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Athena Carter 2012

PORTFOLIO


ATHENA CARTER

I’ve always been passionate about design and architecture. I believe that everything is design, and consequently this mindset has provided me with a well-rounded design background. I started as a project designer at Keystone Construction, where I was a contractor involved in the design, planning, and con-

struction of small landscape design projects for residential clients. After receiving a Bachelor degree in Architecture from UC Berkeley, I worked as a junior designer and assistant project manager for a small architectural firm in Oakland that specialized in interior healthcare and complex laboratory projects.

I went back to school to pursue my Masters in Architecture in ordert to become licensed architect and to expand my visual graphic communication skills, further examine current trends in architecture, and develop my design process skills. I just graduated with my Masters from CCA in 2012. While at school I worked as

a freelance graphic designer and a branding and social media director for a tech recruiting company. Here, I was able to apply the skills I learned through architecture, such as wayfinding, visual communication, and layout skills.


1

PROFESSIONAL & THEORETICAL

3

HEATHCARE INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE REMODELS BLAKEDRUCKER ARCHITECTS | 2009 - 2010

REBOOTING PUBLIC SPACES THESIS | SPRING 2012 | BRIAN PRICE CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

UCSF CRANIOFACIAL & MESENCHYMAL LAB UCSF HEALTH SCIENCE EAST BUILDING, FLOOR 15 BLAKEDRUCKER ARCHITECTS | 2009 - 2010

4

PIER 27 INTERLOCK TERMINAL CBD STUDIO | SPRING 2011 | JUDITH MUSSEL CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS


5

6 CCA DESIGNING THE FUTURE ADVANCED STUDIO | FALL 2011 | CRAIG SCOTT CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

7

BAY AREA EMERGENCY RESPONSE STATION ARCH 100B | SUMMER 2008 | KEITH PLYMALE & MONICA TIULESCU UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY

JAPANTOWN MULTI-PURPOSE HOUSING STUDIO 3 | FALL 2011 | THOM FAULDERS CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

MISC.

ARCHITECTURE PHOTOGRAPHY

8


Martinez Medical Office Building 3rd Floor Reception Remodel

2010

Oakland Medical Center Oakland Piedmont MOB 3rd Floor Oakland Medical Center Material Management Remodel 2010 Urology Reception Station Remodel 2010 Elevator Lobby

/ KAISER PERMANENTE / HOSPITAL RENOVATIONS /

2009


Oakland Piedmont MOB Scoping: Ground Floor Entry Alternatives

Oakland Piedmont MOB Scoping: Ground Floor Entry Alternatives While working for BlakeDrucker Architects, I was responsible for the production of the majority of healthcare projects. I developed and presented early design studies, sketches, and 2D/3D presentation material and finish boards for multiple healthcare projects. Also conducted ceiling survey of existing conditions of the entire

2010

2010

Oakland Piedmont MOB OBGYN Reception Stations Remodel

2009

Oakland Piedmont Medical Office duced scoping alternatives, design Building and coordinated with electri- development packet, variance forms, cal engineer. construction documentation, and submitted documentation for OSHPD I communicated with building deand Building Permit review. I also partments for the adherence of strict was responsible for the production design requirements (OSHPD and of specifications, selection of finish approved materials, furnishings, and furniture, as well as construction and construction standards). Proadministration coordination.


/ UC SAN FRANCISCO / CRANIOFACIAL & MESENCHYMAL LABORATORY RENOVATION /


11,000 sq ft high-rise research laboratory renovation. I assisted the lead architect with construction administration and was in charge of marketing, finish and furniture selection, and coordination with consultants’ work to ensure compliance with the design solution and a timely submission of documents. Also in charge of LEED Submittals, which received Gold certification upon completion in May 2010 (the first Gold rating for a research laboratory at UCSF).

LOCATION: UCSF; HSE 15 CLIENT: UC REGENTS

PROJECT BUDJET: $5,000,000 COMPLETED: MAY 2010


EVOLUTION OF PERSON TO PERSON CONNECTION

One Person Trying To Send Information To The Many

The Many Are Now Able To Respond

TYPICAL PU

ANALYSIS

The Many Are Now Interconnected In A Network

1

STREETS

EXAMPLE: WINTERF

PHYSICAL STRA

RATE OF PROGRESSION 2010

2008

2006

2002

2000

1998

1995

1990

1980

1960

1940

1920

1900

1850

1800

1400

micro-blog augmented reality peer-to -peer sharing video conferencing smart phones

PAST

live stream social networks blogs

PERSCRIPTIVE PROGRAM

MMO games

sta

instant messaging mobile phones chat rooms websites online games computer television radio telephone pneumatic post telegraph printing press ult

i-u

ra

sto

lk

as

fo f in ro s sfe se

ge

m

ta

ts os sp tu ta ls d na orl rso rw pe fo ns fo s le g in e a rin s vic ha up de r s ps gro ile rve ob se g ap & m le attin cial rks e ip o o ult ch f s w ag m eo n o f ne g p es vidatio n o stin am o o g cre ati al p yer rm u fo ivid i-pla t lt ha ind u nc sm rso as pe here ps m n to nyw grou rso a pe from ltiplefo e m lk mu l in ga ta rk to ita lk ig two ta re d e a rn sh se

m

ta da

e to

on

n rso pe

an l tr

n to

m fro

ua vis

info

rso

pe

narrowing of pathway slows speed

POPULARITY OF MEDIA

PRECEDENT STRATEG ??

PROJECTS

STRATEGIES

dc

SECOND LIFE

MOVABLE WALLS

d MULTI-FUNCTIONAL SPACES

eo

vid

TRANSFER FROM ONE SYSTEM TO ANOTHER (BMZ) MICRO ZOO INCREASE OF DATA TRANSFORMS STRUCTURE

sts

CHANGES IN SCALE

s ew

ln

ion vis

cia

ca

so

s

es sit

tele

ork etw

s/

ln

ast

cia

gs

blo

b we

te ge tar

po

so

DIGITAL

BLUR BUILDING

rs

pe

io

rad

pa ws

ne

FLOW & SEQUENCE OPEN EDGE PERIMETER

/m

CLOSED EDGE PERIMETER

al

az ag

loc

MIXED

ACADEMY OF SCIENCES REPETITION VISUAL CONNECTIVITY

s

rke

ine

ma tp

SEAGRAM PLAZA

e lac

PATHS OF TRAVEL CORRIDORS

2020

2015

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2004

2002

2000

1998

1995

1990

1980

1960

1940

1920

1900

1850

1800

THE ARGUMENT

c

CURRENT REQUIRES EMERGENT PROGRAM

STAMMERINGS HIGH LINE BARRIERS ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS TORONTO WATERFRONT

INTERACTIVE MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

PHYSICAL

/ 2012 CCA THESIS / REBOOTING PUBLIC SPACES /


UBLIC SPACE TYPOLOGIES

PROPOSED STRATEGIES reclaiming

2

FELDPLATZ

PARKS EXAMPLE: GOLDEN GATE PARK

3

SQUARES EXAMPLE CLEVELAND PUBLIC SQUARE

4

5

WATERFRONTS EXAMPLE: TORRONTO WATERFRONT

PLAZAS EXAMPLE: SEAGRAM PLAZA

ATEGIES

the use of a venue for activities that were not originally intended for those locations

appropriating input

actions through which the use and structure of traditional public space can be changed

output

when people and still, groups start to form

people attract people

VS

surveillance

abilities change based on location

input + feedback

stammering using funneling as a way of slowing down traffic to focus on events

RELATIONAL FEEDBACK LOOP

user list of friends all friends friends of friends networks

sharing information

OPENNESS

ENVIRONMENTAL - BEHAVIOR ELEMENTS

PRODUCTION OF USER EXPERIENCE

DIRECT ATTENTION

EMOTIONAL

DEMAND ATTENTION

USER AGENCY

USER ENGAGEMENT

EXPERIENCE

TYPICAL PUBLIC SPACE TYPE

SPATIAL STRATEGY

CONTROL

PHYSICALLY DEFINED BOUNDARIES

SENSORY INTERACTIVE

PERCEPTION OF SOCIAL ORDER PERCEPTION OF SECURITY

FLEXIBILITY EFFICIENCY

RESULTANT BEHAVIOR

DISTINCTION BETWEEN PUBLIC & PRIVATE EXPERIENCE ROMAN FORUM

PERCEPTION

AWARENESS OF SPACE

COGNITIVE MAPS

AWARENESS OF ACTIVITIES

HOMOGENEOUS HEIGHT REQUIREMENTS LONG-TERM TRANSFORMATIONS

LACK OF CONTROL

the discovery of social activity through the mapping of latent mobile & physical data

PERCEPTION OF SOCIAL ORDER

PASSIVE REPITION FUCTION MAXIMIZATION

ACCESSIBLITY

PERCEPTION OF SOCIAL ORDER HIERARCHIES

IMPLIED BOUNDARIES

INTERPERSONAL ISOLATION MODIFIED USES INFORMATION TRANSFER

MYSTERY

AWARENESS OF BODY

STRESS

CHANCE ENCOUNTERS

DISTINCTION BETWEEN PUBLIC & PRIVATE EXPERIENCE

3RD STREET PROMANADE SANTA MONICA

INCREASED DENSITY USER AGENCY

WORKS ON DIFF. SCALES

$$$$$

PHENOMENOLOGICAL NON-PASSIVE

DESIRE FOR ATTAINING WEALTH COMMODIFICATION OF EXPERIENCE

SEAGRAM PLAZA

COMPLEXITY

PARTICIPATION

PEOPLE WATCHING

PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS

ENTERTAINMENT

COHERENCE & LEGIBILITY

PRODUCTIVE

INTERPERSONAL PANOPTICON CHANCE ENCOUNTERS

SITE BUILT FOR CONSUMPTION

ORDER

SEGREGATION

OPENNESS

INTERACTIVITY WITH PEOPLE

ACCESSIBILITY POTENTIAL FOR CIVIC CONGREGATION

NETWORK ENCLOSURE

SOCIAL ORGANIZATION CUSTOMIZATION

PERCIEVED PRIVATIZATION OF SPACE PERCEPTION OF SECURITY

consolidating infrastructure allows for overlapping of programmatic use

SEMI-ENCLOSURE

COMMON INTERESTS / GOAL SF FEDERAL BUILDING

Information and communication technology – specifically social media – has produced a culture increasingly obsessed with change. The constant fluctuation of the life of the city fights against the static backdrop of its physical environment. This has resulted in the decline of traditional forms of public space. Here, architecture is unable to cre-

ate a bi-directional relationship between the physical and virtual realms. This thesis attempts to reconcile this interconnected relationship through the creation of a new public space typology that uses open-source strategies to produce a complex, real-time, adaptive system for social organization that is centered around specific fluctuating

HYBRID DATASCAPE

MOBILE POSTS, CHECK-INS & PICS SENSORED SITE DATA SENSORED WEATHER DATA N TIO IZA IOR OM AV ST CU EH TE L B MO IA RE SOC

QUALITIES

ENVIRONMENT AUGMENTED AMBIENT EFFECTS AUGME AUGE AUGEMENTED SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

uncovering

GIES

PEOPLE

ACTIVATION SPATIAL ORGANIZATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE PROGRAM MODE

user agency

SYSTEM

SIT ED AT A

audience PASSIVE VS. PARTICIPATORY

crossroads and streets can become public squares

INPUTS

NS OR ED

transgressing the discovery of social activity through the mapping of latent mobile & physical data

SE

public

Broadcast Yourself

MICRO PUBLIC SPACE OUTPUTS

program. These emergent spaces are at the same time transactive, interactive and collaborative; transforming public space into an urban stage where users are participants and co-creators.


DATASCAPE GENERATION ENVIRONMENTAL

daylight & shade

wind patterns

GROUPING PATTERNS 15TH 16TH

people

PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT PEDESTRIAL MOVEMENT TEMPORAL 15TH 16TH

day time

17TH 17TH

morning

AVE

16TH 16TH

15TH

17TH

16TH

15TH

RAPH TELEG

FLICKER FLICKER+ TWITTER + TWITTERGEOTAGGE GEOTAG

evening

COMBINED COMBINEDMAPPING MAPPINGOFOFTWITTER TWITTERAND ANDFLICKER FLICKERPOST POSTGEOTAGG GEOTAG GG

STRATEGIES The advent of the virtual public sphere affords people the ability to generate spaces instantaneously through collective crowd-source activation and the ability to spatially organize around particular concerns without the constraint of physical proximity. Now, the crisis in physical public spaces is also due

to the lack of opportunity for the public to have a contributory role in its formation. How can we turn physical public space into an open-source software where collectively sourced participation can be leveraged as a form of social empowerment as well as embed in it and serve local issues and desires?


FOURSQUARE NETWORK NIGHTLIFE

TWITTER POST GEOTAGGED LOCATIONS

ARTS

1 TO 1000

SHOPS

BUSINESSES

1001 TO 2000

2001 TO 3000

FOOD

3001 TO 4000

4001 TO 5000

5000+

PARKS/PLAZAS

0.5 MILE

PICAN 5426 CHECK-INS LUKA’S TAPROOM & LOUNGE 4014 CHECK-INS BEER REVOLUTION 3974 CHECK-INS

FOX THEATRE 8039 CHECK-INS THE UPTOWN 2384 CHECK-INS PARAMOUNT THEATRE 2184 CHECK-INS

KAISER CENTER 2076 CHECK-INS ASK.COM 2056 CHECK-INS THE CLOROX COMPANY 1320 CHECK-INS

24 HOUR FITNESS 8039 CHECK-INS CLUB ONE FITNESS 2384 CHECK-INS FARMER’S MARKET 1021 CHECK-INS

WHOLE FOODS MARKET 7265 CHECK-INS PICAN 5426 CHECK-INS LUKA’S TAPROOM & LOUNGE 4014 CHECK-INS

OAKLAND CHINATOWN PLAZA 1868 CHECK-INS FRANK H. OGAWA PLAZA 1148 CHECK-INS SNOW PARK 624 CHECK-INS

262,708 CHECK-INS

FLICKER POST GEOTAGGED LOCATIONS

0.5 MILE

PERFORMATIVE NETWORK

GGED ED POSTS POSTS

SIMULTANEOUS TWITTER & FLICKER POSTS

0.5 MILE

GED LOCATION LOCATIONS ONN

OPEN-SOURCE TECHNOLOGY

ing information. Here, the potential lies in its ability to actually affect 3D space Situated sentient technologies that collect, – open-sourced data as an active agent on store, and monitor information from the the landscape in the production and formacity have transformed the way we perceive tion of physical public space. the city. Site is no longer just geographic and static, but rather, it is a layered daIn order to create a bi-directional relationtascape of the flows of constantly fluctuat- ship between 2D and 3D public spheres,

the datascapes can not be completely dependent on physical and ambient inputs, but rather, it’s the hybridization between these and those generated through the collection and filtering of real-time recorded crowd-sourced data captured by a vast system of mobile locative communication devices.


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

THE SIDEWALK

CITY OF INFRASTRUCTURE

TERRITORY

PROGRAMMATIC MODES ACTIVITIES ARTS

BUSINESSES

FOOD

PEDESTRIAN TRIAN REALM

PARKS/PLAZAS

FLEA MARKET

CIVIC GATHERING

OPEN FESTIVALS

OPEN MARKET

STREET PERFORMANCE

OUTDOOR GALLERY

SHOPPING

OUTDOOR CONCERT DANCE PARTY PRODUCT DEMONSTRATION

ACCESS TO INFOMATION: GALLE GALLERY LLERY RY INF INFO O * ART GA * LOCAL ARTIST INFO ENTS * UPCOMING ART EVENTS ART FORUM POST YOUR OWN VIRTUAL ART AR POST EVENT PHOTOS HOTOS

LOUNGE

ART

ONLINE COMMERCE INFO: REVIEWS REVIEW IEWSS & RATINGS RATIN RA TINGS GS * REV * PRODUCT INFO * LOCAL VENDOR SALES

benc

PHO PHOTOSHOOT

light

SHARE & DOWNLOAD: MUSIC IC * MUS * MOVIES * PHOTOS * VIDEOS

trash

WA Y

DOWNLOADABLE LIBRARY FOOD FOO D FORUM: FORUM: FORU M: * SHARE RECIPIES * POST/READ REVIEWS * POST PICTURES TRANSIT TIMES & INFO

DEPLOYMENT

SHOPS

ROADWAY CORRIDOR

COMMERCIAL PERFORMANCE

INFRASTRUCTURE

infrastructural modification responding to desired or sensed physical and ambient input From here, I used the sidewalk as a prototype. strategies. Each category starts to take on difI saw potential in its traditional static infraferent characteristics in order to maximize the structure as a way of embedding this informacapacity to respond to both the physical stratetion processing. Thus, transforming it into a gies of organization, programmatic needs, and dynamic supporting network of instruments. ability to augment ambient experiential qualiThere starts to develop a type of catalog of ties

BRO AD

NETWORKED WIRELESS CONTENT

EVENTS

NIGHTLIFE

COFFEE LUNCH CAFE PARADE POETRY READING WI-FI LOUNGE BAR / NIGHTCLUB BUS STOP

DEP

parki mete

0.25 MI


PNEUMATIC MUSCLES

PLOYABLE TECHNOLOGY

CLASSICAL STEEL FRAMEWORK GIRDER

TENSAIRITY GIRDER

STRUCTURE

PHASES

LOAD

LOAD compressional rod

1/4” LATEX TUBE

Y

air pressure

TENSAIRITY inflatable structures ADJA ADJACENT LAND USE

tensional rope

STRUCTURE

1/2 “ MESH SLEEVE

TUBE TO AIR COMPRESSOR / VACUUM

maximum contraction

FOLDING TYPES DEPLOYABLE TENSAIRTY BEAM

TYPICAL TENSAIRTY BEAM

static state compression element

no air

segmented compression element

air beam

1/8” METAL SCREW USED AS PLUG

air beam

cable

cable

loop - folding

closed-loop folding

starts to curve

spiral folding mechanism

maximum expansion

SETBACK ZONE

EXPANDING AND LOCKING RIBS

compression element

air compressed in

INFLATABLE STRUCTURAL INFLATABLE STRUCTURAL TYPES TYPES

compression element

TUBE

ch

ADVANTAGE: soft thin material can be used, tubes can run perpendicular to curvature DISADVANTAGE: joinery more complex, requiring sewing and thermal binding

cable compression element

h can

ing er

air vaccumed out

QUILT

ADVANTAGE: simple thermal binding methods DISADVANTAGE: thicker material required to compensate for weak joints, tubes cannot run perpendicular to curvature

AIR BEAM

ADVANTAGE: less material required, possibly relatively lighter DISADVANTAGE: thick material required in beams for rigidity, less control in executing desired form

cable

compression element

ILE

cable

MANIPULATION

not only alters the program of the space but also creates a type of atmospheric The manipulation of sidewalk infrastrucmicro-climate by activating stimuli – light, tural elements, such as the bus stop, street image, and sound. Here, urbanism is an light, parking meter, and sidewalk, by onemergent property based on online openline activity to produce pop-up architecture sourced data. The architecture becomes a that caters to the type of program that the semi-living organism: adapting, emerging, online information indicates. This new form evolving, mutating, and growing.

In order for these elements to transform their physical structure had to change as well. The requirements thus became: foldable compression unit, rapid deployability and retractablity, durability (able to fold and unfold numerous times), and self-supporting (using sustainable technologies to produce electricity to sustain itself independently)


1

BUS STOP / LARGE PAVILLION

Within the new proposed bus stop typology, I used an inflatable tensairity structure that could unfold to produce a large canopy system that re-appropriates the space of the street for public congregational use. The internal structure is different than typical inflatable structures and tensairty structures. By replacing the standard compression and tension with a mechanism, a deployable tensairty structure is achieved that needs

PHASE 1

OPENING

PHASE 2

ROTATION

TOTAL SEQUENCE

interior air supported strut exterior air supported strut

inflatable skin

STRATEGY : APPROPRIATION OPEN-SOURCE PARTICIPATION AS MODIFIER OF AMBIENT QUALITIES LIGHT FLUCTUATION:

CANOPY PROTECTS AGAINST RAIN N

EXPANDS PUBLIC ZONE EXPAND

TAKES ADVANTAGEE OF THE IO O OF BUS PARRALLEL LOCATION STOPS TO CREATE LA LARGE CANOPY


– besides changing the internal pressure of the air beam – no additional handling to compact or erect the structure. Once erected in its final canopy form, the solar cells attached to the inflatable fabric gathers solar radiation to power the air compressor.

When two bus stops are activated across from one another, as in the case shown here, it creates a large open pavilion. The lights that are projected onto the inflatable fabric within the pavilion change based on online activity: people are able to submit what colors they want shown and the combination of all the submissions create

a constant fluctuating image. The timing of the visualization fluctuation is based on the sounds of the city or event. Thus, the collective behavior of many within the virtual realm in conjunction with the influence of the physical realm shapes the ambient qualities of the space


2

PHASE 1

STREET LIGHT / OPEN CANOPY ATTRACTION: light as an attractor zone

PHASE 2

ACTIVATED: semi-expanded

38 FT 36’

32 FT 26 FT 20 FT

26’

zone of illuminance

42 FT

Once activated by digital social data (people checkingin, posts, picture uploads), the street light becomes a social hot spot and starts to expand; widening the social zone. The canopy responds to environmental conditions by tilting and expanding. The inflatable bubble collects solar energy The furniture and canopy change form based on use. In conjunction with adjacent activated street lights, the street light system starts to form a continuous landscape.

38’

22 FT

Using the illuminance zone created by a street light, you start to see the emergent zone of social interaction. Here, I used light as a social attractor. In its static stage, it behaves as a regular street light would. However, it has a trashcan embedded within it. The trash uses a fuel cell and anaerobic digester to convert trash into energy.

NON-ACTIVATED : static

6996 2 FT 4 1582 FT 23014 FT 2520 FT 2

PHASE 3

ACTIVATED: fully-expanded 50’

X 16 LU10 LUX X 6 LU LUX 4

emergent zone of social activity

20’

using light as a social attractor

illuminance plan

illuminance ratios A1

A2

A3

50 ft 6 1/4 ft

18 3/4 ft 3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

18 3/4 ft 3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

6 1/4 ft 3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

3 1/8 ft

PVC membrane creates air pressure to manipulate form of exterior skin

exterior skin: flexible tubing acts as compression element

creates a large tansairity structure

20 ft

1 A5-1.0 A5

1 A5-1.0 A5

connection to adjacent pneumatic furniture using magnets

trashcan that turns waste into energy

pneumatically deployed and manipulated furniture


APPROPRIATION:

collective digital and physical data OUTDO

ST

OR GA LLERY GALLER Y

VALLE Y

RAPH TELEG

ST VALLE Y

TELEG

RAPH

using gathered digital and physical data to activate hot spot

EATIN

OUTDO 23RODR GALLE RY

G

23RD

BOUNDARIES

PEDESTRIAN DENSITY

SOCIAL ACTIVITY HOT SPOTS

TWITTER + FLICKER POSTS

FLICKER PICTURES

EVENT: ART MURMUR

PROGRAMMATIC ACTIVITIES


DEPLOYMENT: activated hot spot depolys manipulated sidewalk infrastructure stage 0

stage 1

stage 2

stage 3

stage 5

static

data gathering

activation + expansion

environmental response

return to static position

environmental data

light eminates from inside inflated structure and widens social zone

canopy tilts and expands in response to environmental data

uses a fuel cell and anaerobic digestor to convert trash into energy

people can physically check-in

digital social data: posts, check-in’s, and picture uploads activate social hot spots

air inflates furniture and canopy

furniture and canopy can change form based on use

internal computer filters data into activity categories. that correspond to pre-set organizational modes

canopy and furniture connect to form continuous landscape

not always 2 sided

SUSTAINABILITY: trash as a fuel cell

MANIPULABILITY: pneumatic muscles structure

trash is converted into energy for the system, here people have a direct effect on whether or not the system operates

actuating pneumatic muscles acts as the flexible structure of the system which manipulates the inflatable membrane

canopy and furniture are restowed once use is no longer needed

MEMBRANE air inflated tubes

fuel reformer

compactor trash methane gas

fuel cell stack

anaerobic digestor

power storage battery

air pump / compressor

STRUCTURE

pneumatic muscles

energy


LOCATION: San Francisco, CA PROFESSOR: Judith Mussel CBD Studio Spring 2011 | CCA

/ PIER 27 / INTERLOCK TERMINAL /


Situated along the San Francisco waterfront near the existing downtown, SF Pier 27-Interlock Terminal was designed to not only be the new iconic symbol of San Francisco as an entry port, but also as an urban center. Its location calls for a design that promotes pedestrian traffic and offers new recreational spaces on the edge of the dense vibrant urban context. We proposed to interlock the 3 major programmatic areas on the site – terminal, commercial, and public rec-

reational areas – into an infrastructure optimized for public life to create new opportunities for intersection, visual connectivity and continuity as well as mask the temporality of the terminal usage -- during the 280 days that the terminal is not in use, it will continue to inform the site spatially as a void. Movement was one of the key concepts that the design tried to incorporate throughout its circulation and activities as well as the development of the user’s spatial experience.


SITE ANALYSIS & CIRCULATION

LEISURE

WORKOUT

SPORTS

S TREA

RIDGE

HOW MANY..............................COMING BY............................DOING WHAT

The design was developed based on an analysis of the activities that take place on the Embarcadero adjacent to the site – mostly recreational and tourist site seeing. As a way of adding vitality to the site during the 280 days that the terminal was not in use, we proposed creating an extension of the Embarcadero and its activities throughout the site through the insertion of recreational and commercial program. We then used connections to the surrounding site – view corridors, site lines, circulation paths, and connections to other relating program – manipulated them within the site to accommodate access points and areas of interest. We used these new lines to carve through the project site and buildings to start to develop the form. Later the form would be altered based on programmatic needs.

PICTURES

ERMIN

URE

BAY B

M

OVEMENT of pedestrians on existing site

ND

ISLA

T FERRY

WORKING

AL

PIER 23

PARKING MAIN TERMINAL

+

TRANSAMERICA PYRAMID

EVENT SPACE

REC FIELD

WATER FRONT VIEWING AREA

BAGGAGE CLAIM

ENTRANCE PLAZA ENTRANCE LOBBY

REC FIELD

BUS

REC FIELD

ST ERY BATT

GROUND TRANSPORTATION AREA

WICH GREEN

PARK

PARK

ST

KOIT TOW ER PERCENTAGE

SITE ANALYSIS : PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT

CURRENT TERMINAL 100,250SQ’

VIEW CORRIDORS / SITE CONNECTIONS

RETAIL.RECREATION

PROGRAM INTERLOCK

CONNECT TO CITY

C


CIRCULATION circulation, all the circulation paths within the design of the site consist of loops that traverse both horizontally and vertically. These paths allow users to experience the site in different ways depending on which path, program area, and what activity they chose. The major design features of the recreational programmatic areas are the 3 running tracks. These were designed to provide users with different running experience options: Track I runs along the waterfront,Track 2 is a continuous loop within the site and partially runs along the promenade, and Track 3 runs through the terminal and retail spaces. As the user moves through the site they are constantly inter-related: not only through the visual contrast of the structure but also through visual connectivity.

O ER AD C R BA EM E TH RY ST BAT TE

BA LOM T RD S

LEGEND PEDESTRIAN ROUTE TO RAISED PROMANADE T= 0.6 MILE PROMANADE: 0.3 MILE 0.5 MILE RUNNING TRACK 1 : WATERFRONT RUNNING TRACK 2 : WATER + RETAIL 0.5 MILE RUNNING TRACK 3 : THROUGH TERMINAL + RETAIL 0.4 MILE

CIRCULATIONROUTES ROUTES ---- PLAN PLAN CIRCULATON

1/192” = 1’ - 0”

CRUISE TERMINAL LOADING TRUCK ACCESS ONLY VEHICULAR ACCESS PARKING, DELIVERY, ACCESS TO SITE

CIRCULATION ROUTES -- PLAN

1/192” = 1’ - 0”

DERO AD CA THE EMBARC

BATTERY ST REET

CIRCULATON ROUTES -- AXON


INTERLOCK CONCEPT In order to mask the temporality of the terminal’s usage, the design interlocks the 3 major programmatic areas. The incorporation of the ideas of movement and interlock were translated throughout the project’s design. Although, the design of the terminal required that certain areas remain segregated from the retail and recreation spaces due to security (TSA TSA regulations), internally the buildings ngs interlock not only physically but also through the use of visual connectivity ty to the other programs and the adaptability tability of the terminal spaces as multi-functional unctional areas.

LEGEND CRUISE TERMINAL RETAIL RESTAURANTS / CAFES RECREATIONAL SERVICES MULTI-USE RECREATIONAL FIELDS RUNNING TRACK

CRUISE TERMINAL

RETAIL

RESTAURANTS / CAFES TYP

MULTI-USE RECREATIONAL FIELD TYP

LOCKER ROOMS MULTI-USE RECREATIONAL INDOOR GYM LINES USED TO INDICATE WHAT TYPE OF ACTIVITIES COULD TAKE PLACE ON FIELD. HOWEVER, IT IS NOT LIMITED TO THAT ACTIVITY

RUNNING TRACK

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

FOR PATH OF DIFFERENT RUNNING TRACKS AND SITE CIRCULATION SEE A1-3.23

THE EMBARC

ADERO

BATTERY ST REET


MINAL CONCOURSE STUARANTS / CAFES MINAL LOADING CESS ONLY

DISEMBARK

ACCESS ELIVERY, SITE

DISEMBARK LOBBY

SECUR ITY

WAITING AREA

BAGGAGE CLAIM

CHECK-IN

SECURITY

BAGGAGE CLAIM

ENTRANCE LOBBY

TERMINAL CIRCULATION ROUTES

SITE PLAN


The structure of the terminal consists of concrete conversely, the commercial spaces are made of a light steel structure encased in a glass enclosure. This type of juxtaposition was created in order to evoke images of a monolithic form that floats atop glass and to strengthen the contrast between the 3 programmatic areas for wayfinding and a visual distinction of the interlocking concept. The terminal walls are tilted and apertures are made of punched openings to remain distinct from the uninterrupted clear commercial faรงade. Due to the tilted walls of the concrete terminal, during the 280 days that the terminal is not in use, it continues to inform the site spatially as a void.

PROGRAMMATIC MATERIALS

STRUCTURE TERMINAL = CONCRETE

COMMERCIAL = STEEL


FACADE

TYPE : SOLID TYPE 1:1SOLID

TYPE : LARGE TYPE 2:2LARGE VIEWVIEW PORTALS PORTALS

TYPE : VIEW PORTAL : VIEW CROPPING TYPE 3:3 VIEW PORTAL VINGETTES TYPE TYPE 4:4VIEW PORTAL CROPPING VINGETTES PORTAL

MM

ER M M SU UN ER

OPERABLE INLET CLERESTORY WINDOWS CLEARESTORY WINDOWS

AN

E GL

OPERABLE INLET, SOUTH FACING, CLEARESTORY WINDOWS

N SU E GL AN

The design offset each level’s walls and added roof light wells with reflecting fins and operable clerestory windows for cross ventilation. To heat and cool the buildings, an embedded hydronic system in the concrete ceilings/floors uses the water from the bay to cool the system. The cool air radiating from the system would fall into the spaces below. Conversely, the heating strategy uses electricity to heat the hydronic pipes and the hot air would then rise from the floors to heat the spaces above.

TYPE : VIEW PORTAL TYPE 6:6VIEW PORTAL PANORAMA/ VINGETTE PANORAMA / VINGETTE

SU

DAYLIGHT STRATEGY

TYPE 5 : VIEW PORTAL TYPE 5:VIEW PORTAL PANORAMA PANORAMA

The Terminal’s façade consists of punched apertures that lead the user through the building. Within transitional spaces the user is allowed fleeting glimpses of the city and the bay through a rhythm of small openings, whose directionality and progressive size variation leads the user toward large panoramic portals located in areas of “pause” that high-light specific views of the surrounding area. While, the placement and varying heights of the apertures was intended to provide each user with a different experience of the space (child vs. parent).

WIN TER SUN ANG LE WIN TE

R SU

N AN

GLE

ROOF LIGHT WELLS ROOF LIGHT WELLS

DIAGONAL LIGHT REFLECTING FINS DIAGONAL LIGHT REFLECTING FINS

OPERABLE INLET CLEARESTORY WINDOWS OPERABLE OUTLET, NORTH FACING, CLEARESTORY WINDOWS


/ JAPANTOWN MULTI-PURPOSE HOUSING/ LOCATION: Japantown San Francisco, CA PROFESSOR: Thom Faulders

push together

Studio 3 Fall 2010 CCA

elevation


L FI

GO LD EN

RE MO

FORT MASON

TH E

GA TE BR

RI TO DI AU

ID G

E

R HE FI S

SAINT

UM

W

MARY’

S CATH

CH

A IN

TO

WN

EDRA L & TH E BAY BRIDGE

K

FE R

PA

’S

&

JEF SON

TE

AN ES

AR

S QU

E

EN LD

A

P JA

R

G

T

K PA R

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EU US

When designing the new layout for Japantown in San Francisco, I started by examining the different connections between the existing site and allowing that to dictate the pathways and building shapes throughout the site. The tightness of the streets were to reference the shopping district typologies of japan.

ARE

M

O G

N MA

F AR

For the multi-purpose housing I extruded the buildings and aggregated them together to form a large development complex. Emphasizing the tourist aspect of the site, I then manipulated the openings of the complex to face a different San Francisco tourist attractions.


In order to maintain the site pathways, the design allowed the pathways to cut through the plan of the multi-use residential building. The building itself serves as a micro city; everything a resident would ever need is located within the building. The first two floors are open to the public, while the other 10 floors are private and reserved for the residents. LEVEL

1


LAUNDRY

752 SF

1027 SF 744 SF OPEN TO BELOW

OFFICE 432 SF

UP

OPEN TO BELOW

632 SF

DN

561 SF

UP

OPEN TO BELOW

929 SF

UP STORAGE

1105 SF GAME ROOM

UP

OPEN TO BELOW

1449 SF 890 SF

STORAGE

950 SF

OFFICE 724 SF

STORAGE

1108 SF

LIVING AREA 1591 SF

OFFICE 564 SF OFFICE 556 SF

OFFICE 1333 SF

LEVEL

930 SF

930 SF

642 SF

2 980 SF

980 SF

P

E

UP

1183 SF

MECH

305 SF UP

UP

MECH 335 SF

CONFERENCE 1129 SF

1177 SF

864 SF

1523 SF TECH 305 SF

ONE WAY MIRROR TOILETS 1545 SF 1219 SF

LEVEL

1

ARTIST GALLERY

R NC ENTRANC ENTRA

ENTRANCE

ART STUDIO 995 SF

E AG OR ST

ENTRANCE


LOCATION: California College of the Arts San Francisco, CA

PROFESSOR: Craig Scott

Addvanced Studio Fall 2011 CCA

/ CCA / DESIGNING THE FUTURE /


This studio continues a line of Advanced Studios where advanced architectural design is grounded in topical, real world sites and situations. Instigated by CCA’s recent acquisition of the large lot on 7th Street behind the main San Francisco campus building at 1111 8th Street, the studio took on the project

of designing a major new building/campus addition that was to act as the centerpiece of CCA’s San Francisco campus expansion. As such, students were asked to directly engage in the question of how architecture would take part in shaping the future culture of CCA.


RIDG E BAY B

N LA AK O

M O

M

(E) OUTD

OOR NAV E

CO

RR IDO R

YO UN G (E )N AV E

DE

(E )

RR

ID OR

(E )N AV E

TE GOLDEN GA

CO

This strategy emphasizes the communal discourse or visual influence amongst disciplines to produce a productive collaborative network of all the departments within CCA. It creates a culture of collaboration rich with inspiration between disciplines. This is why the new building cuts through the old one, as a merger between new and old – an integrated strategy vs. a fragmented one.

INTERWEAVE

LOUNGES

OPEN GREEN SPACE

GYM

GALLERIES

SCULPTURE GARDEN

CONNECT

ACTIVE

STUDENT/FACULTY/STAFF : THROUGH BUILDING + PLAZA LOCAL COMMUNITY ACCESS: EXTERIOR LOCAL COMMUNITY ACCESS: INTERIOR VEHICULAR ACCESS PARKING, DELIVERY, ACCESS TO SITE

STORAGE

ART EDUCATION COMMERCE

PIN-UP

CAFE

TRANSFORM

LEGEND

LIVING

DORMS

STUDIO

AUDITORIUM

CLASSROOMS

GROCERY

PARKING

VEHICLE

First, I divided the program of the new building into categories: education, living, recreation, and community. I saw an opportunity in the adjacencies and overlapping of different program and used interweaving as a leveraging strategy.

A

(E)

EDUCATION LIVING RECREATION

SITE ANALYSIS

M

(E) CORR IDOR

GATE DEN G OL

EXITING SITE

M O

A

(E) CORR (E) OUTD IDOR OOR NAV E

G UN YO DE

D

S PU M A C

GYM DORMS OPEN GREEN SPACE

CAFE SCULPTURE GARDEN

PARKING

GALLERIES

GROCERY

PIN-UP STUDIO

LOUNGES CLASSROOMS AUDITORIUM STORAGE

PARKING


BA AY BRIDGE

D AN KL OA

M O

M

D AN KL OA

C

S PU AM

A

(E) CORR IDOR (E) OUTD

OOR NAV E

EXTRUDE

PROPOSAL

NEW PROGRAM INSERTION INTO EXISTING

CO RR IDO R

EDUCATION

(E )

YO UN G (E )N AV E

TE GOLDEN GA

DE

BAY BRIDG E

DORM / LIVING US MP CA

PUBLIC

RECREATION AS VOID

PROPOSAL

EXISTING BUILDING

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

OPEN GALLERY SPACE OPEN STAIR SEATING


INTERWEAVE As patterns of us are overlaid, and user paths cross, the new spatial relationships are developed informing the program. Through moveable partitions and large sliding doors, the building is configured to maximize flexibility. The addition extends the original building through interwoven surfaces that offer new potentials for networked interconnectivity. The program focus informs experience and structure through its strong tectonic presence.

2

ARCH STUDIO GALLERY LOUNGE PROGRAM DIAGRAM

CLASSROOM GALLERY S


COMPONENTS DIAGRAM


FORM

I saw recreation/green space as a void within the building; an open are that could be used as ventilation and as a counter to the massiveness of the building. It acts as an extension of the street to bring the community into the space while also allowing for an open space for the students and public exhibition events. So events do not have to detract from classes. However, the space could also serve as an amphitheater when public lectures are projected on the building’s surface.

ICON The new addition would become an icon for the school (whose primary program is architecture) – cementing CCA as the leader in progressive innovative ideas in both art and architecture. The building projects this idea to the rest of the architecture and art communities, the city, and globally. The form itself connects to all the art disciplines in its iconic sculptural qualities.

1

AUDITORIUM

NAVE PA PARKING

PARKING


DORM ADMIN AD ADMIN AUDITORIUM STUDIO NAVE

CLASSROOM CL CLASSROOM ASSROOM

LOUN LOUNGE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION


/ BAY AREA / EMERGENCY RESPONSE STATION

LOCATION: Point Pinole, CA


Arch 100B Summer 2008 UC Berkeley

Professors: Keith Plymale Monica Tiulesco

The challenge was to design an emergency response station within the site at Point Pinole in California’s Bay Area. By focusing on the circulation paths of different systems and how they interacted with each other a web started to form that demonstrated how by taking away or placing additional force on one of the nodes it would consequently force other areas to re-organize themselves to accommodate to the change. Their interaction was then characterized by five separate

categories: explorer, infiltrator, independent, dependent, and intermediary. I generated a systematic “secondary� infrastructure of the site based on the interaction of the systems using the five categories. Then continued this idea of systematic organization when analyzing how the program would interact with the site and allowed the structure of the building to develop from this merge of program and site systems.


connection typologies Dependent

Explorer

Intermediary

Original

Independent

site condition mapping

site transformation

Combination


Site analysis diagrams revealed the interaction between the different ecological systems on the site based on their circulation paths. This series of diagrams were used to analyze the various factors acting on the site in order to evaluate its potential as an organizational for new dynamic forms and patterns. By categorizing the five types of interaction that took place, I was able to create an organizational system using Y-shaped structural components to form circulation path modules, from which I systemically created a secondary diagrammatic landscape.

By manipulating parameters such as adhesion and branching, when the modules converged, the resulting patterns resulted in a range from simple patterns to complex dynamic forms. The “combination” of the infiltrator and Intermediary components became the new hybrid module for the water circulation path through the site. Similarly, when all the paths met the cross between all the modules generated a hybrid “Super” module. Within the “Super” modules, the type of interaction, branching, and adhesion read as the potential degrees of flexibility and connectivity found in the new forms of workplaces, collaborative environments, and outside skin. Thus, from secondary landscape evolved two programmatic structures..


Research Station

Rescue Volunteer Dorm 2nd Level 3

1. Sleeping Cells 2. Bathrooms 3. Lounge 4. Indoor Dining 5. Indoor Kitchen 6. Outdoor Kitchen 7. Outdoor Dining

1 2

3 8 1

2

6

6

4

5 3

1

7

2

8

1st Level

Research Station

4

7

5 7

1. Entrance 2. Library 3. Administration 4. Bathrooms 5. Water Research Laboratory

9 6. Conference room 7. Large Equipment Storage 8. Medical Storage 9. Loading and Receiving Area


A

/ ARCHITECTURE / PHOTOGRAPHY / A. Griffith Observatory, Austin & Ashley Architects B. Ennis House, Frank Lloyd Wright C. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Frank Gehry D. Department of Water & Power, A. C. Martin

B

A

C


D

C

C


Athena Carter 2012 Portfolio  

This is a collection of some of my work as of 2012. It includes some of my professional work as well as my work done while receiving my Mast...

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