield Bonus DK 1 ball in Azure 0824 (CC) Available from www.knittingwool.com

About the yarn Hayfield Bonus Chunky: Chunky; 137m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic Hayfield Bonus DK: DK; 280m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic

Tension 10 sts x 9 rows = 10cm measured over tss

Hooks used 10mm Tunisian crochet hook 7mm standard crochet hook 4mm Tunisian or long shaft standard crochet hook

Other supplies tapestry needle 41x15cm bolster cushion insert 6 cream buttons, 2cm

Sizing Approximately 42cm

Special stitches

Tunisian Bullion Stitch (tbs): Yrh number of times indicated, insert hook into next ch, yrh, pull loop through ch and all loops from beg yrh, leave rem loops (from previous sts) on hook. Tbs-1 begins with 1 yrh, tbs-2 begins with 2 yrh, and so on

Start crocheting You can adjust this pattern to fit any size of bolster. Just add additional Tunisian rows to the body and corresponding extra rows to the end pieces. The cushion body will work out shorter than the length of the cushion, but it will stretch to fit snugly. Check fit as you progress.

Cushion Body The final row of this section will leave neat square holes. These will be used as buttonholes. With MC and larger Tunisian hook, chain 37. Row 1 FP: Starting in 2nd ch from hook, pul in each ch across. 37 loops on hook Row 1 RP & all RP: Standard RP. Row 2: Miss first vertical bar, tss across to last st, insert hook under front and back vertical bars of last st, yrh, pul. 37 loops on hook Rows 3-49: As Row 2. Fasten off.

Cushion Ends (make 2) This piece is worked in the amigurumi style, in a spiral without slip stitching or turning chains. Use a st marker or waste yarn to keep track of the first st of each rnd. Rnd 1: With MC, standard hook, and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Work all sts into BLO for rnds 3-8. Rnd 3: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 24 sts Rnd 5: [3 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 30 sts Rnd 6: [4 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 36 sts Rnd 7: [5 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 42 sts Rnd 8: [6 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times, sl st in next st to close spiral. 48 sts Fasten off. Making up Place WS of long edge of Row 49 on top of RS of Row 1 to form the cylinder of the bolster and pin or baste in place.

With WS of circular end piece against inner WS edge of cylinder, and working through both layers, join yarn to cylinder, dc in Row 48 and nearest st on end piece, dc through both layers evenly around to overlapped rows, working through 3 layers, dc across overlapped rows, ensuring buttonhole row is on top. Fasten off. Rep for other end. Sew 6 buttons evenly spaced and lined up with buttonholes of overlapped edge.

Leaf (make 11) With CC and smaller Tunisian or longshaft standard hook, loosely chain 12. Row 1 FP: Starting in 2nd ch from hook, [pul] twice, 2 tbs-1, 3 tbs-2, 3 tbs-3, 1 tbs-4. 12 loops on hook Row 1 RP & all RP: Standard RP. Row 2: 3 ch (does not count as st), rotating as you go, work in the other side of the starting chain, miss 3-ch just made, pul across. 12 loops on hook Fasten off, leaving a tail to sew Leaf onto Cushion. Use the tails to sew through the 2 end rows of each Leaf to create the point and then straight stitch down the centre of each Leaf to attach to body of Cushion.

Make your own Tunisian hook Did you know you can make your regular crochet hook work for Tunisian crochet too? All you need is a hook, some rope or cord roughly the same size, and some insulation tape. We made our glittery 10mm hook ready for Alison’s project by taping 40cm of cord to the end, meaning you can work over all the stitches you need.

Round Knitted Super Strong Woven Cord, 10mm £2.20 www.beadsdirect.co.uk

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Chunky home

Make your own

CHUNKY YARN

Chunky yarn often doesn’t have as big a colour palette as its DK and aran counterparts, and many of us have lots of lightweight yarn in our stash to use, so we’ve come up with some ways you can make your own chunky yarn

1

2

3

Where to buy Patons Fab DK, £1.99 www.knitting wool.com

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Chunky home 1

Knit it yourself

If you want to go super chunky, get hold of a knitting mill and use any 4-ply, DK or even aran yarn to knit up a mega-chunky, flexible cord that can be crocheted using a 15mm hook. We’ve used Patons Fab DK in Canary 2305 and the Prym Knitting Mill MINI which, with the simple crank of a handle, knits your skinny yarn into a thick cord! Although this method takes some time, it’s a lot of fun to make and to crochet with. Hook used: 15mm Tension: 4.5 dc = 10cm

How to chain ply Also known as Navajo plying, use this technique to make a single ply into 3-ply – here we make DK yarn into chunky.

1

Where to buy Prym Knitting Mill, MINI, £16.99 www.minerva crafts.com 2

Fold the two strands back down again so you have three strands, and a loop at both ends.

3-in-1 method

One of the best ways to create chunky yarn is to have fun with colour and create your very own colour-changing yarn. Simply grab three colours in DK, hold them together, and start crocheting to get a super-chunky tension. The same could work for four strands of 4-ply or two strands of aran. We’ve used Patons Fab DK in Canary 2305, Mint 2300 and pink 2304, but you could use three balls of the same colour if you wanted as well. Hook used: 12mm Tension: 7 dc = 10cm 3

Fold the end of your yarn back down on itself (about 50cm) so you are holding two strands.

2

3 Holding all three strands together, crochet as normal.

4 Once you run out of three strands, you should see a loop in your yarn.

Chain plying

Did you know that you don’t even need to wind your ball into three if you wanted to get chunky yarn from one ball of DK? In our step-by-step instructions, we show you how to chain ply from a single ball to a chunky tension. Why is this useful? If you wanted to make a chunky blanket in a colour palette that you can only find in DK, now you can! Just be careful to buy more yarn than you think – your meterage will be about a third of what the ball band says. We’ve used a 10mm hook and Patons Fab DK in Canary 2305. Hook used: 10mm Tension: 8 dc = 10cm

5 Pull the yarn attached to the ball through this loop and back on itself.

6 You will have three strands again! Repeat Step 5 every time you work to the loop and you have made your DK yarn into chunky.

Turn over to try this technique in a project! www.crochetnow.co.uk | 53


Chunky home

YOU ARE MY

Use chunky yarn, or any DK, to make this happy wall art – or why not make several into a child’s blanket? DK

SUNSHINE

10mm, 12mm

★ Stretch your skills Yarn used Patons Fab DK 1 ball each in Canary 2305 (MC), Mint 2300 (CC1), pink 2304 (CC2) Small amount in black 2311 Available from www.knittingwool.com

About the yarn DK; 272m per 100g; 100% acrylic

Tension 9 sts x 9 rows = 10cm with larger hook and yarn held triple over dc 3 blocks = 10cm with smaller hook and yarn held double over C2C

Hooks used 10mm 12mm

Other supplies 50cm-square picture frame double-sided tape tapestry needle stitch markers

Sizing 48cm square

Start crocheting The sun is worked in the round in amigurumi style (continuous rounds, do not join with a sl st) and yarn held triple – you can use the chain-plying method, or wind your yarn into three balls. The background is made using the C2C method and two colours held together.

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Sun With MC held triple and larger hook. Rnd 1: Working into magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: [2 dc in next st] to end. 12 sts Rnd 3: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] to end. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st] to end. 24 sts Rnd 5: [3 dc, 2 dc in next st] to end. 30 sts Rnd 6: [4 dc, 2 dc in next st] to end. 36 sts Rnd 7: [5 dc, 2 dc in next st] to end. 42 sts

Sun Rays The rays are worked in rows, by joining to different parts of the sun. *Rnd 8: 5dc. Turn. 5 sts Next Row: 1 ch, 5 dc. Turn. Rep last row 9 more times. 10 rows Fasten off. Miss 2 sts on Sun and re-join MC. Rep from * around for a total of six rays. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Background With smaller hook, and holding CC1 and CC2 together, chain 6.

Row 1: 1 tr in 4th ch from hook, tr in next 2 ch. Turn. 1 block Row 2: 6 ch, 1 tr in 4th ch from hook, tr in next 2 ch, [sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp from previous row. Turn. 2 blocks Row 3: 6 ch, 1 tr in 4th ch from hook, tr in next 2 ch, {[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp from previous row} twice. Turn. 3 blocks. Continue to increase in this manner until 14 rows have been worked. Work decreases from Row 15 onwards: Row 15: Sl st across first tr, {[sl st, 3 ch, 3 tr] in 3ch-sp from previous row} in all 3chsps from previous row til last 3ch-sp, sl st in last 3ch-sp. Turn. Continue in this manner until one black remains. Fasten off.

Making up With black, embroider smiling face onto Sun. Use stitch markers to position Sun on Background and sew into place with MC. With double-sided tape, stick Background into frame.


ns r tte rth a P wo

9 Fresh ideas for you and your home Issue 22 9 . 8 on sale 1 ÂŁ now!

STYLISH 2-IN-1

dress pattern tie-back top pattern In sizes XS-XL Fun granny square cushion

Stylish water carrier

Order your copy today at www.moremags.com/sn22


Heart to Heart Crochet is good for the mind and the soul, and we want your help continuing the conversation

L

ast issue, we launched our brand-new Heart to Heart campaign with the aim of encouraging readers to open up about their struggles with mental health and wellbeing. One in four of us will be affected by mental health issues during our lifetime, so it’s important that talking openly and honestly becomes second nature.

About Heart to Heart The Heart to Heart campaign is a way to share your experiences with like-minded crafters around the country. We want to hear your stories about how knitting and

crochet has improved your mental health and wellbeing. Each month we’ll be sharing some of the inspiring stories we receive to encourage people to open up about their struggles and show them our support.

Want to get involved? Getting involved is simple. All you need to do is knit or crochet a heart and send it to us along with a letter telling us in as few or as many words as you like how crafting has impacted your wellbeing. Simply fill out the entry form below and enclose it in an envelope with your heart

and letter. Your contribution will be forwarded to another participant and you will receive a letter in an exchange to help spread the conversation. This month, we’ve been reading some of your stories and are sharing one reader’s journey to recovery.


THIS MONTH’S STAR LETTER

I’ve suffered with mental health for a while. I recently got diagnosed with two chronic hip conditions and I unfortunately had to give up work. The anxiety and depression kicked in big time and I was at a loss... then someone recommended crochet to me. I searched YouTube and Bella Coco came up so I taught myself to crochet. I instantly became hooked! Now I can’t put my crochet hook down, every time things get bad it makes me feel 100 times better. Due to my hip conditions I’m in pain most of the time and am not very mobile. Crocheting helps me almost forget about the pain for a while and helps me take my mind off things, especially when I’m down, stressed and upset. I don’t know where I’d be if I didn’t learn to crochet. It’s helped save me and I’ve found myself again. It’s also boosted my confidence and I’ve even met new friends on the way.

Crochet a heart

Try our easy heart pattern Make 2 With 3mm hook, and DK yarn, chain 3. Row 1: 2 dc. Turn. 2 sts Row 2: 1 ch, [2 dc in next st] twice. Turn. 4 sts Row 3: 1 ch, dc across. Turn. Row 4: 1 ch, [2dc in next st], dc to last st, [2 dc in next st]. Turn. 6 sts Rep last 2 rows until 22 sts have been worked. Dc across 4 rows. Next Row: 1 ch, 11 dc. Turn. Work across these 11 sts only: *Next Row: 1 ch, dc across. Turn.

Next Row: 1 ch, [dc2tog], dc to end. Turn. Rep last row until 4 sts rem. Next Row: 1 ch, [dc2tog] twice. Fasten off. Rejoin yarn to rem 11 sts at centre edge. Rep from * once. Fasten off.

Making up Place wrong sides together and sew together, leaving small hole to fill with stuffing. Stuff and sew closed.

Supported by...

Send submissions to: Heart to Heart, Practical Publishing, Suite G2 St Christopher House, 217 Wellington Road South, Stockport, SK2 6NG Name .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Address ........................................................................................................................................................... Postcode .................................................. Email.......................................................................................................................................Phone number ................................................................... I am happy for my postal submission to be forwarded to another participant of the Heart-to-Heart campaign I am happy for my submission to be shared anonymously in Crochet Now magazine I am happy for my submission to be shared anonymously on all Crochet Now social media I am happy to receive marketing emails from Crochet Now


Children

COTTON CANDY DRESS

Use open stitches as buttonholes for adjustable straps

This super-sweet pinafore dress has adjustable straps that will suit growing kids

If the waistband gets a bit loose over time you can slip-stitch around it to tighten up

Veronika Cromwell 58

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Children DK

4mm

★ Stretch your skills Yarn used Cygnet Cottony DK 1 (2, 2) balls in cream 225 (MC) 1 ball of each in Vanilla 848 (CC1), Coral 549 (CC2), Pistachio 266 (CC3), Powder Blue 198 (CC4), Candy Pink 550 (CC5) Available from www.deramores.com

About the yarn DK; 111m per 50g ball; 46% cotton, 46% acrylic, 8% viscose

Tension 21 sts x 9 rows = 10 cm measured over tr in BLO

Hook used 4mm

Other supplies

Work all rem rnds of Main Skirt in BLO. Rnd 2: 3 ch, 7 tr, 2 tr in next st, [8 tr, 2 tr in next st] around, sl st to top of beg 3 ch to join. 110 (120, 130) tr Fasten off and change to CC2 for all sizes. Rnd 3: 3 ch, 8 tr, 2 tr in next st, [9 tr, 2 tr in next st] around, sl st in top of beg 3 ch to join. 121 (132, 143) tr Rnd 4: 3 ch, 9 tr, 2 tr in next st, [10 tr, 2 tr in next st] around, sl st in top of beg 3 ch to join. 132 (144, 156) tr Rnd 5: 3 ch, 10 tr, 2 tr in next end st, [11 tr , 2 tr in next st] around, sl st in top of beg 3 ch to join. 143 (156, 159) tr 6-12 MONTHS ONLY: Fasten off and change to CC3. ALL SIZES: Rnd 6: 3 ch, 11 tr, 2 tr in next end st, [12 tr , 2 tr in next st] around, sl st in top of beg 3 ch to join. 154 (168, 182) tr 2-3 YEARS ONLY: Fasten off and change to CC3. ALL SIZES: Rnd 7: 3 ch, tr around, sl st in top of beg 3 ch to join. 154 (168, 182) tr

6-12 mths (2-3 yrs, 4-5 yrs) Waist circumference: 48 (54, 60) cm Skirt length: 17.5 (22, 26.5) cm Back length: 16 (20, 22) cm

Start crocheting Waistband With CC1, chain 6. Row 1: Starting in 2nd ch from hook, 5 dc. Turn. 5 dc Row 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st), 5 dc in BLO. Turn. Rep Row 2 another 86 (94, 102) times. Fold in half, working through both the layers along the first and last row, then sl st across to form a ring, rotate to continue working in each row end around the long edge.

Main Skirt Rnd 1: 3 ch (counts as 1 tr throughout), 6 tr, 2 tr in next st, [7 tr, 2 tr in next st] around, sl st to top of beg 3 ch to join. 99 (108, 117) tr

Front Pm into 12th st on either side of Back, with RS facing, join MC in first marked st, rep as for Back for 14 (17, 21) rows.

Neck shaping Row 1: Sl st in first closed V-st, 1 beg closed Vst2tog, 4 (5, 6) closed V-sts, 1 closed Vst2tog, leave rem sts unworked. Turn. 6 (7, 8) closed V-sts Row 2: 2 ch, 1 tr2tog over first 2 sts, 2 (3, 4) closed V-st, 1 tr2tog over last 2 sts. 4 (5, 6) sts 6-12 MONTHS ONLY: Fasten off.

ALL SIZES: Rep Row 7 seven (eleven, fifteen) more times using each CC colour for 3 (4, 5) rows in total. Fasten off.

2-3 YEARS & 4-5 YEARS ONLY: Row 3: 2 ch, 1 tr2tog over first 2 sts, - (1, 2) closed V-st, 1 tr2tog over last 2 sts. - (3, 4) sts Fasten off. With RS (WS, WS) facing, miss 1 closed V-st on last row of Front, join MC with sl st in next closed V-st and rep Neck shaping. Fasten off.

Back

Finishing

Working in row ends on the opposite edge of the waistband, pm in 16th (18th, 20th) row end from either side of join (joining the Waistband into a ring). Row 1: With RS facing, join MC in first marked row end, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr throughout), 1 tr in same row end, miss next row end, * 2 tr in next row end, miss next row end; rep from * until next marked st, 2 tr in next row end. Turn. 17 (19, 21) closed V-sts Row 2: Sl st in space between first and 2nd tr, 3 ch, 1 tr in same sp, *2 tr in next closed V-st; rep from * across. Turn. Rep Row 2 fourteen (eighteen, twenty-two) more times. Do not fasten off.

Sew buttons onto Front at top of neck shaping. Use the 2ch-sp in the straps as button holes. Weave in all ends and block to dimensions.

2 buttons, 18mm

Sizing

(counts as 1 tr throughout), [1 tr, 2 ch, 1 tr] in next closed V-st, 1 tr in next closed V-st. Turn. Row 2: 3 ch, [1 tr, 2 ch, 1 tr] in next 2ch-sp, 1 tr. Turn. Rep Row 2 ten (thirteen, sixteen) more times. Fasten off. Join MC with sl st in third closed V-st on the other edge of Back and rep from * for 2nd strap.

4-5 YEARS ONLY: Fasten off and change to CC3.

Straps Row 1: Sl st in first closed V-st, *3 ch

Special abbreviations

Closed V-st: 2 tr worked in the same st, st of next row is worked in the space between the 2 tr Closed Vst2tog: *[Yrh, insert hook in closed V-st, yrh, pul, yrh, draw through 2 loops] twice in same st; rep from * in next closed V-st, yrh, draw through all 5 loops on hook Beg closed Vst2tog: 2 ch, 1 tr3tog with first leg in first st and both of next 2 legs in next closed V-st

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Crochet-along

Don’t forget to use #riseandshinecal online and tag crochetnowmag in all your CAL pictures

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Crochet-along

Lucia Dunn Welcome to Part 4 of our colourful crochet-along, where we are pushing our skills with a mandala design www.luciasfigtree.com

T

hank goodness for the warmer weather that we seem to finally be experiencing, and what better way to celebrate than with some happy, bright and colourful CAL squares? They’re the perfect size to take outside and work on in the sunshine. We have a colourful striped square to ease you in this issue, before we test our skills on working in the round, Cluster and Popcorn stitches in the impressive mandala square. It’s full of lovely, squishy texture that would make a stunning blanket all by itself! Don’t forget to join the Official Rise & Shine crochet-along group on Facebook www.facebook.com/groups/ riseandshinecal

Making a mood board Mood-boarding is a fantastic tool not only to colour co-ordinate your yarn, but also to add something special to your project. It is very simple to put together a moodboard; all you have to do is to take a 60cmsquare space (I use a large tile I found in the office, but cardboard will do) and position little things that you have found or bought, objects you have collected, and bits of colour that trigger happy memories for you. Even a juicy apple will do! The key is that everything is connected to a happy memory. The purpose of the board is to replicate the feeling and the memory of that day. There is no right way or a wrong way,

just play with the objects, and when you are done take a picture. If you want, start again changing places or adding bits and pieces until you are happy. Here is my mood board that inspired my mandala square: a trip to Spain we did with the children a few years ago. These colours and objects helped to inspire my square design. So give it a go, it is really easy and will make your projects very special as you are crocheting memories! Enjoy your summer!

Lucia

Buy your kit today!

Don’t forget to get your hands on your CAL yarn pack from one of our friends below, or head to www.stylecraft-yarns.co.uk to find your local Stylecraft stockist www.woolwarehouse.co.uk www.deramores.com www.knittingwool.com www.blacksheepwools.com www.poppys-holmfirth.co.uk

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Crochet-along Row 2: 1 ch (does not count as a st now and throughout), dc across. Turn. Fasten off. Rep Row 2 another 8 times, working 2 rows each in the following colour sequence: CC3, CC4, CC1 and CC5. Rep Row 2 another 9 times working 1 row each in the following colour sequence: CC2, CC3, CC4, CC1, CC4, CC1, CC4, CC3 and CC2. Rep Row 2 another 10 times working 2 rows each in the following colour sequence: CC5, CC1, CC4, CC3 and CC2.

Edging

Start crocheting Show Your Stripes We’re starting with easy colour changes this month, a great way to practise colour changing in other projects.

Yarn used

With smaller hook, join CC1 to bottom right corner, 1 ch, 1 dc in same st as join, *evenly space 25 dc across edge, rotate to work across next side, 3 dc in first st for corner, pm in centre st of corner; rep from* around to beg omitting last 3 dc and pm, 2 dc in same st as beg dc, pm in last st, sl st to first dc to join. 112 dc Fasten off. Weave in ends.

CC1: Petrol, 2 strands held together CC2: Sage, 2 strands held together CC3: Fuchsia Purple, 2 strands held together CC4: Grass Green, 2 strands held together CC5: Pistachio, 2 strands held together

Hooks 6mm 7mm With CC2 and larger hook, chain 28. Row 1: Starting in the 2nd ch from hook, dc across. Turn. 27 sts

Special stitches

Beginning cluster (bCl): 2 ch (counts as first tr), [yrh, insert hook into st, yrh, pul, yrh, draw through 2 loops] twice into same st, yrh, draw through all 3 loops on hook Cluster (Cl): [Yrh, insert hook into st, yrh, pul, yrh, draw through 2 loops] 3 times into same st, yrh, draw through all 4 loops on hook Beginning Popcorn (bPC): 3 ch (count as first tr), 4 tr in next st, remove hook from loop, insert hook into top of beg 3 ch, replace loop on hook, yrh, draw through all loops on hook Popcorn (PC): 5 tr in next st, remove hook from loop, insert into top of first tr, replace loop on hook, yrh, draw through all loops on hook

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Marvellous Mandala This is a unusual because we start working in the rnd before shaping into a square. The colour and exciting stitches make this a really interesting square.

Yarn used A: Mustard, 2 strands held together B: Plum, 2 strands held together C: Fuchsia Purple, 2 strands held together D: Bright Pink, 2 strands held together E: Grass Green, 2 strands held together F: Emperor, 2 strands held together G: Empire, 2 strands held together

Hooks 6mm 7mm


Crochet-along

DK

4, 5, 6, 7mm

★★ Try something new Yarn used

Rnd 1: With A and smaller hook, working into a magic ring, 1 bCL, 2 ch, [1 Cl, 2 ch] 5 times, sl st to top of bCL to join. Fasten off. 6 Cl Rnd 2: Join B with smaller hook in any 2chsp, [1 bCl, 2 ch, 1 Cl] in beg 2ch-sp, 2 ch, *[1 Cl, 2 ch, 1 Cl] in next 2ch-sp, 2 ch; rep from * 4 more times, sl st to top of bCl to join. Fasten off. 12 Cl Rnd 3: Join C with larger hook in any 2chsp, 1 bPC, 2 ch, [1 PC in next 2ch-sp, 2 ch] 11 times, sl st to top of bPC to join. Fasten off. 12 PC Do not worry if your work is not flat, it will be after the next rounds. Rnd 4: Join D with larger hook in any 2chsp, [1 bCl, 2ch, 1 Cl, 2 ch] in same 2chsp, *[1 Cl, 2 ch] twice in next 2ch-sp, [1 PC, 3 ch, 1 PC, 2 ch] in next 2ch-sp for corner**, [1 Cl, 2 ch] twice in next 2ch-sp; rep from * around ending last rep at **, sl st to top of bCl to join. Fasten off. 24 sts Rnd 5: Join A with larger hook in 3rd 2ch-sp after any corner, 1 ch (does not count as a st now and throughout), *2 dc in 2chsp, 2 htr in next 2ch-sp, 3 tr in next 2chsp, [2 dtr, 2 ch, 2 dtr] in corner 3ch-sp, 3 tr in next 2ch-sp, 2 htr in next 2ch-sp; rep from * 3 times, sl st to beg dc to join. Do not fasten off. 64 sts Rnd 6: With smaller hook, 1 ch, 9 dc, *3 htr in corner 2ch-sp, pm in centre corner st, 15 dc, miss 1 st; rep from * to last 2ch-sp, 3 htr in last 2ch-sp, 7 dc, sl st to beg dc to join. Fasten off. 72 sts Move markers up to centre corner st each foll rnd. Rnd 7: Join E with smaller hook in first dc after any corner, 1 ch, [17 dc in BLO, 3 tr

in marked stitch] 4 times, sl st to beg dc to join. Fasten off. 80 sts Rnd 8: Join F with smaller hook in next st after marker, [19 dc in BLO, 1 tr in space between sts before marked st, 1 RtrF around marked st, pm, 1 tr in space between sts after marked st] 4 times, sl st to beg dc to join. Fasten off. 88 sts Rnd 9: Join D with smaller hook in next st after marker, *8 dc in BLO, [1 PC, 1 dc] twice, 1 PC, 8 dc in BLO, 3 htr in marked st; rep from * 3 times, sl st to beg dc to join. Fasten off. 96 sts Rnd 10: Join C with smaller hook in next st after marker, [23 dc, 3 dc in marked st] 4 times, sl st to beg dc to join. Fasten off. 104 sts Rnd 11: Join G with smaller hook in next st after marker, [25 dc, 3 dc in marked st] 4 times, sl st to beg dc to join. 112 sts Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Stylecraft Special DK 3 balls in Mustard 1823 2 balls each in Fuchsia Purple 1827, magenta 1084, Shrimp 1132, Grass Green 1821, Sage 1725, Bright Pink 1435, Emperor 1425 1 ball each in Plum 1061, Fondant 1241, Pistachio 1822, Empire 1829, Petrol 1708, Lipstick 1246, cream 1005 Stylecraft Special Aran 1 ball in Lipstick 1246 Note: Based on the designer’s tension, 98g of Fondant 1241 and 96g of Empire 1829 were used in this blanket. If you are unsure of how loose your tension is, we recommend purchasing additional balls of these shades

About the yarn Stylecraft Special DK DK; 295m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic Stylecraft Special Aran Aran; 196m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic

Hooks used 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 7mm

Tension 11 sts x 12 rows = 10cm measured over dc with 2 strands of DK using largest hook

Other supplies stitch markers, wool needle, scissors, row counter (optional)

Sizing Individual squares: Approximately 25cm square Finished blanket: Approximately 180x115cm

Turn to page 28 for our special subscription offer and pick up issues 27-29 that include parts 1-3 at www.moremags.com

Check our website for helpful hints & tips www.crochetnow.co.uk

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The book club

Crochet in the City by Annemarie Benthem, €14.95 (£13.16) Livres de Louise

Each month, we’re expanding our literary horizons with a new yarn classic, and this month we’re embracing summer with some fresh floral designs

W

e’ve been enjoying the sunshine and warmer weather here at Crochet Now HQ, but we still can’t resist an excuse to crochet. This exciting new book from Annemarie Benthem of Annemarie’s Haakblog (www.annemarieshaakblog. blogspot.com) has been providing us with some fantastic colourful patterns this month, perfect for our summer makes! Crochet in the City is a freshly styled book filled with colourful and unique designs, each of which has been constructed to be accessible for beginners and experienced crocheters alike. Each of the book’s 21 contemporary designs has been inspired by Annemarie’s love of flowers, which has shone through her work over the past eight years – we encourage you to check out her Instagram (annemariescrochetblog). This theme is effortlessly intertwined into every pattern, whether through the overall shape of a blanket or the detailed motifs of a bag. This book is all about accessibility and this is apparent from the beginning. What is striking about the structure of the book is that all the patterns and text are written in two languages: Annemarie’s native Dutch, and also English. Whilst this may sound a confusing concept, don’t worry – the clear, concise layout of each page allows for easy reading! Each pattern also includes charts as well as written instructions which makes

them simple to follow regardless of which language you choose. One thing to bear in mind is that the English patterns are written in US terminology, so if you’re used to UK terms, a little research may be necessary to start with – or use our conversion guide on page 95. Don’t worry, we’ve translated one for you!

Turn over to make Annemarie’s Blossom in Spring Shawl!

Annemarie’s choices of colours are bright and bold – her signature style. She’s chosen three of her favourite yarns – Phildar, Paintbox and Durable – to create her projects (you’ll also find an helpful list of alternative yarn suggestions). The minimal photography styling that runs throughout is eye catching and helps to highlight the detail of each project, allowing them to be used as a point of reference should you need it.

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The book club

You can adjust the shape of your shawl very easily, simply connect the flowers in a shape you prefer

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The book club

BLOSSOM IN SPRING SHAWL

Annemarie’s pretty shawl avoids traditional triangle and rectangle shapes by using darling flower motifs to create any shape possible Sport

4mm

★★ Stretch your skills Yarn used Phildar Phil Coton 3 2 balls each in Corail, Girafe, Piscine, Soleil, Canard, Elephant, Meringue, Amande Available from www.loveknitting.com

About the yarn Sport; 121m per 50g; 100% cotton

Tension Finished flower 4.5cm

Hook used 4mm

Sizing

Start crocheting The pattern suggests you join flowers as you go, so make sure you read the Joining Flowers section before you get carried away making all your lovely flowers. If preferred, you can make individual flowers and then stitch together at the end.

working 3 ch on your joining petal, you will need to: 1 ch, 1 sl st in 3ch-sp of Flower to join, 1 ch. Then continue to finish the motif.

Finishing Weave in all ends. Gently steam block to make sure Flowers lie flat.

Flower Rnd 1: With colour of choice, and working in magic ring, 4 ch (counts as 1 tr, 1 ch), [1 tr, 1ch] 11 times, sl st in 3rd ch of beg 4 ch to join. 12 sts Rnd 2: *[1 sl st, 2 ch, 1 tr, 3 ch] in next 1chsp, [1 tr, 2 ch, 1 sl st] in next 1ch-sp; rep from * to end, sl st in first 2 ch to join. Fasten off. Continue to make and join flowers, changing colours with each flower, until you reach your desired size and shape of shawl.

Chart This shows you where to join the flowers

Joining flowers

You can create any size/shape you like

Start to connect the flowers from the second one made. In Rnd 2, instead of

Need somewhere to start? If you prefer to follow a colour scheme, get started with Annemarie’s below. Start with one flower on Soleil, then join a Corail and a Meringue, and so on, until you have created 11 rows, and as many flowers as you want Soleil

Corail

Amande

Elephant

Girafe

Canard

Meringue

Piscine

Soleil

Meringue

Piscine

Soleil

Corail

Amande

Elephant

Girafe

Canard

Amande

Elephant

Girafe

Canard

Meringue

Piscine

Soleil

Soleil

Corail

Amande

Elephant

Girafe

Canard

Girafe

Canard

Meringue

Piscine

Soleil

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Toys

SWEET SUMMER ICES These chunky ice cream toys look almost good enough to eat, and are great for non-messy playtime

For clean colour changes, change to new colour on last part of previous st (last yarn over hook), sl st to next st, work first dc in same st

Louise Watling 70

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Toys DK

3.5mm

★ Beginner friendly Yarn used Stylecraft Special DK 1 ball each in Camel 1420 (A), Spring Green 1316 (B), Sunshine 1114 (C), Jaffa 1256 (D), Fondant 1241 (E), cream 1005 (F), Walnut 1054 (G) Oddment of black 1002 Available from www.deramores.com

About the yarn DK; 295m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic

Tension 20 sts and 21 rows = 10cm measured over dc

Hook used 3.5mm

Other supplies toy stuffing stitch marker tapestry needle

Sizing Ice Lollies: 18cm long Ice Cream: 17cm long

Start crocheting All pieces are worked in the amigurumi style, in a spiral without slip stitching or turning chains. Use a stitch marker to keep track of the end of each rnd.

Lolly Stick (make 2) Rnd 1: With A and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Rnd 3: [2 dc in next st, 1 dc] around. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc in next st, 2 dc] around. 24 sts Rnds 5-15: Dc around. Rnd 16: Dc around, sl st in next st. Fasten off. Stuff firmly.

Striped Ice With B, chain 4. Rnd 1: 2 dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc, 4 dc

in last ch, rotating as you go, work in the other side of the ch, miss ch with 4 dc, 1 dc, 2 dc in next ch, pm to mark end of rnd. 10 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 20 sts Rnd 3: [2 dc in next st, 1 dc] 10 times. 30 sts Rnd 4: *[2 dc in next st, 2 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 34 sts Rnd 5: *[2 dc in next st, 3 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 38 sts Rnd 6: *[2 dc in next st, 4 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 42 sts Rnd 7: *[2 dc in next st, 5 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 46 sts Rnd 8: *[2 dc in next st, 6 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 50 sts Rnd 9: *[2 dc in next st, 7 dc] twice, 9 dc; rep from * to end. 54 sts Rnds 10-15: Dc around. Change to C. Rnds 16-23: Dc around. Change to D. Rnds 24-31: Dc around. Rnd 32: 5 dc in BLO, 6 dc2tog in BLO, 15 dc in BLO, 6 dc2tog in BLO, 10 dc in BLO. 42 sts Rnd 33: 3 dc, 4 dc2tog, 13 dc, 4 dc2tog, 10 dc. 34 sts Rnd 34: 1 dc, 4 dc2tog, 10 dc, 4 dc2tog, 7 dc, sl st in next st. 26 sts Fasten off. Stuff firmly. Pin open end of Lolly Stick to open base of Lolly Ice so the stuffing is enclosed. Sew pieces tog.

Melon Ice With E throughout, work as rnds 1-23 of Striped Ice. Change to B. Rnds 24-34: As rnds 24-34 of Striped Ice. Fasten off. Stuff firmly. Pin open end of Lolly Stick to open base of Lolly Ice so the stuffing is enclosed. Sew pieces tog. With black, embroider a few stitches over the surface for seeds.

Ice Cream Cone Rnd 1: With A and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Rnd 3: [2 dc in next st, 1 dc] 6 times. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc in next st, 2 dc] 6 times. 24 sts Rnds 5-9: Dc around. Rnd 10: [2 dc in next st, 3 dc] 6 times. 30 sts Rnds 11-15: Dc around. Rnd 16: [2 dc in next st, 4 dc] 6 times. 36 sts

Rnds 17-21: Dc around. Rnd 22: [2 dc in next st, 5 dc] 6 times. 42 sts Rnds 23-26: Dc around. Rnd 27: Dc around, sl st in next st. Fasten off. Stuff firmly.

Ice Cream Rnd 1: With F and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. 12 sts Rnd 3: [2 dc in next st, 1 dc] 6 times. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc in next st, 2 dc] 6 times. 24 sts Rnd 5: [2 dc in next st, 3 dc] 6 times. 30 sts Rnd 6: [2 dc in next st, 4 dc] 6 times. 36 sts Rnd 7: [2 dc in next st, 5 dc] 6 times. 42 sts Rnds 8-10: Dc around. Rnd 11: [2 dc in next st, 5 dc] 7 times. 49 sts Rnd 12: [2 dc in next st, 6 dc] 7 times. 56 sts Rnd 13: [2 dc in next st, 7 dc] 7 times. 63 sts Rnds 14-16: Dc around. Rnd 17: [1 dc2tog, 5 dc] 9 times. 54 sts Rnd 18: [1 dc2tog, 4 dc] 9 times. 45 sts Rnd 19: [1 dc2tog, 3 dc] 9 times, sl st in next st. 36 sts Fasten off. Stuff firmly. Pin open end of Ice Cream Cone to open base of Ice Cream so the stuffing is enclosed. Sew pieces tog.

Chocolate Stick Rnd 1: With G and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnds 2-5: Dc around. Fasten off. Stuff lightly. Sew to ice cream in desired position.

What’s your flavour?

Candyfloss 1130

Lemon 1020

Mocha 1064

Sherbet 1034

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Every issue of the magazine features more than 20 contemporary crochet and knitting patterns covering everything from cute toys and modern home décor to blanket squares, accessories, baby garments and more. Most of the patterns can be made up using the yarn kit, plus there’s plenty of inspiration on other yarn to use if you want to make more.

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Accessory

Find more like this in issue 1 of Your Crochet & Knitting ON SALE NOW

Veronika Cromwell 74

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Accessory

CANDY STRIPE COWL This quick and easy stitch creates an effectively wonderful result

4-ply

3mm

★ Beginner friendly Yarn used Your Crochet & Knitting kit yarn 1 ball each in Lagoon Blue (A), Princess Pink (B), Sunshine Yellow (C), Meadow Green (D), Vibrant Plum (E) , Unicorn White (F)

About the yarn 4-ply; 66m per 22g ball; 100% polyester

Tension 22 sts x 14 rows = 10cm over 2-row patt rep

Hook used 3mm

Sizing 22cm high x 62cm circumference

This cowl is worked in the round, created using a simple two-row repeat. It uses alternating rows of tr and dc stitches.

Start crocheting With A, chain 132. Join with sl st in first ch to work in the rnd, being careful not to twist.

Rnd 1: 1 ch (does not count as a st throughout), dc around, sl st to first dc to join. 132 dc Rnd 2: 3 ch (counts as 1 tr), 3 tr in first st, miss 3 dc, *4 tr in next st, miss 3 dc; rep from * around to last 3 sts, miss 3 sts, sl st in top of beg 3 ch. 33 4tr-groups Rnd 3: With F, as Rnd 1. Rep rows 2-3 for patt 14 more times following colour changes below: Work all reps of Row 3 with F until last rep, work the final rep with E. Work two more reps of Row 2 with A, then rep Row 2 three times each with B, C, D and E. Fasten off.

Need an alternative? Patons Fairytale Fab 4-ply

Fuchsia 1037

Apple Green 1072

Lipstick Pink 1036

Sundance 1022

Finishing Weave in ends and block to finished dimensions.

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Toy

Take care when stuffing not to put too much in so that it shows through the stitches

Use your

10mm hook

ZoĂŤ Potrac 76

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Toy

Cool Cactus

SPECS HOLDER

This little chap will keep your shades in place when you’re not using them, and look pretty cool while he’s doing it

Chunky

10mm

★ Quick & easy Yarn used King Cole Big Value Chunky 1 ball each in Bronze 1972 (A), Moss 548 (B) Oddments of black 554, white 822, Rose 1542 Available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

About the yarn Chunky; 152m per 100g ball; 100% acrylic

Tension 7sts x 10 rows = 10cm over dc with yarn held double

Hook used 10mm

Other supplies toy stuffing

Sizing Stands 20cm tall, holds one pair of glasses

Start crocheting This pattern is worked in the amigurumi style, in a spiral without slip stitching or

turning chains. Use a st marker or waste yarn to keep track of the first st of each rnd. Hold yarn double throughout.

Colin the Cactus

Pot Rnd 1: With A and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st. 12 sts Rnd 3: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 18 sts Rnd 4: [2 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 24 sts Rnd 5: Dc in BLO around. Rnds 6-16: Dc around. Fasten off. Tuck the Pot inside itself to form a double wall to help keep it sturdy. Use the tail to sew the top edge inside to the base. Using an oddment of black, sew running stitch about 2 rows from the top edge to create a decorative line, like the ridge found on a terracotta pot.

Main Body Rnd 1: With B and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st. 12 sts Rnd 3: [1 dc, 2 dc in next st] 6 times. 18 sts Rnds 4-18: Dc around. Rnd 19: Dc in BLO around. At this point, while the base is still open, embroider six decorative lines with white from the top centre down the sides to look like the spines on a cactus, using photo as a guide. With black, embroider eyes at rnds 5-6 and with Rose, a mouth 4-5 rnds below eyes. Stuff firmly, but not so firmly that the stuffing shows through the sts. Rnd 20: [1 dc, 1 dc2tog] 6 times. 12 sts Rnd 21: 6 dc2tog. 6 sts Fasten off. Weave in ends. With A, sew

into Pot so that green stitches don’t show through on the bottom.

Arms (make 2) Rnd 1: With B and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnds 2-7: Dc around. Fasten off. Stuff and sew onto each side of Main Body just below eye level. Nose Rnd 1: With B and working into a magic ring, 6 dc. 6 sts Rnds 2-3: Dc around. Fasten off. Stuff and sew in place just below and centred between the eyes.

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Blanket

10% OFF

e this! the yarn to mak for 60 ge Turn to pa ils ta de e mor are www.woolw .u house.co k

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Blanket

SHARK ATTACK This blanket is guaranteed to bring a smile to kids every time they snuggle into the comfiest shark attack ever! Designed by

Super Chunky

8mm

★★ Try something new Yarn used DROPS Eskimo 12 (13, 15, 16, 18, 19) balls in Medium Grey 46 (MC) 6 (6, 7, 7, 8, 9) balls in Dark Grey 14 (CC1) 1 (1, 1, 1, 1, 2) balls in black 02 (CC3) 1 ball each in Off White 01 (CC4), Christmas Red 56 (CC5) Available from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

DROPS Design Team

Start crocheting The Body is worked bottom up, beginning between the Body and Tail Fin. The Tail Fin is worked from bottom of body downward. The entire piece is worked back and forth in rows. 1 ch and 3 ch count as 1 dc and 1 tr respectively throughout the pattern, unless otherwise stated.

How to increase

Increasing stitches in this pattern are worked a little differently. In places the pattern will tell you to add a certain number of stitch markers evenly across the last row worked – just place the stitch markers according to what looks evenly spaced (no need to count sts every row!) and on the increase row, when you reach a stitch marker, work 2 sts into marked st to increase.

About the yarn Super chunky; 50m per 50g ball; 100% wool

Tension 9 sts x 5 rows = 10cm over tr

Hook used 8mm

Other supplies 10 stitch markers

Sizing 3/4 (5/6, 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14) yrs Length before tail fin: 70 (84, 98, 112, 128, 142) cm Width at top: 81 (86, 90, 99, 103, 112) cm Tail height: 27 (31, 33, 35, 37, 39) cm

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Blanket Body With MC, chain 32 (34, 34, 36, 38, 40). Rows 1 & 2: 3 ch, tr to end. Turn. 32 (34, 34, 36, 38, 40) sts Place 8 (6, 6, 9, 7, 10) st markers evenly across row. Row 3: 3 ch, *tr to next st marker, 2 tr in next st; rep from * to final marker, tr to end. Turn and remove markers. 40 (40, 40, 45, 45, 50) sts

Body increases Cont repeating Row 1 throughout pattern AT THE SAME TIME work increases as follows: Using 5 st markers to position increases, rep Row 3 every 2nd (2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 5th) row 6 (6, 8, 7, 9, 10) times. 5 sts inc’d, 70 (70, 80, 80, 90, 100) sts Next Row: 3 ch, tr to end. Turn. Place 3 (7, 1, 9, 3, 1) st markers evenly across row. Next Row: As Row 3. 73 (77, 81, 89, 93, 101) sts Rep Row 1 until work measures 66 (80, 94, 108, 124, 138) cm. Change to CC3. Next Row: 1 ch, dc to end. Turn. Change to CC5. Next Row: 3 ch, tr to end. Turn. Next Row: 1 ch, dc to end. Turn.

Teeth Change to CC4. Next Row: 1 ch, * miss 2, [1 dtr, 2 tr, 1 dtr, 4 ch, 1 sl st] in next st, 1 sl st; rep from * to end. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Tail Fin With the Body lay flat, at the narrow end fold in each outer edge to meet in the middle of the piece. Join CC1 at edge (the work should be folded). Row 1: Working through both layers of fabric, 1 ch, dc to end. 16 (17, 17, 18, 19, 20) sts Place marker in middle st of row. Row 2: 3 ch (does not count as a st), 3 tr in first st, tr to 2 sts before marker, 2 dc, sm, 2 dc, tr across to last st, 3 tr in next. Turn. 4 sts inc’d Rep Row 2, slipping marker up each time, 13 (15, 16, 17, 18, 19) times. Work should measure approximately 26 (30, 32, 34, 36, 38) cm. Change to CC3 held double.

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Make sure to sew the Body enough to tuck your feet into

Next Row: 1 ch, dc across. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Eyes (make 2) With CC3, chain 3 and join to work in the round. Rnd 1: Working into the centre of the ring, 3 ch, 11 tr, join with sl st in top of beg 3 ch. 12 sts Change to CC4. Rnd 2: 1 ch, dc around, join with sl st in first ch. 12 sts Change to CC 1. Rnd 3: 1 ch, 1 dc into same st, [2 dc in next st] around, join with sl st in first ch. 24 sts Fasten off and weave in ends.

Jawshopping Fintastic Shark Head Money Box, £10 Paperchase

Blue Shark Backpack, £9.99 TK Maxx

Shark Socks, £3 Topman

Making up Whip-stitch the edges of the body together at the narrow end (tail end) as far up as you want to cover feet (sewn together up to 30cm). Sew just enough to secure a vent for feet, but not too high up that you can’t snuggle under the blanket still! Sew eyes 10cm below the top edge.

Lunch Box, £2 Flying Tiger Copenhagen


The best way to discover a new yarn is to give it a squish at your local yarn shop, and this month we’re soaking up inspiration from the California sunshine

Hoooked Zpagetti Zpagetti is the original T-shirt yarn from Hoooked. Each giant bobbin holds 120m of yarn which is perfect for creating fast and sturdy results. Zpagetti is an ideal choice for a whole range of projects including homewares such as pouffes, rugs and cushions and its cotton composition means finished projects will have a soft, comfortable touch. It’s 100% recycled textile, so you can also be sure this yarn is environmentally friendly as well as ethically sourced and produced.

King Cole Flash DK

This self-striping yarn is a fantastic choice for children’s clothes and toys, allowing you to create well-blended colour combinations without the fuss of having to swap yarn. Available in a choice of 11 beautifully bright and jazzy colourways, King Cole Flash DK is made from 100% acrylic which means its machine washable and can be tumble dried – perfect for keeping your finished makes nice and clean.

Patons Fab DK

Patons Fab DK is a great-value staple yarn that everyone should have in their stash. The yarn is available in 45 fantastic shades, ranging from bright solids through to subtle self-striping options. Being 100% acrylic, Fab DK is easy to care for and is machine washable. This classic yarn works well for a number of projects including amigurumi, giving toys a soft and cuddly finish.

Scheepjes Our Tribe

Our Tribe was developed with Scheepjes bloggers to capture and embrace the sense of community and belonging amongst their group. This sportweight yarn is an ideal choice for creating garments, socks, shawls and lightweight home accessories. Each of the Scheepjes bloggers has selected their own colours, bringing you a total of 24 shades. The yarn’s fibre is made up from 70% wool and 30% polyamide which results in a soft touch and subtle sheen.

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& claim your free gift worth £25! *

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Knitting yarn specialists stocking Debbie Bliss, Noro, Louisa Harding, Wendy and Sirdar yarn as well as cross stitch and haberdashery supplies.

We hold regular knitting and crochet workshops. Birmingham House, 22 Alban Square, Abaraeron SA46 0AH

We are a main stockist of King Cole, Sirdar, Stylecraft, Adriafil, Bergere de France, Knit Pro needles, accessories and a huge range of patterns. 07913 307752

11 Water Street, Bakewell, Derbyshire, DE45 1EW

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CROYDON

Stash Fine Yarns is a stockist of Debbie Bliss, Rowan, Louisa Harding, Noro, Mirasol, Sirdar, DY Choice, Addi and Knit Pro.

Coldspring Mill Haworth Road, Cullingworth West Yorkshire BD13 5EE T 01535 275646 www.coldspringmill.co.uk

from

Westcliff Wools

Woolshopdirect

Stockists of Rico, Cygnet, James C Brett, WYS, King Cole, Toft & more. We also sell patterns, books and accessories. Clubs & classes are also available. 197 Hamlet Court Road Westcliff on Sea, Essex, SS0 7EL 07941 002458 westcliffwools@gmail.com

HARROGATE

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Email........................................................................................................................................... *Minimum in-store spend of £15 applies. To take advantage of this offer please hand this voucher over the counter with your contact details. Gift will be sent direct from Practical Publishing Ltd with 28 days. While stocks last. Please ensure all your details are completed in black ink. By taking advantage of this offer you are agreeing to join the Practical Publishing Int Ltd e-newsletter list. You may opt out of this at any time. Your details will not be shared with any third party companies. UK offer only. Only stores listed on these pages (82-83) of Crochet Now issue 28 are participating in this offer.

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High-quality, low-cost knitting wool and accessories, including a large selection of Rico, Stylecraft, Jarol and Woolcraft yarn at bargain prices. Also gift vouchers, crochet hooks, craft books, buttons, gifts, needles, and much more, visit us instore today.

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Visit the shop for summer crochet inspiration

ESSEX

A local friendly family run business. Probably the UK’s largest display of yarn and patterns for knitting and crochet from Sirdar, King Cole and lots of other brands. Discount packs always available. Open 7 days 10-5

New wools just in for the coming Season Energia, Kimera, Rugiada, Snappy by Adriafil

An independent local yarn shop with yarn for all tastes and budgets. Crochet and knitting workshops in a relaxed creative environment. Stockists of Scheepjes, Juniper Moon Farm, Louisa Harding, StyleCraft, King Cole and more... 17 Knaresborough Road, Harrogate HG2 7SR

01423 885 565

yarnetc@mail.com

Stocking a wide range of yarn, patterns and accessories from Stylecraft, King Cole, Sirdar, Katia, Adriafil, KnitPro, plus many more! Explore our collection of beautiful gifts and enjoy refreshments from our Tea Bar! 79 Main Street, Long Eaton, Nottingham NG10 1GW Tel: 0115 972 4965


Spend £15 in store and you’ll receive: Two James C Brett hat kits worth £14, an exclusive alternative design for your kit, an Animal Safari crochet book + a set of crochet hooks all for free!

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Tel: 01738 440183

10% off with this advert

SALE

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Visit us in-store or online to see our range of yarn, workshops and courses. Yarn stocked include lovely British yarn from Woolyknit and Ty Mel and popular brands DROPS and Wendy. 7 Llantrisant Road Pontyclun CF72 9DP 01443 520200

Stockists of Sirdar and Wendy

www.ammoniteyarns.co.uk

SURREY

WOODBRIDGE

Opening Hours Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 10:00 - 16:30 Wednesday 10:00 - 13:00

BlueButtonDesigns djpproducts@msn.com 07540 634 351 Blue Buttons Designs Traders Outlet 3-7 Tatton Road, Sale, Cheshire, M33 7EB

Cedar Cottage, Notcutts Garden Centre Stratford Road, Shirley, Solihull, West Midlands B90 4EN Tel: 0121 314 6888 www.stitchsolihull.com

We stock a wide range of knitting yarn, including a large selection of baby yarn. To support our yarn we have a wide range of knitting pins, crochet hooks including circular needles, haberdashery and knitting patterns. 02086433211 www.whichcraftwools.co.uk

www.crochetnow.co.uk | 83


S N O S A E R 5 TOP TO SHOP LOCAL Turn back to find your local independent yarn store, or if you want to find out more, check out www.aiyso.org.uk for an interactive map of yarn shops across the UK!

You aren’t likely to find any better experts in their field than yarn shop owners – if you need crochet, knitting or general yarn advice, the shop owners will always be delighted to lend a hand!

Your local shops often have products, kits, events and more you won’t find anywhere online! Turn to page 82 to find out what’s going on near you.

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It’s the only way to get a real look and feel for the yarn before you buy – squish, squash and feel for what you need, and get the colour right first time!

Supporting local business keeps the high streets vibrant, busy and fun, and keeps your investments local, so it can go right back into your community.

The community around local yarn shops is a great way to get out, make friends and get involved!


The Noticeboard

Keep up to date with what’s on at your local yarn shop, including workshops, events and exciting news

Whichcraft Workshops Whichcraft Wools, Surrey, is pleased to announce it is now offering one-to-one lessons for all skill levels of crochet and knitting. The team also hosts a regular knit and natter group every other Tuesday at the Glyn Hall, where people come together to complete their own projects, charity projects and enjoy each other’s company with tea and biscuits. For more information check out the Whichcraft Wools Facebook page at www.facebook.com/whichcraftwool

Say hello to...

WOOLFULL We spoke to shop owners Debbie, Mand and Rosie about what goes into running a yarn shop! www.woolfull.com

The Big Stitch The British Heart Foundation is calling on crafty fashionistas to help the fight against heart disease by taking part in The Big Stitch. Launching on 1st July for two weeks, The Big Stitch will encourage shoppers to visit their nearest BHF shop, buy an item and upcycle it, with a chance to win amazing prizes. With 530 shops nationwide, there’s plenty of finds to work with. All you need to do is upload a before and after picture, tagging BHF on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook, including #TheBigStitch. Winners will be announced 3rd August 2018. www.bhf.org.uk/TheBigStitch

Hi! How are you today and what’s going on at the shop? Debbie: Hi, we’re marvellous thank you! We’ve got lots of things going on. We’ve recently started selling Adriafil and lots of new Bernat and Caron yarn, so we’re having a bit of a rejig What was the first thing you ever crocheted? Rosie: My first crocheted item was an elephant. I got bored of other people’s patterns and started making my own toys. I’ve designed lots of patterns since, in crochet and knit. Debbie: I was taught by my grandma who showed me granny squares. After several attempts I mastered it and could even change colours; I made about 30 squares that sewed together to make a blanket as a gift for my Dad’s birthday. Tell us why you wanted to open your own yarn shop Mand: Rosie and I are somewhat gung-ho, and would think nothing of travelling a couple of hours to check out a yarn shop. We loved some of them, but others left us

underwhelmed, and we’d always talk about how our yarn shop would be if we ever opened one. Debbie: I always wanted to have a shop, so when it came time for a career change last year we decided it was time to make our yarn store a reality. A year later we’re going strong and having a wonderful time doing it. What makes your shop stand out? Mand: Colour. Our shop is bright and airy and there is colour everywhere. From the massive wall of cake yarn, to the wall of Stylecraft Special, you really don’t know where to look. What can crochet enthusiasts expect to find at the shop? Rosie: In some shops crocheters are an afterthought, but in ours they are front and centre. From our three ranges of crochet hooks (Pony, KnitPro Waves and Clover Amour) to the wide range of brands which are ideal for crochet you’ll find a wealth of knowledge and advice from people who know how to crochet, and love it just as much as you.

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Basics

HOW

to read a pattern If you’re new to the world of crochet, here’s a beginner’s guide to getting started with a crochet pattern

Reading a pattern line There are many different ways to write a crochet pattern, but all the patterns inside Crochet Now use the same style, which we’ll clarify here for easy reference.

1 2

Using numbered Rows or Rounds (Rnds) is the best way to keep your place in a pattern. Take notice of whether the pattern says Rows or Rnds, as it’ll also signify whether you should be working the piece flat or in the round if not stated already.

3 5

In Crochet Now, the instructions for working a basic stitch will be given with the instruction of how many stitches are worked in succession. For example, the instruction ‘4 dc’ will tell you to work a double crochet stitch into the next four available stitches on the row below. Increases are signified by the instruction ‘in the same st’ or ‘in the next st’. As an example, ‘4 dc in the next st’ will mean working four double crochet stitches into the next available st. Square brackets are used in patterns to show a complete instruction, which is then followed by a further instruction outside the bracket. For example, ‘[3 dc, 2 dc in the next st] 4 times’ means that ‘3 dc, 2 dc in the next st’ will be worked four times in succession. Another way of indicating a repeat is to use *, followed by an instruction to repeat from * a certain number of times. Round brackets within pattern instructions will signify sizing – so make sure you pay attention to the Sizing section of the project materials column. If a pattern states S (M, L) then in the instructions 20 (24, 28) dc, you work the number of stitches required that corresponds to the size you are working only.

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4

1. About the yarn If you can’t get hold of the pattern yarn, or want to substitute it for another yarn, this box is important. Not only does it tell you the weight of yarn, it also gives an insight into the fibre make up (in case you want to create something that looks similar) as well as the yardage, so you can ensure you buy enough yarn length in the substituted yarn. If not, you might find yourself with a different dyelot, which could cause a subtle, but noticeable shift in the colour of your project. 2. Tension For most crochet projects, a tension square is important – especially with wearable items such as garments, accessories and baby clothes. How tightly or loosely you crochet is important for sizing, so crocheting a small square in the suggested pattern is an indicator of whether the final project will turn out the right size. If your tension does not match the suggested tension, adjust your hook size as required. Many people do not look at tension for amigurumi toys, however,

yours may end up a different size if you have a looser or tighter tension. 3. Finishing Apart from toys, most projects should be blocked to relax the yarn into its new shape. This is done by wetting the object, either in warm water, with a spray bottle or by steaming it. Then shape it and leave to dry. This can be just laid out flat, pinned out on a blocking or foam board or with the likes of hats, some people even pop them over inflated balloons. You can find this at the end of a pattern. 4. Charts A symbol diagram is in essence an X-ray of the finished crocheted item. Symbol diagrams are excellent for all skill levels, and some beginners find that they are able to tackle more complex stitch patterns much earlier. They don’t suit all stitchers, particularly those who aren’t visual learners in the first place, but with a few tips and pointers, even those who are less intuitive visually will be able to successfully read a diagram and stitch a lovely piece.


HOW-TO GUIDES WE LOVE

Vlog – The Secret Yarnery The Secret Yarnery is a thriving vlog for yarn enthusiasts to meet through and form lasting relationships. Regularly uploaded content includes plenty of fantastic crochet tutorials as well as frequent live chats so you can join in and get real time help and advice! www.secretyarnery.com

5. Stitch patterns If you come across a term outside of the common abbreviations included in this issue, it may be a special stitch. Look out for separate instructions outside of the pattern, which will explain how to make the stitch.

You read a crochet chart from bottom to top when worked in rows, or from the inside out when working in rounds. Rows are worked from right to left first, then left to right, continuing as set unless otherwise stated, while rounds are worked anticlockwise, as you would crochet them.

How to read a chart First up, find your key. While you may recognise some of the symbols from previous chart reading experiences, you need to remember that different people draw charts differently, and what meant a treble stitch before may mean a half treble now. It will also contain any special information needed to make sense of the chart.

Small numbers with arrows signify where each Rnd starts – helpful for making sense of more complex charts, while also giving a clue of where to fasten off and join in colours. If there’s a jump between where you end the row and where you start the next, there’s a good chance that the colour has changed – sometimes this is signified in the colouring of the chart, sometimes not!

Blog – Moji Moji Design Moji Moji is a fantastic blog from designer Janine Holmes. Specialising in amigurumi, this blog contains a whole variety of wonderful free patterns as well as photo tutorials to help you through those trickier projects. www.mojimojidesign.com

Stitch Key Plain Section

ch dc

Chart Key

Stitch Key

Plain Section

ch dc RhtrF

5

3 5

tr

1 3

1

2 2

4 Rep for Rows 6-43

tr3tog

Book – Beautiful Blankets, Afghans and Throws RhtrF This book by Leonie Morgan is an essential guide to creating colour tr using interesting stitch combinations. Each of the 40 blocks and patterns tr3tog are accompanied by clear written instructions and easy-to-follow charts as well and helpful skill level indicators. Search Press, £10.99

4 Rep for Rows 6-43

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NEW

Don’t miss the brand-new magazine for yarn lovers

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH SARAH-JAYNE OF BELLA COCO

FIND US IN

ISSUE 1

ON SALE NOW ✔ Exclusive yarn collection with every issue ✔ Packed with 39 crochet and knitting patterns ✔ Expert tutorials and step-by-step advice ✔ Toys, accessories, baby knits, home décor blanket inspiration and much more!

Find out more at www.yourcrochetmag.com


Basics

1 2 3

LEARN

the basics

Master the essential crochet techniques you’ll need to see you through your next project

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Holding the hook

11 12 13 14 1

2

15

PEN METHOD

KNIFE METHOD

There’s no right or wrong way to hold your hook, but many crocheters find it comfortable to hold it as they would a pen.

Others prefer the knife method, with the end of the hook resting against the palm of the hand for extra control of the hook.

16 17

Holding the yarn

Making a slipknot

18 19

1 The key is to ensure tension in the yarn. This technique shows the tail held between index finger and thumb, and working end over the middle finger.

1 Holding the tail end firmly, wrap the working end of the ball of yarn around two fingers to make a loop.

20

2 Pull a loop from the working end of the ball of yarn up through the centre of the loop you’ve just made.

21 22 23 24

2 This technique shows the tail end held in between the thumb and middle finger and the working end wrapped around the index finger – see what works best for you!

3 Remove the loop from your fingers and you should have something that looks like this.

25

4 Pull the tail end of the yarn to close the slipknot – it’s now ready to be popped onto your crochet hook and pulled tight to close.

26 27 28

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Basics

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Chain stitch (ch)

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1 This is what the start of any crochet project looks like – a slipknot on a hook.

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2 To begin making your first chain, first wrap the yarn around the hook (yrh).

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3 Pull the hook towards the first loop on the hook – always be sure to move the crochet hook and not the yarn to make your stitches – this will catch the yrh in the head of the hook. 4 Continue to move the hook until you pull your yrh through the first loop on the hook – you’ve made your first chain stitch!

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Working into a chain

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Once you’ve made the required length of chain, you should be left with something looking like this. This is your foundation row, into which Row 1 is worked.

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2 The starting chain instructions often include the turning chain in them already. This example shows a treble crochet, so the stitch is worked into the 4th chain from the hook to create the height needed for the first stitch.

3 This is what the first treble stitch into a chain looks like – you will then continue to make the next stitch in the next chain all along to the end to create your first row.

Turning chains

Working in rows

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1 Once you reach the end of a row, it’s time to work back along the other way. To do this you need to turn the work. This example shows a treble once again, so we’ve made a three chain turning chain.

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2 Then simply turn the work before continuing to work the next row. This produces what is known as a right side (RS) and wrong side (WS) to the crochet fabric – something you’ll come to recognise in no time at all.

1 Different stitches have different size turning chains; double crochet is one chain (which is often not counted as a stitch); half treble is two chains; treble is three chains and double treble is four chains.


Basics

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Working in the round

1 To work in the round, first of all you need a centre ring, into which the first round of stitches are worked into. There are many ways to do this, but for this example, we are first making a chain of four stitches.

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4 5 centre ring

2 Next, slip-stitch into the first chain you made to create a centre ring.

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3 We are creating treble stitches again, so next up we make a chain of three for the turning chain.

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4 The stitches are then worked directly into the centre ring – not into the actual chain stitches themselves as we did when working into a row. This allows us to work many more stitches into the ring, without leaving a large hole in the centre.

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Magic ring

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1 A magic ring is a key technique used in the making of toys (also known as amigurumi). It allows you to have even greater control on the size of the hole at the centre ring of your project.

2 To start off, follow the first few steps for making a slip knot by making a loop around your fingers with the working end of the yarn.

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3 Pull through a loop of the working end of the ball of yarn – place your hook into the new loop; however, this time don’t pull the tail to make a slipknot. Hold the centre ring in your fingers to stop it moving.

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4 In this example, we’re double crocheting into the magic ring. To secure the magic ring, make one chain.

5 Then continue to work the number of required double crochet stitches directly into the magic ring, ensuring both the loop and the tail end are caught in the stitches.

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6 Pull the tail end of the yarn and the magic ring will close up as tightly as it is able, depending on the number of stitches.

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Basics Double crochet (dc)

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Insert your hook into the next stitch from front to back.

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Wrap the yarn round the hook (yrh).

Pull up a loop through the stitch. You will now have two loops on the hook.

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Yarn round the hook again.

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5 Pull through both loops on hook. You’ve made your first double crochet.

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Double crochet is essential for amigurumi

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Double crochet 2 together (Dc2tog)

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1 This stitch is a common decrease in double crochet. First up, work a double crochet stitch as far as Step 3. Then insert your hook into the next stitch, yrh and pull up a loop. You will have three loops on the hook.

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2 Yarn round the hook again.

3 Pull through all three loops on the hook.

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Double crochet increase (Dc inc)

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To increase the number of double crochet stitches, simply make more than one double crochet in the same stitch as shown in this example.

TV Keep an eye on www.crochetnow.co.uk for our channel with step-by-step videos


Basics Slip stitch (sl st)

1 Slip stitches are used as joining stitches and in places where you need to move along a row or round without impacting the height of the row. Insert the hook into the next stitch. 2 Yarn round the hook, pull up a loop not only through the stitch, but also the first loop on the hook.

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Half treble (htr)

1 First up, yarn round the hook.

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2 Insert the hook into the next stitch, yrh and pull through one loop. There are three loops on the hook.

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3 Yarn round the hook again. 1

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4 Pull through all three loops. One half treble stitch made.

Half treble 2 together (Htr2tog) 1 Work as for half treble until Step 2.

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2 Work steps 1 and 2 again in the next stitch. There are five loops on the hook. 3 Yrh and pull through all five loops.

Treble (tr)

4 Pull through all three loops. One half treble stitch made.

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1 First up, yarn round the hook. 2 Insert the hook into the next stitch and pull up one loop. There are three loops on the hook. 3 Yarn round the hook and pull through two loops. There are two loops left on the hook.

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4 Yarn round the hook again and pull through the remaining two loops. One treble crochet stitch made.

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Basics Treble 2 together (Tr2tog)

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1 Work as for a treble crochet stitch up to Step 3. 2 Yarn round the hook again, insert into the next stitch and pull up one loop. There are four loops on the hook.

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3 Yarn round the hook again and pull through two loops. There are now three loops on the hook.

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4 Yarn round the hook again and pull through the remaining three loops.

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Changing colour

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2 Pull through both loops to complete the stitch and continue to work the next stitch in the next colour.

Crochet colourwork can make for some fantastic results. To change colour mid-row, first work the stitch until the penultimate step in colour 1. Yarn round the hook in the new colour.

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3 Once secured, you can either fasten off the old yarn, or keep it attached if you’ll be working it in again soon – this is called stranded colourwork.

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Measuring tension

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Tension squares are particularly important for projects where size does matter, so be sure to work up a square in pattern that’s slightly larger than 10cm2. Grab your ruler and count your stitches. Too many? Try a hook size up. Too few? Try a hook size down.

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Basics

STANDARD ABBREVIATIONS Get your head around these abbreviations that you’ll find regularly in Crochet Now patterns

alt  alternate

sl st

beg  beginning

sp space

work in back loops only BLO 

st(s) stitche(s)

CC  contrasting colour

tbl

ch  chain

tr treble

ch-sp  chain space

ttr

triple treble

cont  continue

tr2tog

 ork two treble crochet w stitches together

WS

wrong side

yrh

yarn round hook

double crochet dc  dc2tog  work two double crochet stitches together dec  decrease

slip stitch

through the back loop

double treble crochet dtr 

US to UK crochet terms

fdc  foundation double crochet

If you come across a ‘sc’ instruction, it’s likely to be written in US crochet terms. Crochet Now is written entirely in UK terms, but here’s a guide on how to translate them. UK US Double crochet dc Single crochet sc htr hdc Half treble Half double tr Double dc Treble Double treble dtr Treble tr ttr Double treble dtr Triple treble

FLO  work in front loops only foll  following htr

half treble crochet

work two half treble crochet htr2tog  stitches together inc

increase

LH

left hand

main colour MC  patt  pattern pm  place marker prev  previous pul  pull up a loop rem  remaining rep  repeat RH  right hand rm  remove marker rnd  round RS  right side RtrF

r aised treble front: Yrh, insert around post of indicated st from front to back around to front again, yrh, pul, [yrh, draw through two loops] twice

RtrB

raised treble back: Yrh, insert around post of indicated st from back to front around to back again, yrh, pul, [yrh, draw through two loops] twice

Sk skip

Crochet hook conversions UK In mm US 14 2mm 13 2.25mm B/1 12 2.5mm - 2.75mm C/2 11 3mm 10 3.25mm D/3 9 3.5mm E/4 - 3.75mm F/5 8 4mm G/6 7 4.5mm 7 6 5mm H/8 5 5.5mm I/9 4 6mm J/10 3 6.5mm K/10.5 2 7mm 0 8mm L/11 00 9mm M/13 000 10mm N/15

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How to...

Crochet 101 with the

BLOGSTARS

Sandra Paul

Are you boggled by changing colours? Sandra gives us her helpful hints on how to change colours as neatly as possible! www.cherryheart.co.uk

Sandra’s crochet blog

How do I change colours in a design? I love working with lots of colour in my crochet and so this is one of the first questions I found myself asking when I started out!

If you are changing yarn colour in the middle of a row for a picture or design, work the required number of stitches in the first colour, but do not complete the last stitch. Work up to the point where you are ready to make the last yarn over. If you are changing colours when starting a new row or round, finish with the first colour and secure the end.

Add the new yarn colour by drawing a loop through the last stitch, then you can either hold the new yarn end in place while you work the first few stitches, or temporarily knot the two ends to hold them firmly in place.

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Use the new colour yarn to pull through the last two loops and complete the stitch. You can then continue making stitches in the new colour. Try it with California Baby (page 24) and Sweet Summer Ices (page 70)

Cherry Heart is a crafty blog where I share my love of crochet, knitting and sewing all mixed together with a slice of my family life, including our cat Stanley and Bertie, our miniature dachshund. I like to chat about all my latest creations, sharing the ups and downs of the process along the way. It’s where you’ll find all the patterns that I’ve come up with, along with lots of free downloads and a whole heap of handy crochet tutorials. I also have a podcast, so it’s become a great place to find all of the links and photos for each episode.


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Crochet Now – July 2018  
Crochet Now – July 2018  
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