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creatives’ tips for sharing on instagram diy woven denim jacket

MAKE IT!

EASY-SEW

VELVET CUSHIONS

  

  MACRAMÉ PLACEMATS

   

TROPICAL

PAPER LAMPSHADE  

  RAINBOW SCRUNCHIES &more..

Made for each other


F420 The Innov-is F420 is packed with a huge range of features including 140 stitches, lettering, lock stitch button, automatic thread cutter, and Square Feed Drive System for strong, smooth, even sewing on all types of fabric.

Create your own style

55FE The feature-packed Innov-is 55 Fashion Edition will shape your fashion dreams into reality. 81 stitches including 10 one step button hole styles plus lettering together with the included 12 accessory feet make this an excellent all round machine.

27SE The Innov-is 27SE offers fantastic versatility for both the beginner and experienced sewer. With fingertip controls, 50 stitches including 5 one step button hole styles and a protective hard case; it’s ideal for all kinds of sewing.

brothersewing.co.uk


INSIDE THIS ISSUE ¤ VELVET PATCHWORK CUSHIONS ¤ ROPE BASKET BAG ¤ DOLL’S HOUSE MINI MAKES ¤ WOVEN DENIM JACKET ¤ CROCHET BOHO BUNTING ¤ MACRAMÉ PLACEMAT SET

Se

MAIN IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

93


CONTENTS

93

issue number ninety-three

81

18

Doll’s house

ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE & MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: KATE THOMAS

AMIGURUMI BEARS

Talk to us!

INTRODUCING.. LIVING The latest news from the world of handmade

Fill your life and home with crafted goodness

9 INTRODUCING…

45 LIVING

Handpicked crafty happenings

We find the loveliest hand-crafted, new season buys for your home

14 TRENDS Shop and craft in paintbox brights

48 HOME TOUR

18 CROCHET BEARS

See inside SMUG Lifestyle Store owner Lizzie Evans’ mid-century nest

The cutest amigurumi pair

55 LIBERTY KITCHEN SET 26 TEA AND A CHAT Meet homeware designer Bert Fowler

Whip up a coordinating tea towel and oven mitt in pretty floral prints

31 WOVEN JACKET

59 PAPER LAMPSHADE

Jazz up your denim, festival style

Make a botanical chandelier, cascading with tropical paper leaves and flowers

36 GOOD READ

facebook.com/MollieMakes

@MollieMakes

MollieMakes

Have a happy, healthy social media life

62 VELVET CUSHIONS

38 ROPE BAG

Play with colour blocking and simple patchwork to make this luxe duo

Sew the summer basket bag trend

67 PULL-OUT PAPERS pinterest.com/MollieMakes

youtube.com/user/MollieMakes

43 HANDMADE AWARDS 2018 This year’s categories and how to enter

4 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Bright, upbeat patterns and posters designed by illustrator Nikki Miles


NEVER MISS AN ISSUE 24 Subscribe UK Get a TOFT crochet bunny kit and a Sun Jellies bag when you subscribe today

87 Subscribe overseas International subscribers save up to 78%

38

Rope bag

FESTIVAL SEASON

62

Velvet cushions

31

As I’m writing this, Team Mollie are getting ready for The Handmade Fair at Ragley, our first craft event of the year. I’ve packed lots of goodies for our creative workshops, exciting surprises for the designers crafting live on stage with me, and extra pocket money for all the treats I’ll want to buy! If you couldn’t join us, you can still channel those al fresco maker vibes with the summery projects inside this issue. Find the most amazing woven denim jacket on page 31, boho-style crochet bunting on page 88, and an on-trend rope bag on page 38 this season’s must-have accessory. And, don’t miss the most ingenious use of a suitcase on page 81... We’re oicially smitten.

Woven jacket

LOVING Treats and treasures to fall in love with

88

Crochet bunting Yvette Streeter Acting Editor

75 LOVING Beautiful things to adore and make

76 CROWN AND CAPE Kit little ones out for adventures in a knitted crown and pom pom cape

81 DOLL’S HOUSE MAKES A teeny tiny cushion, rug, banner and balls of yarn for a mini craft room

88 CROCHET BUNTING Boho flags with beads and tassels

93 MACRAMÉ MATS

93

Macramé placemats

A pair of knotted zigzag placemats

96 TEMPLATES All you need for this issue’s makes

106 BACK PAGE PROJECT Allison Sadler talks creative freedom and playing by her own rules Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Turn the page for more on your free gift! Then Turn to page 67 for your papers


Contributors

Tiam Safari

Nikki Miles

Tiam is a London-based yarn hoarder, cat lover, and general knitting and crochet enthusiast. Her stash is called Yarnia, as it was originally tucked away in a large closet before it finally took over her apartment. Make Tiam’s cape and crown on page 76. www.knitsafari.com

Nikki’s a graphic designer and illustrator living just outside of London. For as long as she can remember, she’s always loved telling visual stories, whether that’s drawing in a sketchbook or designing on her Mac. See Nikki’s fun papers on page 67. www.nikkimiles.design

EDITORIAL Editor (on maternity leave) Cath Dean Acting Editor Yvette Streeter Senior Art Editor Helena Steele Deputy Art Editor Matilda Smith Commissioning Editor Lindsey Newns Production Editor Becca Parker Digital Editor (on maternity leave) Nina Dyer Digital Editor Hannah Carr Picture Editor Emma Georgiou molliemakes@immediate.co.uk

ADVERTISING Call: 0117 300 8206 Senior Advertising Manager Penny Stokes Client Partnership Manager Beckie Pring

MARKETING & CIRCULATION

PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS DIBBLE

Head of Newstrade Marketing Martin Hoskins Newstrade Marketing Manager Janine Smith Subscriptions Director Jacky Perales-Morris Direct Marketing Manager Penny Clapp

Lisa Congdon American illustrator and author Lisa is best known for her colourful drawings and hand lettering. She’s the author of seven books, including Art Inc: The Essential Guide to Building Your Career as an Artist. Find Lisa’s illustration on page 36. www.lisacongdon.com

PRODUCTION Production Director Sarah Powell Production Managers Louisa Molter/Rose Griffiths Production Coordinator Lily Owens-Crossman

LICENSING Director of International Licensing and Syndication Tim Hudson tim.hudson@immediate.co.uk

Bert Fowler When he’s not in his studio with classic soul playing, Devon-based homeware designer and illustrator Bert can be found outdoors – foraging, taking long strolls and having BBQs on the beach with his family and friends. Check out Bert’s nautical studio on page 26. www.bertandbuoy.com

BUYING TEAM Paul Torre, Karen Flannigan, Corinne Mellerup

MANAGEMENT Publishing Director Catherine Potter Group Senior Editor Julie Taylor Chief Executive Officer Tom Bureau Managing Director, Bristol Andy Marshall

SUBSCRIPTIONS For new orders and back issues sales call 03330 162 148 or visit www. buysubscriptions.com/craft. For enquiries relating to your subscription email molliemakes@buysubscriptions.com or call +44 (0) 1604 973 757.

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES FOR PROJECTS We have requested permission from designers so you can make and sell selected projects on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. Please credit the designer where appropriate and when requested. Mollie Makes encourages creativity and as well as making for gifts and for yourself, we want to help you make small batches of handmade items to sell. You can individually handmake as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell for yourself, a local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) or go into mass production, so you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine or its kit is prohibited. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Lizzie Evans As founder and creative director of SMUG Lifestyle Store in Islington, blogger and new mama Lizzie oversees every aspect, even designing her very own collection – her proudest creative achievement. Take a peek inside Lizzie’s home on page 48. www.ifeelsmug.com

Sandrine Deveze Self-taught hookster Sandrine lives in the south of France. Amigurumi is her favourite to make and she’s also written two amigurumi books. Her next mission is to open a shop to sell her crochet patterns and cute creations. Hook Sandrine’s adorable bears on page 18. www.lisenncabane.canalblog.com

Other contributors Anna Alicia,Valerie Bracegirdle, Colette Earley, Emma Escott, Kasia Fiszer, Nicky Gotobed, Emily Katz, Christine Leech, Gillian Martin, Sarah Matthews, Fiona Murray, Lou Orth, Angela Poole, Alicia Rand, Bethan Rees, Allison Sadler, Philip Sowels, Lottie Storey, Kate Thomas @ Mustard Models, Amy Vickberg, Jesse Wild

6 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Mollie Makes is published by:

Immediate Media Company Limited, 2nd Floor, Tower House, Fairfax Street, Bristol, BS1 3BN. Tel: 0117 927 9009 We abide by IPSO’s rules and regulations. To give feedback about our magazines, please visit immediate.co.uk, email editorialcomplaints@immediate.co.uk or write to Yvette Streeter or Katherine Conlon, Immediate Media Co., Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited (company number 05715415) is registered in England and Wales. The registered ofice of Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited is at Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk. Although every care is taken, neither Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited nor its employees agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.


your bonus gift!

Paper ice lollies

THIS GIFT COMES WITH THE PRINT COPY OF THE MAGAZINE ONLY. ALTERNATIVE GIFT ON SOME OVERSEAS COPIES. ICE LOLLY PATTERNED PAPERS: HELENA STEELE, PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Cut and fold bright papers to make Angela Poole’s summer treat garland

What’s your flavour? “Both my younger sisters have July birthdays and I wanted to design a fun alternative to birthday bunting. As children, our summers were spent splashing in the paddling pool. We had ice lollies, too – lollies that would be considered retro now.There was always a squabble over the last Fab lolly! I designed my template with those retro lollies in mind. You can use the patterned papers with your kit to make several diferent lollies and they

look great strung together as bunting. For a quirky look, try covering both sides of the stick with contrasting washi tape.You could even embellish the lollies with seed beads for faux hundreds and thousands.” Angela was Commissioning Editor for Papercraft Inspirations before setting up her own craft business. www.angelapooledesign.etsy.com Turn to page 96 for instructions on making your lollies, then share using #molliemakers.


INTRODUCING..

93

THE LATEST IN CREATIVE GOODNESS – HANDPICKED JUST FOR YOU

PHOTOGRAPHY: SOFI ADAMS

L.O.M. Fashion are known for their bold festival and party wear, and the Monster’s Garden Party collection does not disappoint. This jumpsuit fulfills all your pom pom, leopard-print and off-theshoulder frill needs in one statement outfit. Oversized tassel earrings and neon socks optional. www.lomfashion.co.uk

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93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 9


TOP READ Cutting edge Paper engineer and Mollie favourite Sarah Louise Matthews’ first book is full of gorgeous projects to cut, fold and shape. From pretty blooms to structural vases, it all starts with a humble sheet of paper. www.searchpress.com

We Are Knitters x The Hook Nook might just be our dream collab. With five crochet garment kits in 22 colours, you’ll never be able to pick just one. www.weareknitters.co.uk

THIS MONTH’S WISHLIST Matte on the outside, shiny on the inside; we love the Tinto mug’s strong form and clean lines. Pick your fave colour or create a teatime rainbow. www.madeandgood.com

Nothing quite says summer like a beaded watermelon raffia clutch with tassels. Pair it with a crisp white sundress for a slice of everyday fun. www.anthropologie.com

10 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Treat your sofa to a pop of colour with illustrator Cherie Gregory’s travel-inspired geo cushions. Choose one to add impact to a simple scheme, or buy the whole set and scatter for a maximalist approach. www. sparrowandwolfshop.etsy.com


Begging to be filled with plants (or clutter), these sisal baskets in dusky pink and soft greys are handwoven by a talented women’s co-operative in Kenya. Shop happy knowing the provenance of your products. www. thesmallhome.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: ELLIE LONGHURST

Join the houseplant appreciation society with Ellie’s tee

BRAND FOCUS Ellie Longhurst, the creative behind Little Paisley Designs, has a love for all things flora and fauna. Working from her sunny studio in Bristol, all Ellie’s homewares and gifts begin as handpainted illustrations. With products ranging from screenprinted tees and temporary tattoos to embroidered badges and enamel pins, they are all unified by a whimsical nod to nature. Shop at www.littlepaisleydesigns.etsy.com. British wildlife inspires all the Little Paisley Designs products

WEBSITE TO WATCH Okla If you’ve got fun and vibrant gifts or homewares on your shopping list this month, let us introduce you to Okla. The sister company to Oklahoma MCR, Manchester’s largest independent bricks and mortar gift shop, the Okla website is no less of an Aladdin’s cave, with unique products to delight and suit every pocket. www.okla.co.uk Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Show your love for nature (temporarily) with her pretty tats

93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11

PHOTOGRAPHY: SAM MORGAN MOORE @ FRAME DOGS

PHOTOGRAPHY: CAROLINE JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

Little Paisley Designs


Katie Jones Knit has long been a designer we admire, so we’ll be first in the queue to check out her pieces in the V&A’s Fashioned From Nature exhibition. It’s on until 27 Jan 2019, so make sure you get your fashion fix. www.vam.ac.uk.

PHOTOGRAPHY: RACHEL MANN

TOP READ Crochet crush

Terrazzo meets Dalmatian in these super-luxe Geometry Drop Earrings. Nail two trends at once and grab yourself some statement ear candy (which is totally a thing). www.trouva.com 12 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Whimsical Stitches, the new book from kawaii guru Lauren Espy, is a celebration of Japanese amigurumi in which animals, flowers and even slices of pie are reimagined as mini crochet cuties. With 30 projects, you can hook up some guiltfree pastries, wiltproof plants or a full menagerie of animals. www.bluestarpress.com

Neon highlights and bold typography combine to make Jacqueline Colley’s Love is Power poster a must-have. Focus on the positives and unleash your own inner tigress, or at the very least put this on your wall. www.jacquelinecolley.com

Blogtacular is back! Join like-minded creatives, entrepreneurs and bloggers for a day-long conference to inform and inspire on 16 June. Get your tickets at www.blogtacular.com.


It’s all about simplicity MAY COLLECTION 2018 MY JAPANESE RINGS

SHOP ONLINE!

www.gudrunsjoden.com

Stockholm | Est. 1976

“Matsumoto” linen/ cotton kimono, £119 and “Otsu” linen/cotton trousers, £79


INTRODUCING trends

THIS MONTH WE’RE

Retro kitsch is brought right up to date with showstopping colours.

OBSESSING ABOUT...

www.sunjellies.com

PAINTBOX BRIGHTS

PHOTOGRAPHY: JO BRIDGES

This trend’s all about colour blocking with solid crayon hues

14 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93


INTRODUCING trends 01

03

02

01

Nail all the shades in

one with a bright print. www.lisacongdon.com 02

The only way is up,

with Perspex stripes. www.lou-taylor.co.uk 03

You had us at red

Anthro jumpsuit. www. anthropologie.com 04

Cobalt + lilac = new

fave combo. www. eachtoown.com.au 05

Mid-century vibes,

2018 style. www. mardefe.com 06

My milk jug brings all 04

the boys to the yard. www.amara.com 07

Petri dish or paint

palette? Either way, we’re getting one. www.arhoj.com 08

09

Scandi essentials.

www.hay.dk/en-gb 09

Up the stakes in

rainbow hues. www. fredaldous.co.uk

06

07

MAKE IT! TURN THE PAGE TO 08

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

DIY THE PAINTBOX TREND 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 15


INTRODUCING trends

MAKE IT!

PAINTBOX BRIGHTS SCRUNCHIE

02

03

04

05

06

STYLED PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA

STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

01

MATERIALS Q Cotton fabric, 56 x 12.5cm (221/8 x 5") Q Flat braided elastic, 0.5cm (¼") wide, 18cm (71/8") Q Rotary cutter Q Sewing needle Q Matching sewing thread 01 With the wrong side (WS) of the fabric facing, fold the two short edges over to the WS by

16 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

1cm (3/8") and press. Fold the rectangle in half along the length with right sides (RS) together, and press again. Sew the long open edge using a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance. 02 Next, turn the sewn fabric tube RS out, as shown. 03 Holding onto one end of the length of elastic, thread it through the fabric tube and pull it out through the other end.

04 Tie the two ends of the elastic together with a double knot, leaving a small tail at each end, and pull tight. Rearrange the fabric so the knot is hidden inside the fabric tube. 05 To join the fabric tube together into a ring, overlap the two short edges, as shown, then pin them in place. 06 To finish, handsew the join using small slip stitches.

Gillian Martin lives in Glasgow, where she’s currently studying fashion design. She has a background in fine art sculpture and makes hair scrunchies in between her many hobbies, which include quilt making, drawing, and sewing. She’s interested in incorporating her quilting skills with fashion design in the future. www.thescrunchiestore.etsy.com


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Hook Sandrine Deveze’s sweet amigurumi pals


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH


HOW TO MAKE… CROCHET BEARS MATERIALS Q DMC Natura Just Cotton, 100% cotton, 155m/170yd per 50g, one ball in grey (Gris Argent 09) (Yarn A) Q DMC Babylo 10, 100% cotton, 267m/292yd per 50g, one ball each in white (Ivory 5200), (Yarn B), pink (224) (Yarn C) and mustard (783) (Yarn D) Q 1.5mm (US steel 8) crochet hook Q 3mm (UK 10, US D/3) crochet hook Q Black embroidery thread Q Stitch marker Q Two pairs of black safety eyes, 0.5cm (¼") Q Polyester toy stuffing Q Red crayon Q Scrap of fabric Q Yarn needle Q Sewing needle 20 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

TENSION Tension is not critical for this project but it is important the stitches are dense so the stuffing doesn’t show through ABBREVIATIONS st(s) stitch(es) ch chain ss slip stitch dc double crochet inc work 2 dc in st, to increase by 1 st yrh yarn round hook dc2tog double crochet 2 together – (insert hook in next st, yrh and draw loop through) twice, yrh and draw through all 3 loops on hook FINISHED SIZE Characters stand approx. 15cm (6") tall

If you go down to the woods today, you might just see these two inseparable sweethearts looking for a picnic spot. They’re both outdoorsy types, you see, with a love of great adventures and a penchant for accessorising. Customise your amigurumi bear pair with different colour bows or stitching. Where will their tiny legs will take them next? Instructions Unless stated otherwise, work in one continuous spiral (do not join rounds) and mark the last st of each round with a stitch marker. Pink bow bear Head Worked from the top of the head downwards Using Yarn A and 3mm hook Round 1 ch2, work 6dc into 1st ch [6 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [12 sts]

Round 3 (inc, 1dc) 6 times [18 sts] Round 4 (inc, 2dc) 6 times [24 sts] Round 5 (inc, 3dc) 6 times [30 sts] Round 6 1dc in each st around Round 7 (inc, 4dc) 6 times [36 sts] Round 8 (inc, 5dc) 6 times [42 sts] Rounds 9-13 1dc in each st around Round 14 (dc2tog, 5dc) 6 times [36 sts] Insert safety eyes 9 sts apart, between Rounds 10 and 11 Round 15 (dc2tog, 4dc) 6 times [30 sts] Round 16 (dc2tog, 3dc) 6 times [24 sts] Round 17 (dc2tog, 2dc) 6 times [18 sts] Start to stuff the head and continue as you go Round 18 (dc2tog, 1dc) 6 times [12 sts] Finish with a ss and break the yarn, leaving a long tail to sew the head to the body later Legs Worked from the feet upwards


Using Yarn A and 3mm hook Round 1 ch2, 8dc in 1st ch [8 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [16 sts] Rounds 3-9 1dc in each st around At the end of Round 9, fasten off leaving long tail for sewing, and set aside Repeat for the second leg but do not fasten off, instead continue by joining the legs Joining round ch5, 1dc in each of first 8 sts of first leg, ch5, miss first 8 sts of second leg, 1dc in remaining 8 sts of second leg, ending at the start of the first ch5 [26 sts] Mark last dc and continue working in the round for the body Body Round 1 1dc in each st around Round 2 inc, 2dc, inc, 9dc, inc, 2dc, inc, 9dc [30 sts] Round 3 1dc in each st around Round 4 4dc, inc, 6dc, inc, 6dc, inc, 6dc, inc, 4dc [34 sts]

Rounds 5-6 1dc in each st around Round 7 14dc, dc2tog, 14dc, dc2tog, 2dc [32 sts] Using a tapestry needle, sew up the gap between the two legs. Now begin to fill the body with stuffing and continue filling it as you go Round 8 5dc, dc2tog, 14dc, dc2tog, 9dc [30 sts] Round 9 1dc in each st around Round 10 (dc2tog, 3dc) 6 times [24 sts] Round 11 1dc in each st around Round 12 (dc2tog, 2dc) 6 times [18 sts] Rounds 13-14 1dc in each st around Round 15 (dc2tog, 1dc) 6 times [12 sts] Finish with a ss and break the yarn Arms Using Yarn A and 3mm hook Round 1 ch2, 5dc in 1st ch [5 sts] Round 2-12 1dc in each st around Finish with a ss and break the yarn

Ears (make two) Using Yarn A and 3mm hook Round 1 ch2, 6dc in 1st ch [6 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [12 sts] Round 3 inc, inc, 12dc [14 sts] Finish with a ss and break the yarn Snout Using Yarn B and 1.5mm hook Round 1 ch2, 6dc in 1st ch [6 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [12 sts] Round 3 (inc, 1dc) 6 times [18 sts] Rounds 4-16 1dc in each st around Finish with a ss and break the yarn leaving a long tail for sewing to head Using black embroidery thread, embroider a nose on the snout Belly Using Yarn B and 1.5mm hook Round 1 ch9, 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each of next 6 ch, 6dc in next ch (i.e. the 1st ch), turn to work along the underside of the ch 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


HOW TO MAKE‌ CROCHET BEARS sts, 1dc in each of next 7 sts, 6dc in next st [26 sts] Now continue working around in a continuous spiral Round 2 *7dc, (inc, 1dc) 3 times; repeat from * once more [32 sts] Round 3 *7dc, (inc, 2dc) 3 times; repeat from * once more [38 sts] Round 4 *7dc, (inc, 3dc) 3 times; repeat from * once more [44 sts] Round 5 *7dc, (inc, 4dc) 3 times; repeat from * once more [50 sts] Finish with a ss and break the yarn leaving a long tail for sewing the belly to the body Bow Using Yarn C and 1.5mm hook, work in rows Foundation ch15 Row 1 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch along, turn [14 sts] Rows 2-7 ch1 (does not count as st) 1dc in each st along, turn Break yarn, leaving a 40cm (15ž") tail. Using a tapestry needle, bring the tail to the centre of the 22 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

rectangle and wrap it around to shape the bow. Bring the starting tail to the centre as well, and knot the two together. Yellow bow bear Make the Head, Legs, Body and Arms as for the pink bow bear Ears (make two) Using Yarn A and 3mm hook Round 1 ch2, 6dc in 1st ch [6 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [12 sts] Round 3 (inc, 1dc) 6 times [18 sts] Finish with a ss and break the yarn Snout Using Yarn B and 1.5mm hook Round 1 ch2, 6dc in 1st ch [6 sts] Round 2 inc in each st around [12 sts] Round 3 (inc, 1dc) 6 times [18 sts] Round 4 (inc, 2dc) 6 times [24 sts] Rounds 5-16 1dc in each st around Finish with a ss and break the yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Using black embroidery thread, embroider a nose on the snout Bow Make as for pink bow bear, using Yarn D, leaving a tail for attaching Finishing Using a yarn needle, sew the snout to the head. Sew the body to the last round of the head, making sure the face is centred and adding more stuffing to the neck as you sew. Position and attach the arms to either side of the body. Position and sew the ears between Rounds 8 and 9 of the head on both bears. For the pink bow bear, using Yarn B, sew the belly onto the body. Using Yarn A for the pink bow bear and Yarn B for the yellow bow bear, sew long stitches onto the bellies. Position the bow on the ear or neck and sew in place. Rub the crayon on a scrap of fabric, then rub the fabric on the cheeks of the faces to transfer the colour.


Sandrine Deveze Sandrine lives in France with her husband and three children. She’s a crochet addict, but also loves baking, taking photographs, sewing, and decorating her home with treasures found at flea markets. She’s been sharing tutorials and inspiration on her blog since 2009. www.lisenncabane.canalblog.com


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Describe your style in a few words. The modern classic. Nautical, but not as you know it.

Beside the seaside with…

BERT FOWLER Take a glimpse into creative life on the Devon coast with the man behind contemporary homeware brand Bert & Buoy Words: COLETTE EARLEY Photographs: KASIA FISZER

Designer and illustrator Bert Fowler set up his nautical homeware brand, Bert & Buoy, in the summer of 2015. Having always found inspiration in his surroundings, Bert spent his childhood in the Midlands, climbing hills and fishing in local rivers. After a number of years, the love of a woman – his now wife – brought Bert to Devon, where he discovered another love in the form of the coastal surroundings. “The rare light, vivid colours, prevalent wildlife and iconic places ofer an unrivalled way of life.” 26 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Inspired by his new home, Bert decided to design a seaside-themed homeware range, Bert & Buoy, for which he produced the branding and first collection in just six weeks, launching with a pop-up at Dartmouth Royal Regatta. It was a huge success and attracted interest from interior designers and homeware buyers wanting to take home a slice of the British coast. We chatted with Bert about his wonderful life in the South West, and how he made his lifelong dream of becoming a designer a reality.

What’s your typical working day like? I walk to my studio along the stunning Devon coast – the best commute in the world. With a nice cuppa in hand and music filling the room, I’ll catch up with the studio team, pick and wrap customer deliveries, respond to partner, media and customer requests and then spend the bulk of my day doing something creative. It’s fair to say I’m a design-aholic – a good idea takes sweat and sometimes tears to get right and for me to be happy with it. When did you first get into design? I’ve always been influenced by mid-century style – the simple yet bold approaches to design. At university, I discovered a love for film title artwork, as strange as that might sound, especially those made by one of my design icons, Saul Bass. Soon after leaving university, I set up a creative agency working as a designer and illustrator for festivals, music, museums, galleries, theatre and cinema across the UK. My work was recognised as modern twists on classic styles, bold compositions and distinctive


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“I have an amazing studio space by the sea in Torbay – the inspiration is 360o.”

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illustration. This led me down a path to create Bert & Buoy. How did you learn and hone your craft? Practice makes perfect. I needed time to build my confidence and it wasn’t until I hit 25 that I felt like, actually, I’m pretty good at this and now want to really push myself out there as a professional. Share a bit about your creative process. I’m fortunate to have an amazing studio space by the sea in Torbay – the inspiration Subscribe at molliemakes.com

is literally 360o. I start a new design at the drawing board with a mug of tea. My process is to sketch potential ideas and compositions before thinking through how it might work as art on ceramics or textiles. Once I commit to a design, it’s the hard slog of refinement, refinement, refinement before outputting the final version.

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cushions all feature

The huge

his illustrations and

chalkboard in the studio is great for

are printed and

mapping out colour

made in the UK.

and design ideas. 02

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Bert’s collection

of bold nautical

Hand screen

printed ‘Ship Ahoy’ greeting cards.

Where does your love of all things nautical come from? The place I call home. We live and breathe the nautical lifestyle here in South Devon. 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 27


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

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Forget the clichés, the Bert & Buoy collection is an authentic slice of the British coast to take home and treasure. Why did you choose homeware? Because home is at the heart of life and we all need good design in our lives. To be able to have my designs in people’s homes makes me immensely happy. How do you decide on design styles? Trial and error. I enjoy experimenting with my designs and seeing if they will become a tessellating surface pattern or a singular bold design. I love working with black line work and how ‘simple’ can be so beautiful, but I also love a slab of colour, especially ofsetting this colour inside line work.

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Bert’s 1950’s

Nike Hydraulics

Tell us about your production process. For the ceramics, it was very much a collaboration with Keith Brymer Jones. We met at a trade show and Keith invited me to his studio. He loved my designs and had this idea about the mugs being like a beach pebble – the smooth shape and the unglazed base. Keith threw the shape and I started the designs, wrapping bold compositions around the mug.

drawing board, where he sketches his ideas. 02

The Oystercatcher

design, plus some new Bert & Buoy lampshades that will be available soon. 03

A peek of Bert &

Buoy’s new coasters in production.

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What tools couldn’t you live without? The Rotring Mechanical Pencil 800/0.7mm to be precise – this is one


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“Home is at the heart of life and we all need good design in our lives.”

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super-cool pencil. Also, a tracing paper pad and some Sharpies – I take these items everywhere. I’ve taught myself to not be precious over using just sketchbooks and instead work freely across sheets of tracing paper that can be pulled out and pinned up. It gives you the freedom to make mistakes, which is the process of refinement and happiness. How do you balance having a busy business with having a personal life? When I’m home, I awake to utter, joyful Subscribe at molliemakes.com

chaos each day; singing, laughing, skipping and playing. I’ve two kids under four, you see. They keep me grounded and remind me to step away from my studio to enjoy life by the sea together.

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displaying some of his latest products. Bert & Buoy’s

Dartmouth

illustration as a large teatowel.

harbourside studio,

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Have there been any struggles in getting your design business off the ground? Time. Sometimes it feels like there’s so much to do, and that 24 hours in a day just isn’t enough to fit everything in. I’ve had to learn to let go and that it will all happen… just one day at a time.

Shipshape shelves

in Bert’s Devon

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The mug range

that Bert produced with Keith Brymer Jones for MAKE International.

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

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Do you ever feel creatively stunted? It hasn’t happened yet. If anything, I’ve got too many ideas. Too many scraps of paper with sketches, too many designs bursting for a lease of life in the Bert & Buoy collection. I do find a little pressure helpful though, often a deadline or goal will make me focus. Also the classic line of stepping away from your usual surroundings I find always helps – a sketchbook on the go, away from the studio, is super helpful.

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Old letterpress

drawers hold Bert’s printed wall art, with Fishy Line-up being one of his signature patterns. 02

Bert always keeps

his sketchbook handy and loves taking it out and about with him.

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Bert Fowler Bert lives in Devon with his wife and children and is currently balancing work with renovating their seaside home. After graduating, Bert set up a creative agency, working as a designer and illustrator, before founding Bert & Buoy in the summer of 2015. www.bertandbuoy.com www.bertfowler.com

What’s the most important business lesson you’ve learnt? Keep plugging away and put yourself out there. It’s so true that it’s 1% inspiration and 99% blood, sweat and tears! Can you share what you’re working on? I’m developing the ceramics and kitchen range with Keith Brymer Jones – using the existing designs and a few newbies too. There’s a new interlocking design I’ve called Mighty Mackerel that I’m very excited about – I can already see it on a plate and a serving board. I’m also working on a range of new textiles and hand-screen printed and foiled wall art. Finally, what’s the best piece of creative advice you’ve been given? Keep it simple and trust your judgement.


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: KATE THOMAS

Off the wall Channel festival vibes with a colourful statement jacket weave by Christine Leech


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HOW TO MAKE… A WOVEN JACKET MATERIALS Q Paintbox Yarns Simply Aran, 100% acrylic, 184m/201yd per 100g, one ball each in Neon Yellow (Yarn A), Bubblegum Pink (Yarn L), Neon Pink (Yarn N) Q Stylecraft Special Aran, 100% acrylic, 196m/214yd per 100g, one ball in Aspen (Yarn B) Q Clover Natural Roving, 100% wool, 20g, one pack each in Pale Blue (Yarn C), Pale Pink (Yarn G) and Pale Yellow (Yarn J) Q Paintbox Yarns Wool Mix Super Chunky, 50% wool/50% acrylic, 55m/60yd per 100g, one ball each in Neon Pink (Yarn D), Pale Blue 32 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

(Yarn I) and Dusty Rose (Yarn M) Q Lion Brand Fun Fur, 100% polyester, 59m/64yd per 50g, one ball in Soft Pink (Yarn E) Q MillaMia Naturally Soft Super Chunky, 100% merino wool, 50m/55yd per 100g, one ball in Heirloom (Yarn F) Q King Cole Opium, 54% cotton/42% acrylic/4% polyamide, 250m/273yd per 100g, one ball in Rose (Yarn H) Q Lana Grossa Feltro, 100% wool, 50m/55yd per 50g, one ball in Perlviolet (Yarn K) Q Cascade Ultra Pima, 100% cotton, 201m/220yd per 100g, one ball each in Jade

(Yarn O) and Emerald (Yarn P) Q Denim jacket Q Yarn needle Q Weaving needle Q Weaving comb Q Small pom pom maker Q Erasable fabric marker

Oh yeah, weaving you can wear is officially a thing now. You can nail the trend for statement jacket back detailing and get to know your rya knots from your soumak in the bargain. And how about that pastels-versus-neons palette? Eye-popping festival chic, and your girl gang will definitely be able to spot you in a crowd. Instructions Turn to page 96 for a guide to the different weaving techniques, and a detailed placement guide. Use approximately 3m (1181/8") of yarn for each weave section. You may need to add more in places, but it’s a good length to start with and is less likely to tangle. Start each row in the middle of the warp threads – this hides the loose ends and prevents unravelling. Also try to finish each row in the middle.


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This will help keep the weave rows even. Use a weave comb to bat down the weave after each row, as this helps to keep the weave taut and neat. For the looser techniques such as the soumak and the looped weave, you can alter the shape by batting down the rows more firmly at the edges to create curves. When starting each new colour of the weave, leave a yarn tail of approximately 10cm (4") at the back of the warp. Sometimes the first row of a new colour will be in the same order of over and under as the row before. Don’t worry, as when you squish the rows together the inconsistency will disappear. As you’ll sew the warp threads directly onto the jacket, the weave won’t be as taut as it would be if you were using a loom. You might find it easier to use your hands to pull the jacket taut as you weave.

Tabby weave This is the simplest weave to do. Thread the yarn onto the weaving needle or a large plastic darning needle and weave over, then under, each warp thread across the weave. When you’ve reached the edge of the weave, turn the needle around and weave back the other way, alternating the over and unders. Weaving 01 To create the warp for the weaving, using the black outline of the weave diagram on page 96 as a template, draw the weave shape on the back of the jacket using an erasable pen, including the black V-shaped line inside the template. Make a mark every 0.5cm (¼") along the top edge and the bottom V-shaped edge, making sure the marks are parallel. These are guidelines for the warp threads.

02 Using a yarn needle and Yarn P, sew parallel lines joining the marks at the top and bottom of the weave shape. Turn the jacket upside down so the top edge becomes the base of the weave. 03 Weave three rows of tabby weave in Yarn A and then three rows of tabby weave in Yarn B. Using 1m (393/8") of Yarn C, weave two rows of large soumak. Begin the weave about 20 warp threads in from the right-hand side. Weave towards the left, grouping the warp threads as shown, then back towards the right, finishing roughly two-thirds of the way across. 04 Weave approximately eight rows of tabby weave in Yarn D, following the shape of the soumak. By approximately the eighth row you should have a straight edge of weave again. Next, weave three rows of tabby weave in Yarn B.

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HOW TO MAKE… A WOVEN JACKET 05 Weave approximately 20 rows of tabby weave in Yarn E across the right-hand section of the weave, following the template on page 96 for shaping. Gradually decrease the number of columns you weave across to create the curved shape. You’ll need to use the comb to brush the fluff to the front of the weave as you go. Next, weave six rows of looped stitch in Yarn F on the left to create a similar shape to the curve. 06 Using 50cm (19¾") of Yarn G, weave two rows of large soumak across the right hand side of the warp. Weave 14 rows of tabby weave in Yarn H across the whole width of the weave, curving it around the soumak.

Christine Leech Christine’s an author, maker, stylist and workshop host. She loves sharing her crafty skills with people, be it in workshops or through her Instagram posts at @sewyeah. She also sells a range of colourful handmade goodies through her Etsy shop. www.sewyeahstudio.etsy.com

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07 The weave should be nearing one of the drawn V-shaped guidelines on the jacket. Keep referring to this for the next few colour changes as it will help you keep the V shape of the weave. Start at the left-hand side and weave 16 rows of tabby in Yarn I across 19 warp threads. After the first three rows, gradually decrease the width of the weave by one warp each time to create a triangle shape, using the drawn V shape as a guide for the left-hand edge. 08 Following the shapes on the template on page 96, weave 16 rows of tabby weave in Yarn A and six rows of looped weave in Yarn J. Squish the yarn more at the right-hand side to follow the shape of the V. Weave approximately 22 rows of tabby weave in Yarn E. Next, weave nine rows of looped weave in Yarn K, then continue to weave 22 rows in the same yarn, decreasing to follow the drawn V guideline until you reach a point. 09 Weave 20 rows of tabby weave in Yarn L across the full width of the warp. You will now be weaving in a V shape. Bat the yarn down firmly to accentuate the V shape. Next,

weave seven rows of tabby weave in Yarn M. Finish the section by working tabby weave in Yarn N. Follow the drawn V guideline to shape the weave to a point. 10 Make 11 rya knots, using 10 25cm (97/8") lengths of Yarn O for each one. Begin at the point of the V and work outwards. Make 10 rya knots underneath, using 10 25cm (97/8") lengths of Yarn P for each one. Make them around alternate warp strings to the previous set. 11 Turn the jacket around so the rya knots hang downwards. Brush them flat and lay a ruler at a diagonal across one side of the V shape. Trim the excess yarn to create a neat edge, then repeat on the other side. Push the knots back over the weave, then fill the remaining V shape with decreasing rows of tabby weave in Yarn N. 12 Using a pom pom maker, make three small pom poms: one in Yarn A, one in Yarn B and one in Yarn K. Sew them to the weave using the main image as a guide for placement. To secure the weave on the jacket, sew a few slip stitches along sides of the weave, catching the weave and the jacket together.


Kaffe Fassett with Candace Bahouth

19 May to 2 September Victoria Art Gallery by Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AT 01225 477233 www.victoriagal.org.uk Daily 10.30 – 5.00

BATH’S PUBLIC ART MUSEUM

Only 90 minutes from London Paddington

Kaffe Fassett Seed packet quilt (detail)

A Celebration of Flowers


ILLUSTRATION: LISA CONGDON


INTRODUCING good read

FEELING SOCIAL Social media has given us exciting and inspiring platforms for sharing our creativity online, but how do we use it confidently – and keep having fun? Words: HANNAH CARR Illustration: LISA CONGDON

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o post or not to post? That is the question, not penned by Shakespeare, of course, but contemplated by many of us in our social media age. Plus, how much should we reveal? And how do we keep it enjoyable? So. Many. Questions. Social media has opened whole worlds to us and our worlds to others, but it’s left us with lots to ponder. Understandably, all these queries can leave us feeling unsure when it comes to sharing online. Well, no more! We’re ready to take back control of our social media lives, to feel comfortable, empowered and happy when posting online. You with us?

THE BIG REVEAL As makers, social media seems custom-made as a great place to share our crafts, whether we’re selling them or want to showcase the hobbies that bring us joy. Instagram alone is full of awe-inspiring makes and personal posts from the people behind the products. But how much is too much when it comes to sharing? Artist, author and illustrator Lisa Congdon (www. lisacongdon.com) and Tara Swiger (www.taraswiger. com), who ofers advice to handmade businesses, both agree that our followers want to know a bit about us as well as our crafts. Tara suggests taking time to plan the direction of your social media and listing what you do and don’t want to feature – something you can revisit, even if you’ve had an account for a while. Meanwhile, Lisa emphasises that a comfortable level of sharing difers from person to person – it’s all about doing what’s right for you. Listen to your gut but be brave too. “What I usually like to remind people is that if you have a sinking feeling you’ve shared too much after a post, maybe you have. On the other hand, maybe you’ve also just shared something uncomfortable that will connect you to people who deal with the same issues or anxieties.” Lucy Nicholls of fashion and lifestyle blog Shiny Thoughts (www.shinythoughts.net) takes a pause before posting. “I sense check before I post a caption as to how I may come across to people such as my old school friends or my director at work.” Want a second

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opinion? You could also show content to someone you trust and ask for honest feedback before you post it. Sometimes it’s all about context. If you don’t want to reveal too much day-to-day, you could take part in an Instagram challenge, using its prompts to share more about yourself during a set period along with other makers. Instagram Stories are a great forum for sharing more about yourself as well. “I love Instagram Stories because I can share bits and pieces of my life for short 24-hour periods without overwhelming people with that kind of stuf in my regular feed,” says Lisa.

FINDING BALANCE It can be tricky to find a happy medium when it comes to the frequency of our posts, particularly when we feel pressure to keep up with the social media Joneses. There are ever-changing algorithms to consider too… Lisa has a refreshing approach to this: “Honestly, I don’t pay very much attention to the algorithm pressure.” Tara agrees: “Focus on engaging people… and don’t spend time gaming the system.” Both make their own rules that work for them, with Lisa posting nearly every day. “It’s part of my business practice and so much a part of what I do that it’s as habitual as brushing my teeth.” Tara tries to post daily, Monday to Friday, so she’s consistent and can connect with her followers. “But if I feel poorly that day I don’t fake it.” Remember, it’s fine to take a breather. Lisa pays attention to how social media makes her feel and has a break when she needs it. And, Lucy reminds herself it’s about posting content she’s happy with, not posting for the sake of it. For her, success on Insta is about “the quality of your content and the stories you tell”. Hold on to your sense of enjoyment and it’ll shine through. “For me, creating a curated gallery of my life’s colourful moments is what brings me the most joy,” says Lucy. Tara agrees: “I love Instagram best when people are having fun with it and posting what they love, so I know the same must be true of my feed.” After all, whether you’re a ‘Grammer, Snapchatter or Facebook fan, you deserve a happy social media life that’s packed full of inspiration and enjoyment.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: KATE THOMAS

Beach ready Sew a basket-style bag for the summer – Amy Vickberg shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… A ROPE BAG MATERIALS Q 30.5m (34yd) of braided natural cotton rope, 0.5cm (¼") thick Q Polyester thread, one large spool each in white and navy blue Q Embroidery thread in blue, red, pink and white

Q Oval wooden bead, 3cm (1¼") long Q Cardboard, 5cm (2") wide Q Sticky tape Q Embroidery needle

Amy Vickberg Amy’s a crafter, quilter and dance teacher in Montreal, Canada. She also works at Closet Case Patterns and is learning to sew clothes. She sells some of what she makes in her Etsy shop, Fils et Fils, which means threads and sons; the latter of which she has two. www.filsetfils.etsy.com

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Right now, we like our bags how we like our doughnuts – round, sizable and sweet. And who knew you could get in on this summer’s hottest accessory trend with a bit of clever rope coiling? This casual, cross-body treasure has holiday written all over it. It’s light enough to throw on over your shoulder and has enough room for your phone, purse, sunnies and your current read. It’s easy to customise, too – keep threads neutral for a subtle look, or mix in brights for a rainbow fix. We’ll be sewing ours and heading to the lido, dreaming of the Riviera. 01 Load three bobbins with thread – this will be for inside the bag, so either colour works. Use navy blue

as the top thread. Set the sewing machine to the widest, longest zigzag stitch. Coil the rope end, as shown, and place it under the presser foot keeping the working end on the right. Start by sewing across this and then sew around, coiling the rope and catching both sides of the rope with the needle. 02 To create stripes as you go, stop and change the top thread, backstitching at the start and finish. Create variations by shortening the stitch length periodically. Continue around until the diameter measures approximately 25cm (97/8"). 03 To create the edge of the bag, lift the circle at a 45o angle to the sewing machine and continue coiling and sewing as before for approximately 4cm (15/8").


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04 Backstitch and snip the threads. Turn wrong side (WS) out so the top stitching is on the outer curved side. Pin a loop of rope to the side at 2 o’clock and continue pinning to the other side, leaving enough rope for another loop, plus enough to reach to the bottom of the bag, then cut off the rope. 05 Sew the rope to the bag, backstitching at the stress point of the loop. Pin the second loop to the bag, tucking the end into the bag’s edge. Sew from this end to the loop, backstitching to finish. 06 To create the second side, repeat Steps 1-3. Measure as you go to ensure they are identical – you can count the ropes to be exact. Flip the piece, tuck in the end and finish with backstitching.

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07 Place the two bag sides on either side of the presser foot, WS facing, starting at the loop. Sew together, folding the bag in half on the right in order to get it under the sewing machine arm. 08 For the strap, use a piece of rope to measure where you want the bag to fall. Double this length and, using white thread, sew it to itself starting at the fold. Push this double rope through one of the loops on the bag and pin the rope to it leaving a little slack. Sew the rope to itself again – three widths now – backstitching at the end. 09 Measure the fourth length against the strap and cut the working end off the rope. To create a clean finish, use clear sticky tape around the rope and cut halfway

through it. Pass the strap through the second loop, making sure the strap lays correctly, and sew the last length to the strap. 10 For the closure loop, finish both ends of a 20cm (77/8") length of rope with clear sticky tape, as in Step 9, and sew to the inside of the back of the bag, as shown. 11 To make tassels, wrap the embroidery thread around the cardboard ten times, leaving a tail at the top. Wrap the thread around the top and tie, then cut the bottom loop off the cardboard and trim. Make one in each colour, then tie to the bag loop. 12 Using the closure loop to measure the placement, sew the wooden bead to the bag with embroidery thread. 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 41


DODODODODOD

For more advertising DODODODODOD opportunities, please contact: DODODODODOD Beckie Pring 01173 008 205 DODODODODOD DODODODODOD DODODODODOD on

email: beckie.pring@immediate.co.uk


INTRODUCING handmade awards

Last chance to enter!

We’re looking for the creative stars of 2018! Enter via Pinterest by 6th June to be in with a chance of winning a Mollie Makes Handmade Award, plus some incredible prizes.

howcasing and supporting the UK’s amazing designer-makers is hugely important to us, so we’re delighted to be launching the fifth annual Mollie Makes Handmade Awards. They’re free to enter, and open to residents of the UK and Europe: the closing date is 6th June 2018. Shortlisted finalists will be invited to present their businesses to our judges at The Dead Dolls House in Islington, London, on Monday 9th July 2018, so keep the date free! Our chosen finalists will join us for a day of workshops, talks and photo walks with some of the UK’s bestloved creatives. Find the full judging lineup, plus this year’s prizes, on the blog.

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How do I enter? Create a Pinterest board entitled ‘Mollie Makes Handmade Awards 2018’ and pin at least five pictures of your projects, bricks and mortar space, illustrations or creative services from your website or blog. Use the ‘Description’ box to tell us about your business, and the category you’re entering. Then, invite us to view it by emailing mollieawards@immediate.co.uk through Pinterest’s ‘Send Board’ button. Visit www.molliemakes.com/mollie-makeshandmade-awards for more details.

Which category should i enter? We’ll shortlist three finalists for each category – you can enter more than one! BEST SMALL BUSINESS AWARD NEW! If you’ve got a start-up, a side hustle you’re trying to grow, or a small handmade business that’s been trading for less than three years, this is the category for you to enter. BEST ESTABLISHED BUSINESS AWARD In association with The Handmade Fair Enter this category if you’re a full-time creative with an established handmade business that’s been trading for over three years. HANDMADE CHAMPION AWARD Be it a craft blog, a bricks and mortar shop, an online boutique or the team behind a great campaign or Instagram hashtag, this award is intended to recognise the people promoting, supporting and championing all things handmade. BEST WORKSHOP AWARD In association withWest Elm This award celebrates the designer-makers out there passing on their skills and passion through workshops, inspiring others to pick up a new craft or technique. BEST ILLUSTRATOR AWARD Championing talented new illustrators is hugely important to us, and this award category recognises those artists turning their work into a creative enterprise. BEST PRODUCT AWARD VOTED FOR BY YOU! Got a stand-out product people love? We’ll let Mollie Makes’ readers pick their favourite.

Find more information & enter online at: www.molliemakes.com/mollie-makes-handmade-awards TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY. SEE FULL DETAILS AT: BIT.LY/MOLLIEAWARDSTERMS


INNOVATION IS OUR PASSION. We love to inspire you with our GZEGNNGPV GTIQPQOKE UGYKPI VQQNU Visit us on www.prym.com


LIVING

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INSPIRATION ALERT! SPACES, PLACES & NEW DESIGNERS TO WATCH Do mid-century your way with a spot of DIY à la Elizabeth Dot Design. She uses Annie Sloan paints (www. anniesloan.com) to update vintage pieces – get a load of the pins on this one – and sells her one-of-a-kind furniture on Etsy. www. elizabethdotdesign.etsy.com

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Pull together eclectic décor or cement a colour palette with a well-placed statement print. Clare Nicolson’s Pink Palm cuts a dash, and Crispin Finn’s Gin and Tonic screen print has a retro look. www.clarenicolson.com; www.crispinfinn.com

GET THE LOOK

Adding bright spots of colour, geo goodness and housing your beloved tiny plant babies, these wee concrete planters are small wonders for sure. www.anthropologie.com 46 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

COLLECTED AND CURATED

When you want to embrace that tropical vibe but you’re committed to the pastel aesthetic, a pink toucan coinbank is really the only logical way to go. www.ifeelsmug.com

It’s probably way too soon to call it, but Kiran Ravilious’ linen waterlily cushion has the makings of a classic. We only have eyes for this print now. www.thehambledon.com

No word of a lie, this chair’s called Dapper. It’s got industrial design good looks, strong legs and a whiff of comfortable, millenial sensibility about it. A heartthrob in chair form. www.hay.dk


Up your pin board game with muted linen, shiny gold edges and serious shapes, then pick your pin-ups wisely so they’re not outshone. Just think of it as Pinterest IRL. Cork boards need not apply. www.oliverbonas.com Anna-Lisa takes style cues from mid-century design

BRAND FOCUS Anna-Lisa Smith Yorkshire-based textiles designer Anna-Lisa is all about keeping it British. Her minimal, contemporary designs – primarily cushions and blankets – are woven in West Yorkshire mills and then finished by hand in her studio. We’re suckers for Anna-Lisa’s neat, geometric creations and straightforward use of colour. www.anna-lisasmith.com Blankets from the Carousel collection are reversible

WEBSITE TO WATCH Studio Arhoj

A love of colour is evident in her textile designs

Danish designer Anders Arhoj founded indie ceramics and interiors outfit Studio Arhoj after spending time studying in Tokyo. The Copenhagen studio is bestknown for their quirky hand-thrown ceramics, channelling both Scandi design and Japanese influences. Our fave fact? They have a studio dog. www.arhoj.com Subscribe at molliemakes.com

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LIVING home tour

Londoner Lizzie Evans of SMUG and her love of ‘Cluttered Minimalism’ Words: LOTTIE STOREY Photography: FIONA MURRAY

Cluttered Minimalism is a phrase coined by Lizzie Evans to describe the interiors style of the flat she shares with husband Daniel, son Constantin, and Persian cat Mabel. Lizzie is the shop owner and designer behind SMUG Lifestyle Store, one of London’s best-known interior shops based in Camden Passage, Islington, making her more than a bit prone to take her work home with her. So what is Cluttered Minimalism? This home is full of

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LIVING home tour

The open plan kitchen diner is the room Lizzie and Daniel spend the most time in. “It’s the hub of the home.” Right: Constantin’s bedroom features vintage kids’ books and toys, stacked next to tiny clothes on classic Vitsoe shelving.

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LIVING home tour

MID-CENTURY The term used to describe a movement in design and architecture from 1933 to 1965, mid-century modern encompasses designs by Charles and Ray Eames, Alvar Aalto,Verner Panton and many more, such as Lizzie’s sideboard, green rocker, wooden birds and blue elephant. Daniel and Lizzie have carefully collected favourite pieces over the years.

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everything that makes the couple happy, from beautiful pieces of Eames, Eileen Grey and Robin Day furniture, to old Pez and Street Fighter toys, with plenty of plants, light and colour mixed in. “We’re collectors at heart and love piecing together and curating our space based on what we have at our fingertips,” Lizzie explains. It’s a look that’s evident from the piles of books, clothes and rows of collected objects that are on display. “Rather than buying lots of new things at once that match or go together in the traditional sense, mixing old and new is what makes me tick.” The flat itself is a bright and colourful home, peppered with mid-century furniture, layered with collected objects and Lizzie’s house plants. She bought the Hackney home 12 years ago. “My brother works in property – it was his idea I buy somewhere as an investment so I could stay living near the rest of the family when I ‘grew 50 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

up’. He found the flat and we viewed it before it went on the market. I fell in love right away,” she recalls. For the first seven years, Lizzie lived with her parents while she set up the shop and let the flat to tenants. But things changed once Lizzie and Daniel decided to move in. “When we could aford to live here ourselves, we did the flat up, got married and moved in together. The first night we slept here was our wedding night!” So how did the couple begin with decorating? “I always start with white walls and let the books, art and objects bring the colour. I love bright yellow, soft pink, celadon and navy as well as soft greys and beiges,” says Lizzie, whose inspiration comes from museums and art galleries. “I’m very inspired by mid-century designers’ homes and classic Modernist architecture – think Le Corbusier and Ray and Charles Eames.” This love of mid-century runs throughout the home, forming its core look.

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objects contribute to Lizzie and Daniel’s style. “We call it Cluttered Minimalism.” 02

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inherited some beautiful pieces from the flat’s previous owner.


“Kempton Antiques Market used to be one of my favourites for vintage pieces. Beware of the 5am start! It’s worth it though.”


LIVING home tour

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“I feel particularly ‘grown up’ owning bits of Vitsoe shelving! It’s such a classic design and a beautifully simple and functional solution to our shelving needs. We’re big fans of Dieter Rams – another mid-century hero!” So where do these treasures come from? Lizzie’s favourite shops include The Conran Store, SCP, Margaret Howell and Merci in Paris, but it’s slow and steady for this couple. “Car boot sales are where we find the nostalgia. We’ve collected furniture over many years. As a teenager I’d ask for an Eames rocker or Tomado shelving for birthdays and Christmas!” Lizzie laughs. “I was lucky enough to inherit the Eileen Grey side table.” And the dining table, chairs and sideboard? “They all came with the flat, passed on by the previous owner.” It’s no surprise the open plan kitchen and dining room is the heart of the home. Right now though? With those collected objects adorning 52 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

the sideboard, Lizzie’s in love with the living room. “The art on the walls are some of our favourites,” Lizzie says. “Since Constantin was born, we’ve had loved ones come and hold him sitting on the sofa and we’ve snapped every one!’ A couple that works in design, living in a flat found by a brother, furnished with handme-downs and now home to the first of a new generation, it’s clear what’s important to Lizzie. “Home means everything to me,” she smiles.

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room, “the Farrow and Ball Hague Blue wall is a fantastic backdrop.” 02

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car boot fan and loves mixing old and new.

Lizzie Evans Lizzie’s shop, SMUG Lifestyle Store, is at the heart of renowned shopping destination Camden Passage in Islington. She shares shop updates and life snippets on Instagram @ifeelsmug. www.ifeelsmug.com


30 INSPIRING PROJECTS TO MAKE + NURSERY TOURS & STYLE IDEAS

LIVING A CREATIVE LIFE WITH LITTLE ONES

your bonus gifts!

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PULL-OUT CHILDREN’S WARDROBE DIVIDERS + NURSERY PRINTS BY WONDER & RAH

The team behind Mollie Makes bring you a collection of beautiful projects to make for children, from newborns to young explorers. Break out your sewing, crochet and papercrafting skills to create toys, clothes and décor – and be inspired by nursery tours and family-focused features.

PRE-order your copy today! Call 03330 162 138 AND QUOTE ‘MOLLIE MAKES MAMA 2 PRINT 1’ Online WWW.BUYSUBSCRIPTIONS.COM/MAMA2 Lines open weekdays 8am to 6pm and Saturday 9am to 1pm. Overseas please call +44 (0) 3330 162 138. * EUR price £12.99, ROW price £13.49. All prices include P&P. Please allow up to 28 days for delivery.


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SHOW YOUR ing interiors trend is more popular than ever — and it’s easy to see why. Instead of blowing the budget on vintage pieces or brand new shabby chic furniture, you can spend a bit of time and effort on something that you feel has potential and, with a bit of creativity, you can make it Etsy-worthy.

Av our pearlescent pastel shades, it makes DIY decorating easy, lightly tinting wood and infusing it with a bright pop of colour, while still allowing the attractive natural grain to come through for an authentic look.

If this is something you’ve always wanted to do, but you don’t know where to begin, then you’ll love Rust-Oleum’s Colour Wash paint.

Applying a beautiful translucent shade to bare or unpainted wood is a simple way to add texture, dimension and natural paint layers. Rust-Oleum’s Colour Wash paint allows you to personalise a tired piece and give it a new lease of life.

No. 1

No. 2

Ensure the surfaces you’re going to paint are clean, dry and free from grease and contaminants. Using pliers, remove any staples from the outer edges.

Cover each crate in a light coat of Colour Wash and leave it to dry. For a more intense shade, add a second coat.

The project

Upcycle wooden wine crates to create inexpensive colourwash bathroom shelves. Dress them with your favourite pampering products and admire your handiwork as you enjoy a relaxing soak in the tub.

Spruce up your home using a new twist on a classic painting technique with the help of Rust-Oleum Colour Wash paint

Materials - Rust-Oleum Colour Wash (750ml, £12.99) - Wooden crates - Paint brush - Pliers - Electric screwdriver - Screws

No. 3

Screw the boxes together, alternating colours.

Cloud Blue and Mint Sorbet have been used in the example

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CHOOSE YOUR PAINT AND DISCOVER MORE INSPIRATION I VISIT MAKEITYOURS.CO.UK


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HOW TO MAKE… A TEA TOWEL AND OVEN MITT MATERIALS Q 50cm (19¾") Liberty The Cottage Garden Collection in Emily Silhouette X (Fabric A) (ours was from www. alicecaroline.co.uk) Q 50cm (19¾") Liberty The Cottage Garden Collection in Newland Large Y (Fabric B) Q 50cm (19¾") washed natural linen fabric (Fabric C) Q 50cm (19¾") heat resistant insulating wadding Q Matching sewing thread Q Sewing needle Q Tailor’s chalk Q Metal ruler Q Set square Q Rotary cutter Q Cutting board Q Awl Q 2.5cm (1") bias binding maker tool

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We’re waltzing merrily into pattern clash territory with this ditsy floral duo – a quilted oven mitt and co-ordinating tea towel. And if getting disproportionately excited about fancy kitchen linen is wrong, we don’t want to be right. Whether or not you can nail the perfect soufflé, making your own bias binding is totally doable and we’re loving the contrast effect it gives this pair. Take that rotary cutter for a spin and rustle up a set for a bit of floral loveliness in your kitchen, or to treat a foodie pal. If you’re using a fabric with a directional pattern, you’ll need 75cm (29½") for Fabric A. Cutting out 01 Start by cutting out a 48 x 66cm (187/8 x 26") rectangle from both Fabric A and Fabric C for the tea towel. For the oven mitt, fold Fabric B in half with right sides (RS) together. Using the template on page 96, draw out the mitt shape twice, close to the open edge,

not the folded edge of the fabric, leaving a larger, square-ish piece intact to make the bias binding for the tea towel. Cut both of the mitt pieces out with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance, so you end up with four mitt pieces altogether. Tea towel 02 Lay the Fabric C rectangle out and place the Fabric A rectangle on top, wrong sides (WS) together. Using the set square and the tailor’s chalk, mark a line at a 45° angle across the tea towel. Repeat this all the way across the tea towel at 7cm (2¾") intervals, adding some pins along the lines to keep the fabrics together. Sew along the marked lines, removing the pins. Now mark lines in the opposite direction in the same way, creating a criss-cross pattern. Sew along these lines to quilt the fabric. 03 Lay the tea towel out with the linen side facing up. Fold one of the long edges to this side twice by about 1cm (3/8") and pin in place,

as shown. Repeat this step with the other long edge. Sew in place close to the folded edge. 04 To make the bias binding, take the remaining piece of Fabric B. Using the set square, mark diagonal lines at 45° across the fabric, each 5cm (2") apart. Next, cut the fabric into strips using a metal ruler, rotary cutter and cutting board. You should have a couple of strips long enough (at least 48cm (187/8") once the diagonal ends are cut off) so that you don’t need to sew any of the strips together. 05 Thread the strip through the bias binding maker using the awl and press with a hot iron in sections as you pull it through, creating the bias binding. Next, fold the bias binding in half along the length, with the open edges on the inside, and press again. 06 To make the loop for hanging the tea towel, cut a 13cm (5¼") length of bias binding. Sew the open long edge closed.


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07 Cut a piece of bias 1cm (3/8") longer than the short edge of the tea towel. Fold the ends of the bias to the WS by 0.5cm (¼") and pin the bias in place over one of the short edges of the tea towel. Repeat at the other end. Fold the loop piece in half and tuck the raw ends under the bias, about 0.5cm (¼") in from one of the corners. Machine-sew the bias in place, close to its inner edge.

Oven mitt 08 Make the bias binding in the same way as for the tea towel, using the leftover Fabric A – you’ll only need about 32cm (125/8"), so you shouldn’t have to sew any strips together. Set aside for now. 09 Pin two of the mitt pieces with RS together. Sew around the chalk line but leave the wrist opening unsewn. This is the lining. Cut the seam allowance between the thumb and main glove. 10 Place the other two mitt pieces RS up on top of the wadding and

pin in place. Cut out around the fabric. As per Step 2, mark diagonal lines at 7cm (2¾") intervals on the two fabric/wadding mitt pieces, sew along these lines, and repeat in the other direction to create a criss-cross pattern. Trim any overlap if the wadding has shifted at all during the sewing. 11 Place the two mitt pieces with RS together, then pin and sew 1cm (3/8") in from the edge, stopping either side of the wrist opening. Snip the seam allowance between the thumb and mitt, trim the seam to 0.5cm (¼") and cut darts along

the curved edges. Turn RS out and tuck the lining into the outer piece with WS together, lining up the edges of the wrist opening. 12 Finally, take the bias binding and fold it over the open edge of the mitt all the way around, pinning it in place. Overlap the ends by about 2cm (¾"), fold the top end to the WS by 1cm (3/8") and pin. Make a hanging loop as per Step 6, then fold the loop piece in half and tuck the open ends under the binding edging. Hand-sew the bias binding in place around the outer and inner edges to finish.

Anna Alicia Anna’s the craft writer and designer-maker behind eco-ethical jewellery and homeware label A Alicia. She’s based in London with her husband and their toddler, and loves combining handmade ceramics with organic textiles in her jewellery collections, but is always looking for new avenues to explore within her craft practice. www.aalicia.bigcartel.com

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New themed box on the 1st of every month Visit our blog & YouTube channel for ideas & inspiration ail ppy m g & ha For planners, scrapbooking, craftin

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Sat 30 June 2018 ¡ 9am – 6pm Farnham Maltings, Bridge Square, Farnham, Surrey, GU9 7QR craft.farnhammaltings.com

A handpicked collection of fabrics delivered to your door

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Recycle your magazine and seven days later it could come back as your newspaper

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Cut and fold Sarah Matthews’ paper chandelier and rack up the plant lady points

PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE WILD; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Indoor jungle


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HOW TO MAKE… A PAPER LAMPSHADE MATERIALS Q Lampshade ring with bulb holder, approx. 28cm (11") in diameter Q Lampshade ring without bulb holder, approx. 23cm (91/8") in diameter Q 11 30cm (117/8") lengths of floral wire Q Flat or round-nosed pliers with wire cutters Q Green floral tape Q All-purpose adhesive Q Fire retardant spray

Q A4 paper, six sheets in blush pink, four sheets in dark green, three sheets in sage green, two sheets in bright green and one sheet each in pastel pink, bright yellow, white and mustard Q Craft knife Q Cutting mat Q Embossing tool

Sarah Matthews Sarah’s a paper engineer and paper product designer living in Nottingham. She designs and makes fun, innovative stationery, artwork and decorations as well as bespoke commissions for anything from weddings to visual merchandising. www.sarahlouisematthews.com

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Trailing vines, pink polka dot plant leaves, lily-like blooms and must-have monstera – this tropical papercut project knows the way to our plant-loving hearts. It’s made on a lampshade base (imagine the amazing shadows it’ll cast), but will look just as beautiful as a hanging decoration. Note Always use with low-heat LED bulbs and fire retardant spray. Do not leave unattended. 01 Wrap the lampshade rings with floral tape, only wrapping around the outer ring, not on the central bulb holder section. When using floral tape, stretch the tape as you work to release the glue and allow the tape to stick to itself. Next, join the two rings by binding the crossovers with floral wire and adding a couple of additional lengths of wire to hold the rings in

position, winding one end of each piece of wire around each ring. 02 Using the templates on page 96 and a craft knife and cutting mat, cut four flowers in white paper, four in pastel pink paper and four in bright yellow paper. Cut 12 flower centres in mustard paper. Next, cut 24 of leaf 1 in blush pink paper, 12 of leaf 2 in dark green paper and 12 of leaf 3 in sage green paper – these three shapes make up the variegated leaves. Next, cut four of leaf 4 in dark green paper and four of leaf 5 in each of the blush pink, dark green and bright green papers – 12 in total. From the sage green paper, cut four of leaf 6. Cut four of leaf 7 from the bright green paper. From the blush pink paper, cut 10 of leaf 8, five of leaf 9 and five of leaf 10. Cut five of leaf 11 from the dark green paper. From the bright green paper, cut five of leaf 12 and five of leaf 13. Cut five of leaf 14 and five of leaf 15 from


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the sage green paper. Cutting towards you is safest as you’ll have the most control over the knife. Hold the paper with your other hand, rotating it to always cut towards the body. 03 Use an embossing tool and ruler to score the crease lines shown on the templates. To do this, line up the ruler, then run the end of the embossing tool alongside it, pressing to create an indentation. 04 Separate the pieces into flower pieces, full leaf/full vine pieces and variegated leaf pieces. Take the full leaf/vine pieces and fold along all scored lines. To do this on the smaller leaves, turn the piece upside down and push the side of one finger along the score from the back while squeezing the sides of the leaf with the other hand. 05 Cut 24 10cm (4") lengths of floral wire using wire cutter pliers. 06 Take the variegated leaf pieces and fold along all scored lines.

Position one pink leaf piece with a valley fold, so with the paper on either side of the fold pointing upwards. Glue a cut piece of wire onto the leaf using all-purpose adhesive, aligning the wire with the fold and leaving a 2cm (¾") gap at the pointed end of the leaf. The wire should protrude the base of the leaf by around 3.5cm (13/8"). Repeat this step for all the pink variegated leaf pieces. 07 Glue the green variegated leaf pieces onto the wired leaves in the positions shown, building up in layers with the dark pieces on top. 08 Fold along all the scored lines on the flowers. Hold the first petal with a mountain fold, so the paper on either side of the fold pointing downwards. Run the ruler edge along the back of each petal while pressing on the front with your thumb to curl. Repeat for all petals. 09 Cut 12 7cm (2¾") lengths of floral wire using wire cutter pliers.

Use the tips of the pliers to bend one end of each piece into a loop. 10 Wrap a petal piece around the wire, just below the loop. Overlap and glue the end two petals, aligning the edges. Apply a dot of glue to the base of the wire loop, then press the flower up to the loop. Take a flower centre piece and fold the stamen up. Apply glue to the back of the centre and press onto the top of the wire loop. Repeat for all the flowers. 11 Attach all the non-wired leaves and vines to the lampshade rings, positioning the larger pieces on the inner ring and smaller pieces on the outer ring. Fold the end of each stem up and over the ring and glue it onto the back of the leaf. 12 Fix the wired leaves and flowers to the outer lampshade ring by wrapping the wires around the ring. Apply fire retardant spray following the manufacturer’s instructions and leave to dry. 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 61


PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE WILD; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Latest crush Upgrade your sofa with Lou Orth’s patchwork cushions in strokable velvet


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HOW TO MAKE… VELVET PATCHWORK CUSHIONS MATERIALS Q Crushed velvet, 50cm (19¾") each in light pink, gold, light blue and medium blue, 1m (393/8") in dark pink (ours was from www. myfabrics.co.uk) Q Rotary cutter Q Cutting mat Q Matching sewing threads Q Metal ruler Q 45 x 45cm (17¾ x 17¾") cushion pad Q Polyester stuffing Q Sewing needle

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The whole gang’s here – modern geo patchwork, colour block goodness, rich jewel brights and luxe crushed velvet. Basically, this simple-sew cushion duo project is smashing through all of our favourite interiors trends in one go like some kind of crafty juggernaut. Don’t you think it’s time you let your sofa live its best life? Square cushion 01 Using the rotary cutter and cutting mat, cut a 50 x 50cm (19¾ x 19¾") square and a 50 x 26.5cm (19¾ x 10½") rectangle from the light blue velvet. Cut a 50 x 50cm (19¾ x 19¾") square and a 50 x 26.5cm (19¾ x 10½") rectangle from the medium blue velvet. 02 Using the rotary cutter, cutting mat and metal ruler, cut the two

squares in half diagonally from the bottom left to the top right to create two triangles in each shade. Set one of each triangle aside as you’ll only need a light blue one and a dark blue one for this project. 03 For the cushion front, place a light blue and dark blue triangle with right sides (RS) together and sew along the diagonal line with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance. 04 Next, with each of the 50 x 26.5cm (19¾ x 10½") pieces, fold one of the long edges to the wrong side (WS) by 0.5cm (¼"), and then again by 0.5cm (¼"). Top stitch in place approximately 0.25cm (1/8") in from the edge. 05 Place the cushion front with RS facing. Lay the cushion back pieces on top, aligning the edges, and with WS facing. The hemmed back


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pieces should overlap in the middle to form an opening, as shown. 06 Pin in place and carefully sew all the way around the outer edge with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance. Backstitch at the beginning and end. For added security, encase the seams with zigzag stitch. Turn the cover RS out and insert the cushion pad to finish. Semi-circle cushion 07 Using the templates on page 96, cut one triangle piece from the dark pink, light pink and gold velvet fabrics. For the cushion back, cut a semi-circle piece from the dark pink velvet. 08 Place the light pink triangle and gold triangle with RS together and sew along the right diagonal sides with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance.

09 Place the gold triangle and dark pink triangle with RS together and sew with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance. This is the cushion front. 10 Place the cushion front with RS facing. Lay the semi-circle template from page 96 on top of the cushion front with the curve at the top, aligning the bottom point of the gold triangle with the bottom edge of the template. Carefully trim away the excess fabric around the

top of the template to create the upper curve of the semi-circle. 11 Place the cushion front and back pieces with RS together, aligning the edges. Pin in place, then sew with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance, leaving a 12cm (4¾") gap along the bottom edge for turning out. 12 Snip the seam along the curved edge, then turn RS out. Fill with stuffing, using small pieces for an even finish. Sew the gap closed.

Lou Orth Lou is a self-confessed fabric addict from Oxfordshire, where she lives with her young family. Sewing is her passion, specifically patchwork and quilts, and she blogs about her sewing projects and shares her latest projects on Instagram @imstudiolou. www.imstudiolou.com

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illustration by Harriet de Winton of de Winton Paper co.

14-16 September 2018 The Green at Hampton Court Palace

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Make your day with Kirstie Allsopp From papercutting to dress making, make the most of your creative day out! Skills Workshop - get hands on and learn a new skill with creative experts Super Theatre - hear from inspiring speakers in live demos and Q&As Grand Make - create something beautiful with like-minded makers

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EXCLUSIVE PAPERS! Find a new mantra and some serious wall candy among these playful, upbeat patterns and posters. Share your makes using #molliemakers Illustrations: NIKKI MILES WWW.NIKKIMILES.DESIGN


LOVING

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OH, YOU PRETTY THINGS! MOODBOARDS & MUSINGS TO INSPIRE US When you finally hear those three little words: mini unicorn piñata. We’ve been swept off our feet by this treasure from indie party goods brand Bash. Pair your paper cutie with holographic plates and confetti galore for a shiny, happy shindig. www.bashpartygoods.com

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Make believe Play pretend with Tiam Safari’s magical dressing up set

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; MODELS: AMELIA AND CHARLOTTE HAWKINS. WARNING – THESE ITEMS ARE NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN UNDER 36 MONTHS DUE TO POSSIBLE CHOKING HAZARD. ADULT SUPERVISION RECOMMENDED.


HOW TO MAKE… A CROWN AND CAPE MATERIALS For the crown Q Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK, 100% cotton, 125m/137yd per 50g, one ball in Mustard Yellow (424) Q 3.25mm (UK 10, US 3) circular knitting needles Q Yarn needle Q Stitch marker For the cape Q Turquoise satin fabric, 1 x 1m (393/8 x 393/8") Q Turquoise organza fabric, 1 x 1m (393/8 x 393/8") Q Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK, 100% cotton, 125m/137yd per 50g, one ball each in Bubblegum Pink (451), Marine Blue (434) and Mustard Yellow (424) Q 1.5m (591/8") mustard satin ribbon, 3.5cm (13/8") wide Q 6.5cm (25/8") pom pom maker Q Fork Q Matching sewing thread Q Tapestry needle

TENSION 30 sts and 37.5 rows in st st to measure 10 x 10cm (4 x 4") using 3.25mm needles ABBREVIATIONS st(s) stitch(es) k knit p purl rh right hand yo yarn over ssk slip one st, slip one st, knit slipped sts together k2tog knit 2 sts together s2kp2 slip 2 sts, knit 1 st, pass 2 slipped sts over the knitted st b bobble stitch – on the RS work (k, yo, k, yo, k) into 1 st. Turn to WS, and p each st. Turn back to RS, and K2tog twice. Slip the second st on the rh needle over the first st. k the final st in the bobble, and slip the second st on the rh needle over the first st RS right side WS wrong side FINISHED SIZE Crown has a circumference of 50cm (19¾")

Tiam Safari Tiam’s a cosmetics developer by day, and knitter by night. She designs for various yarn companies, and has knitted for The OprahWinfrey Show and London Fashion Week. She shares her makes on Instagram @knitsafari. www.knitsafari.com

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Not all superheroes wear capes, but our favourite kind can rock a pom pom with the best of them. This DIY crown and cape set is what dressing-up dreams are made of, and a spot of knitting and sewing will have little ones kitted out for all sorts of imaginary adventures, whether they’ve got epic rescues in mind, or fancy being king or queen of everything for the day. We love the idea of giving this handmade set as a birthday gift – both accessories are sized to fit children aged four to eight years. Crown The first section of the crown is knitted in the round from the base upwards. The five peaks of the crown are each knitted from this section in rows. Cast on 115 sts using the long-

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tail cast on technique. Join in the round, taking care not to twist the cast on edge. Foundation k, place a stitch marker at the beginning of the round Rounds 1-38 using Chart A on page 96, work 38 rounds. The chart is repeated 5 times on each round, for example for the first round work: (yo, ssk, k18, k2tog, yo, k1) 5 times. Note that every alternative round on the chart is k except for Rounds 20 and 38 within which the bobble sts are placed. Peaks Using Chart B on page 96, work in rows across the first 23 sts only, leaving the remaining stitches on the circular knitting needle cable. For example, Row 1 reads: k1, ssk, yo, k17, yo, k2tog, k1, turn Note that Row 2 and every alternate


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row up to Row 20 is p. When you have worked the final bobble at the top of the peak, cut the yarn leaving a 15cm (6") yarn tail. Rejoin the yarn to the work leaving a 15cm (6") yarn tail and repeat Chart B across the next 23 sts. Repeat Chart B in the same way around the crown until all five peaks have been worked and there are no sts left. Weave in all ends. When weaving in the ends on the crown peaks, weave back and forth under the bobble to help give it more stability. Block gently. Cape 01 Lay the organza on top of the satin with wrong sides (WS) together. Sew around three edges with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance, using a 0.25cm (1/8") stitch length.

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02 Trim the organza seam allowance to 0.5cm (Âź") along the three sewn edges, then fold the satin edge towards the organza side over the seam twice, creating a 1cm (3/8") folded seam along all three sewn edges. Press gently and top stitch close to the folded edge. 03 To make mini pom poms, wrap pink yarn around the tines of a fork 20 times. Tie in the centre, then slip the yarn off the fork. Cut the folded edges of the bundle, then roll the pom pom in your hands to fluff up the yarn. Trim the mini pom pom into shape. Repeat until you have 10 pom poms in each colour. Then, using the 6.5cm (23/8") pom pom maker, make three pom poms in each yarn colour. 04 Put all the pom poms into the cape through the open edge, between the satin and organza.

Fold over the edges of the organza and satin towards the organza side and press gently, creating a 1cm (3/8") fold. To make a channel, fold over again by 4cm (15/8"), using the ribbon as a width guide, and press. Top stitch the folded edge closed. 05 Thread a tapestry needle with a length of scrap yarn, and knot one end. Insert through one end of the ribbon and use the needle to feed the ribbon through the channel created in Step 4. Remove the yarn and needle from the ribbon. 06 Cut both ends of the ribbon into an inverted V shape, as shown. 07 Lay the cape flat, and wriggle around the pompoms so they’re arranged randomly inside the cape. Thread the sewing needle and sew some of the pom poms in place, through the satin layer only, referring to the image as a guide. 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 79


crAft rOom gOals

PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE WILD; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Four mini makes by Bethan Rees to doll up a tiny dream house


banner

cushion

01

03

04

05

yarn and needles

11

12

14

16

HOW TO MAKE… DOLL’S HOUSE ACCESSORIES MATERIALS For the banner Q White cotton fabric, 7 x 7cm (2¾ x 2¾") Q One craft matchstick Q Fabric pen Q PVA glue Q Fray-stop glue Q String For the cushion Q Grey cotton fabric, 14 x 7cm (5½ x 2¾") Q Eight white mini craft pom poms Q Soft toy stuffing Q Fabric glue Q Matching thread Q Sewing needle

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For the rug Q Roll of brown jute string Q Sheet of A4 card Q Sheet of A4 clear plastic Q Sticky tape Q Compass For the yarn and needles Q Yarn or embroidery thread in various colours Q Yarn needle Q Drinking straw Q Brown paper Q Cocktail sticks Q Wooden beads, 0.7cm (¼") diameter Q Sandpaper

The growing trend for modern doll’s houses has got us feeling like kids again, only this time around we’re kitting them out with squee-worthy mini versions of all the home décor we’re crushing on. This small-but-perfectly-formed craft room is inside a little case, Polly Pocket style, so it’s easy to cart about. Got the urge to redecorate? You can do it in an afternoon with fabric scraps, pom poms and cocktail sticks. Visit www.molliemakes.com to download additional templates. Banner 01 Attach a matchstick to the right side (RS) of the fabric with PVA glue, approximately 1cm (3/8") in from one of the edges. It should be parallel to the edge, as shown. 02 Using the image as a guide, mark out a 4 x 5cm (15/8 x 2") banner shape with fray-stop glue, then cut it out with the matchstick

along the top edge. Trim the matchstick if necessary. 03 Use a fabric pen to draw your desired wording or design onto the RS of the banner. You could draw it on beforehand with erasable fabric pen to make sure you’re happy with the design. 04 Cut a 7cm (2¾") length of string and glue the two ends of the string to the wrong side (WS) at the top of the banner for hanging. Pom pom cushion 05 Cut the fabric rectangle in half along the width to create two 7 x 7cm (2¾ x 2¾") squares. 06 Place the squares RS together and sew along three sides with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance. 07 Trim the seam allowance at the edges and corners. Turn RS out, stuff, then sew the gap closed. 08 Using fabric glue and the image as a guide, stick the pom poms to the front of the cushion.


jute Rug

06

07

08

09

17

18

20

22

Jute rug 09 Using a compass, create a template by drawing a circle with a diameter of 9.5cm (3¾") onto A4 card. Draw 22 smaller circles around it, each with a diameter of approximately 1.5cm (5/8"). 10 Tape the plastic sheet in place over the card template sheet. 11 Using one end of the roll of jute string, use your fingers to pinch the ends together into a small ‘U’ shape and slowly start turning the string into a small circle. Aim for a neat circle so there isn’t a hole in the middle of the rug. Glue the

Bethan Rees Bethan creates on-trend miniatures of beautiful homes in her attic studio in Dublin. When she isn’t thinking about or making miniatures, she can be found enjoying life with her husband and two little boys. www.littlelucciola.etsy.com

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small circle onto the plastic in the centre of the rug template. 12 Holding the circle down with one finger, begin to turn the plastic as you wrap the string around to create a bigger circle. Apply glue to each outer round before adding the next round of string. 13 Once you reach the edge of the larger circle on the template, cut the string and glue to the edge of the circle as neatly as possible. 14 Repeat Steps 11 and 12 to make smaller circles approximately 2cm (¾") in diameter. Glue them in place, making sure they are glued to both the edge of the large circle and to the next smaller circle. 15 Let the glue dry completely before slowly peeling the plastic from the back of the rug. Trim any dried glue away. Yarn and needles 16 Cut a 1.5cm (5/8") length of straw for each ball of yarn.

17 Thread a needle with yarn and tape the end of the yarn to an end of one straw piece, as shown. 18 Begin threading the yarn inside the straw and continue wrapping yarn around the straw evenly until the straw is completely covered. 19 Once the straw is covered, shape the ball of yarn as desired and cut the yarn tail. 20 To create a ball band, cut a 4 x 1cm (15/8 x 3/8") strip of brown paper. 21 Draw your desired image or text on the middle section of the strip of paper, keeping in mind only a small part will be visible on the ball of yarn. Wrap the paper around the middle of the ball of yarn and add a dot of glue to secure. 22 To create a pair of knitting needles, cut two 3cm (1¼") lengths from a cocktail stick, making sure each one has a pointy end. Sand the cut end, then glue a wooden bead in place on top of the cut end on each knitting needle.

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, e s u o h s ll o d r u o y e s li a n o Pers

Use plain paper or this month’s pull-out papers on page 67 as fancy wallpaper

Knit or crochet little squares for throws

Small suitcase = portable doll’s house

84 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93


Use beads as pots and planters

Folded fabric scraps make a mini stash

Refresh shop-bought doll’s house furniture with a lick of paint


Think small So you’ve fallen in love with all things wee, but where can you get a slice of prime miniature real estate worthy of your on-trend makes? IKEA (www.ikea.com) do a great house-shaped display shelf to kick things off, or you can find Modernist-inspired plywood storage houses in two sizes at www.fermliving.com. If you fancy a bit of Grand Designs action, you could put together your own set-up with flat-packed doll’s house units from www.littlephant.com. Small suitcases, like the one in this project, score highly for portability and they’re easy to source. Once you’ve found that dream home, the styling fun begins. You’ll be itching to make your own pretties, but for teeny baskets, soft furnishings, mirrors and more, head to www. littlelucciola.etsy.com (she also makes custom travel doll’s houses). If it’s furniture and papers you’re after, check out the collection at www. mostlyminiature.com – you’ll find dreamy beds, kitchen units and even blush pink bedding too.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE WILD; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; EMBOSSED GLAZED VASE AND DIPPED SEAGRASS BASKET WWW.COXANDCOX.CO.UK

Boho living Crochet Emma Escott’s sunshine-ready beaded bunting


HOW TO MAKE… CROCHET BUNTING MATERIALS Q Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK, 100% cotton, 125m/137yd per 50g ball, two balls in Champagne White (403) Q 4mm (UK 8, US G/6) crochet hook Q Eight wooden beads, 2cm (¾") diameter Q 10 x 10cm (4 x 4") piece of cardboard Q Yarn needle TENSION Tension is not important for this project ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) sp space(s) ch chain ch-sp chain space(s) yrh yarn round hook ss slip stitch 90 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

dc double crochet htr half treble tr treble 5-tr cluster five treble cluster – (yrh, insert hook in st or ch-sp, yrh and pull up loop, yrh and draw through 2 loops) 5 times, inserting the hook in the st or ch-sp indicated each time, yrh and draw through all 6 loops on hook, ch1 to complete st dtr double treble RS right side rep repeat beg beginning FINISHED SIZE Each flag is approx. 14cm (5½") wide Finished bunting measures approx. 180cm (71") long

We’ve long suspected there may be more to bringing summer vibes into the home than stocking up on seasonal blooms. Petals, we just can’t quit you, but how about adding a length of crochet bunting to nail that summery je ne sais quoi? These pretty flags are hooked in crisp white cotton, simultaneously satisfying our longings for both neutrals and texture. Drape yours around the kitchen, lounge or garden, preferably adjacent to a basket and/or an abundance of foliage for maximum boho appeal. Instructions The bunting is made from eight flags. Each flag is crocheted separately, then joined together using chain and slip stitches. Bunting flags (make eight) Foundation ch5, join with a ss to

make a ring Round 1 ch1 (does not count as st), 12dc in ring, join with a ss to first dc [12 sts] Round 2 ch5 (counts as 1tr, ch2), *1tr in next st, ch2; rep from * to end of round, join with a ss to 3rd st of beg ch5 [12 2ch-sps] Round 3 ss into 2ch-sp, ch2 (counts as 1st leg of 5-tr cluster), 5-tr cluster (working next leg into same 2ch-sp, 1 leg into next st, 2 legs into next 2ch-sp), ch2, * 5-tr cluster (working 2 legs into same 2ch-sp, 1 leg into next st, 2 legs into next 2ch-sp), ch2; rep from * around, join with a ss to top of first 5-tr cluster [12 5-tr clusters] Round 4 ss into next 2ch-sp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), 2tr in same 2ch-sp, ch1, 3htr in next 2ch-sp, ch1, 3tr in next 2ch-sp, ch1 * (3dtr, 3ch, 3dtr) in next 2ch-sp, ch1, 3tr in next 2ch-sp, ch1, 3htr in next 2ch-sp, ch1, 3tr in next 2ch-sp, ch1; repeat


from * once more, (3dtr, 3ch, 3dtr) in last 2ch-sp, ch1, join with a ss to 3rd st from beg ch3 [5 3st groups along each side, with 1ch-sp in between and 2ch-sps in corners] Round 5 ch1 (does not count as st), 1dc in st st base of ch, 1dc in each of next 14 sts and 1ch-sps, (1dc, ch1, 1dc) in 3ch-sp, * ch1, miss 1 st, (1tr, ch2, 1tr) in next st, ch1, miss next st, 1dc in 1ch-sp; rep from * four more times, (1tr, ch2, 1tr) in 3ch-sp, 1dc in same 3ch-sp, ** ch1, miss 1 st, (1tr, ch2, 1tr) in next st, ch1, miss next st, 1dc in 1ch-sp; repeat from ** four more times, ch1, 1dc in same 1ch-sp, 1dc in each of next 3 sts and last 1chsp, join with a ss to first dc Fasten off, weave in ends and block if necessary Tassels (make eight) Take the piece of cardboard and wrap yarn around it 15 times. Cut a 20cm (77/8") length of yarn and thread

it through the wound yarn at the top of the cardboard. Tie tightly into a knot. Cut the yarn at the other end of the cardboard, or slide it off the cardboard and cut it. Cut another 20cm (77/8") length of yarn and tie tightly around the tassel approximately 1.5cm (5/8") from the knot. Thread a wooden bead onto both the ends of yarn at the top of the tassel. Trim the tassel and attach through 2ch-sp at the point of the flag, knot to secure, then weave in the ends.

Joining When joining the bunting, be careful not to pull the slip stitches too tightly. You can correct this by going up half a hook size if needed. Ch20, with flag RS facing ss through each of the top dcs, *ch12, attach next flag by ss through all top sts; rep from * until each flag is joined, ch20. Fasten off and weave in the ends. If you want the flags to be closer together, reduce the number of chain stitches between each flag.

Emma Escott Emma is a crochet designermaker from Wiltshire. She started her blog eight years ago to document her adventures in crafting, and she takes inspiration from vintage patterns, loving anything with frills and ruffles. www.lululoves.co.uk

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E 018 L SA E 2 N O JUN T 1S

2

NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE PLANS!

Crochet a rainbow piÑata cushion

Sew patchwork cassette tape purses MAKE IT

Upgrade a tee with botanical embroidery

¤ SEQUIN FESTIVAL BUMBAG ¤ TROPICAL RING DISH ¤ WOODEN BEADED TRIVETS ¤ MACRAMÉ WALL HANGING ¤ CROCHET SUMMER SANDALS ¤ PRINTED BEACH TOWEL

PLUS FREE TOUCAN KEYRING KIT Sew your own tropical feltie!

94 COVER GIFT AND CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM MODERN MACRAMÉ: 33 STYLISH PROJECTS FOR YOUR HANDMADE HOME BY EMILY KATZ, COPYRIGHT (C) 2018. PUBLISHED BY TEN SPEED PRESS, A DIVISION OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE, INC. TEXT AND TUTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHS (C) 2018 BY EMILY KATZ; INTERIOR DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHS (C) 2018 BY NICOLE FRANZEN.

FINE DINING Create a striking tablescape with Emily Katz’ fringed macramé placemats


HOW TO MAKE… MACRAMÉ PLACEMATS MATERIALS Q 113m (124yd) hemp rope, 0.4cm (¼") thick Q Masking tape Q Dowel, 3cm (1¼") wide ABBREVIATIONS (UK) LHK lark’s head knot SK square knot RSK right-facing square knot HDHH horizontal double half hitch FINISHED SIZE Each placemat measures 42 x 44.5cm (16½ x 17½") including fringe

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

If daydreaming to you means mentally rearranging the décor in your pad, it might be time to get your teeth into a new project. Our money’s on this pair of carefully knotted zigzag placemats – beautiful, modern macramé with only the slightest hint of 70s heritage. You’ll get the joy of creating something lovely, then your handiwork will be conveniently parked right under the noses of your diners for admiration. Refer to the macramé guide on page 96 to familiarise yourself with the knots used before starting. Instructions Cut four 86.5cm (341/8") lengths and 30 4m (157½") lengths of rope. Tape off a 42cm (16½") workspace on the dowel. Mount the 30 4m (157½") ropes onto the dowel using LHKs, and space them evenly across the workspace.

Knotting Work a row of HDHHs from left to right, using an 86.5cm (341/8") rope as filler and leaving a tail of approximately 23cm (91/8") on either side of the knotting. Be sure to tighten each HDHH just enough to keep it positioned directly below the LHK above it. If your knots aren’t tight enough, this row will end up wider than the LHKs above it. If they are too tight, the row will be too narrow. Because this design has bilateral symmetry, the method for working all rows will only be described from the left edge to the centre. To work each row, simply complete the left side as written, work the central SK (where noted), and then follow the instructions for the left side once again in reverse using RSKs. Row 1 work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 2 cords. Repeat in reverse.

Row 2 skip 2 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK. Repeat in reverse. Row 3 skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords. Work an SK in the centre, then repeat the left half of the row in reverse. Row 4 skip 6 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 5 skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 6 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 6 repeat Row 4 Row 7 repeat Row 3 Row 8 repeat Row 2 Row 9 repeat Row 1 Row 10 skip 2 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 11 skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 2 cords.


Repeat in reverse. Row 12 skip 6 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK. Repeat in reverse. Row 13 skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords. Work an SK in the centre and then repeat the left half of the row in reverse. Row 14 skip 6 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 15 skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 6 cords.

Modern Macramé This project appears in Modern Macramé by Emily Katz (£17.56), published by Ten Speed Press. The book features 33 beautiful and inspiring macramé accessory projects to knot for the home. www.penguinrandomhouse.com

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Repeat in reverse. Row 16 skip 2 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work 2 SKs, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 17 work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 2 cords. Repeat in reverse. Row 18 skip 6 cords, work an SK, skip 8 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords, work an SK. Repeat in reverse. Row 19 skip 4 cords, work an SK, skip 12 cords, work an SK, skip 4 cords. Work an SK in the centre, then repeat the left half of the row in reverse. Give the placemat a lower edge by working a row of HDHHs from left to right, using a 86.5cm (341/8") rope as filler and leaving a tail of approximately 23cm (91/8") on either side of the knotting. Measure 18cm (71/8") below the previous row and extend a piece of

tape across all cords at this height. Work a row of HDHHs from left to right below the tape, using one of the 86.5cm (341/8") ropes as filler and leaving a tail of approximately 23cm (91/8") on either side of the knotting. Repeat Rows 1-19, adding the lower edge as above, to make a second placemat below the first. Finishing Separate the placemats by carefully cutting the cords halfway between them. You may want to mark this height with a piece of tape before cutting to ensure that the fringe on each placemat is the same length. Trim all of the cords at the bottom to 9cm (35/8"), including the tails extending from the lowest row of HDHHs. Remove the first placemat from the dowel by cutting each rope at the centre of its LHK. Trim the ropes just cut, as well as any remaining filler cords, to 9cm (35/8"). 93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 95


MAKES

TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes. Unless otherwise stated, templates are shown at 100%.You can find the full-size templates ready to download from www.molliemakes.com

YOUR BONUS GIFT BY ANGELA POOLE PAGE 7

01

02

03

04

05

06

MATERIALS Q Craft knife Q Cutting mat Q Long needle Q Baker’s twine Q PVA glue 01 Place the patterned paper face down. Using a pencil, draw around the shape of the template. Using these pencil lines as a guide, cut out the 3D ice lolly template.

02 Turn the paper over so the patterned side is facing upwards. Use a craft knife to lightly score along each of the fold lines. Apply only a light pressure to avoid cutting the paper – you could use a bone folder scoring tool instead, if you have one. 03 Fold along each of the scored lines to make it quicker and easier to glue the tabs in place. 04 Apply tacky PVA glue to one of the lollipop stick tabs and

attach the stick. Glue the bottom tabs of the ice lolly and the other side of the lollipop stick tab in place. Hold the base together for a few seconds while the glue starts to dry. Look down inside the lolly to check the tabs are all flat – if not, use the blunt end of a pencil to nudge them flat. 05 Apply glue to the remaining tabs and fold in the side of the lolly. Then tuck in the tabs as you stick down the curved top.

06 Finish by tucking in the last tab at the end of the curved strip. Smooth any pointed edges along the curve with your fingers. If you find you’ve pushed any part of the curve in too far, then hook it back with the point of the scissors and reposition before the glue dries. Repeat Steps 1-6 to make more lollies. Use a long needle and a length of baker’s twine to string the ice lollies together into a garland.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

TEA TOWEL AND OVEN MITT BY ANNA ALICIA PAGE 55 Photocopy at 200%

Oven mitt Cut 4

VELVET CUSHIONS BY LOU ORTH PAGE 62 Photocopy at 400%

Semi-circle Cut 2

Triangle Cut 3

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 97


MAKES

PAPER LAMPSHADE BY SARAH MATTHEWS PAGE 59

Leaf 2 Cut 12

Leaf 1 Cut 24

Flower centre Cut 12

Leaf 3 Cut 12

Flowers Cut 12

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

PAPER LAMPSHADE BY SARAH MATTHEWS PAGE 59

Leaf 4 Cut 4

Leaf 5 Cut 12

Leaf 6 Cut 4

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 99


MAKES

PAPER LAMPSHADE BY SARAH MATTHEWS PAGE 59

Leaf 7 Cut 4

Leaf 9 Cut 5

Leaf 10 Cut 5

Leaf 8 Cut 10

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

PAPER LAMPSHADE BY SARAH MATTHEWS PAGE 59

Leaf 14 Cut 5

Leaf 15 Cut 5

Leaf 11 Cut 5

Leaf 12 Cut 5

Leaf 13 Cut 5

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

KNITTED CROWN BY TIAM SAFARI PAGE 76

CHART A

KEY k on RS

O

yarn over

/

k2tog on RS

\

ssk on RS

Chart A is worked in the round, across multiples of 23 + 1 sts

KEY CHART B B

k on RS

20 19 18

/

O

O

\

17

O

yarn over

16

/

O

O

\

15

/

k2tog on RS

\

ssk on RS

14

/

O

O

\

13 12

/

O

O

\

11

No stitches in this area of the chart

10

/

O

O

\

9 8

/

O

O

\

7

B

Bobble stitch

\

s2kp2 on RS

6

/

O

O

\

5 4

/

O

O

\

3 2

/ 1

O 2

O 3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

\ 22

1 23

Chart B is worked flat, across 23 sts for repeats 1-4 and 22 sts for repeat 5

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

MACRAMÉ KNOT GUIDE USE OUR HANDY KNOT GUIDE FOR THE MACRAMÉ PLACEMATS ON PAGE 93

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02

Lark’s head knot (LHK) 01 Make a loop in the centre of the rope and bring it to the front of the dowel.

01

02

03

Fold the loop back around the dowel. Pull the ends of the rope down through the loop, as shown. 02 03

02

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04 Make sure the rope is divided precisely in half so each length measures the same, then tighten the knot to finish.

03

Working cords

Filler cords

Square knot (SK) 01 Bring the left working cord (grey) over both filler cords and under the right working cord (white).

01

02

Right facing square knot (SK) 01 Bring the right working cord (white) over both filler cords and under left working cord. 02 Bring the left working cord (grey) under

02 Bring the right working cord (white) under the filler cords and over the left working cord (grey), then tighten the knot. 03 Bring the right working cord (white) over

03

the filler cords and over the right working cord (white). 03 Tighten the knot. 04 Bring the left working cord (grey) over

both filler cords and under the left working cord (grey). Next, bring the left working cord (grey) under the filler cords and over the right working cord (white). Tighten the knot.

04

both filler cords and under the right working cord (white). Next, bring the right working cord (white) under the filler cords and over the left working cord (grey).

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 103


MAKES

MACRAMÉ KNOT GUIDE USE OUR HANDY KNOT GUIDE FOR THE MACRAMÉ PLACEMATS ON PAGE 93

01

02

03

up and around the filler cord and to the left of itself and tighten. 02 Work a second HH with the same working cord, looping it around the filler cord to the right of the first loop.

Horizontal double half hitch (HDHH) 01 Make a half hitch (HH) by holding the filler cord (white) horizontally in front of the working cords (grey), leaving a long tail of cord, and looping the leftmost working cord

WOVEN JACKET BY CHRISTINE LEECH PAGE 31 Photocopy at 200%

04

Tighten to complete one HDHH. To complete a whole row of HDHHs, repeat Steps 1-3 with the next cord to the right, and so on until you reach the end of the row, as shown. 03 04

Rya knots Yarn P Rya knots Yarn O

Tabby weave Yarn K

Tabby weave Yarn M

Tabby weave Yarn N

Tabby weave Yarn L Tabby weave Yarn K Tabby weave Yarn E Looped weave Yarn J

Tabby weave Yarn I

Looped weave Yarn K

Tabby weave Yarn A

Tabby weave Yarn H

Soumak Yarn G

Looped weave Yarn F Tabby weave Yarn E

Soumak Yarn C

Tabby weave Yarn D

Tabby weave Yarn B Tabby weave Yarn A

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

104 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93


MAKES

WEAVING GUIDE USE OUR HANDY WEAVING GUIDE FOR THE WOVEN JACKET ON PAGE 31

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02

Soumak weave 01 Take a length of roving (50cm (19¾") is a good length to work with, you can always add more) and, starting in the middle of a row, bring the roving up from the back of the weave leaving a tail of 5cm (2"). Wind the roving around one warp thread to secure it.

01

Looped weave 01 Weave a row of tabby weave but don’t pull the yarn too tightly. When you reach the end

01

Rya knots 01 Cut 20 25cm (97/8") lengths of yarn. To make sure they’re all the same length, wind the yarn around a 12cm (4¾") wide piece of cardboard and then cut at one end.

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02 To make the first row take the roving over six warp threads then loop it under and back between the 3rd and 4th warp threads. 03 Repeat Step 2 across the weave. Vary the amount of warp threads you weave the roving across and through to vary the shape and size of the soumak.

05

04 Bat the weave down when you reach the end of the row. Turn and repeat back across the weave the other way. 05 The soumak will also vary in size depending on the thickness of the roving – as it gets nearer the end of the length, the soumak will gradually taper away.

02

of the row, gently pull the yarn of the row just woven to create a series of small loops across the row, as shown.

02

02 Wrap the bundle of yarn behind the four middle warp threads of the weave so there's an equal amount of yarn on either side. 03 Pull the centre of the bundle through the middle of the warp threads, then pass the

02 Repeat across each row, and bat down each row as you go with a weaving comb to hold the loops in place.

03

two cut ends through the loop created. As you pull the cut ends, the loop will tighten to form the rya knot. Repeat Steps 1-3 as required for your weaving project, then trim the yarn ends to neaten.

Mollie Makes (ISSN 20460228) (USPS 20517) June 18 is published 14 times a year (monthly, with a Spring issue in March and a Christmas issue in November) by Immediate Media Company Bristol Ltd., Tower House, Fairfax St. Bristol BS1 3BN, United Kingdom. Distributed in the U.S. by NPS Media Group, 2 Corporate Dr., Suite 945, Shelton, CT 06484. Periodical Postage paid at Shelton, CT and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Mollie Makes, 3330 Pacific Ave., Suite 500, Virginia Beach, VA 23451. Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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93 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 105


Indie shop owner Allison Sadler on playing by her own rules

Name: Allison Sadler Occupation: Creative entrepreneur and mentor

Allison takes pleasure in the little things – roses included

Creative freedom is being able to fill your days with the things you enjoy – no rules, no pressure, just doing what you love. It’s breaking free from conventional living to create a life that’s a true reflection of you. I passionately believe this is how we find our happy place! I’ve used this approach to shape my everyday living and to create a business that works for me. Through my workshops and mentoring, I hope to inspire other creatives to have the confidence to do the same. There’s no cookie cutter formula for finding your creative freedom, but giving

There’s no cookie cutter formula for finding your creative freedom Allison and her husband run The People Shop in Birmingham

yourself permission to have fun and be your true self is a good place to start. Now I’m on a mission to share my message – find me hanging out on Insta, encouraging you all to set your inner rebel free! If you’re in need of inspiration, join one of my hashtag challenges – #freeupmyinsta is freedom to share whatever makes you happy and #thriveinmyfreedom celebrates being unapologetically you.

Visit www.allisonsadler.co.uk to see what Allison’s been up to lately, and see her Insta @allison_sadler_ for hashtag challenge updates and more creative freedom goodness.

Next issue: Geo Heaven takes 3D printing to the next level 106 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 93

Currents Listening to: Count To Five by Rhye from their album Blood. Eating: Krispy Cremes. Watching: First Dates. Thinking about: Living by the sea, after a trip to my favourite place in the world – Cornwall!


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