Page 1


STORIES.

GHOST WITH

**The Green

Mantle, without

DARLBT.

utteringa word, entered

NEW

JAMES

BY

ILLUSTRATIONS

MILLER,

the house.'*"

YORK: 622

BROADWAY.

MDCCCLXV.

zed by Digiti;

/^0W 118.


zed by Digiti;


STORIES

GHOST

/LiJ-A

A

COLLECTED

WITH

VIEW

TO

PARTICULAR

THE

BELIEF

VULGAR

GHOSTS

APPARITIONS.

AND

Wrtii Cm

PROM

COUNTERACT

finflvatgdigs,

DESIGNS

OP

NEW

P

O. C. DARLBT.

YORK:

^

PUBLISHED

BY

(svoonsoB 528

TO

JAMES a

t. ntAHov

MILLER, *

oo.,)

BROADWAY.

1865.

zed Digiti;

by


a J

^

'

A lUNlVERSlTY M4ARVARD

LIBRARY OCT

Entered

tlMlNatrtct

Conrt

.

AXBBBSOH

/

accordlnffto Ixt of CongreM, in the yearlMCby CARET

IntlieCaerk'sOaicoof

8 1941

ft

HABT,

of the Eastern

IMstxict of

Penngybrani^

it BaMSAT

jjlrfntets, 18 Fi ankfoH

Struts N. T,

zed by Digiti;


CONTENTS.

6

Introduction The

Cold

The

Haryard

The

Ghost

A

Hand

College Ghost

Deserter's

Garrick's

13

of Lameyille Ghost

London

The

7

15 30

"

Ghost

33

Ghost

33

"

Apparitionof

Lord

The

Water

The

Friar's Ghost

William

Petty

34

Spirit

37

in the

Imperial Palace

of Vienna

"

43

"

TheBearofFriedrichshall

Barbito,

the

or

The

Danger

The

Devil

The

Ghost

of

and

48

Spectre of

Cuenza

Tampering

with

the

Prussian

of Count

the Fear

of Ghosts

"

63

"

Grenadier

70

Walkenried

Extraordinary Confessions

'l

53

The

VillageApparition

The

Haunted

The

Green

Mantle

The

Ghost

of General

The

Haunted

of

a

73 .81

Ghost

88

Castle

97

of Venice

106 183

Marceau

186

Inn 3

zed Digiti;

by


zed Digiti;

by


/Z"i^/Jh INTRODUCTION.

What

is a

In the

? ghost

or popularacceptation

the term, itis a visible appearance of a deceased person. It is called also a spirit if it must ; but, visible, be matter;

matter,it can

If it is not a spirit. consequently of the onlyexist in the imagination

; and must

not

holder be-

therefore be classed with the multifarious

phantomswhich

haunt the sick man's couch in

delirium. But

have appeared to ghosts Can

than

more

one

time ; how then ? ? That is not of two persons at once of and we doubt the " authentic" accounts

at

a

"

to

many

no

at a

one

The

time.

imagination probable, ghosts appearing

stories we

about to tellwill show,however,that in

are

saw

than

more

person

he exist in the

great

a

instances several persons have thmghtthat they there was at the same time,when, in fact, ghosts

ghostin the

; but substantial flesh and

case

blood

and bones. But what

ghostof?

does Of

does it appear Oh no ! Oh

a as

a

ghostrepresent?

man a

man

or

woman,

or

woman

! shocking rules. It alwaysappears been murdered,it appears

is it the

What

to be

only?

sure.

But

Is itnude ?

This is contraryto all the dressed ?

If the

man

in the very clothes he

!"

5

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has was


6

INTRODUCTION.

with in, allbloody,

murdered

murdered-looking pale, wound in the breast,head,stomach, "ce, and a ghastly back or abdominal region, as the case may be ; If the person died but alwaysin decent clothes. then the ghostis a natural death,in bed ; quietly shroud ; but clad in longwhite robes, or a generally So then,we dressed. have the ^ost stillproperly of the clothes also" the ghostof the coat and unmentionables ^theghostof the cocked hat and wig. How a

"

IS

this?

theoryof to bear the roughhandlingof ghostsis too flimsy either reason The best way to dissipate or ridicule. most the inbred horror of supernatural phantoms,which alBut

sources

to cut

the matter

short

"

the whole

all persons derive from nursery tales or other of causeless terror in early is to show by life,

itis to impressupon ignorant examplehow possible or credulous persons the firm belief that theybehold when in pointof fact no ghostis there. We a ghost, proceedat once to our stories.

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STORIES.

GHOST

THE

of

in I

On "

arrival

my ^I

forget

however, in

the

which

upon

the

After waited

and

to

be

to

during

his

dence resi-

pass

house.

with

Dieppe

village give

even

and

diligence

village near the

not

in the

and

;

in the

^I found

"

luggage,

my

partaken

by the

a

tbe

mile

distant

give

inn

me

a

so

bed

undertook,

He me

lodging

a

this arrangement

on

floor ; and

on

It

situated the

comfortable

a

with

where

night.

from

of

servant

house

quite small,

a

following story

I

was

satisfied.

having

to

little

a

could

might sleep

receive

to

upon me

him

Brussels

to at

it

landlord

the I

of

name

neighbourhood

obliged

stars

Paris

evening

one

that

crowded

the

Europe.

travellingfrom

was

befell

which

adventure

terrible

a

HAND.

artist relates

American

eminent

An

COLD

I was

on

lantern, who

a

lone

a

inn.

There

knocking

at

the

by of

house, heath,

wide

a

was

destined

was

were

I

was

to

duct con-

supper,

half

some

rooms

admitted

was

7

zed Digiti;

evil

stories,

two

three

but

door, I

my

by

a


8

GHOST

by

melancholy-looking young

a

and

STORIES.

whose

woman,

bespokepoverty,althoughshe

appearance

dress neat

was

and

tidy. On beingconducted

as

kitchen,I found

a

house

inhabited

was

in my

countenance

into the apartment which no

one

onlyby a

there.

served

It appearedthat the

this young

look of wonder

woman.

and

Seeing she inquiry,

ceiving merelyremarked, that she was often in the habit of reand that it was from the inn when full, lodgers

she would the

endeavour

to

aflbrd me

a

for

comfortable room

night.

As

it would

have

been

ill-bred to ask any questions the firefor half an hour speculating

lookingat the melancholy when the oddityof the thing, on damsel went on with her sewing,which she had taken seated. At last, as I was beingquitefatigued up as soon with my day'sride,I desired to be shown to my isleeping afler this,I

on

of very moderate dimensions,and situated ground floor. In fact it was but barelylarge

It

room.

the

sat

was

bed, and a few inches of single flooron one side of it where I might undress ; and there was a window openingnear the head of the bed.

enough to

aflbrd room

for a

the candle,I locked my hostess had set down the threw my clothes upon the door,undressed myself, bed, and was soon fast asleep. I suppose I might have When

in the dead waist and slepttwo hours, so that it was when I was middle of night," suddenlyawakened by a cold hand, as it might be the hand o[ a corpse, drawn over deliberately my face,from the forehead to the chin, towards my feet ! and so passing off a space downward "'

Horror-struck tremulous

1 started bolt

and upright,

but loud voice," Who's

I stretched

out

my

there ?"

shouted No

in

a

answer.

hands, and feltall the three walls of

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COLD

THE

the

room

9

HAND.

the head of the bed, and found

near

but nothing

the said bare walls.

I then got upon my knees on the felt the walls ail round the room, I could as

bed, and

do, by easily I then

crept under

that there It

of itsexceedingly limited dimensions.

reason

was

no

the bed, and

I could

had feltthat awful cold hand done

thingwas be

mistake

no

you

by

may

and coolly about it. Why so

In fact I

say.

its touch ; and

I stood

gone.

nature

arrived

"

In

was

but

room

have

myself. that I

sworn

passingover my face. The that there could deliberately, did I

waked

before I had

not

out

time

grasp

profoundsleep

of to

the hand ?

seize it,it

was

hensible wonderingat the strange and incompreof the thingfor some minutes, and finally

the reluctant admission

at

dreaming hand

in the

creature living

mighty strange!

was

fullysatisfied myself

that it

was

my

at

all,but the ghostof

a

very

confused

and

have

that I must

imaginationthat "

a

it

been

was

no

hand.

unsettled

state

of mind, I

at

tigue, lengthgot into bed again,and, stillunrested from my faI speedily fellinto a doze. Before I had completely lost my consciousness, however, I feltthe same appalling sensation as before that horrible corpse-like hand dragging itselflike the body of a serpent over ror my face. Horof horrors ! I screamed out at the utmost pitchof my there ? Who, what are voice, Who's Speak ! you ? Avaunt ! Begone !" I sprang instantly out of bed, and feltin the darkness all round the room again.There was no one to be found. There was nothingbut empty space as before. I was, The dumb-founded. to use a homely phrase,completely would not hold former theoryof dreams and imaginations The thingwas too real. It was a hand, and good now. nothingbut a hand. I could swear to it. It might be "

"

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10

GHOST

and

STORIES.

the hand

was, probably

of

dead

a

skin and bones,and muscles and motion I

;

blood in my body,back and went my face. It came that I had not time to grasp

all the thought,

it passed over

so suddenly, hands beingunder

Now

I

somethingof

a

and it had sent,

heart,as

to my

this time at

more

it,both of my

the bed-clothes. well indifferently

an

am

; but it had

man

and philosopher,

informed had been

never

person-" a

believer

of any sort or kind. ghostsor supernatural appearances I could not but think, But this thing staggeredme. with Hamlet, that there are many thingswhich are not could the owner dreamt of in your philosophy." Where in

**

of the hand

clear. from

He

be ?

There

had

not

not

was

been time

if the door had

it,even

in the

room.

enough for him

was

to escape

locked,which

been

not

That

it

no was as I had justproved. There securely, So he could not have crawled up the chimney. fire-place.

was,

very

closet

of any kind. The hiding-place I could make nothingof inexplicable. thingwas utterly it ; and in a desperate state of doubt and bewilderment I once betook myself to bed, and thought and more thoughtabout ittillmy brain ached again; but all to no

There

was

no

or

purpose.

Fatigueand drowsiness at lengthovercame me, and I slepttillmorning without further disturbance. It had been arrangedthat I should breakfast at the house where I slept. When I sat down, my melancholyhostess inquiredhow I had slept ^hopedI had a comfortable night. On the contrary," repliedI, the nightwas rather "

"

"

an

uncomfortable

one

for

me,

such

as

I

never

to

the whole affair to narrate again." I then proceeded it had passed. She listenedwith fixed attention, only

pass as

desire

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THE

with

me interrapting

had

brother.

that I have

who

my

hearinga home

disturb

word

in the

me,

three

questions.When

It must

have

went

been

and

my

I

poor

tell you, sir,"she continued,

habits, dissipated

here, since the death of

me

often goes away

came

or **

11

HAND.

unfortunate brother,of

an

lives with

I must

He

to

two

concluded, she said,

dranken *"

COLD

our

parents.

stays for weeks

without together, He of his whereabouts. probably middle of the night, and not wishing of his bed-room which

the window

to

and thrust in his hand in order you occupiedlast night, to ascertain whether occupyinghis bed. any lodgerwas He

was

of your

probablytoo

much

exclamations

;

he has gone of his

and

intoxicated

take any notice pied, having found his bed occu-

ofi*and found

a

to

lodgingwith

some

one

acquaintance." home in the course of young hopefulcame learned ; for in half an hour after this I never

Whether the

day

conversation satisfied with

I

was

the

on

my

way

to

melancholyyoung

of the dreadful mystery of the Cold

Brussels, perfectly woman's

Hand.

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solution


12

HARVARD

THE

Old

Harvard, in

Science

and

"

no

whatever

annoyance

unbelief had

the increase of

GHOST.

troubled time, though frequently

our

suffered spirits,

with

COLLEGE

them frightened

had pa{)ulation

leftno

with

ghosta.

all away,

and

secluded spot in all

ever, howCambridge suitablefor a ghost's promenade. Still, there lingered old traditionsof ghosts, in former some

times,who

had made

ghostsreal and one description,

fictitious.

.

our

latter

from

memory

the

artist, Washington Allston.

lamented

story is in substance

their haunt-

those of the

Among

has stilldwelt in

narrative of the The

these classic shades

follows :

as

In those reunions which

used

To these narratives many

of the student auditors would

often

to take

placein the students' chambers, for conversation, cigar-smoking, of ghosts the subject had been very and social enjoyment, students from the country discussed. Some frequently well authenticated by their told longand dreadful stories, and maiden aunts, of real,veritable ghosts grandmothers appearingin the old fashioned legitimate way, dressed in revelations of long white robes and making appalling crimes and hidden treasures, and then vanishing instantly of drum, and leavingthe astonished goingoff without beat and horrified spectator in the most state. pitiable so

"

*"

incline,"while seriously

order

to

induce the of the

same

others

narrators

sort.

to

in counterfeited belief,

afibrd them

In fact, on

one

more

tainment enter-

the occasion,

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THE

whole

coterie,with

belief unqualified heard

be doubted.

declared their singleexception, ghosts. The stories they had just

in

There

and authentic,to circumstantial, the accumulawithstanding dissenter from this opinion, single no

was

evidence. The

however, stubbornlydeclared that there mistake.

'The

belief. He with

one

see

would

thingwas

would

like

his

to see

absurd

too

beheve

be

must

in itself to

some

gainhis

ghoststillhe should As for fearing them, he eyes. him." ghostthat could frighten

never

in

*^

own

the

of his fellow

One

13

GHOST.

a

too accurate,

were

tion of

COLLEGE

HARYABD

students,as far from

supernatural appearances

a

real behef in

less, himself,resolved,neverthe-

as

put the hero's courage

the

proof. the next eveningafter that when- this on Accordingly remarkable conversation took place, at a very late hour, he dressed himself up in white, and quietly glidedinto the chamber of his companion,who was lyingalone in to

to

his bed and wide awake.

knowing ghost-student,

The

with slept

taken too

to

to

draw

under pistols out

the

doubt that he would

the appearance

his

always

had previously pillow,

the bullets from them

with acquainted

well

other On

care

loaded

that his friend

;

for he

impetuouscharacter

use

them

on

such

was

of the

occasion.

an

of the spectre,the hero sat up

in bed

took a survey of him, as well as the deliberately moonbeam's misty hght" shiningin at the struggling the would permit. The windows ghost glidedacross before the bed, raised his hand in an room, and, standing awful and menacing manner, accordingto the most approved fashion of ghostdom. Stillthe whole performance and

very

*"

failed

to

shake

the

firm

nerves

and ghost-seer.He onlylaughed, form of speech, Vanish "

Harvard

of the

dramatic shouted aloud in melo! I fear you

not

2

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l"


14

8T0RIE8.

fiHOST

and gazing motionless,stillstanding masked face. Our hero,at length, upon him with ghastly The

spectrewas

determined him

neyer

put the

to

there

to come

heneath

from

and to the proof, apparition

his

no

more," took

pillowand

fired it

**

of the

one

pointblank

teach

pistols in the

there cleared away the smoke face. When spectre's stood the grim figure, before,immovable and appaas rently the appalling belief invulnerable. Instantaneously the mind of the unhappy beholder that he came over from the other in the presence of a spirit was actually world. All his preconceived opinions all his habits of all his vaunted courage vanished at once. His thought, fell into the whole beingwas changed; and he instantly "

"

convulsions. frightful

most

companion,who became experiment,

His his

joke.

Medical

watching the

aid

was

turn

efiectof

and

;

called

had

in the illparticipated called in,and every appliance

all in for his recovery. But it was Convulsion succeeded convulsion ; and the unfortunate

resorted vain.

been

alarmed in his

the entry who

in others from timed

had

to

youth never be made

aware

recovered

sufficientconsciousness

of the trick that had

him, until the melancholyscene

been was

to

played upon closed by his

untimelydeath. This

story has

its moral.

The

mind

of

man

delicate and

is

too

to be tamperedwith a structure complicated Whatever by experimentsof this description. may be one's opinion of ghosts, it is dangerousto counterfeit any thingof this kind for the purpose of producingterror in

the mind

of

anotner

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16

GHOST

STOKIES.

Madame the high-spirited Desintimidating to divert her friend added her persuasions houli^res, now from an enterprise from which the bravest man might have we shrink appalled. "What not to fear,then," failed of

she

added,

mother ?

"

for

Let

woman

a

the

on

if

conjureyou,

me

of

eve

not

for your

for that of your unborn infant, giveup your and over All these arguments, repeated over the determined

insufficient to shake Her of the

courage

dangersto

because herself,

she

was

and spirit, Her

no

which

she

was

that

convinced

from

weak

noble host and hostess

haunted

chamber.

and

spacious

the

walls

"

depth. into near

door with

"

As

her wish Madame

soon

as

bed, ordered

madame

safe.

of

a

cavernous

undressed,she stepped

was

largecandle to be placedon a stand it,and enjoining her/cmmc de chambre to shut the dismissed her. securely, Having providedherself a book, accordingto custom, she calmlyread her

roused

to repose

by a noise at the succeeded. footsteps

door

therefore addressed it with her frighten which

;

it

"

Madame

decided that this must

to

departed

a

usual time, then sunk

of

a

from the thickness of

chimney antiqueand

the

of

she

:

blamed, but pleaded, pitied, of takingpossession of the DeshouHdres found it grand dark

the windows

minds

her lifewas

one

tations represen-

goingto expose they owed their

fleshless arm"

immaterial

an

to lengthyielded

at

*"

sake,

venturer. of the ad-

superiorto these

rose

faith in the

own

daringplan." again,were

purpose

colouringto superstition actingupon entertained

becominga

from this she

opened,and Deshouli^res

be the an

was

soon

the sound ately immedi-

and supposed ghost,

assurance

that,if it hoped

her purpose of detecting the imposture had created such foolishalarm throughout the

it would castle,

from

find itselfdisappointed in the attempt ;

zed by Digiti;


THE

for she

was

no

OF

bent resolutely

itat allhazards. for

GHOST

answer

in contact

17

LARNEVILLE

and exposing discovering

on

This threatshe reiteratedto was

returned.

with

a

no

purpose,

lengththe

At

intruder

largescreen, which it overturned the bed, that,getting so near entangledin the curtains, which played loosely their rings,they returned a oa sound so sharp, that any one under the influence of fear would have taken it for the shrill scream of an unquiet but madame she was as spirit, perfectly undismayed, came

afterwards declared.

contrary,she continued to the nocturnal visitor, whom she suspectedto interrogate be

one

On

the

of the domestics ; but it stillmaintained

silence, thoughnothingcould for it

movements,

now

be

againstthe

ran

an

broken un-

less quietin its stand

on

which

placedthe heavy candlestick,which fell with a it noise. In fine,tired of all these exertions, thundering Ma* and rested itselfagainstthe foot of the bed. came called upon dame Deshouli^res was now more decidedly of and intrepidity to evince all that firmness of mind of which she had boasted ; and well did she justify spirit the confidence she had placedin her own courage, for, stillretaining she exclaimed, Ah ! her self-possession, was

**

now

I shall ascertain what

she extended which came

thou

both her hands

art ;

contact

with

Madame

the

to to

placeagainst resting.They

was

retain them

whom

or

time

same

the

soft velvety ears,

two

detemined firmlygrasped, lend its lightto discover

at

towards

she felt that the intruder in

"

to

which

she

tillday should what

longed. they be-

found her

trial, patience put to some but not her strength, for nothingcould be more ing unresistof the imprisonedears. and quietthan the owner Day at lengthreleased her from the awkward, painfu in which she had remained position,

for so

many

2*

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hours,


18

GHOST

and discoTeied h^r

STORIES.

to prisoner

be Gios-Blanc,a

dog large and worthy,if fidelity

to the chdteau,and as belonging Far as any of its inhabitants. honestydeserve the title, the bondage in which Madame from resenting Deshouli6reshad so longkept him, he licked the hands which all he believed had been kindly keepinghis ears warm Deshouli^res enjoyed a hearty night; while Madame laugh at this ludicrous end to an adventure,for the en*

of which

counter

In

the

mean

givenup

she had braced her every nerve. time, the Count and Countess,wholly

their fears,had found it

to

to impossible

close

duringthe night. The trial to which their terrible to their exposed herself grew more the more they dwelt upon it,tillthey at imagination evitable persuadedthemselves that death would be the inlength With these forebodings they proceeded consequence. the it dame as soon was as lightto apartment of Mahad theycourage to enter it, Deshouh6res scarcely or to speakwhen theyhad done so. From this state of theywere revived by their friend undrawing petrifaction her curtains, and paying them the compHments of the morning with a triumphantlook. She then related aH and having that had passedwith an impressive solemnity, the catastrophe, roused intense curiosity she to know pointedto Gros-Blanc,as she said to the Count, smilingly There is the nocturnal visitorwhom you have so long taken for the ghostof your mother ;" for such he had concluded it,from havingbeen the last person who had their eyes friend had

"

**

died in the chdteau. then

at

whether

the

"

and

Count

blushed

looked

at

his wife

deeply,not

"

knowing

But Madame, angry. which at the a commanding manner, possessed

it were

who same

dog

The

time awed

better to

and

laughor

be

ended this state convinced,

zed by Digiti;

of irreso-


GHOST

THE

19

LARNETILLE.

OF

r

by saying ^^No,no, Monsieur, you shall no longer continue in an illusion which deared longindulgencehas enI will completemy task,and emancipate you to. by proving your mind from the shackles of superstition, lution

"

you that all which has so longdisturbed the peace of Madame your familyhas arisen from natural causes." to

arose, made

wood

the lock of the door,the

her friends examine

of which

was

decayed as

so

render the

locking strength.

to

againsta very moderate degreeof of the cause of entrance This facility had been evidently out of doors,making Gros-Blanc,who liked not sleeping The rest is easily choice of this ro("n. accounted for : it useless

^

Gros-Blanc

smelt,and wished

which candle,in attempting

to

he

possess

night;and

he would

'bed,also,if he had his into

ears.

omens

Thus

not are

have

givenme the

most

all the blun"

committed

ders,and caused all the noises,which this

himself of the

have

taken an

annoyedme

of possession

my of seizing opportunity

simpleevents magnified

of fearful axid supernatural augury."'

zed by Digiti;


20

LONDON

A

GHOST.

of In the year 1704, a gentleman, to all appearance in a house in Sohotook furnished lodgings largofortune,

After he had resided there

square.

weeks

some

estahlishment,he lost his hrother,who

Hampstead, and he

to

him

to

and

to

on

his death-hed

interred in the

The

Abhey.

who

make

corpse

landlord

to

permit

lodgings,

for the funeral.

there

his landlord without hesitation signified

at

in Westminster

of his brother to his

arrangements

lived

sired departicularly

familyvault

his gentlemanrequested

bringthe

had

with his

The

compliance.

body,dressed in a white shroud, was accordingly broughtin a very handsome coffin,and placedin the to take placethe great dining-room.The funeral was next day, and the lodgerand his servants went out to for the solemnity.He make the necessary preparations thing. The stayedout late ; but this was no uncommon that they had no oclandlord and his family, casion conceiving The

to

wait for

twelve o'clock.

in,and

to

him, retired

maid-servant

One

boil some

water, which

bed

to

as

usual, about

leftup to let him he had desired might was

The girl cordingly acwas readyfor making tea on his return. all alone in the kitchen, when a tall, sitting spectre-looking figureentered, and clappeditselfdown in a chair opposite to her. be

sex

The

maid

;

but she

was was

by no

means

one

of the

terrifiedbeyond

most

timid of her

as expression, lonely

zed by Digiti;


A

she was,

at

this unexpectedapparition.Uttering a loud

she

scream,

hurried

21

GHOST.

LONDON

flew the

to

out

like

chamber

an

of her

side door,and

at a

arrow

and

master

mistress.

to them, and communicated Scarcelyhad she awakened the whole familysome portionof the frightwith which she was herself overwhelmed,when the spectre,enveloped in a shroud and with a face of death-like paleness, made

its appearance, without

their

and

having

of all was,

worst

sat down

in

a

observed

chair in the how

that this chair stood

bed-chamber, so that

bed-room,

it entered.

by

The

the door of tho

could get away without the apparition, which rolled its glaring not

a

creature

passingclose to and so hideously distorted its features, eyes so frightfully, that they could not bear to look at it. The master and

mistress crept under

the bed-clothes, covered

while the maid-servant profuseperspiration, insensible by the side of the bed. At

the

uproar;

head and

same

time the whole

house seemed

nearly

to be

though they had covered themselves ears, they could stillhear the incessant

for

which and clatter, At

sunk

served

to

increase their

stillin lengthallbecame perfectly

landlord ventured

to raise

his

head,and

in

an

over

noise

terror.

the house. to

with

steal

a

The

glance

chair

by the door ; but behold,the ghostwas gone ! its power. Sober reason The poor girl began to resume was broughtto herself after a good deal of shaking. In sufficient courage to quit a short time, theypluckedup at the

the bed-room, and

to

commence

an

examination

of the

they expectedto find in great disorder. whole Nor were their anticipations unfounded. The house had been stripped and the genby artful thieves, tleman had decamped without payingfor his lodging. It of the turned out that he was other than an accomplice no house, which

zed by Digiti;


22

GHOST

STORIES.

notorious Arthur Chambers, who in 1706; and that the

was

executed

supposed corpse

at

Tyburn

this arch-

was

rogue himself,who had whitened his hands and face with chalk,and merelycounterfeited death. About mid*

nighthe quittedthe coffin,and appeared to in the kitchen.

When

followed her, and, seated acted

as

were

enabled

a

she at

flew

up

the maid

stairs,he softly

the door of the

chamber, he

that his industrious accomplices so sentinel, to

plunderthe

house without the least mo-

jestation.

zed by Digiti;


24

GHOST

sentenced

be

to

Sl*ORIES.

hanged.

gibbetwas

near

executed

on

Idee

then buried without the town,

the

a

erected for the

of the town-gates, not far from

purpose, there was

was

one

A

which

was military guard-house.The sentence the 31st of August, 1764, and the body of

accustomed

near

a

spot where

dry their linen. It was natural to expect that the culprit would pay nocturnal visitsto such of the good-wives as kept watch over the linen hung out there to dry. He actually appearedalmost and drove the terrified creatures from the every night, place.Such as may suppose that this was onlysome sly thief concealed under the disguise of a spectre,need but women

were

to

be informed,that the washerwomen

were

never

more

cure se-

of thieves than at thistime ; and depredations that,as soon as the morning dawn had scared away the nocturnal visitor, theyalways found their linen exactly that half a proof, at least, as they had leftit. This was of supernatural the apparition was origin. that Idee's ghostwalked, was The rumour soon spread the general the whole town, and became topic throughout The of conversation in every company. unsupported of the washerwomen statements might have been liable established beyond was to suspicion ; but their veracity of doubt by the declarations of the sentinels, the possibihty sometimes who affirmed that theyhad seen the malefactor, sometimes in another. one m place,

from the

The m

a

unfortunate

white

coat

man

had been

executed

and

interred

bordered with black ribbon,a presentfrom

in this It was females of the town. compassionate The story attire that he appearedagainafter his death. ceived reof this spectre,which spreaduniversal consternation, snow-ball. The unhappy like a rolling dailyadditions, wightgrew bolder by degrees.About four months

some

zed by Digiti;


25 after his execution,he stalked,with and with

a

melancholyair,

a

lantern in his hand, before the faces of the

erected for him within the town, to the gallows sentinels, all sides,suddenly and after surveyingit intently on This

vanished.

onlyby

not

seen

was

but sentries,

the

several other soldiers on

guard. of the ghost now belief in the reality The gained strength ; for it had appearednot merelyto old women, but to warriors whose valour had been provedbeyond aQ by

doubt in many and to whom and more a battle, courage therefore justly ascribed than to presence of mind are any other class of persons.

education and

a

mind

from womanish preserved

the way

superior hitherto

luntary felta thrillof invo-

fears,now threw

chance

a

had by prejudice

unfettered

horror,when

those whom

Even

them

nightinto

at

of the resuscitated malefactor.

these

Among

the last,

classed

narrator

himself.

At

that time

eighteenyears old,he was servingas a common but disbelieved the whole story soldier in that garrison, of the spectre,because he had neither seen this nor any other. Though by birth a German, he had from his situation

acquiredat

the French

as

word

a

that he

confinement

of German.

sentinel with

a

earlyage

so language,

during the not

an

He

considerable was

of

had

fluencyin preter employed as inter-

Idee,who

understood

been frequently

this unfortunate

man,

and

duty

on

roughly tho-

was

both with his person and sentiments. acquainted He never expected to behold his executed comrade at last signally was again; but his incredulity punished.

We

shall continue the 7th of

On

the narrative in his

January,1765,

about was

1

was

own

words

:

"

duty at the gate, Idee on which gibbet on

fifty paces from which stood the hanged. The officerof the watch

had

a

friend with

a

zed by Digiti;


26

GHOST

STORIES.

him until ten o'clock. When lie down

to

I was he had retired,

the bench

on

in the soldiers'room

nap, when

the officerwished

apartment,

to

and sleepy,

bear

him

therefore

unfit for the purpose

could

refuse

not

to

:

glassof good beer

"

Do

why

I

with

him.

into his

so

urgent, that 1

excellent tobacco and these I

Over

a

excessively that I was quite

but the officerwas

pipeof

him

get

was

confessed frankly

a

to

soon

a

reco^

usual flow of

spirits. said reason, Pressler,"

vered my "

to go with

me

company.

take

ing prepar-

you know the I have desired your

the

officer,

?"

company

suppose,"repHed I, because, out of the twentybest." four who are on duty here, you like my company besides." reason Certainly ; but I have a particular "

I

"

**

is that?"

"What "I "

**

afraid."

am

?" cried I, with possible forgetthat there are three

Is it

You

burst of

a

laughter.

sentinels before the

house." "No

matter

if there

thirteen.

were

Last

Christmas

nightIdee put them all to the rout, when, in his ludicrous the gallowsby the light of his he contemplated attire, of this kind, lantern, I am believer in apparitions no for the sins of my and yet I am now perstitious susuffering nurse.

The

deuse

take

the

confounded

!" gossips We

both

laughed,smoked

our

pipes, and

chatted

The clock struck eleven. The reliefsalliedfrom away. the soldiers'room to their respective repairing ; the men

of which

posts,some less than Heved

a

sentries at

quarterof back.

came a

were an

We

at a

considerable distance.

hour, those who heard

the

had

usual

cry

been

In re-

of the

quarterto twelve,and then againat half-past

zed by Digiti;


27 steps, haatyfootlike those of many rushinginto persons together, the house and into the soldiers'room oppositeto that where we were sitting,

twelve.

aflerwards Immediately

"*

What

"

I

is that ?" cried the amazed

Heutenant.

I,somewhat alarmed, that verilybelieve,"replied sentinels have run again from their posts." away

the

""

of my mouth, before something We looked at each other ; my

the words

were Scarcely

out

rappedat our door. companion changed colour,and made

have

may

candle

The the

"

heard

we

the

that ensued

scene

The

knockingwas

Come

in I" and Idee

the

that unlikely

observation

same

the table burned

on

it is not

more

he

me. respecting

thus rendered

dimly,and awful.

: I repeated

took courage and cried,

solemn

in stalked with

in the very himself,

pace

the

fortunate un-

dress in which

he

suffered. consternation

Our

We

from

sprung

the lieutenant

at

seats

our

to

this :

We

me.

sightis not

to be

I flew to the

described.

and lieutenant,

soughtrefugebetween

table and the settle, and both sank terrifiedalmost upon

the latter. We

fear of

those of encountering

Do

know

you

in intruder, Grerman.

a

me,

hollow

These

words

This

senses.

raise scarcely

our

the spectre,which

death for

eyes

stillgazed

in silence.

at us steadfastly "

durst

to

the

lieutenant ?"

at

tone, sepulchral

enabled

cannot

me

lengthcried but

yet in pure

to recover

be the Idee who

the

was

my

tered scat-

hanged,

myself,for he could not speak a word of guage have learned the lanGrerman, and he cannot possibly The idea in the other world. so expeditiously which trick of some followed,that it was a naturally himself at our impudent fellow to amuse expense, hurt thoughtI

to

zed by Digiti;


28

GHOST

STORIES.

and I determined to investigate the matter. pride, Mustering all my courage, I snuffed the candle, and takingit in my left hand advanced towards the figure. My blood curdled as I approachednearer, and I was almost temptedto turn back. Luckilymy good genius and strength.I rushed upon the impartedto me spirit "ny

spectre,collared it,and behold

^itwas

"

flesh and

bone.

this conviction allmy energies suddenlyreturned. I thrust the supposedculprit againstthe door, violently With

which

stood

so ajar,

you ?*' cried I,in I received no answer.

as

to

tone

a

shut it.

that

"

Scoundrel,who of the

none

was

are

gentlest.

My unexpectedtreatment seemed the ghost to terrify quiteas much as he had before terrified Nevertheless my speedily revived courage had wellus. when, after again violently nigh left me as speedily, returned. was no answer snakingthe figure, At lengthitcrouched towards a comer, and began to "Don't hurt me, sir!" A smart cry out lamentably: of my thump on the head accompanied the repetition question: Scoundrel,who are you ?" "

"

I

am

Z

,

,"* stammered

secretaryto

affrighted ghost. These few officer the hitherto speechless

restored

words use

to

of his tongue.

the my

pressions Ex-

and curses, indignation, .uttered by the ever as were as coarse imprecations poured forth by him upon the roughestsoldier,were the dog! stab him to the audacious secretary. "Stab neart !" cried he to me repeatedly. the passionin which I was myself, Notwithstanding of the most

"

nero are

The

writer has

not

vehement

given the

of the story is dead, yet many

names,

because, though the

of his

respectablefamily

stillliving.

zed by Digiti;


"I thrust

the

supposed

culprit violently ag"in"t so

as

to

shut

itJ^"PaQe

the

door, which

28^

zed Digiti;

by

sUxmI

ajar,


zed by Digiti;


30

GHOST

want

yon

t"

now

the gate to he

STORIES.

der Only to requestthe lieutenant to oropened for me, that I may go home." **

It should be observed that he lived in the suburbs. "

Tell the sentinel

"

There

to

let you

out."

there."

is none

I closed the window

dismay. What the devil !" cried the enragedUeutenant,springingfrom his seat "No of the Prus* sentry there !" Owing to the severity sian military laws, the affairwas now ed to be attendlikely in

"

"

"

with the

A seasonable serious consequences. adventure operatedaccording to my

most

allusion to

our

own

wishes

the

rigidlieutenant.

on

for a occupy with me and then we hastened "Where

"They

to restore

the sentries?"

are

have

moment

prevailed upon him to the placeof tte sentries, order in the guard-house. I

in,"

come

was

asked the

spectre appearedevery moment." fellows smart

a

severe

strokes of his

cane

to their

lieutenant.

reply,"because He

reprimand,and

the

the

gave the timorous

drove them

with

post. Glad

to come

some

off*

which was punishable for a misdemeanor with the easily er gauntlet, theyhastened back to their station ; but no soondid theyperceive the ghoststanding by the gate,than back they bounced again. The lieutenant then ordered the gate. a subaltern officer to open was Directly," the reply, and he fumbled about a long time as if he could not find the keys. At lengthhe began to proceedleisurely towards the had he set eyes on the self-styled gate ; but no sooner if the as shepherd,than he ran back to the guard-house devil had been at his heels. This subaltern was by no of good of the ordinary a person means stamp, but a man able who was education, distinguished by valuadvantageously so

"

attainments

above

most

of his

in rank,but he, equals

zed by Digiti;


DESEBTER's

THE

31

GHOST.

too, proved the influence of

the delusions of the "

and juvenile impressions, sober reason. over imagination

Will you let the

?" said the

out

man

in an officer,

of

gry an-

tone.

"Not

I,indeed,sir,"repliedhe peremptorily, handing

key to the lieutenant. The latter took it,and silently at opened the gate. The ghostbounded away, rejoiced not receiving somethingto take alongwith him. To judge from circumstances,Z. had designedly got up the farce of this apparition.In his generalconduct the

he manifested sessed

at

our

fondness for tricks of this kind.

that time

which, by few years

a

adventure

one

half.

end

to the

less than

put

an

I

pos-

thousand dollars, fifty

prank or other,he silly

one

to

property of

a

He

was

melted down

in

a

heartily gladthat

and that ithad town-talk,

from the sphere fresh weapons with superstition of experience for contending ; for many

furnished my

with

the spectre before itwas and from convinced,from experience,

of those who were

deemed are

reason

an

real.

had

unmasked,

seen

undeniable fact,that Incredulous

into the officer'sroom,

as

who

I

at

was

knows

what

least some

they apparitions

myself before what would

I went

have become

had this spectre acted a ghostlyphilosophy, and talked French, instead of littlemore consistently, rousingme from my dream of horror,and restoring my ! in High German presence of mind by a question of my

zed by Digiti;


32

GARRICK'S

GHOST.

In the records of his lifeby

read of a trick we Taylor, rf the great actor, who, like Brinsley Sheridan,had an visit for practical inkling jokes. It was on a professional Garrick was for King of Dr. Moncey. announced Lear on that night, and when Moncey saw him in bed, he expressed his surprise, and asked him if the playwas to be changed. Garrick was dressed,but had his nightcap drawn him to givethe apover was on, and a quilt pearance of beingtoo ill to rise. Dr. M. expressedhis it was time for Garrick to be at the theatre as surprise, to dress for King Lear. Garrick, in a languidand whiningtone, told him that he was too much indisposed **

to

perform himself,but that

Marr,

like him

so

in

there

him, and

was

the audience

sure

to trust

would

difference.

theatre,and let him doctor and

the quitted

hastened

room,

to the

Having by

the

scene

know

worse,

to

the result. As

attend the

soon

as

jumped out of the Moncey attended the

left Garrick

in

bed, he

before him, sometimes

he

order that he

Grarrick

theatre.

rable admi-

the part to

feel

was

the

bed

performance. dered bewil-

and doubting,

beingastonished at the resemblance At length, and Marr. that the finding

sometimes

Garrick

so

perceivethe

not

Pretendingthat he began to in requestedMoncey to leave the room might get a little sleep,but desired him

named

actor

an

face,and voice,and figure,

mimic, that he had ventured

a

was

zed by Digiti;

between audience


33 convinced

of Garrick's

Moncey began to identity, stantly him, and insuspect a trick had been practised upon hurried to Grarrick'shouse at the end of the play; but Garrick was too quick {(0 him, and was found by state of illness. These truths are Moncey in the same were

which

are

indeed strangerthan fiction.

zed by Digiti;


34

LORD

OF

APPARITION

William

It is affirmed that Lord the Mr.

of Dr.

care

WILLIAM

PETTY.

Petty,who

was

the hbrarian,and Priestley,

with inflammation of the

lungs,for which After

Mr.

seven,

Alsop was

few

bleman days,the young noseemed to be out of danger; but, on a sudden the surgeon was againsent for in the evening. relapse, It was night before this gentlemanreached Bowood, showed every object in unequivobut an unclouded moon cal the lodge distinctness. Mr. Alsophad passedthrough tonishment, gate, and was proceedingto the house,when, to his ashe saw Lord William coming towards him, in all the buoyancy of childhood,restored,apparently, to health and vigour. "*I am delighted, my dear lord,"

summoned

Bowood.

the Rev.

attacked,at the age of

Jervis,his tutor, was

der un-

to

he exclaimed, " to

see

you,

within doors

a

mediately but,for Heaven's sake,go im-

; it is

death

thistime of night." The child made

quicklyout hurried surprised,

of

round, was

to

distressand confusion,for Lord

few

minutes

This

sad

he before event

no

at

ing but,turnreply, speakably Alsop, un-

sight. Mr.

the house. William

here

all was

Here

had

expireda

reached the portico.

being with

Marquisof Lansdowne,

to be

to you

in

all speedannounced

London, orders

were

soon

to

the ceived re-

for the interment of the corpse and the arrangement of the funersd procession.The former was directed to take placeat High Wickham, in the vault at

Bowood

zed by Digiti;


APPARITION

which

OF

LORD

WILLIAM

contained the remains of Lord

35

PETTY.

WUlianVs mother;

the latterwas

to halt at two specified ing appointed placesdurthe two nightson which it would be on the road. Mr. Jervis and Dr. Priestley attended the body. On the firstday of the melancholy the lattergentleman, journey, of the appearwho had hitherto said littleon the subject ance to Mr. Alsop,suddenlyaddressed his companion

with considerable emotion are

some

very

event, Mr.

mournful

*

a

most

door

one

A

William

few weeks

morning,he

Doctor,'said he, what *

"

:

There

connected with this

remarkable

of the late Lord

engagement.

by his room :

circumstances singular

Jervis,and

dream

a

in nearly these words

tween coincidence beand

ago,

as

I

called me

is your

present

our was

ing pass-

his bedside

to

Christian

name

V

it is Joseph.' Well, then,* said I, you know Surely,' if you are Joseph^you rephedhe, in a hvelymanner, for me, which I had last night. I can a dream interpret dreamed, doctor,that I set out upon a longjourney; that I stoppedthe firstnightat Hungerford^whither I went without touching the ground; that I fiew from thence to Salt mil, where I remained the next night, and arrived the third day,where my dear mamat High Wickham on ma, beautiful as an angel,stretched out her arms and caughtme within them.' Now," continued the doctor, these are the placeswhere the dear child's precisely nightbefore corpse will remain on thisand the succeeding *

*

*

*

"

we

reach his mother's

vault,which

is

to receive finally

it." Now

here is a tissue of

events

as

strange as

theyare

might set myself to illustrate the state of Mr. Alsop's mind, were apparition by the agitated of this mysteriousstory,on it not for the utter fallacy cirtumstantial ; and

which

the late Rev.

I

Mr.

Jervis,of Brompton, whom

zed by Digiti;

I


36

GHOST

knew

it essential to

and esteemed,deemed in the year

marks"

that Mr. Warner

the

STORIES.

nature

"*

these you will learn signation, regardingthe " address,de-

error

and age of the Hon. William Granville Petty, and duration of his disorder, of and the name

the

placeof interment.'* And then it comes neither Dr. Priestley Mr. Jervis attended nor conversed

nor

Mr. who a

at any

time

on

out

that

the funeral,

the circumstance

;

and, regarding

Mr. Jervis, Alsop'sdeath-bed declaration,

in his intimate

was

Re"

From

1831.

is in

publish

thinguntilMr.

Warner's

heard of such

confidence,never volume

This strange story,believed

was

pointedout

by good and

wise

to

men,

him. volved in-

seemingmystery, until we read in Mr. Jervis's Remarks" one simplesentence in reference to the gentlemen the first told that it whom enthusiasm was by him to entertain some of his nature predisposed visionary and romantic notions of supernatural appearances." a

**

**

"

zed by Digiti;


38

STORIES.

GHOST

he would to

way

leapoverboard those

and

boats,close

to

under

swun

which

all the

water

suddenly

he would

the men on guard,who would take terrify him for a water spirit. into The bet was accepted ; Burnet stripped, sprung the water, and was out of sight.The crew ran presently the guardon forward,and all fixed their eyes steadfastly of seeinghim rise. They waited in boats,in expectation and

emerge,

taken his appearance, for he had underthan he could accomplish.A considerable

vain ; he did not make more

elapsed: all hopesof ever whollyextinguished ; he must time

All and were

seeinghim agafnwere have perished. certainly uneasiness and dismay, in the utmost board were on those who had wageredwith him, and who especially in some tormented by the idea that they were now

measure

accessary

This

to

his death.

melancholyevent

of the whole

crew.

At

threw

the

damp

dusk. Walker

of his friends to his cabin,where

companionwas

a

the

over

retired with

spirits some

the lossof their agreeable

and by only,

no

means

pic cheeringto-

of their conversation.

The

party broke up, and the Captainwent

to

bed in

a

of

His mind was so deeply extraordinary dejection. engagedwith the lamentable fate of his friend,that he found it impossible had thus lain for a conto sleep. He siderable dow shone bright time ; the moon throughthe winof the cabin,when he perceived that the door opened. He turned his eyes that way, and discovered something state

which

could

resembled

not

but astonish him, for he fancied that it

human

from figure.Presently recovering his surprise, he would fain have persuadedhimself that it was and onlya phantom of his disturbed imagination, a

looked another way.

His eyes, however, turned instinct-

zed by Digiti;


iK9

SPIRIT.

"WATER

THE

which he now saw plainly object, ivelyto the mysterious the exact approachinghim, and in which he recognised he ^vas figureof his deceased friend. At this moment seized with extorted

a

horror which

of agony

tones involuntary

soul,and

his inmost

shook

his

from

heaving

bosom. The

mate, who

used

to

sleepbehind

the cabin

steerage, was not yet in bed,and heard the loud and evidently voice," Who agitated

the

near

Captaincry you ?"

are

in

a

He

Burnet's light ; but,on perceiving in a morning gown, he fell senseless on word. the floor without uttering a single The nocturnal intruder now proved himself to be a from this humane and compassionate manifesting, spirit, the utmost for the revival of the mate, moment, atixiety

in ran instantly spirit wrapped

who

with

a

half dead with fear.

was

The

to a

spectreran

bottle

stood in the window, held it to the poor fellow's nose, and rubbed his templeswith the liquor. of

which spirits

The

Captain,who the

kind

from his

recover

This

serving objoint, spirit, began to

in every stilllaytrembling

officiousness of the

terror.

his supposed spectre completely dispelled

and

ishment aston-

when, without relaxingfor a consternation,

lifelessmate, he apparently thus addressed the Captain: My dear friend," for it I beg your pardon: other than Burnet himself was no his attentions to the

moment

"

"

"

"

I

am

round

afraid I have the

window.

carried

the

joketoo

shipand got in again,unobserved,at This

result I had

not

I

far.

calculated

on

swam

the cabin ; for my

to convince was onlyobject you of the natural terror occasion the boldest, which usually on even overpowers

You are now, I dare say, of such appearances. convinced of this oft-contestedtruth."

thoroughly

zed by Digiti;


40

STORIES.

GHOST

Walker

from to be thus awaked sincerely rejoiced his frightful dream, and to know that his friend,whom he had believed to be dead, was stillliving.But, while he cheerfully and acknowledgedthat he was vanquished the convinced,he did not fail to recommend perfectly mate

to

sham

was

his friend'sbest efforts, lest his revival from

death should

be marked

by

a

the real death of the

poor fellow.

Mr. Burnet's ;

and

but

endeavours no

did the

sooner

him

to recover mate

not

were

himself,

to

come

successful un-

the

who inadvertently supposedghost, stood justbefore him, than again, with terror, overcome he relapsed into his former senseless state. immediately set his eyes on

then retired from the cabin,to call others

Burnet

assistance of the unfortunate lost; consequently

; and

man

for allto whom

much

to

time

he

appliedwere unexpectedappearance

the was

more

of one at the frightened whom theyregardedas drowned, so that he had great with all his arts of persuasion, to convince difficulty,

less

or

that he

them

The

himself.

unfortunate

of his

use

was

shock, and

mate

Nature

senses. reason

was

the

recovered

never

had

sustained

driven,as

it were,

too

complete a

severe

from her

seat

unluckyhour his mental faculties afterwards could seemed to be stupefied ; and he never in the face,though he be broughtto look Mr. Burnet been one of the most courageous of men, had previously and had undauntedly braved death in many a danger.

for

ever.

Thus

the

From

that

terminated Burnet's

extend

soon

incredulous person may be overcome and how far the fear natural to every person may the so easily deluded senses. its influence over

of imagination ;

experimentto try how

an

His adventure shows

us, at the

same

time,that it may

zed by Digiti;

be


THE

WATER

41

SPIRIT.

dangerousto attempt to convince the reason by attacking the imagination or ; that it betraysbut littlekindness of feeling the soul in a manner, thus to dissect, delicacy of a friend out of mere curiosity ; and that it is unpardon in one who is impressedwith the able temerity, even of supernatural fullestconviction of the nonentity ances, appearhimself to any trial by which human to expose a ingenuity may put him and his courage to too severe test.

4"

zed by Digiti;


42

THE

FRIAR'S

PALACE

in 1692, birth, the renowned of

AT

beautiful Aurora

The

to

to

IMPERIAL

VIENNA.

Konigsmark had just given

became, in the sequel, Saxe, when Augustus II.,Elector

himself from her arms,

Saxony,tore

opposingthe

THE

the infant who

Marshal

call of honour

IN

GHOST

Hungary, where

the

followed the

and

Imperialarmy

was

Turks.

dangers^d the of war formed so disagreeable to the a contrast hardships that Augustus soon grew magicfestiritiesof Moritzburg, The

weary

camp

was

of his

new

not

a

career

harem.

;

and

The

at

the end

of the

paign cam-

he

the army, returning quitted by way of Vienna for the purpose of paying his respects to the Emperor. tinction Leopoldreceived and treated the Elector with such disand attention, Protestant princehad ever as no before experienced at the Austrian court. The easy and agreeablemanner of Augustus paralyzed, for a time,the Spanishetiquette of that court, and gave

rise

Elector.

to

a

series of brilliant /e7e"in honour

Equalityof

of the

of disposition, similarity between him and Joseph, soon produceda close friendship King of the Romans, which seemed to the courtiers to be of a political and therefore attracted universal tendency, voured notice. In order to discover the secret, theyendeato involve the Elector in love-intrigues ; but this the proudand volupstratagemat firstfailed. At length age, and

zed by Digiti;


43 of fascination, Esterle tried her powers hanished from his soon lovelyAurora was

Countess

luous

the

and

thoughts. the rapture of the first enjoyment

Intoxicated with

Augustus

yet

was

he received

when

reveUingin

without delayto repaired his astonishment well perfectly

attend the

his apartment

;

King.

hut what

He was

find this

whom he had left prince, and precedingnight,pale,perturbed,

to

the

to

summons

a

delicious morning dreams,

indeed half delirious in bed. "Good

"

What

?

matter

A

exclaimed

God!"

the

Elector,"what

has

happened to your Majesty?" ing adventure," repUed Joseph,collectfrightful

most

himself; "you shall hear, and I tremble

alongwith

horrid

most

certain you

am

nightI was apparitionthat,perhaps,ever me.

Last

I had been in bed about two of this chamber

flew open

the idea that it was but

is the

my

with

page,

reprimandedhim

visited by the terrified mortal.

hours, when a

the door

great noise.

I did not

undraw

Under my

:

tain, cur-

me. severelyfor disturbing

Judge,however, what was my terror, when all at once heard the rattling stood a of chains, and near me white figure, which, in a hollow,frightful tone, thus me

will

I

tall dressed ad-

"

which is enduring King Joseph! behold in-me a spirit the pains of purgatory, and is commissioned by a to thee,that,by thyfriendship higherpower to announce for the Elector of Saxony,thou wilt infallibly plungethyself and into the abyssof destruction. I come to warn, "

to

*

save or

"With

thee.

Renounce, then, this unhallowed

expect

damnation everlasting

this threat the

and, as

!'

clankingof

frightfettered

my

tion, connec-

chains

was

doubled, re-

tongue, the spectre

zed by Digiti;


44

GHOST

: proceeded

*

What, Joseph! dost thou

Wilt thou have the the

STORIES.

not

answer,

to defythe Almighty? audacity

kindness,is the favour of

a

mortal of

if thou art then resolved to continue

the Elector,thy destruction and his With

these words the to

not

agony

attendants.

After

and my difficulty, "

to

I

am

now

amend

my

I

sins.

am

to

every ; and

thy intercourse with are

inevitable.*{

vanished,and figure

be described.

Is

value

more

thee than the grace of Grod,to whom thou owest for thy answer thing? In three days I will come

"

?

me

I had not

power

leftme

in

call my

to

time I rang my bell with great valet found me almost insensible. some

somewhat

more

and hope life,

; for I am tranquil to

obtain

for you, onlyapprehensive

resolved

of my forgiveness and therefore conjure

: throw holyreligion yourself into the bosom of that church throughwhich alone there of eternal life." is salvation, and thus assure yourself Here the King finished his narrative, which cost him manifest efibrt, and sunk exhausted on his pillow. The confounded and affected to reply. Elector was too much and probabilities considered the possibiUties He silently could of this mysterious occurrence ; but his sober reason the extraordinary cumstance cirnot find any groundfor attributing to supernatural agency. his friend that the He endeavoured at firstto persuade dream, the phantom was nothingbut a lively apparition of a morbid imagination assured : but the King repeatedly him he knew, alas ! but too well,that it was a reality ; that he was awake, and that his statement was perfectly

you

to

embrace

our

accurate. "

But," said the Elector, may "

it not have been

a

ful wil-

?" deception

with genuinegrandezza,refused Joseph,

for a moment

zed by Digiti;


46

GHOST

STORIES.

voice ; but it King Joseph!" began a sepulchral was preventedfrom proceeding by the Herculean arm of the Elector,who seized the apparition by the throat,and What dashed it on the floor. impudent scoundrel art hind thou ?" thundered the Elector. The King trembled behis curtain for the fate of Augustus. "

**

^Maria !" shrieked the spectre

Jesus !

"

For God's sake !" I What

"

"

"

"

am

Mercy ! "

Pater.''

a

!" cried the Elector

"

thou

^**

art

! then spirit

a

purgatory,whence thou art come.*' had, meanwhile, opened the window, and with

hie thee back He

to

a

rolled the

pretendedghostover of the Imperialpalace. The the Toofe of the buildings and accelerated chains clanked amid the stillnessof night, the fall. The noise broughta sentinel on dutyat the palaceto the spot, and in the unluckyspectre he recognised of the King's confessor. a dependent did not expect to b^ thus The miserable wretch certainly loud shriek,down long,

for so honourable

remunerated almost in has spirit

a

mission.

pieces,and expiredin not

been known

to

have

few

a

of the

countenance

King.

and vowed, on intrigue, expel all the Jesuits from

He

was

now

to

the country.

did

not

dismiss

keep his a

word

;

imposedupon. This {^ventureexcited

the

the throne,

to

ever, Time, how-

able to scarcely been so egregiously

was

he had

an

at

of this rash resolve ; he

indeed,he

confessor, by whom

in expressed

incensed

his accession

the vehemence

dashed

hours, but his

base

moderated

was

returned from purgatory.

ever

and indignation, Shame, horror, were the

He

sensation extraordinary

at

Vienna, and strong interest and admiration in behalf of the Elector.

The

Emperor Leopoldalone expressedhis

zed by Digiti;


THE

FRIAB*S

47

GHOST.

at this precipitate conduct displeasure

at a

foreigncourt,

evidentlycolder towards Augustus, who seemed not to observe the change,finished his intrigue with the ambitious HungarianCountess,and then quitted Vienna in triumph. The cunning fathers of the Societyof Jesus were for that time, to relinquish the plantheyhad matured, obliged, in their net one of the most for catching powerful had so essentially apostatesof Grermany,whose ancestors But it was onlyfor a time. promotedthe Reformation. could not on this occasion accomplish, What priestcraft afterwards by an unluckylonging after efi^cted soon was became

and

the Polish

The

crown.

same

very

Augustus, who

had

of Protestantism, defended the principles zealously his solemn recantation of the faith deposited voluntarily of his forefathers in the hands of the Cardinal- Archbishop of an Imaginarydignity, he was, In possession of Raab. so

the

in

involved sequel,

which difficulties,

in

obscured

series of humiliations and

a

his

and glory,

cooled the

tachment at-

of his honest Saxons. He

continued tillhis death in what faith. He

now

and his annals

even

true

nocturnal

suffered

is

styledthe only to walk at pleasure, spirits

that he treated all subsequent relate,

with peculiar apparitions complaisance.

zed by Digiti;


48

Previous of

to

the

FRIEDRICHSHALL.

the French

continental

peoplein as

OF

BEAR

THE

Revolution,there

Europe

soldiers.

common

so

was

no

class

tious superstithoroughly who

Men

would

readily

deadlybreach" would of seeinga ghost. tremble and fly at the bare apprehension Napoleon'satheistical myrmidons changed all this ; but the following story will illustratethe state of thingsat a periodwhen soldiershad not become so brave as to fear

periltheir lives in

the

neither God,

nor

man,

Charles

When

**

imminent

the devil.

XII.

of

Sweden

besiegingthe

was

in Norway, in the winter of the Friedrichshall, nightbetween twelve and one o'clock, year 1718, one town

of

somethingthat had the appearance of a huge bear was in the place, not far from the powder-magazine. perceived His tremendous roar as he approacheddrove the sentries that from their post,and terrifiedthem to such a degree, that the declaring they ran breathless to the guard-house, devil in the form of For

a

bear haunted

that part of the

this violationof their duty the

put in irons,and with

they had

subaltern

a a

was

fresh party

deserted.

to

men

These, however,

monster

them, and that he had

the post which the

flight.They to meet straight

to

had advanced vomited

to

with together

betook themselves subaltern,presently that the protested

instantly mediately proceedim-

were

ordered occupy

town.

flames of firefrom his

gaspingjaws.

zed by Digiti;


BEAR

THE

received directions

officernow

An

49

FRIEDRICHSHALL.

OF

with

to go

cient forceand siftthe story of this formidahle the

to

bottom

:

but after their arrival

to shaggy quadruped were probablybecause the clock

the

The

very

hour

same

with

the two

post, the subaltern

seen.

When

the

to

troops for

parade,and that at the

was

spectresand

had

vanished, one

;

for

imps are visible apparitions. ing adher-

caused the soldiers

war,

that it was

the

guard-dutywere

devil whom

drawn

up

their different posts, among

on

which

allotted to them, those powder-magazine,

the watch

whom

the

who had abandoned their parties not excepted, to be hanged. They

died in the firm conviction

they had

his

of

morning the rigidcommandant,

next

belongingto

It had

struck already

letterof the articlesof

to the

the

had

suffi

apparition

traces

no

seen.

that the devil and

it is well known

onlyin

be

a

there between

the hours

of eleven

be preassignedcould not by any means vailed Since we have the choice," to do their duty. on said they, of havingour heads screwed off by the devil, would rather or being tucked up by the hangman, we die by the hand of the latter than fallinto the tremendous and

was

one

"

"

claws of Beelzebub." The

who

commandant,

from among

the

them

knew

all his

selected

men,

and promisedeach intrepid, of them, who would undertake the midnightdutyat the twelve ducats and promotion to a halpowder-magazine, bert. After a longpause, two sturdyPomeranians offered of to take the duty at the two posts in the front and rear but onlyon that each post the condition, the building, most

should this time consist of of their Two

more

comrades were

should

two

and

men,

agree

to

that

two

accompany

found, and accordingly

others them.

the four resolute

5

zed by Digiti;


50

GHOST

8TOBIE8.

their muskets with after loading fellows,

providingthem

and

fresh

with

a

brace of

balls,

flints, repairedto their

posts. The became

whole

and

more

intense the

more

hour

approached. Not the guard-house ; not

of

in fearful

was garrison

a snore a

which expectation,

heard

was

the dreadful

nearer on

the benches

subaltern narrated his achievements;

drummer

playedmerry-andrewtricks;a dead silence everyivhereprevailed. At the powderwith quickstrides, magazinethe four sentries, paced up and down their beat, at the same time repeating their not

prayers

a

aloud. dreaded hour arrived,and with the last stroke of

The

the clock

low

a

heard

growlwas

at a

distance.

The

faint

glimmeringof fire was soon afterwards discerned. The and the infernal bear himbecame more self frightful, roaring without waitingthe appeared. Two of the sentries, nearer one approachof the monster, ran away ; a third, of the Pomeranians, in the act of takingaim, fell to the ground and broke his arm ; and the fourth,his countryman, what he

alone fired.

But

seemed

to likely

most

destined

was

wounded."

The

made The

towards

moment,

animal, with

horrid

of

be

roar,

he also took to his heels.

had

givenstrict orders,that if any during the night,it should be instantly

;

and

follow him the

at this critical

the truth experience cannot adage,that "spirits

him, and

commandant

his foe,or

either missed

him

tremendous

thing occurred reportedto him. to go

had

learn from

well-known

the ancient

now

to

he

A

subaltern

but before he returned,an meet ;

the

goblin. He

spatched deaccordingly

was

old

resolved captain

ordered

a

sergeant to

the latter refused,tillthe drawn

captainforced

him

to

obey.

zed by Digiti;

sword of


"Without door monster

of

losing

the

moment,

a

buUding,

such

sprawling."

"

Page

a

he

blow

gave on

the the

bear, which

head

with

the

was

hatchet,

51.

zed Digiti;

groiiing

by

as

at

the

laid the


zed by Digiti;


62

OR, THE

BARBITO;

A

the

During

SPECTRE

SPANISH

OF

TALE.

reignof PhilipII. a

Lopez,resided of Cuenza, vicinity Don

the bank

on

CUENZA.

rich

named hidalgo,

of the

Xucar, in the

the farthest

extremityof New Castile. He had a good heart,good health, a good table, in all respectsa happy man and many friends. He was : he feared Grod,he loved the King, he respected the Holy all that in those days a good Office ; in a word, he was Spaniardoughtto be, for his peace, his honour, and his at

eternal salvation.

Lopez dailyblessed

Don

done," said he, is

pleasedto

the

"

me

?

I have

greatestnation in the world

its glory; I have served under Francis

I. taken

"What

have

merit the favours with which

to

load

his fate.

prisonerat

the ; I

honolir

1

Heaven

to

belongto

have had my

share in

the great captain, and Pa via.

home

At

seen

I have

-

nothingto wish for : my wife is a pattern of virtue,and the same her propensities are as mine : whatever exactly she says is justwhat I would have said,except, indeed, that I think it a great deal better said by her ; and she the trouble of scolding domestics, our even spares me who

often deserve it.

very

complaint ^the want "

must

expect

some

relationswhom

have

We

of children

but

one

who voluntary family,

leave

never

surround

me

of

in this life we

j" but

I have disappointments. I tenderly love,and who

affection; and friends who

cause

me

for my

young return

tant dismy

theyform a and happiness

zed by Digiti;

:


THE

for their own.

My

SPECTRE

OF

friends are

53

CUENZA.

attached

to me

;

theyare

I know not how it peopleof excellent understandings. for happensthat theyare alwaysin my way of thinking, why should they stoop to flatter me ? I give them a dinner,to be sure, but a dinner is not worth purchasing at such a price. Is not Father Ignacio, of my guesls, one accustomed lives upon nothing^^^'^ to say, that man This good prior of Hieronimites actuall^ad of a convent this adage in his mouth ; but he gave a decided preference and the game of Badajoz, of Cuenza to the pullets and never drank wine of Biscaywhen he could get that

of La Mancha. One

of his around

wish disturbed single happiness. He was him

the

good Lopez in the

desirous of

midst

those afibrding

and

extraordinary gratification, which should heightenthe degree of felicity that he thoughteach of them shared with him. Long were his and at lengthhe hit meditations directed to this subject, but in the upon an expedient.He resolved to disappear, serious manner, when he dies most as a person disappears and is buried. He smiled when he figured to himself the sudden changewhich he should perceive in the faces of his dear kinsmen and his worthyfriends. What an what an unexpected, what an overpowering exquisite, transition from profoundgriefto extravagantjoy,when he should drop in among them as from the clouds,and theyshould hear him say, Weep no more, here I am !" I suspect how he came by this idea. It was not very longsince Charles Y. in his convent in Estremadura, had exhibited the ceremony of his own funeral,and Lopez than a week determined to follow his example. No more cution. elapsedbetween the formation of this designand itsexesome

new

"

5*

zed by Digiti;


64

GHOST

Don

Lopez

had

STORIES.

attendant who

an

counterpart of the

servant

him. Listen,and

he

of the Centurion.

worse

and

perfect

He

and silent,

listened ; Be

silent; Follow,and he followed.

illness;he grew

the

was

said he

to

was

Lop"z firstfeigned

Don

There

worse.

was

not

a

physicianhut admitted this,since he refused,and for a good reason, to submit to be bled ; and accordingto the of Madrid, theyhad, as a preliminaof the faculty ry practice of that kind. step, proposedfour operations he was givenover and his case declared hopeAt length less. His servant, the

onlyperson

suffered to

collected the scattered

attend him in this criticalmoment, of

he

whom

providedfor the purpose ; he hastily figure somethingwhich bore no bad resemblance to put together Don Lopez : the real one slunk away by a private staircase, for several hours on the and had been galloping highroad to Cadiz, with the intention of embarking for his image was the Low Countries,when removed to be to the great church of Cuenza. conveyedin procession members

a

Meanwhile

all the bells of Cuenza

in

were

motion,and

the

escorted by the clergyand the was dressed-up figure familyin deep mourning. The whole cathedral was hung with black ; itsfive naves and all the chapelswere illuminated;Father Ignaciodelivered the funeral sermon, and the singers performeda Deprofundiain such a that the impression made by it is not yet forgotten. style, Don

Lopez had meanwhile to

while

away

absence,he determined the army

justin

Cluentin,and

to

time

reached

the Low

the six months to to

go to

share

lose the Uttle

the

of his intended He

wars.

in the

of finger

that engagement. This accident was the Mercury of the time,but under

tries: Coun-

of victory

joined Saint

his lefl hand in inserted in

even

the

of designation

zed by Digiti;


THE

* *

Don

*

SPECTRE

OF

55

CXnCNZA.

for,as

be imagined,Don Lopez may easily preservedthe strictestincognito.His faithful servant ;

Pedrillo rejoined him, and informed him of allthe

lars particu-

related above;

only,that he might not divert his from his plan, he was master to which tached, atexceedingly he acquainted him with but a small part of the griefwhich his supposeddeath had occasioned,and thus lefthim in the full enjoymentof the pleasure of being time Pedrillo did not deeply regretted.At the same conceal the circumstance,that,on quitting the house on some plausible wanting pretext or other,which is never occasions,of all the friends

such

on

bidden adieu,Barbito the

trouble

was

the

whom

one

to

he had

whom

it had cost him

prevailupon to remain at Cuenza. Barbito was a Pyrennean dog reared by Don Lopez. This animal was for his beauty, equallydistinguished and fidelity. Don roughly Lopez was thocourage, strength, most

to

sensible of the attachment

of his dear

of his master, which, since the disappearance to

that

thingsthat

his

on

return

partHdgesto cheek

on

his

had

dog should

feast upon,

the 28th of

belongedto and

than

who

enlist under

risk.

whole

ferred trans-

was

He

vowed

rabbits and

olla

August, the

of giventhis grateful prcx)f

Those

an

have

him.

Barbito,

podridato day on which

his

own

he had

remembrance. the banners of Mars

run

more

Don

taken prisoner Lopez was by a who conducted him to his knightof Lower Bretagne, and there kept him confined tillthe peace, that is castle, tedious years. to say, for the space of two During all this time Don Lopez heard not a single word of Castile, and saw nothingfrom the windows of his dungeon but the chimneysof Gluimpercorentin. one

Meanwhile

several incidents had occurred

at

zed by Digiti;

Cuenza,


56

STORIES.

GHOST

griefexcited by the such to be lasting:

The acute

emotions

it not

; were

Castilian

good

might make taken

care

the

a

to

as

a

Donna

will

Beatrix,for that

was

observed,a discreet woman,

he

not

moved

her

and

chair from

a

it had stood for upwardsof fifteenyears.

found in the

was

of the supposed writing-desk nephews,who had looked forward

succession of their beloved uncle,attacked this sole

comma

in

full point, and

a a

that there

lawyer discovered placewhere there oughtto

support of the widow. a

heart.

and, that prudenceitself,

was

have

we

defunct ; but the dear

was

be unable to endure

findinghis house as he left it,he had bequeathto his wife the full and free possession

placein which

to the

too

all violent

with

the human

lover of order that she had

The

Lopez was

sure

was,

such

case

should

excuses

of all his property. name,

is the

so, we

them, and this it is that The

death of Don

A

where particle

have

been

there should have

been

The matter referred to the corregidor, was conjunction. to the oydorsof the royaltribunal of by the corregidor cery Valencia,and by these oydorsto the oydorsof the chana

of

Grenada, who,

on

of the fatal comma,

account

the widow. The nephews unanimouslydecided against of the estates of Don were accordingly put into possession Lopez. Donna Beatrix was allowed to retain the house alone : as her habits were and her wishes moderate, frugal her stock of remained in the same as her wardrobe place, chocolate in the same cupboard,and the cage of her she was corner, dejected parrot in the same onlybecause

the loss of the suit reminded

her

of the

loss of her

husband. The

afifair, however, became

the talk of the whole

provinces. Don country and the neighbouring havingregainedhis

Lopez and being put quiteout of liberty,

zed by Digiti;


OF

SPECTRE

THE

57

CtTENZA.

returned as exciting surprise, inn at Saragossa, at least, as he departed.At an speedily, informed of what had passed: he was somewhat he was ccoiceit with the idea of

astonished,but had much

that his presence would astonish his nephews,and restore thingsto

more

doubt

no

their proper order. Instead,however, of the magnificent and in the to give, entertainment which he had designed midst of which

he

to

was

the

drop from

sky,to

his

own

; the firstthing great joy and that of the whole company he did was to run home, and tellhis wife that it was all a

joke,and

that for the

rest

he

intended

had

to return

sooner.

in the sitting chair,on the same same spot,and engaged in the same that is,in making a dress for Our as formerly, occupation He towards her with all the ran Lady of Cuenza. He

in,and

went

of

eagerness

an

found

Donna

Beatrix

afifectionatehusband.

Beatrix

Donna

of him, but most certainly thinking Don Lopez. No sooner she never to see expected him than she crossed herself, and falling did she perceive image of Saint Jagode Comupon her knees before an cried she, "pray "Ah, my dear husband!" postella, I never please did any thingto disdon't hurt me ; you know you." Don Lopez keptadvancing. "Ah ! dear, her face with her Holy Virgin!" exclaimed she, covering

have might,perhaps,

hands,

"

again,go repose, I

do

not

back !

touch

me

to

to

a

husband

dear

my

soul

wants

promisethat plentyof

but,for Heaven's

for

me,

If your

it ;

The

been

masses

go back any thing for its shall be said for ;

sake, go back, or you will frighten

death !" his wife mistook him

findingthat good hidalgo,

spectre,and that she

his explanation, knew

was

not

too

much

whether

to

to listen agitated

laughor

zed by Digiti;

to weep

;


"b

GHOST

but,with

a

view the to the

he hurried

STORIES.

to revive efiectuaily

more

of

convent

justdone

father had

of Gallicia, for missionary It to his

own

use.

the evil

which order

to

This

spirits,

Hieronimites,and

stairsto the apartment of the Reverend The

her

Father

copyingthe of

the purpose

ran

up

Ignacio. of

sermon

a

appropriating

treated of all the appearances

sermon

is capable of assuming in spirit

tempt the handmaids

of the

Lord, and

to be

was

delivered enza.

in each of the six nunneries of Cusuccessively had Don Lopez entered,and opened his Scarcely

mouth

to

make

himself known

monk, who

was

grievedat

the

to

his old friend, when

the

fullof his subject, and very farfrom a freethinker, stared at him all aghast. Poor Don Lopez,

frightin

which

he had

not

less astonished

him

forcibly by the sleeve. The siesta after a good dinner,and

his

at the

fixed attitude of

pulled Ignacio, roused from jolly prior, divided between

he attacked in his

fear of the devil whom the

lefthis wife,and

the and

sermon,

the devil Lopez,which, as he thought, alone could have assumed, scamperedout at the door left open ; and, without once which was lookingbehind him, leftthe fieldof battleto Don Lopez,or rather to the of figure

Don

evil spirit.

Lopez quittedthe his

nephews.

convent, and

firstmet

He

with the younger, and asked The young man, who disbelieved

if he did not know

him.

the

burst ghosts,

existence

of

to straightway

went

laugh.

into a

"

Grod

I have found cried Lopez, here,at least, praised," "

person !" how was

he

Upon

his wife and not : he was

the

this he

beganto

priorhad

hidalgoLopez,who

tional ra-

relateto his nephew

taken

him

for what

assured him, that,so far from

stillflesh

one

be

he

beinga spirit, and bone ^his dear uncle,the good had always cherished a particular "

zed by Digiti;


60

GHOST

fess what

of him, and to possession order and class he belonged. The good hidalgo the firstsix glasses which he was out stoutly against

what held

forced

demon

swallow

to

taken

when

; but

he

extended

was

a

upon

funnel thrust into his mouth, to prodigious his courage the dose of the fatal liquid, triple

table,and double

had

STORIES.

a

or

have confessed himself

forsook him, and he would

to be

but for a tremendous devil of any class theypleased, resounded throughthe dreary noise which suddenly vauhs,

a

and diverted the attention of his

tormentors.

blast that burst from the horn of

The

or Astolpho,

the walls of

the trumpets of Israel when

Jericho,could alone be wakened The

seat

the

which

arrived

; poor

that the last their knees, thinking

Lopez raised

Don

dropped from turned pale; inquisitor ; the pen

"

got scent of his ; he

master

near

had followed him

himself

on

his

the hands of the secretary; it was

the terribleBarbito. the affectionate,

mites

sound

allthe echoes of this abode of silenceand of terror.

familiars fellupon

day had

they overthrew compared to the

from

Barbito,the faithful., He

the convent

had

accidentally

of the Hieroni-

from street to street, to the

the jailers from fear,and the dogs Inquisition ; where had permitted him to enter. out of friendship, of the prison continued to seek his furious, Barbito,restless, impatient, him, and overturning master ; he perceived every thing in his way, leapedupon the table ; and havingfor a considerable time licked his hands, at lengthlaydown at be now who durst approach to any one his feet. Wo

him !

Lopez. But for him could have expected nothingmilder than to his master after figuring in an auto defe: but for life, be imprisoned of his dog was the testimony a ray of lightthat comBarbito

changedthe

fate of Don

zed by Digiti;


"'Burbito, restless,impatient, perceived

him,

tabXer"Paffe

and

overturning

furious, eontinned every

thing

in

to

his

his

seek

way,

master;

leaped

60.

zed Digiti;

by

upon

he

the


zed Digiti;

by


61

CUENZA.

OF

SPECTRE

THE

who the secretary. This littleman, a most nious ingegreat scholar,was justthen printing Barbito afforded dissertationon the souls of brutes.

convinced pletely a

was

additional argument in favour of his system, and Don

an

strated Lopez reapedthe benefit of this. The secretarydemonto

be

cannot

that a dog is Inquisitor, objectedto in any country.

the

besides,that Don that he had which

was

throughhis The

not

was

perceivedthe the case generally not

a

devil in

at

the

with

sightof

passed

Lopez and Barbito this

if he would, that his perceived,

She of her way. extremelymethodical : for two out

styleof a widow, a

disguise, was,

those who

But the

her fears.

affectionovercame

that of

proved,

hands.

Beatrix;

much

What

least smell of brimstone,

secretary accompaniedDon

Donna

have

Lopez

witness who

a

wife

;

and

the

was

and her fondness for Don dissatisfaction had

witness,conjugal

might goodhidalgo put her very

return we

have

observed,

years she had lived in the found herself obliged to resume

now

but such

as

was,

to

goodnessof her disposition,

Lopez, that the shadow

of

and an hour afterwards she passed, thoughtof nothingbut the happinessof seeinghim again. The wife of Don Lopez was the onlyperson that followed the example of Barbito. The nephews,who had inherited his property, would never acknowledge him, and merelyadmitted that he bore some resemblance to the deceased. Father Ignacio entrenched himself behind his funeral discourse. The question tution concerningthe restisoon

of the property

not

was

discussed

; Don

recovered

Lopez

of the confusion because, exclusively nothing, which a retrograde in families, the cormovement creates regidorof Cuenza, the royalaudienza of Valencia,and

the

chanceryof Grenada,

could

not

be wrong.

6

zed by Digiti;


62

GHOST

little secretary,who

The

Don woman

whom without

to

Lopez, had the

Titian

a

supportedhis sister who

was

book in patronizing firstwaiting-

king'smistress,Donna Clara de Mendoza, then painting was as Venus Anadyomene,

other habiliment than

of oriental pearls as woman

STORIES.

introduced

a

necklace

and

bracelets

The waitinglargeas pigeon's eggs. Don Lopez and his dog to Donna

Clara. The

first act of kindness

certainly proceededfrom a fails to guide the woman ; in that sex, the heart never Donna Clara representedevery thing to the head. of Don Lopez. monarch, from Blirbitoto the littlefinger She considered onlyhis misfortunes and his goodnessof heart ; the king,on the other hand, beheld the services of who had never asked a favour,and settled a brave Spaniard, a pension upon him. Don Lopez purchasedthe work of the little secretary, which the reader has here perused, and wrote the history to warn any one who should have a fancyto return like himself to him, to take the prudentprecautionto cause be firstrecognised by his Barbito.

zed by Digiti;


63

OF

DANGER

THE

FEAR

THE

the end

Towards

TAMPERING

WITH

GHOSTS.

OF

of the firstquarter of the last

tury, cen-

ghostsand the fear of supernatural appearances began here and there to be considered as sillyand dangerous. About this periodsome young and their studies at who Vienna, were men pursuing manifested a strong desire lived on friendly terms together, and superstitious notions to shake offallthe prejudices in which theyhad been broughtup. They soon perceived, slow that it was however, degreesthat onlyby of this objectcould be accomplished one ; nevertheless, them, named JosephBemhardi, who was apt to talk rather big,insisted that,at the age of twenty-two,he had long since completely conqueredthe grossest of his former for instance,the dread of apparitions. prejudices, the belief in

Yes," said

"

as

you hurt us

of his

that devils and ;

I

is much

God

one

am

too

as

companions,

"

spectres have

firmlyconvinced

as

to

nurse

is no whom

such

thingas

the

she threatened

give

me

wholly

cannot

silly gossipof my though I know there

and hobgoblin to

well

the power to be that you can Father to abandon

graciousand tender a of evil spirits ; but stillI

relative to this subject.And

as

not

the power free myself from the influence of the us

I know

the black

in order to

and laugh at all such nonsense quiet, of some connection feeling inexplicable

;

man

keep

stillan

to me

obscure

of nightand dark-

zed by Digiti;


64

STORIES.

GHOST

occupationsof invisible spirits pervades my mind, and, in spiteof my better convictions and the with

ness

the

of reason,

arguments

I cannot particular,

I cannot

late

pass

entirely suppress at nightby the

it.

In

charnel-

with coohiess and composure; church-yard and I alwaysquickhorror comes over an involuntary me, en satisfied that the thoroughly my pace, though I am dead will lie quietly enough in their graves, and that house of

our

those

whom

to

have

the bones in the not

Bemhardi and ^as "

to

do

us

at laughedheartily sparingof sarcastic

not

For my

the power

charnel-house

the least injury."

this frank confession, remarks

his friend.

on

I would he, boastfully,

part,"added

longed be-

once

"

engage

into the vault close to the charnel-house, to-night there a few days since a and give the corpse deposited alarm." the slightest slapin the face,without feeling of his swaggering, His friends, took him at account on his word. As to the slapin the face,"said they, we will cheerfully excuse you and the poor corpse from that ; but we shall expect you to prove to-night, between twelve and one, that you are capable of doingwhat you assert, shall allconsider you as an arrant braggart, who has or we where it oughtto be." a heart in his mouth, but none to

go

"

Bemhardi seemed

"

was

to doubt

almost offended because his

assurance,

and

his

companions

declared that he

was

requiredtest. One of the with the familyto whom the students was acquainted and found means vault in question to procure belonged, the key. In the evening,the party assembled at Bemthe arhardi's apartments, and awaited with impatience rival o'clock at length struck. of midnight. Twelve They gave the resolute Bernhardi the key to the vault quitereadyto

and

a

submit

fork,which, to

to

the

prove

that he had

been there, really

zed by Digiti;


66

STORIES.

GHOST

which, by their pressure, tended stillmore

alreadyobstructed of them

circulationof the blood.

then took him

home, while

some

his back

on

for a doctor,or

ran

and

were

impede the

to

The

est strong-

carried him otherwise

cupied oc-

tunate for the recovery of their unforlost in useless lamentation, moment was

in arrangements friend. or

the

Not

a

they well knew might,in such a

frivolous conjectures, for

delayof

a

quarter of

an

hour

that case,

fatal.

prove

The

they had

reached

his chamber

dressed theyunhim and put him to bed, layinghim on his right side,that the determination of the blood to the regionof the heart might not be increased ; frequently sprinkled his face with cold water, and held to his nose a smellingbottlecontaining volatilesaU ; ^forwant of which the best vinegarmay be employed. After they had persevered time in these attentions, faint signsof returning some some

moment

"

animation

were

ants perceived. The doctor and his assist-

redoubled their exertions, and satisfactionto recall to

expressible lengthhad the inlifeby their effortsthe

inanimate Bernhardi. apparently which theyfeltat The happiness

however,

to

experiencea

at firstsupposedthat he :

was

not

he never but,urtfortunately,

articulate a word

asked

what

nightin pen,

which

had

so

happened

the vault,he

ink, and

paper

he answered words

as

to to

his revival was

tined, des-

drawback.

severe

unable

the power of speech. entirely his tongue, and had paralyzed

at

to

They

speakfrom

ness weak-

afterwards recovered

The

violence of the

fright

for a

long time

he could

be

understood.

When

him

on

that unfortunate

shuddered,and by signsdesired to

the

be

broughtto him in bed, on lowing inquiryof his friends in the fol-

:""

zed by Digiti;


FEAR

THE

(57

GHOSTS.

OF

and my boasting presumption. I reached the coffinwithout perceiving any "

I have

punishedfor severely

been

thingthat at all resembled a ghost; but when I had with and was hand stuck the fork into the coffin, tiring retrembling with the utmost precipitation, somethingdetained to extricate me by seizingmy morning-gown. I struggled to the ground, myself,but fellsenseless with fright and know not what happened afterwards." On readingthese hues, Bemhardi's friends were not a littleastonished. They were the not disposed to question truth of this statement, but their reason had many tions objecit. How could a ghosthold a perto urge against son fast by the morning-gown? How rial could an immate? They beinghave hands to grasp any material object puziledtheir brains for a considerable time, in vain, to "

reconciletheir friend's

of

account

his adventure

with

lengththey resolved to the vault itself, in hopes of discovering examine some traces of the supposedspirit. Without communicatingtheir intention to Bemhardi, comrades at his inquisitive repairedthe following night, the hour of twelve, to the vault. They had the good cause to equip themselves sense againstany emergency, beexperiencehad taughtthem that such precautions ture. impartcourage for the pursuitof an inquiryof this naother things, They took care to be provided, among the voice of sound

with

reason.

At

several lanterns : for the

terrified Bernhardi prove, in

They

thus

a

out

spectre which

same

of his wits in the

to goodlight,

be

a

mere

proceeded with all

due

vault,searched

every

corner

of

but found nothing. At coffins,

the fork which

had

dark, might perhaps trifle.

precautionto

it,looked among one length,

all the

of them

their unfortunate friend had

zed by Digiti;

the

ceived per-

brought


68

GHOST

STORIES. 1

with him of the

one

"

the

precedingnight. It was and from it hung a coffins,

Thank

God

!" cried he,

See, here is the fork,and

"

the

thrust small

into ton. cot-

ghostis discovered

bit of cotton

a

deep pieceof

out

!

of Bemhar-

di's

morning-gown! The poor fellow, in his hurry, pinned his gown with the fork to the coffin,and then which held him fast." imaginedthat it was a spirit satisfiedwith this discovery, the Perfectly theyquitted drearyabode of death, and hastened next morning to their unfortunate friend,to communicate of the mystery. and

sure

took up his morning-gown, immediately pected enough not only was there the ex-

was

of the delusion ; but

the organs of

him the solution

He

hole,but the bit of Bernhardi

to

cotton

was

found

to

fitit

actly. ex-

at the discovery greatly rejoiced recovered the use of never perfectly

speech.

SupposingBemhardi's

friends had

less^enterprise possessed and resolution than were requiredfor the cool of the nature of the imaginary that is investigation ghost, of the fright to say, of the natural cause that overpowered him ; what would then have been thoughtof this story ? The circumstance explicable, inwould certainly have been deemed and

attributed

to

the

operationof

some

evil

the tale repeated hardi to another with dismayand horror. Or, supposingBernhad not stuck the fork deep enough into the coffin, he had pulledit out again with his so that, on retiring, morning-gown,without tearingthe latter,what clue of the real fact ? would there have been to the discovery have found In this case his associates would probably the fork lyingon the pavement of the vault,but would

spirit ; and

one

would generation

have been unable

to conceive

how

have

it came

there,as their

comrade declared that he had stuck itin the coffin; for there

zed by Digiti;


^The

pcMtr

fellow, in

bis

huiry,

pinned

coffin.""

bis

gown

the

with

/""(?"6a

zed Digiti;

by

fork

to

the


zed by Digiti;


THE

OF

FEAR

69

GHOSTS.

explainthe mystery. Had to consider, possessedsufficient good sense they even that it is not always possible to detect the natural attributed to supernatural of effectsvulgarly causes cy, agenstillthis would have been sufficient to satisfy not Bernhardi,who, as long as he lived,would have firmly held him fast by had really believed that an evil spirit the coffin, and deprivedhim of speech as a punishment for his presumption. evil spirit that occasioned an And, in truth,it was of superstition his misfortune,namely the spirit and prejudice, which had been instilled into him in his infancy by the pernicious gossipof siUypeople. He afterwards that he really acknowledgedto his friends in writing, imaginedhe could have gone without any emotion of fear would

have been

no

bit of

cotton

to

into the vault,but,as he entered it,he horror which

whollyfreed

convinced

him

too

was

late that he

seized with had

not

himself from the childish terrors of his

a

yet

early

years.

Happy," added he, droppinga tear on the paper, have the happy are they whose mothers and nurses der good sense to avoid every thingthat can sow in the teninfant mind the seeds of this superstitious fear,which "

"

all the arguments

of

reason

cannot

afterwards

eradicate I"

zed by Digiti;

wholly


70

DEVIL

THE

AND

THE

PKUSSIAN

GKENADIER.

saying,that the devil is not so Wack as he is painted." This proverbreceives confinnation from the following of story,which shows that the appearance his Satanic majestyon earth may occasionally be attended with very agreeable consequences. In the year 1742, duringthe firstSilesian war, Colonel de la Motte Fouque,afterwards a Prussian general, received It is an

old

"

orders from Field-marshal

town

Schwerin

occupy the of Kremsir, in Moravia, with his battalion of grenadiers. to

which he adoptedon Among other precautions of the place, he stationed a sentry upon takingpossession the ramparts, not far from the house Rumour town

; was

The

of

a

catholic

priest.

givena bad character to thisquarter of the believed that the devil himself and it was universally to be seen prowling about there. frequently had

Prussian

sentinel had

ocular

demonstration

of the

; for no accuracy of this report on the very first night had the hour of spirits arrived,than the Prince of sooner

all in black,with horns, claws,and appeared, and armed with a dung-fork. a longtail, ran, The grenadier postedat this placewas a fearlessvetehis Infernal who had long wished to fall in with his Majesty. Instead of being dismayedand deserting ble post, he calmlyawaited the gradualapproachof the sawhich seemed to take no notice of his chalfigure, Darkness

zed by Digiti;


zed Digiti;

by


lenge of

"Who's

forth the

held

AND

DEVIL

THE

71

GRENADIER.

there?"

Advancing close to him, it and in a fearful three-pronged weapon, with instant death.

voice threatened him Conscious

THE

that he

was

engaged in the performanceof

if at all,alarmed. duty,the soldier was very little, awaited the assault, He coolly parriedthe thrust of the and courageously seized his with his bayonet, dung-fork He held him tightly Satanic opponent. grasped, regardless of agony which his nervous of the screams torted gripeexdaemon. Some of his comrades, from the writhing

his

who

at

were

hand,

hastened

soon

assistance of the

to the

and havingsecured Old Homie, dragged grenadier, him away to the nearest guard-house. conducted in his infernalaccouNext morning he was trements, escorted by an immense crowd, throughthe town to the main-guard. nation, examito a rigorous military Findinghimself subjected brave

the devil had the condescension

humblest came

tone

out

questionthat

every

that he

was

no

other

man

in the

to answer

proposed^

was

It

than the Catholic

himself,before whose house the sentinel was priest

posted.

the

incessant challenges of the latter, he Annoyed by imaginedthat a Protestant grenadier might be terrifiedas of his own communion as the most easily superstitious ; but he

was

of vicinity The

not

so

fortunate

his habitation

to

as

by the

mask

other ecclesiasticsof the

town

drive him which were

from

the

he^ssumed. aware

their indiscreet colleague had, by his

that

not only masquerade, his profession, but grossly offended against cast a stigma on the laws of war ; they,therefore, cited soliwith all humility his release, and voluntarily offered to pay any fine that might be imposed. Colonel Fouque seized this opportunity of contributing

zed by Digiti;


72 to

sian who, lite all the Prusgrenadiers, white gaiters, soldiers in those days,wore and after arduous campaignwhich was justover had great need

the comfort of his

the of

STORIES.

GHOST

new

He

ones.

the cost of amounted

Catholic

black

new

to

ordered

about

one

clergyof

the

a

calculation

for his gaiters hundred

whole

to

be made

of

battalion. It

ducats, which

sum

the

cheerfully paid to atone for the misconduct of their colleague. The unluckyrepresentative of Old Nick was sent to a and the grenadiers convent to expiatehis indiscretion; with black gaiters, which rendered them were supplied good service in their subsequentmarches. They jocularly observed that sir for their

well

theyhad

to

leggings ; and

new

pleasedwith

he determined

town

thank the

the innovation of

to furnish

instead of the white

his whole ones

the devil of Krem-

king himself was so Colonel Fouque,that ers, army with black gait-

which

had

hitherto been

worn. universally

zed by Digiti;


73

GHOST

THE

The

OF

Count

young

COUNT

WALKENRIED.

Walkenned

von

had, to the great

satisfaction of his father,pursued his studies for time

with

under advantageat Gottingen,

Winkelmann.

Mr.

farther

improvement him

set out

of his taste.

on

the tuition of

his travels for the

Winkehnann, who

as

his friend and adviser, w"is

been gone a of him who had been, in the strictestsense his

friend,the young

alone. the

father

His

Count

was

resolved

sudden

of the

to pursue

equallyshocked

of Winkelmann's

news

companied ac-

unfortunately and there died, before they had Strashurg, For want month. of one to supplythe place

illat

taken

then

He

some

and

death.

word,

his travels

surprisedby As, however,

steadyfor years, he made no to his intention of travelling by himself. He objection the paternal admonitions wrote to him accordingly, repeating he had givenhim at parting, and enclosing which a he knew

letterto

his

an

son

to be very

eminent

banker

of

when formerlybeen acquainted court

of France, and

whom

he

Paris,with whom he

was

ambassador

regardedas

he had to

his friend.

the In

the banker to advance his son as he requested epistle he might require, and to furnish him much as money with lettersof recommendation when he should quitthe French capital. In order to remind the banker the more of their strongly he transmitted in his packeta handformer acquaintance, some which was a goldsnuff-box,with his portrait, very this

7

zed by Digiti;


74

STORIES.

GHOST

It had

likeness. Striking at

Paris, in his younger

resemblance

to

his

paintedmany days,and bore an

fore years benary extraordi-

been

This

son.

box had

been

sented pre-

fore keepsake by the banker. He therehis old friend,by imaginedthat he should gratify of this memento him a sight dium throughthe meaffording it would moreover of his son, whose serve identity to him

to

a

as

demonstrate. The

what more

had

to young Count, on his arrivd at Paris, repaired is called an hotel garni, till he should meet with

reigners, lodgings.Besides several other fohe there found two Englishmen,brothers, who been his fellow-students at Grottingen. This accidental circumstance, as well as the extremelyelegant

commodious

dinners and of society

who from

furnished

suppers

many

at

this house, and

the

men FrenchhighlypoUshedand intelligent

dailyresorted thither,caused

time to time the execution

the Count

to

defer

of his intention of seeking

another

lodging. One of the gentlemenwhom the Count here met at his susceptible heart soon conceived dinner,and for whom the Baron de Vigny. Extraordinary a particular was friendship, t"ilentsand rendered quahties,

attainments,and

this young

the most

amiable

companion. delightful It was could not be happy not long before the Count without him, or he without the Count : hence they were the Inseand friends, parable called,by their other acquaintance would have been perfectly ; and this epithet plicable apin every

attachment,but

respect,had

man

not

a

death,which

heeds

no

partedthem from one another. In their dailyconvivial partiestheywere accustomed ia to push about the bottle very briskly ; but at night, particular, theyexceeded allbounds. On these occasions too soon

zed by Digiti;


there

of the acquaintance

The

had

He

nothingbut

and wish

caused an

the German

Count

is termed

a

boon

Count, who

and

of the others, and persuasions

had been in

time at Paris had

had dissipation,

not

of money, occupied in

been

called

even

the snuff-box.

his delirium

His

provedthat

in the last moments

and

want

no

on

incoherent

sure plea-

his father's

old friend,the banker, to deliver the letter and

mind

panion, com-

to the rest of the party, agreeable him so far to exceed his ordinary to induce limits, as fever which terminated in his death. inflammatory

whole

him

fella

himself

make

to

The whose

the

of their quality

avoid the illeffects

to

been what

never

strongest wines.

with the

them

of hfe, to which

of this course victim.

finest and

French

enabled productions

native

a

of the

want

no

was

75

WALKENRIED.

COUNT

OF

GHOST

THE

to

show

expressionsduring

this neglectlayheavy upon of his life.

his

Vigny was too sincere a friend to avoid the sick-bed of the suffering Count, with whom, when in ness, health,he had passedsuch happy days: during his illThe

Baron

de

he visited him therefore, the utmost

attention.

He

very often,and paid him the stronglaid,in particular, est

called in, to the physicians who were on injunctions neglect nothingthat could tend to avert the dangerof the disorder. He justly considered this attention as the most if not the onlyproofhe could give of his attachment efficient, strations these demonto the Count ; but unfortunately and all the skillof the physicians, of friendship, could not save the patient, and he fellinto that sleepfrom which

none

The tier to was

he

wakes.

de quarfor the physicien inspectthe deceased,and ascertain whether he

master

of the hotel sent

reallydead. assured

him

After the

most

of the death

careful examination,

of the Count, and

zed by Digiti;

gave


76

STORIES.

GHOST

the certificatewhich

him

the

haste

known

deceased

of the

Paris before

requiredat

It is well

interred.

be

can

person

is

with

a

what

mitted usuallycomto the earth in that city to this ; and, agreeably hours after the Count had practice, twenty-four scarcely breathed his last, borne away earlyin the his body was morning and consignedto the grave. the The very next morning on which he was interred, the banker deceased Count called personally to execute on his father's commission, which he had neglected to

remains

fulfilin his lifetime. In the

are

he had

clothes which

same

during the last days of his health at Paris, and bodied attended by his trustyand disconsolate valet,the disemWalof the deceased repaired, von as Count spirit kenried, to the banker, to pay him his long-deferred visit. introductory worn

The

banker

latter had have

in recognised,

received

Parisian,and the

the

the Count

seen

his

name,

at the spirit,

the

ghostwith

begged him

delivered spirit

to

but

;

if the

even

would

he

probably the son first glance,

his resemblance

friend,so striking was

He

father.

Here

never

mentioned

not

of his old

a

had

to

him

allthe

walk his

to

his

of politeness

into the

parlour.

and his credentials,

with the greatestsolemnity, father's snuflT-box, tain addingcerverbal communications which he had been instructed to make.

The

Banker.

ensued dialogue following

There

was

Comte, for so many the

are

son

to :

in

of my

you

ever}'

money

grave

and

you

a

thingthat want

M.

dear

occasion,my

old friend. Welcome,

! Command

fwitha

"

certificates to convince

particular any

Ghost

no

:

me

le

that you

comes thousand welis in my

shall be

at

er powyour

dignifiedobeisance), I

zed by Digiti;


78

STORIES.

GHOST

have

dTors,)I

and I trust you

will

obligeme

side-door. He its office.

refused

looked

round towards fearfully but his tongue to reply, attempted hair stood erect, and

His the two

audiblyas

as

baubles, earthly fles these triby transmitting

the banker

these words a

beat

no

father.

also to my At

occasion for these

now

his

heart

goldrepeaters that layon

the

table. The

spectre observed '"Pardon

to no

his

and preparedto agitation,

me," said he,

"

it

not

was

tire. re-

intention

my

friend of my father : but beingdead, I had I must alternative. The time is arrived when retire

the frighten

to my

Farewell."

grave.

and vanished, the ghostquitted the room saying, leavingthe banker more dead than alive. He rang for and that he might be againamong the living, his servants knew not what to think or to say. At the sight, however, So

and

of the money

that the adventure

considered justly to

be

valuables leftin his

trick upon

a

him

; as

several thousand

away

seeing him

he possession, much

was

too serious

nobodywould

ing think of throw-

livres for the

of gratification

of his wits

out frightened

very

for

moment.

a

have ventured to palm false jewels Neither would anyone him who was so good a judgeof those matters on ; for he was

satisfiedat the firstglancethat the solitaire of

watches up

the

He

had

need

no

hear that

theywent all louis-d'ors singly ; theywere to

examined

the

ear

to

the box inside and outside ; it was

with which

which

his

greatvalue.

ringwas

he had

presentedthe

on portrait

he had

the box

justbeheld

of the hair and

the

with

in the

a

to hold the

well. real

He

took

gold.

the very

old Count.

ine genu-

He

He

same pared com-

the face of the son,

ghost;

and with the

ception ex-

of which, to dress,in the style

be sure, greatalterationshad taken

he place,

zed by Digiti;

now

found


GHOST

THE

the

COUNT

79

WALKENRIED.

resemblance extraordinary

most

a

OF

between

the father and

son.

the banker

In this dilemma where

his visitor informed

had

doubt

no

drove forthwith

him

that he

the hotel

to

had

He

lived.

that Monsieur Michel, who

be able to throw

kept it,would this otherwise inexplicable on light

some

afiair.

Michel," said he, do you know My dear Monsieur of the miniature on this snuff-box ?" the original I do. The young M. Michel, Count lived Certainly longenough in my house : there is not one of my lodgers "

"

him.

and boarders but knew The

Banker, M,

Mad

Michel, from

mad

young !

Count

no, no

"

Walkenried.

the late Count

"

who

von

died

kenried Wal-

von

here

of an yesterday to our fever,and who, according police inflammatory regulations, buried earlythis morning. was publicly Banker, Surely you must be joking! The same

Germany,

whom

Count

young

this

with portrait,

the

old-fashioned dress,so

half

an

and

valuables

hour

Before

ago

in my

started back

in evident

chair

a

that moment

but the

and surprised He

of many he

finished what

into fainting

;

of the

the latter.

which

He

he had

meant

to

livres.

say, M.

for who

should

ghosthimself!

disconcerted

enter

The

the

chel Mi-

sunk at

room

latterwas

what some-

their terror. observing finish when he quitted

on

banker, hopingto reach the hotel before

begged his pardon for sincerely playedhim, to which he was, in

authorized

bj'nature,

neither the deceased Here

thousand

alarm, and the banker

intended that his part should

the house

exceptionof

stronglyresembles,was not house, and broughtme money

to the amount

he had

the

Count

and

assured

him

von

Walkenried

the trick some

that he nor

spect, rewas

his spectre.

follows the solution of the mystery.

zed by Digiti;


80

STORIES.

GHOST

de

alreadybeen observed,a man of But, understandingand of a livelydisposition. like each stillmore so remarkable,they were was in figureand physiognomy,that a third person by the voice and dress which of onlydistinguish

Vigny was,

acute

what other could the

as

it has

The

stood before him.

two

of this freak of nature

both

in the Baron

found

had

the Count

friend whom

The

clothes and

with

names

of acquaintance mistakes, by exchanging

lead their

to

droll

into many

sexes

tage friends took advan-

two

another. But the

one

suggesteditselfto deceptions

of these

M. de

most

serious

Vigny,when

his death-bed,put into his hands his father's his firiend, on and with the snuff-box, letter, purse, watches, and ring,

a

verbal message, to be delivered to the banker. The reader knows how punctuallythis commission was executed. Count's valet

The

suppliedhim

his deceased master's,which visitthe banker,and which his

on

way,

The

return.

he

who

suit of clothes of

a

de

Vigny had put on to ly to changeimmediatemeant had probably gone a shorter

banker

the coachman

or

M.

with

drove him

had

made

greater

haste,and thus he had reached the hotel before the pretended

ghost. M. and de

Michel knew

not therefore,

was,

Vigny, the

very

a

nothingof

littleterrifiedwhen

image

this disguise, he

M.

saw

of the deceased, enter

the

apartment in his clothes. How as

many chances there were, that,in so largea city Paris,this deceptionshould have passedundiscovered !

What

an

argument it would

of the behef

in

then have afforded in favour

! apparitions

that circumstances the should

not

because miraculous, concealed from

our

It

be

cannot

too

often

peated, re-

countable mysteriousand unacand be pronounced supernatural

most

their natural

causes

happen

knowledge.

zed by Digiti;

to

be


81

EXTRAORDINARY

CONFESSION

OF

A

GHOST.

circumstances recorded in the

The are

stated

horrible every are

a

to

stamp that,for the honour of human

reader

givenin

of which

have

narrative following reallyhappened. They are of so

must

wish

the form of

is indicated

them a

to

be fictitious.

the letter,

onlyby

nature,

They

of the writer

name

the initial.

of his to one Yesterday thus wrote M. de M the prettyMademoiselle Vildac was friends, ^yesterday, married to the amiable Saintville. As a neighbour, I invited to the festivities was givenon the occasion. But the merriment of the day was succeeded,as far as I was concerned,by a nightof such horror as my pen can but describe. faintly know old Vildac,whose unluckyphysiognomy You in was always so repulsiveto us, and whom we were "

....

"

I watched him narrowly consequence afraid to trust. and fully yesterday, expectedthat the joyousoccasion of

the

would relax his morose marriageof his onlydaughter

muscles,and planta smile of satisfactionon

visage. I

mistaken.

was

Instead of

his

scowling takinga paternal

interestin the tender emotion of his child,and the rapture he seemed, on the contrary,to be disof his son-in-law, pleased the

joy expressedin our faces ; and this unnatural father had wellnighspoiled, by his detestable of the day both for his children temper, all the pleasures with

and his guests.

zed by Digiti;


82

GHOST

When

STORIES.

arrived,1

bed-time

shown, for

was

of

want

a

into a room in the great tower lodging, had I closed my eyes before I of the castle. Scarcely I roused by a dull noise,as I thought, over-head. was and distinctly heard the rattling of chains and listened, the sound of footsteps slowlydescendingthe stairs. All at once my door flew open ; a spectre entered,dragging went along the chains, which clanked frightfully, up to stirred the fire, and pushed together the fire-place, some brands. A hollow voice pronounced half-extinguished the words 'Tis a longtime since I warmed myselfl" I confess, my friend, for why should I deny it? that.

commodious

more

"

"

I

thrilledwith horror.

was

myself in

white beard.

He

was

cold,to the fire. I

surveyinghim,

thus

the embers. which

was a

knees. tottering

He

I could understand

thyjudgments!"

are

Is

anybody

bed ?*' ;

snow-

and then flickered from

now

the door

of

traces

he

I

now

deeply

his on involuntarily, The onlywords to pray. O God ! O God ! how just

sunk,

:

longmiserywere

in the

face.

seemed were

absorbed

to be

seemed

"

as

if

made purposely

some

noise

curtains.

with my "

flame

his furrowed

few minutes

a

a

fastly entered,and then fixed his eyes stead-

and profoundestgrief,

In

defend

with holdinghis hands, shivering While I was deeply moved.

the floor. He

imprintedupon

bald head and

towards Rookedthoughtfully

He

he had

on

to

and

half naked, with

man,

sword

drew aside the softly By the glimmerof the fire,I perceived of what appearedto be a venerable figure

the emaciated

old

I seized my

of emergency,

case

curtains of the bed.

by

"

"

"

Yes," said

but who

anybody in I,completelyundrawing my

here ?" asked

are

you, old

he

man

;

"

is

?"

He

this tains cur-

and sighed,

zed by Digiti;


*lle

st'etued were

to

be

absotlx'tl

i"

tli*" fwoVimf*^!

deeply Iniprintvdva

Ui" fufrmed

prl"f" :in#f (nue."""

frin-8

Paffe

zed by Digiti;

84.

of ms-try


zed Digiti;

by


84 fixed my

the spectre,and attempted to on steadfastly

eyes

speak,but could you

"

a

give it a

He

utterance.

It is not

but

not.

question,Old man, on spectre?" quivered

The

"

STORIES.

GHOST

a

of Heaven, I

has been

nuptials you of cruel cupidity my

put

He

to

ahve.

before you, By the Grod

of love and the

one

This

eye ; and it made

not

voice

bride base

heart, ship, friend-

of nature. sions. posses-

gentleman, neighbouring was recentlydead : he found him. their rents and renewing receiving sightVildac devoured with greedy day visited

father

their leases.

see

the hardness of his

insensible

his tenants,

among

that you

entombed

and

are

looks.

doubt, in my

chains,that he might seize my

had

whose

son,

him

in

me

"

the soft emotions

knew

never

rendered He

it,no

of the dead grandfather living The have been celebrating.

the

am

whose

which

read

or really living,

tongue, but I could

my

said he, spectre," who

man

you

are

the

a

baleful

most

heart,which had longcherished

a

his

impressionupon wish

to be

of

master

became sullen and more paternalestate. He now In about a fortnight, three men in gloomy than ever. masks burst one nightinto my chamber, and draggedme How half naked to this tower. Vildac could giveout the

that I

was

dead, I

cannot

bells,and the sound was

my

filledmy

tell; but, from

the

tollingof

hymns, I inferred that it own obsequies theywere performing.This idea soul with mortal anguish. I solicited, the as of funeral

greatestof favours,permissionto speak to Vildac,but in vain. Those who, for these twenty years, have brought me

bread and consider

in this tower.

who

water me

as

This

broughtmy

to a

prolongmy

criminal who

morning I

allowance

wretched

life,probably

is condemned

took notice that the

to neglected

to

die

man

fasten the door

zed by Digiti;


OF

CONFESSION

85

GHOST.

A

securely.I waited anxiouslyfor night,that I must avail myselfof his carelessness. not but the hbertyof goinga few steps farther than of a dungeon." a great treat to the inmate I had

When

first

my

him,

from

recovered

thoughtwas

might

escape

;

usual is

ment, astonish-

my

release the unfortunate

to

this horrid confinement,

from

man

somewhat

I

"

In

me," said I

to

the

Almighty has sent you a deliverer. All are in the castle; follow me. fast asleep I will be your now defender,your guide,your avenger." Instead of replying, he fellinto a profound reverie. My longseparation he at lengthbegan,as if awakfrom all human ening society," from a dream, has produceda total revolution in gination. Every thingdependson imamy sentiments and idAs. "

"

*'

I

and

situation severe

my

The

it for any other. wretched

career

famiHarized

now

am

terrible :

die is

all that renders

with

why

should I

exchange

I will terminate. my

cast:

in this tower."

melancholymeditation,this contempt of hberty, this most combined with other expressions, unexpectedlanguage, caused me to suspect some secret, deeply-hidden and yet I knew not how to reconcile all these things, in short,the whole affair was to me quiteincomprehensible. This

The

old man,

he thus

yet

to

proceeded:

any

has five,liberty

with

tears.

charms

Shall I pursue

the

for

If my

me.

But

never,

The

her into the

disgraceof

I press her to my

Farewell ! my

no

has his innocent daughter villain,

harm.

would

^^

"

atrocious

when my astonishment, In regard to the few daysthat I have

however, diminished

never

her

must

day beginsto

done

never

bedew

her

I must

tomb." 8

zed by Digiti;

rather

with

I, shall I behold dawn.

me

band of her hus-

arms

family? No;

heart and

is an

son

my her !

return

to


86

GHOST

STORIES.

declared that I would

and opposedhis intention,

I

suffer him

"Oppression," said I,

to go.

soul ; but I will

the facultiesof your

torpidspirits.Let

us'not

has

"

paired onlyim-

rouse

consider whether

now

not

your

ought

you

known yourself ; it will be time enough for that by-and-by. The firstthingto be done is to quitthis place of horror. My chateau^ my influence,and my purse, to make

know

who

inviolable secret. "

I

could avail "

Can

myself of

Well, then,stay here

provincewith

of the

For

horrid I

Heaven's

unworthy of

am

hand

pointsto

is the blood of my

the

! "

^thatI

are

improperuse of my like me to perishhere

monster

it ;

"

unnatural

most

here

me.

now,

now,

with

lain that vil-

horror this

by

me

"

the earlier

! the

Ha

cursed ac-

image

to

snatch

they drop !

O

It

infernal

me,

of possession of my

ing expir-

See, his blood-stained

extended stillaffectionately "

:

deed

!

to atone

^lookat the stains of blood.

might obtain

inheritance. paternal

brink of hell

offer. I have

liberty you

father,murdered

parent stillhaunts

go."

not

not an

perpetrated.Look

ever

must

the tyranny of your

force from

execrable,the

for the most

monster

the

I cannot,

the governor acquaint and we melancholysituation,

sake,make a

an

; but I will

by

Leave

secret.

shall remain

have any objection ?" I kindness ; would to God

But

your

will then release you unnatural son." "

it !

shall

creature

a

now

you

for your

thankful

am

Vildac's crime

and

are,

you

desire it,not

If you

your service.

at

are

me

from

arms

the

father,father !

!" thy avenger is despair sunk on the floor, the old man During this rhapsody, hairs that time had left on his and tore the few silvery ; he did not frightful aged head. His convulsions were venture

to

look

me

in the face

"

^while I,for my

zed by Digiti;

part,was


CONFESSION

OF

A

87

GHOST.

After a pause of horror not to be absolutely petrified. heard somethingstirring described,we ; it began also to be light.The old man, if exhausted by the vehemence as You of his emotions, rose slowlyfrom the floor. filledwith justabhorrence of me," said he. well Fareare I if you can, that you have ever seen ! forget, me. shall now to my return to quit it tomb, and I vow never "

"

more." of replying, or of moving from incapable utterly the spot. The castle,and every objectin it,now cited exa horror that I could not conquer ; I leftitvery early in the morning,and am at this moment preparingto set I hope to Grod that I shall estates. out for another of my behold the avenginginstrument employedby more never Providence,nor can I even bear to reside in his neighbourhood. I

was

zed by Digiti;


THE

VILLAGE

A

minister

The "ix

weeks

in

of

of his

the

at

owing

the

had

he

yet

intervention

of

to

the

under

his affectionate wife

the

and provision,

A

not

country

a

cooled

fresher

a

in gayer

colours,and

the soft breeze

returned

balance

he

Here

they

entered

was

those

overhung joined

soon

into conversation

promised

which

which

widow, and

the

to

left his

them

a

decent

parentaljoys which

extended garden was long succession of sultrydays,a

assumed

husbandman,

Pleased

pastor

the lime-trees which

approach of

blooming

had

noon

the

yet tasted.

After

them. about

;

cheeringprospect

they had

lawyers,the

of his habitation.

by

rangements ar-

had been transacted parties,

forwarded

be

to

pay,

entrance

the

He

important business, which,

parcelcontainingthe

the

on

been

parsonage.

finally adjusted.

this both

seated himself

then

of

of integrity

study,delivered

new

had

new

predecessorwere

the

without

villagein Germany

neighbours; the domestic with completed ; and his accounts

termination to

STORY.

small

a

his

were

widow

TRUE

possession of his

duly visited

had

APPARITION.

a

as

the

appearance exhaled

wantoned

about

who, summoned

with his

All

atmosphere. ;

the flowers

more

implements to

storm

had

nature were

attired

fragrantperfumes ;

thje glowing cheek

by

before

of the

the

evening bell,slowly

the

peacefulcots

of his

village. "

Dear

Dorothy,"said

the pastor, when

his wife

zed Digiti;

by

rose


VILLAGE

THE

make

to

89

APPARITION.

for supper, preparations

"

the heat from

the past

is still very perceptible in the house. weather sultry Supposewe take our supper this eveninghere under the of airing lime-trees ? We shall thus have an opportunity the house thoroughly, and shall enjoythe beautyof the eveningan hour longerin the open air." You take the word out of my mouth," repliedhis The wife. indeed,is too fine,and we shall evening, relish the pigeons, and a which are at the fire, certainly "

"

nice No

saLad,as well again here sooner

said than

Dorothyhastened

as

done.

in the close rooms."

cheerful

With

industry

the kitchen ; the pastor fetched the

to

table and chairs,laid the cloth,and

broughta bottle of wine out of the cellar. Accordingto his general tom, cusreserved for Sundays or particuthis indulgence was lar occasions ; but this day,when, as the reader has been informed,he had so happilyterminated the business of his accounts, seemed to him settling worthy of being made an exception : it was an importantday for him, as that he felt himself completely it was installed not tillnow in his office and made he^ habitation. Dorothysoon appearance and ance

with

the

his sister, who in

pigeons,and she, with

had

removing, and

sat

down

to

even

lend

followed them

to

in their

domestic

new

the rural repast. It

cheerful conversation

her husband

and

innocent

was

her assist ments, arrange-

seasoned

mirth, whilst

a

by late

their ears with his strains, charmed and the nightingale worthy pastor quaffedthe generous beverageout of a he gobleton which, as an heir-loom of his grandfather's, set a particular value,tillthe joyoustone of his mind Thus the was plainlyexpressed in his countenance. nightstole upon them almost without their perceiving its approach. Dorothywas going to fetch a candle,but 8*

zed by Digiti;


90

GHOST

her husband

STORIES.

detained her.

is stillfine,"said he,

but

"

that you know, Dorothy, soon

I have

as

The

"

to evening,

the air grows take

must

finished this

cooler.

of

care

be

sure,

You

yourself.As

will all go

glass,we

in

together."Scarcelyhad the pastor finished speaking had Dorothy taken her seat again, when all at scarcely "

both the females started up with shrieks of terror. pastor looked about,and to his utter astonishment

once

The

stood beside him. apparition It was tall, a elegantfigure.The face,of exquisite seemed tingedwith the roseate glow of evening; beauty, decorated its hair,which flowed in charming a rose-bud whiteness ; a robe of azure over a neck of snowy ringlets blue,studded with stars of gold,covered its form ; an encircled the angelic eflfulgence resemblingsunbeams vision,which, with a look of inexpressible sweetness, an

seemed The

to

two

invite the pastor to follow it. ladies, informed, as the reader has been already

had flown from

enchanting appearance it.

His

The

their seats.

wife and

of the

disengagedhimself. moving on before him, his wife once churchyard, to

but

with

directed its

desisted from

her, promisingnot

went

he could not

over help asking,

towards

course

up to

earnestness

consideration of

follow the and

the

him, clasped

with such

his intention. to

followed

however, the figure,

When,

more

and

detained him, but

that,in proceedno farther,

her. state, he back

have

and entreated him

in her arms,

and alarm

phantom,rose

sister would

he

him

divine,attracted by the

over

He

turned

apparition ; again,how

being,which, so far from about it,rather looked like having any thingterrifying an angel from heaven, whose invitations could only be Both stoppedbefore designedfor some good purpose. she

could

be

afraid

of

a

zed by Digiti;


zed Digiti;

by


VILLAGE

THE

the house-door,and watched wall of the

to the

91

APPARITION.

the

which proceeded spirit,

rose churchyard,

the top of it,and

to

disappeared. The

consequences of this adventure were, from agreeableMothe worthy pastor. The was

spread with

soon

various

additions

over

however, far report of it the

whole

ary, acquiredthe character of a visionand the neighbouring at the mention of his clergy, would turn up their noses, significantly name, shrugtheir shoulders, and talk a great deal about Swedenborg, and Co. ^ nay, there were Schropfer, persons ill-natured that the phantom was enough to express their conviction, created by the wine alone. TJie superintendent himself,

country

who

came

his

to

minister

; the

few weeks

a

afterwards

when congregation,

new

introduce the pastor the other guests had retired to

after the dinner make

very of his host.

given on the occasion,began to circumstantial inquiries the health concerning "

You

are

a

fond of the sciences, who

man," continued he, have littledomestic

"

who

are

occupation,

situation of the place, sequestered cannot expect much society.Under these circumstances, I am afraid that you will stick too closely to your books and your writing-table, that exercise which is so neglect essentially necessary, and thus laythe foundation of those numberless complaints, which sooner tendants or later arq the atof hypochondria.Let me persuadeyou to avoid of this,my dear colleague.Rather take abundance

and, on

of the

account

exercise,and consider your ahment of

knowledge,but at

"I "

to

can

your mind

which

the expense assure

that I have

studies and

should

as

a

medium

of

veying con-

assuagingyour thirst be purby no means chased

of your health and cheerfulness."

your

nothingto

reverence," repliedthe pastor, fear from the attacks of melan-

zed by Digiti;


92

GHOST

STORIES.

in ramblingabroad to enjoythe beauties delight of Nature, and the charming environs of this place inducements this inclito me nation. to gratify present irresistible with which I am likewise very fond of gardening, I amuse myselfseveral hours a-day. I sleepwell,and that very is good. I have a flow of spirits my digestion ner rarelyfailsme, and I cultivate the sciences in such a manand that they rather afford me for recreation, matter than for gloomy meditations." for pleasure, consequently the superintendent, this is alAh ! yes,"rejoined ways the languageof you gentlemen ; but such diseased persons are in the most dangerous way as fancythat they and let me ail nothing. Beware, my dear friend, mend recomto you of plentyof exercise and a due proportion

choly.

I

"

"

medicine."

clergymannow began to imagine,that there must be some for these exhortations. After reason particular pausingfor some time,he thus addressed his visitor: I am infinitely to your reverence for the interest obliged Our

"

'*

take

you

in my

have

must

advice,and with

health ; but it appears

motive for your particular therefore earnestly entreat you to

some

wish

the real

know

to

you

the

favour

me

superintendent, if yoii "

truth,I will tellyou

believe in the appearance

received such such

that you well-meant

explanation."

an

Well, then," answered

"

to me

that I cannot

I

am

formed in-

spirits.I have

of this

assurances positive

respectable sources,

of

:

fact,and from

have

any doubt

subject.I have far too good an opinionof your of it there,and must, to seek the reason understanding

on

the

of course, at

attribute it to

times operate

so

some

of those obstructions which

on powerfully

the

of perimaginations sons

the strongestminds." possessing

zed by Digiti;


The

matter

clear to perfectly

now

was

93

APPARITION.

VILLAGE

THE

divine.

our

He

had reached that the report of the apparition perceived behaviour and had occasioned the marked the metropolis, fore but from which business had beof the superintendent, preventedhim from payingso much attention as he had done on this day. He therefore related to him the and simplicity, and whole affairwith the utmost fidelity

added,

It could not be

"

"

proceededin

could it have

high road

any

of the the

; for the

senses

and

so lonelyvillage,

a

could

Neither

?

moment,

same

optical deception; for whence

an

it have

figurewas tillits

watched

himself,but likewise

by my wife, my B.'s maid, who neighbour

and

A.'s man,

What

of it. description it came,

or

it was,

what

or

whither it went, I know

been

far from

sion any delu-

onlyseen at disappearance, by sister,neighbour not

all givethe it meant,

not, and

I

same

whence do

can

no

than repeat Hamlet's common-placeobservation, so 'There often quoted on similar occasions: are many

more

"

thingsbetween heaven and of by our philosophy.'

earth which

were

dreamt

never

"

superintendentsmiled,shook

The no

;

more

could

not

but

next

forbear

as he morning,once more calling

the conversation

Plentyof

advice. with

a

One me,

who an

and

to

the

said

his chaise,he "

pastor "

and yesterday,

expiredon

member Re-

good

my

The pastor bowed

his

if

as lips,

suddenly

sharptwitch of the toothache.

by a day,in

the

delivered

informed

me

summer a

of 17

letterfrom

in

it,that

"

"

the

,

a

stranger

lady of

General

the bearer,Mr.

to

came

M.,

S***, was

artistof great skill in

several exhibitions the

mounted

exercise,""c. "c.

smile,which

checked

had

we

his head, and

public. As

at

and who, in optical deceptions, H., had given great satisfaction to

he intended

to

exhibit the

same

zed by Digiti;

at

C,


94

GHOST

STORIES.

she should consider herself to

if I obliged

promote the views of Mr. anxious

to

serve."

S., whom

she

S.,who

Mr.

endeavour

would

larly particu-

was a

was

man

of

siderable con-

talents and

means

my

found soon prepossessing manners, in his favour, and I prevailed to interest me upon of a largeempty apartfather to allow him the use ment in the mansion

in which

resided.

we

floorwith my helphavingalmost hourlyoccasions of upon

was

the

same

As

room,

this apartment I could not

ing seeingand speakto the artist whilst employed in making his various this or arrangements. Sometimes he explainedto me

that partof his apparatus ; at others he entertained me with of his travels, his residence in the principal account an cities of

Germany, and his various adventures. Thus, he related to me other things, what follows : among In one of my journeys from Dresden to Frankfurt,I of A. took it into my head to visit the beautiful valley I therefore turned off from the high road,but about noon overtaken by a storm, and obliged to stop at a village, was "

"

because

my

automata

had

got

wet

under

the

canvas

which

covered my carriage.Whilst I was dryingthem, I availed myselfof the opportunity to clean my mirrors,

and

when again, wards as I aftera party, consisting, my wife pointedout to me of the minister of the place and two learned, females,who were suppingunder the shade of the limebefore the door of the parsonage. In a fitof playful irees was

justgoingto pack up

humour, she persuaded me a

dessert for the company

to

;

oppositeto my room exactly inn, and only at a moderate were

low, and

have

had

a

apparatus

my

dish up

and, as on

the

the

as apparition,

parsonage

ground floorof

distance,as

was

the

the windows

till late, I could

not

for complyingwith opportunity

the

the party remained

better

an

zed by Digiti;


THE

wish

of my

VILLAGE

frolicsome wife.

I directed my mirror,and I intended them to see. The

which figure ladies started with affright from sent

over

95

APPARITION.

a

their seats, but the pastor,

tiU one of the courageous man, followed the apparition, ladies, probablyhis wife,pulledhim back, and I made a

the

raised

event

the

a

persons ;

door locked

Kept my

house,and

at

churchyard. This tered village.As I had en-

great noise in the

by inn-yard

but few

by

the wall of the

at figure disappear

the back way, I had been noticed of my puppets, I had account on ;

there

the time the

were

no

was apparition

children in the seen,

host and

my

who took me for a dealer in toys,were gaged enpeople, of hay which in housinga wagon-load had come very late. I had therefore plentyof time to remove

his

in

apparatus,and thus

my

any

to obviate

hand in the afiTair. The

of my all suspicion was apparition

ing hav-

regarded

and several of the inhabitants who talked supernatural, of opinion, under my the subject, window, were over that itwas a token of a death that would speedily happen the parsonage, not onlybecause the apparitionhad at from that placeto the churchyard, directed its course but wife was, for the firsttime,in also because the pastor's the familyway. as

"

I know

not

it

how

happened," continued Mr. S.,

I well leftthese peoplein their error. purposely of such phanknew how to appreciatethe moral object tasmagoric exhibitions ; namely,to form delusive figures the natural means and by explaining by the aid of optics, the belief in superemployed for the purpose, to destroy natural "

that I

appearances

:

I

knew,

moreover,

that

no

calculate the consequences of an action,and it was doublymy dutyto clear up the matter as soon

danger of

my

was deception

can

man

fore thereas

the

exhibited in prettystrong

zed by Digiti;


96

STORIES.

GHOST

colours

standing expressions. Notwithby those superstitious I leftthe all this,

and the mischief which sometimes "

As

I may

lies heavy upon

for this

cause

peoplein my

their absurd notions ;

have then occasioned still heart."

of uneasiness,"I

replied,I "

am

gladto have it in my power to relieve you from it. The familyof the pastorof A. stillenjoysgood health ; instead of having diminished, it has been increased by three robust,heartyboys; and the character of a visionary, which he acquired, be done away by the very may now of this occurrence. At the same natural explanation time it may serve and his colleagues, to convince him that it is extremely to maintain,because we cannot silly for any particular account circumstance,that it must be inexplicable.*' necessarily

zed by Digiti;


98

GHOST

STORIES.

though he had not been a and travelling favourite of the king's, commission. on a special His host seasoned the simplerepast prepared and the colonel orin haste with agreeable dered conversation, welcome, equally

been

even

him

broughtwith

to be

fetched

had

that he

bottleafter the other of the wine

one

out.

conversation turned,among other things, on the^ ancient castle situated in the village.Throughout the The

country, far and wide, it had the character of

whole

being Not a creature haunted by blood-thirsty spirits. passed and ejaculating it without feeling a prayer. a secret horror, who never but had long believed in real ghosts, Bretiole, with reputed resolved to wished for a rencounter spectres, that occurred for avail himself of this first opportunity the ecand therefore requested his curiosity, clesiastic gratifying to permithim to sleepin the castle. His host entreated

his

design.

"

I have

"

no

said

doubt,

he,

"

that you

are

the

; popularnotions concerningapparitions consider,colonel,that your temeritywill infallibly

superiorto but

you your life. You whose melancholy fate we

cost

Of all those who

had occasion

have

have hitherto ventured no

of courage

but

one

to

to pass

has

deplore. the night

been

carried

the evil

away

by

Why

will you

either natural or supernatural. spirits, which to dangers wantonlyexpose yourself

the bravest and

stoutest

of the contest, cannot

The

the firstman

not

are

in this fatal castle,there is

even

sake,to relinquish

him, for Heaven's

heart,owing

hope to

to

to

ity inequal-

?"

surmount

colonel,nevertheless,adhered

the

his resolution,

to the approved excellence of his pistols. As trusting I am his Majesty'sbusiness,"thoughthe, on travelling I may that apventure to show certainly proaches any spirit "

"

too near

me

how

well I

can

hit my

mark."

zed by Digiti;


HAUNTED

THE

99

CASTLE.

of was incapable worthy divine,whose eloquence partedfrom him with evident shaking his determination, behold him emotion,persuadedthat he should never more cried he, more God be with you !" emphatically aUve.

The

"

than

to impatience youthful

himself,while his with bed and

the

seemed

the

into two

He

to be the

one

of which castle,

onlytenants, conducted

first floor. This hall had

rooms, contiguous

to the

followed

parson'sman

into the deserted

staircase which

righta

hall on

and the

bedding.

owls and mice on

with

the C"istle: he carried the lantern

servant

to the entrance

Close

the other hand, hastened

on Bretiole,

once.

of

there

into the

two

doors

was

great

leading

which, beingthat nearest

the colonelselected for his bed-chamber. staircase,

ordered

two

candles

to be

and, by way lighted, lantern also placednear his bed. with fright overwhelmed ; cold

had the precaution, The parson's man was covered his brow, and he. trembled in every perspiration entreated that the colonel's servant joint.He earnestly him with the lantern to the outer door mightaccompany of the castle, he should certainly colonel die. The or himself went with him, and then,havingcarefully charged and layinghis drawn sword by his side,he his pistols, retired to bed without undressing. eleven o'clock he was About roused by a tremendous noise. It was as thougha regimentof hussars was entering the castle on horseback and marching upstairs, their clattering sabres after them. None but the trailing determined slanderer could have chargedthe colonel most with cowardice ; but he acknowledged, himself,that at he felt a sensation more this moment than he unpleasant of

before

had

ever

was

pouringa

experienced. It

bucket

seemed

of cold water

over

as

if

him

some

;

zed by Digiti;

one

his hair


100

GHOST

STORIES.

The began to stand on end, and he trembled all over. din lasted for some time, and graduallyapappalling proached his chamber.

Seizinghis with his at

once,

with

sword

his

righthand, and a pistol the co1(Hielboldly awaited the assault. All left, the door flew open as if by enchantment. At

of the spectre which the terrific appearance entered, Bretiole's nerveless hands droppedthe sword and pistol ;

horror and astonishment,the for,to his inexpressible

ment mo-

the hideous

his sightboth candles met apparition but by what means he was utterly at a were extinguished, The figure had fiery lossto conceive. eyes, roared like an enraged lion,and rattled glowing chains. An infernal

hundred

a

cannon-balls

heard

was

commenced

now

uproar

thousand

over

All

that resembling

succeeded

and, lastof all,was A

it seemed

as

if

a

to and fro. Presently rolling a dismal howlingand mewing,as though from dogs and cats ; and the neighingof horses

report was

:

were

swelled the hellishconcert.

This

head

by

of

there

at once a

a

a

ning stun-

twenty-four pounder.

the harmonious

heard

was

chime

of bells,

shout piercing

of

I Victory

inanimate.

The

spectre

death-like silence ensued. The

colonel

thumped him

lay like

one

and his servant

both with chains.

and beat them unmercifully,

It retired, and descended the stairswith

who had been onlytaken clatter. The colonel, prodigious and who was not deficienteither in presence by surprise, a

of mind

firmness,soon

or

recovered

himself.

"

If this

tainly thoughthe to himself, he must cersteel and bullets ; his body against have protected will be able neither sword nor pistol but if it be a spirit, it. Should the ghastly to make upon any impression figurereturn, I will muster courage and softlyfollow

spectre be

a

man,"

"

zed by Digiti;


*

At

the

report, four sturdy fellows

upiiroacliedhliu

with

Mghts:" "Page

zed Digiti;

by

101.


zed Digiti;

by


THE

HAUNTED

101

CASTLE.

designhe so confinned himself, bent on executing that he was quences it,letthe conseresolutely be what theymight. In about an hour the goblinagaincame up stairswith before. Bretiole, whose heart was a noise as as frightful in the rightplace, not to be driven from his purpose. was which the submitted He to the discipline patiently hideous being again bestowed on him and his servant. ing clatterAt lengthit rushed out at the door with the same and clankingnoise which accompaniedits entrance. The colonel, true to his purpose, involuntarily grasped and cautiously a pistol pursued the spectre. Seemingly

it as it retires."

aware

In this

it retired with of his intention,

its face towards

him, so that its fiery eyes served him instead of

a

lantern.

all around flamingspectre suddenlydisappeared: dark as pitch, and Bretiole was obliged to pause. was now He had previously imagined that he could hear that the precededby several persons, the sounds of spectre was whom suddenlyceased before he lostsightof the figure. time he heard his servant At the same above,shrieking lamentable manner. and howlingin the most Hundreds, had theybeen in the placeof our hero,would sick of the nocturnal long ere. this have been heartily adventure, and after the firstdepartureof the^ spectre the haunted castle forever. .would have quitted Bretiole, The

however,

was

he

not

yet daunted.

formed

the

Without

deration farther consi-

desperateresolution of pursuing

his way alongthe dark passage end of it. Scarcelyhad he

tillhe should

reach

the

proceededa few paces, he sunk into an abyss. At the bottom of it when down found himself on a heap of hay and straw. he fortunately In the fall he had involuntarily of his pulledthe trigger which was cocked, and fired. At the report,four pistol, 9*

zed by Digiti;


102

STORIES.

GHOST

sturdyfellows approachedhim with lights. Audacious dog !" cried one of them, how darest thou to presume to hither?" come They seized him by the arms, and dragged him like a criminal into a room where upwards "

"

of twenty persons,

of whom

some

seemed

of the

be

to

higherclass,were seated round a table. The apartment furnished,and adorned with costly was elegantly tapestry. fixed upon him ; and they The eyes of all were instantly seemed he

at

was ""

be

to

Rash

induced

less astonished

not

at

his appearance

than

what

hath

theirs. !"

man

thee

at

lengthsaid to this

to come

of them,

one

castle ?

Has

no

"

warned

one

thy temeritywould infallibly thee thy life? Prepareto die for die thou must." Bretiole ; I swear Die !" replied by the king that

thee,no cost

told thee that

one

"

"

"

for my death !" ye will pay dearly ** Away with the impudentdog !" cried another will show

him

heed

we

not

"

we

his threats."

words, the four fellows againseized him, and

At these

shut him up in

by

that

:

this time

a

dark,narrow

convinced thoroughly

but among spectres,

men

who

colonel was

The

dungeon. that he

was

not

here assembled

were

among on

some

He perceived business. a ray importantbut mysterious which penetrated his prisonby a knot-hole in the of light

door. hear

clapped his ear how his judgesdebating

them

He

to

the

his intrusion could

from

this aperture, and

danger which

could

menaced

best be averted.

Some

for the death of the adventurer; voted,without hesitation, but others

were

agreedthat

of a different opinion. At

he should be

lengthit was

againbroughtbefore

them

and

examined, and then they would consider of his sentence. them with his rank, the object The colonel acquainted of his

journey,and

his motive

for

passingthe nightin

zed by Digiti;


104

STORIES.

GHOST

but the majority discussion, were

vehement

colonel's life, but also for

sparingthe

not

him setting

onlyfor ty, liber-

at

givinghis word of honour ; and their opinion ultimately prevailed.Bretiole awaited the final result of this long consultation in his prison.As a man, he of could not hear this decision of his fate from the lips the subterraneous president without evident demonstrations of the greatestjoy. He was dismissed in the politest Two now manner. of the attendants accompanied him to the passage through which he had come in the dark, and conducted him by a his

on

door

secret

to

pursuitof

the

that he had

got off with

The

spectre.

whole

a

colonel thanked

to

his bed.

cordial ; and both hastened from the den of murderers the parsonage. a

wink

againalive.

in Jutland.

He

was

a party justentertaining

neighbouring gentry, when

informed him

that

a

groom,

to speak to particularly

groom

the colonel

who had meanwhile years after this event, Bretiole, been appointedprivy-councillor, was on residing

estate

of the

to

clergymanhad been unable to sleep for anxiety, with delight, and he was transported

in his house

his

a

The

he beheld when, contrary to his expectations,

Some

his

revived the faithfulfellow hke

his master

sightof

on fright

his

Heaven

skin,and hastened

he found half dead with

servant, whom

The

he had commenced

the staircase where

delivered

present from

some

to

him

a

entered

servant

with three led

and

horses,desired

Bretiole went

out, and the

letter, saying,that it was

a

ting gentlemenof his acquaintance.Put-

the bridlesof two into the hand

him.

a

beautifulchestnut exquisitely

of his

with the other like

a

horses

the groom darted away attendant, which enclosed bird. The letter,

zed by Digiti;


105

CASTLE.

HAUNTED

THE

gold medal of the value of twenty ducats,contained the following passage : fell in subterraneous The which you once society

a

finelyexecuted "

with

is

and dissolved,

promiseand

oath.

is desirous of

The and name

a

therefore releases you

It admires

expressing

your

from

your for which it silence,

its

acknowledgments. enclosed medal will enable you to guess its object, of its members, either by though you know none or rank, still tbeycannot deny themselves the pleasure of presenting horses sent herewith as to you the two to

you

token of their esteem." a

heart lightened

whole

adventure, and

With the

Bretiole related all did

declare that the

him

to

the

his guests

justiceto so artfully

pranksof these coiners were devised,and so cleverly executed,that every one of them in his placewould, in his firstfright, have been convinced that he had

seen

a

real spectre.

zed by Digiti;


106

THE

MANTLE

GREEN A

TRUE

VENICE.

STORY.

of counting-house

The

OF

Mr.

of that fact, Tobias,the old man-servant,

doubt, and

haunted

Mellingerwas

often told Rosina, the

entertained

:

no

housekeeper, though

of the under the strictestinjunction

sacred silence,

most

that in the middle of the the went

nighthe heard noises in it ; that opened and shut ; that the ghost great ledgerswere about slipshod, and that he could frequently tinguish disof money. the jingling

The

cupied ocnunnery ; the firstfloorwas derable Mr. Mellinger, who had fitted it up at consi-

house had been

by

expense

;

a

his business

was

and the exterior and all the floor,

confined rest

to

the

ground-

left in their

were

from motives of economy, and partly partly because his onlydaughter,Emmeline, who found in it that the solemn gloom somethingromantic,had petitioned of the antiquated cloistersmight remain inviolate. Her good taste had preservedthe dark cells,and the whole of the building proclaimed arrangement of this portion littlevisionary not that the young and lovely owner a ; she aflfectedto be thoughtso, for there could not be a state original

;

"

more

natural character than that of Emmeline. had been

one

of the

of the real world, no created

one

earlyage,

of its own. and her father

utmost

wonder She was

cation Her edu-

artlessness, and, ignorant if her

glowing fancy

had lost her mother so

with occupied-

zed by Digiti;

at

his

an

two


MANTLE

GREEN

THE

that it millions of dollars, much the

his

to

even

had

She

and and station,

heart,that it would herself for

to attend

left her

life of the

a

her

to most ut-

teenth eigh-

learned all that became

have

her age the holyinnocence of her

cost

her very littleto devote

cloister.

to a

ever

and thus, in

was perfect

so

had

He

him

she reached tranquillity,

retirement and year.

;

107

VENICE.

foi impossible

was

onlychild.

of the Ursulines

care

OF

had an old housekeeper, whom Mellinger repeated him to discharge acts of gross dishonesty obliged ; in her of excellent stead he engaged Rosina, a young woman character,and fetched his daughterfrom the convent to placeher at the head of his domestic aflairs. The report of her beautysoon spread far and wide. As yet Mr. MelUnger had entertained no company ; but now aunts, cousins,uncles,and relations from all parts of the city, endeavoured to gaina sight of her ; for theythoughtthat the young ladywith a fortune of two millions of dollars Mr.

would

be

bad match

no

either old

or

her monastic

world

; but

gay

homage which,

:

change in

her

of the

her father could Emmeline

at once

retirement into what

in

not

or

invited

was

dinners,

to

longer

no

emerged

is called the

feasts, and the splendidentertainments,

charms, made either rich

She

and importunities,

from

or

concerts

of their families,

member

some

young.

and balls,

suppers, resisttheir

for

a

the

thousand

forms,was

paid

slightest on impression

nature.

beautiful.

She Her

knew

not

to

her

her mind,

that she

father,however, was

was

well

^itdid not escape objects theyhad in view him that the heavenlymaiden and the godlikegoldwere but little what theysought: it required to see penetration and with great skill he contrived throughtheir designs, to keep them at a distance without givingofience. At aware

"

zed by Digiti;


108

GHOST

STOKIES.

after returning from night,

his custom

party, it was

a

to

in review before his daughter ; and pass all the company he in the art of ridicule, that there was so skilful was

took

Emmeline

his talent in this way, that cisms, to his critipleasure in listening

more

than in the conversation and

a

of the most

man

the

equalin againsaw

and penetration,

acute

knowledgeof

those of whom

mankind he had

the truth of all his observations. Emmeline

when passed,

all who charms

:

that he had

spoken,she recognised Half

a

absolute

not

drew

no

she when, therefore,

year had

ly scarce-

laughedat everybody;

were

her fortune

or

of the

amusements

had often heard that her father was

itself. She

company

pulledto

not

was

agreeablewas

So

pieces.

that

hair of their heads

scarcelya

devotees

back, while the

car

to

sequently, con-

her

of her

followed only by silly triumph was wights,to whose but who nevertheless sighsshe would not condescend to listen, assailed her with amorous effusions in incessantly prose and

verse.

had been admired before,people as she proportion now began to cool in her praise.The first stone was her beautiful and mothers, among whom cast by daughters face,her largeexpressiveeyes, her noble carriage, In

her made

the jewels, glittering a

thousand

than these

enemies.

mothers sons

vows

ignorantof were

But

the suitors whose

were

and whose was

eternal

she had the

of variety

stillmore

her

apparel,

bitter

devotions had been

rejected.Yet

of this alteration: the

cause

she missed

attachment which

and daughterscivil, the hearty, open, and

she had found

among

the

affectionateUrsulines in the

days of

the walls that

from the world, no

her separated

spised, de-

line Emme-

stillcourteous, the

flattering ; but

even

her

youth.

zed by Digiti;

the cere sin-

honest, Within on"

en-


THE

Tied her,no

MANTLE

GREilN

one

ridiculed by her

was

the love of all, and

109

VENICE.

OF

nowhere

there she sessed poselse did she feel ;

chamber. This was happy but there and in her solitary what Mr. Mellinger wished : his plancompletely exactly succeeded.

She became

of the tedious intercourse

weary

of heartless crowds, and returned

to

her

housekeeping,

her books,her instruments,and her flowers. The

father was

not

loss for a son-in-law.

at a

been connected for many

with the

years

whose merchant, Sponseri,

onlyson,

had

He

tian wealthyVeneequalin fortune

Emmeline, having been bred to business under his about to enter a foreign father,was now counting-house. to

Old

Sponseri,who

had

head, well knew speculative the good circumstances of Mr. Mellinger : he knew, too, that be had an onlydaughter, whose age corresp"mded with that of his son ; that his widely-extended trade was an

a

instructive school for a young

had already sent Mellinger scholars. should

into the world

therefore made

He

merchant

the

;

and that Mr.

some

very apt

proposalthat his

son

for a few counting-house Mellinger's ingly, willacceptedthe more ; and it was years without salary the expense not onlybecause he should thus save of a clerk,but in the hope that young Sponseriand his might in time form a matrimonial daughterEmmeline serve

in Mr.

and thus connection,

a

business be established with

of not less than four millions. one

of his clerks on

the

He

a

tal capi-

therefore dismissed

from Venice, of intelligence receipt

that young Sponseriwould in a short time have the honour to wait upon him in person. " stance Man ;" and in this inproposes, but Grod disposes it

was

ordered that the fathers should be

disap-

in their project. lK"inted

Thus

matters

stood at the time when

Rosina

10

zed by Digiti;

imparted


110 to

GHOST

Emmeline

the

from old Tobias

STORIESi

which intelligence

under

a

in

received

promise of the strictestsecrecy,

the strange noises regarding

Emmeline

she had

he had

listened

to

heard

in the

her with

ing-house. count-

great

tion: atten-

spite of her cultivated understanding, many-

notions of supernatural thingsstillclungto superstitious her, owing to her monastic education ; and she could not a certain anxietyproduced by Rosina's overcome story. she considered whether it was On reflection, not possible that some might thus be attempted. The imposition had originally been the oratory of the counting-house abbess : it adjoined the church, which was stillused for pubUc worship,and was separatedfrom it only by an iron

door,furnished with three

One

of the bolts and

two

stout

bolts and locks.

of the locks could be

opened

and the others from the church from the counting-house,

if,therefore,any of the

servants

had

an

:

understanding

nothingwould be easier than to enter the and to do justas theypleased.The doorway counting-house, should have been bricked up longago, but it had not Mr. Mellingerbought the nunnery, when been agreed, the expense : ithad therefore remained who should defray in statu qtw, as Mr. Mellingerwould not lay out a than he could help. more shilling Emmeline had promisedRosina not to mention a word about the supposedghostto any person whatever ; but she now considered it her duty to communicate the matter it more that he mightinvestigate to her father, ly. minuteHer father laughedat her, as well he might,for it he himself, had been heard slipwas who, after midnight, shod in the counting-house. There was a secret staircase, known to no one else, from his chamber, formerly occupied converted into a by the abbess,into the old chapel, now with the sexton,

zed by Digiti;


112

STO"IES.

GHOST

The

a word, entered Mantle, without uttering

Green

if he had known all the as proceeding, struck upon passages, to the door of the counting-house, that the whole building it three times so loudly againre"" trembled : the previous echoed. Mr. Mellinger knocking

the house, and

at

the house-door

at so

unseasonable

him, and he had hurried up

to his

hour had alarmed

an

chamber

for the

key

that he might open it and see who counting-house, admission. it could be that so impetuouslydemanded he was when At the very moment turningthe key in the lock,the three heavy blows dealt on the outside of the solid door platedwith iron made his heart sink within of the

him, and he recollected what Emmeline the

morningabout

had told him

in

the nocturnal visitor.

perceivedthat the door was ing-house, not fastened within,he opened it,stalked into the countter leta word, held forth a and, without uttering to Mr. Mellinger, who, at the firstglimpse of the was utterly dismayed. He took it with deathlyvisage, a trembling hand, and found that it was from old Sponsethe bearer as his son Guilielmo. ri,introducing Mr. Mellingerrecovered a little During the reading, ; he secretly his needless apprehensions, and received laughedat When

the Green

the

of his old friend in such

son

in business

him

to

Mantle

on

terms

these occasions.

his house, and would

as

his intended

but the young man drew back. son-in-law, not," cried he, in a hollow tone,"" I am dead

this

morning

came.

Mr.

"

^I must

return

to

the

tomary cus-

welcomed

He

have embraced

are

"

"

Touch

me

^Iexpired

placefrom

which

I

Farewell!"

blood curled as Mellinger's spokewith dull unmoving eyes ;

the Green and

as

Mantle thus

the

deadlycold

hand, stretched forthfrom the foldsofthe robe,touched him

zed by Digiti;


GBEEN

THE

at

stood like a

the power alone remained.

of

he

"To-morrow," of the letterI have

to

Mantle

Green

extinct in him

was

his cadaverous

me

;

hand,

to

my

receiptfor the safe dehvery

a

that brought,

I may hand decent interment,for I am

you to my here,and know none return

waving

end, and

on

continued, "I shall appear

Give

father in Venice.

Look

The

of marble ; all Hfe

statue

speech,and

my

his hair stood

;

chilled in his bones.

marrow

113

VENICE.

OF

shrieked aloud

he parting,

the

MANTLE

but you.

it

to

him.

stranger

a

If Providence

then mits perof misery,I shall soon see

this world

again. I shall report all your deeds to the eternal God, who judgesus as we judge others : act accordingly. you

Farewell !

I yearn for my

grave ; but firstthe

with palsied hand, complied: Mellinger,

Mr.

!" receipt the

pale

seized it,thrust it into the cuff of his mantle,and spirit

proceededto the door,followed by the merchant. but seeing Tobias was his master waitingthere with a light, hold it. The corpsetremble with fear,could scarcely Hke spectre,with ghastly look,stared him in the face,and without uttering word, glidedslowlypast him, and a the house. quitted Follow the stranger,"whisperedMr. Mellinger, in then

"

the

of the

ear

Tobias, and petrified "

where

see

he goes

to." Tobias shook his head

he, in a

a

subdued

tone,

a ghost, spirit, or,

"My

"

:

"

dear master," returned

My

that is

no

stranger ; itis a corpse,

for aught I know, the devil himself."

dear Tobias," rejoined Mr.

in a tone Mellinger, will giveyou two guilders ; go,

of unusual

kindness, I

foUow

him

; see

young

Sponseriof Venice;

"

where

he stops ; it is I

a

forgotto

stranger; it is ask where

lodges." 10*

zed by Digiti;

he


114

GHOST

STORIES.

"

Mellingcrhad

Mr.

dear Tobias," neither

"

servant

before called his old faithful

never

had

he

offered him

ever

for a single errand. guilders

two

Tobias mustered

courage, crossed

himself,and

went.

followed the

He

figureat a distance through mysterious the longsilent street : justas the clock of the next church struck twelve,it reached the cemetery of the Augustine thrice at the iron gate, which

knocked

and friars,

The

opened from within. closed after him

his astonished "

Say

and old Tobias

Mantle entered

not

a

he had

what

master

; the

gate

thrilledwith horror.

was

quicklyround, hastened home,

turned

He

;

Green

was

and

reportedto

and heard.

seen

word, Tobias, about what

has

happened,** two ers guild-

givingthe old man the began Mr. Mellinger, I will endeavour which he had promised: to-morrow Mr. Sponseri to to learn where lodged. Now go quietly secret." bed, and keep the matter a profound his servant, slepta wink Neither Mr. Mellinger, nor ter that night. The former read over and over againthe letIt was delivered to him by the ghastly messenger. the handwritingof the elder Sponseri,who, certainly recommended with paternal to him his son Guiaffection, "

lielmo,and solicitedhis kind attention He

laid considerable

to go so

far from home

under Mr.

to

to

on

to

his

and

concluded with

time how

to

his

chargethe

a

same

;

delayof

the

journeycould

four weeks

in the

not

self, him-

thousand to

his

ducats account.

been written

take up there had been from some consequently, weeks

to be requesting

conducted

son

the date of this letter it had

From

man.

an suffering onlychild

supplyhim annuallywith

for pocketmoney,

the young

finish his mercantile education

and Mellinger,

informed from time and

stress

to

more

cause

than or

five one

other

delivery.Accordingto

zed by Digiti;

: a

his


THE

GREEN

declaration he

learn of the to

Mr.

115

VENICE.

for he was recently, hoped in the morning to Mellinger residence of the deceased,and

the police

await the result of this inquirybefore he

his acquaint

to

OF

have died very

must

stillunburied.

MANTLE

father with the fatalintelligence.

words of the

" iron upon deeds to the eternal Grod,who

others."

did the

What

"

judges us pallidinhabitant

by this intimation ? He last judgmentof God was to be held He

wrote

apparition laylike a mass of red-hot his heart. I shall report,'* said he, allyour

The

world

solved re-

mean

viewed

his past lifewith

judge

we

as

of the nether

felt as

though the

forthwith upon him. and resolved to contrition,

reform. after breakfast, he hurried morning,immediately the residence of Guilielmo to the pohce-office to inquire The clerk turned to the register. Sponseriof Venice. Next

"

He

Hved," said he, "

at

the Sun

Inn, No. 14, and died

ing years,"addmorningat the age of twenty-five yesterday full description of his person. a Every particular exactlytallies,"repliedMr. Mellingervnth profound emotion,clappinghis hand to his brow, and with faltering from the office. He hastened to the Sun step retiring for young Sponseri, conducted was Inn, and on inquiring to

No, 14, where

he beheld the terrificvisitantof the preceding

extended on |i bier,with a green mantle night, thrown over him, and a white paper in the cuff. loosely The old man's heart was readyto break : he wept, perhaps for the firsttime in fifly years, that is to say, in his whole to

life.

"

What

the waiter,who

The

waiter drew

paper

had

is that in the cuff?" said he

conducted

him

to

the chamber.

it forth,opened it,and showed

it to Mr.

who trembled violently, when he saw Mellinger, which he had written with his own the receipt was

zed by Digiti;

that it hand


116 the

STOBIES.

GHOST

precedingnight.

itback ! put it back

Put

"

Mellingerwith

said the horror-struck Mr.

again!"

averted face,

that GuiJielmo had told him he intended to recollecting give this receiptto his father to prove the due delivery of his letter. Having uttered a silent prayer at the foot in great perturbation, of the corpse, he hastened home and was with a face in which it received by Emmeline was acquaintedwith all that easy to read that she was had passed. Tobias had told the whole story to Rosina, it to EmmeHne. and Rosina could not helptelling will receive the sacrament,*' On Sunday,my dear,we said he, and every Saturdayyou shall give away ten dollars in charity to the poor ; and if you chance to hear "

"

of any

one

in

Henceforward, too, you

you

no

peoplesay

fit; and I

will do every of

a

and

twice

beer

to your givingthem objection

think

am

tell

so, but

thingin

God

know^

power

my

meat

if I appear

me

relieve him.

allow Tobias

may

bread and butter for supper, have

that I may

tell me, distress,

to

and a

week.

I

for dinner,if

close

it is not

Rosina

or

true

stingy; ; and

I

avoid the appearance

penuriousdisposition."

at the deeplyaflfected; but she rejoiced time at the changein her father ; for she now same began to perceivethat he had not alwaysbeen so kind as at this Mr. Mellingerthen sent for his chief clerk, moment. that Mr. Sponseri, informed him and briefly who, as he knew, was expectedfrom Venice, had arrived in their but died almost immediately. He directed him to city, funeral,to be charged to giveorders for a very splendid of Sponseri, senior. the account "My dear Slipps,'* continued Mr. MelHnger, you must invite all the principal houses in the place; and I must beg you to follow the corpse to the grave in my stead: the melancholy

Emmeline

was

"

zed by Digiti;


THE

has

GREEN

MANTLE

OF

deeplyaffected me, that I am it will be impossible for me to attend." Mr. Mellinger also gave directionsthat an event

and quiteill,

so

should be inserted in the

117

VENICE.

advertisement

publicpapers for a clerk to

duct con-

the

which young Englishand Italiancorrespondence, Sponseriwas to have undertaken; adding a particular that it should be very short, of the account on injunction exorbitant chargesof the newspaper gentry. The young interred with the utmost man was accordingly and Mr. Stippswas called in to givea magnificence, did you dress him, Mr. report of his proceedings. How Stipps?" asked Emmeline, who had listened to him with "

evident interest:

"

in black,of course."

the clerk,"but replied he expressly desired to be which he had alwaysworn. in the

cuff,and that

the Sun

found

a

So

we

in which

paper

buried in the green There was a note

leftthere,because

ed," intend-

mantle

sticking

the waiter

at

that you. Sir,had read itand ly expressordered that itshould not be taken away."

"

"

assured

we

we

"

"

me

look well ?" inquired Emmeline. Did the young man No doubt he did when alive,"repliedthe clerk

;

peopleare dead when the eyes are deep cold and sunk, the cheeks paleand hollow,the face livid, stiff" theydo not usually look over and above well. This "

but when

whole

business ;

"

"

"

with

peopleknow

How

so

Excuse

not

what

me.

Sir ; I do not

At

at night,

sheet

most

nary extraordi-

think of it!"

daughterboth

at once.

that I think any ill, what others may think. This

only,that I know not the son young gentleman, morning; he was laid out, a

to

?" asked father and

but

him, and

Sponseriis

young

over

say

of your friend,died in the the green mantle spreadover

that,and

eleven o'clock

the room-door

the precisely,

locked.

lock of the door

zed by Digiti;


118

GHosrr

stories.

rattled this the waiter heard "

stairs awoke

sleepsdown that

one

some

was

at

; the distinctly

porter who

the noise,and

with

he the house-door,

rose

:

thinking

at

that moment

passedhim in the dark, and said in a deep,hollow, sepulchral voice,*Open the door!' half asleep with fright, and overpowered The man obeyed to this command, and the Green Mantle glided past him inMantle

the Green

the "

What

say you to this ?" be merciful to his soul !" ejaculated Mr.

street.

God

Mellin-

ger. **

Well, and

morning,what

next

then ?" asked the

tonished as-

Emmeline. "

Why,

morning,there laythe

next

corpse

on

the bier

before,with the green mantle over him, and in the cuff the paper, which, according to your directions. Sir, as

to

was

be buried with

him.

Not

creature

a

him

saw

heard the door open for him ; the lock was oath that the \ininjured ; and the waiter is readyto make back

come

was

paper

or

not

in the cuff before

it,and found your of the contents

"

a

I beUeve

low "

:

he took it out,

Sir,at the bottom,but

name.

he could not read,it was

I trembled

a

said little,"

written

opened

the

rest

bly." illegi-

so

in Mellinger,

Mr.

tone.

For heaven's sake I" cried honest it then

interrupting Stipps, ? Where ^ifI reallyyour writing the question where did you meet

him,

"

may

venture

with

this terribleGreen

was

to

ask

"

"

Mantle ?

It must

have

been

at

night! Be not angry. Sir, but indeed there are some circumstances connected with this dreadfully mysterious Mr. Sponseri. in Mr. Mellinger, "Ask me not, good Stipps," rejoined I can: a tremulous voice which betrayedhis agitation "

zed by Digiti;


120

GHOST

the

salaryin

any

STORIES.

here hope of acquiring

that in which

I

stilldeficient. In my former situations I have saved enough to last me for several years. I have therefore am

hut

this

wish, and

one

is,that you would

permitme

to

to hoard

In

I should

be

been to

sure

obtain it "

rehnquishmy prospect here." Mr. Mellinger hemmed, and of his clerks eaten when

it was

the persons

at

men

sometimes

but I should

was

about to

hke

not

his custom in his

rate, seemed

too

give an

to

employ;

entertainment

but the young

services he could

valuable

a

prizeto

to

his refusal, signify

his table, on Christmas excepting

stranger,whose a

informed,all

am

since the establishment of his house had

for never

to

into bad unavoidably, former situationsI have enjoyedthis extremelycomfortable. At Naples

my

and privilege,

descension con-

indeed

and

get, in consequence, company.

; but young

the

tahle and

your

clerks,as I

Your your house. and lodge elsewhere

lodgein hoard

at

have

one

day, to

all

and well-informed

gainat

so

cheap

be lost for the sake

condition. He therefore repliedthat he single he leftthe managewould consult his daughter, to whom ment of his house, and givehim an answer. he acquainted Emmeline with the circumstance. Accordingly him first," Let's see said the daughterof the with somethingof the spirit of wealthyMr. Mellinger, commercial pride. Oh ! he will be sure to pleaseyou," repliedthe father,littlethinkingof the dangerto which he might possibly by the introduction expose Emmeline of the young stranger into her company, and considering only what an advantageousbargainhe should make by at such a securingthe benefit of his talents and industry in his deportment; not price. He is very gentlemanly but as modest as he is of young like the generafity men, of that

"

"

"

zed by Digiti;


THE

handsome.

GREEN

He

Just

soon

as

the house

that matter.

;)that

need

you

dinner

perhapsmake

our

cheerful."

will be

Quite, quite!

**

will

We

"

we

have

may the

of the best in

one

goodenough,I suppose."

His victuals will

him

pour

;

let him

can

;" (which, was by-the-by,

room

green

121

VENICE.

said Emmeline father," please,

you

arrange

OF

speakswell,and

table a littlemore "

MANTLE

but

out

one

not

much, and

cost

glassof

wine

after

would

but heat his young blood." In this they proceeded to arrange the whole course of more

"

manner

his meals, the old

gentlemanenforcingthat degreeof or, more frugality, properlyspeaking,parsimony,for which he had been distinguished throughlife. Young Wilmsen called thisfollowing morning,learned with manifest joy that his terms took poswere accepted, session of his post,and had his desk.

His firstduty was

sudden

decease of his

he received from

seat

allottedto him

inform old

to

to agreeably

son,

at

the

of Sponseri

the

the instructions

Mellinger.The latter of course venture, abstained from the slightest allusion to the nocturnal adand chargedhis new his correclerk to assure spondent of his most profound sympathy in this his painful loss. Accordingto his representation, Sponseri young had

sent

thither He

went

of

to

Mr.

request him

but immediately, on

to state

to

was

his inn

;

he hastened

to

dead.

his arrival found him

on

for the purpose

he life havingproved fruitless,

be interred on

demonstrations of respectdue of the expense

to

that all the attempts made

him recalling

had caused him

to come

to

enclosed.

the third day with allthe his family ; and

In this account

an

account

not a

kreut-

forgotten.I should wish you, Mr. Wilmsen," from our ordinary added Mr. Mellinger,to deviate a little Old style:make ita littlepathetic^you understand me. zer

was

"

"

"

U

zed by Digiti;


122

GHOST

Sponserilikes that sort

STORIES.

thing; he is worth a coupleof and one would willingly afford such a man millions, as which costs nothing." that a gratification Wilmsen havingrapidlyfinished a rough draft of the of

submitted it with great difiidence letterin Italian,

to

his

read it with such

delightthat he could to himself as he proceeded not refrain from exclaiming : In fact he was Excellent ! Capital ! Just the thing!" had to admit, that such a composition compelledsecretly never yet issued from his counting-house. took Wilmsen Dinner-time arrived,and Mr. Mellinger alongwith him, and introduced him to his daughter. employer.

He

'"

blushed

Emmeline to

have

and

him

seen

at

her

prayed by

he bowed

as

to

her,for she recollected

the cathedral, where at

the

high

altar.

knelt

he had

She had

carried

away with her the image of the handsome young man, without knowing herself how deep an impression it had made

on

her

heart,and

she

was

now

surprisedby the

of the

to her original.He sat opposite her lovely on figure ; but whenever gazed intfently eye met his,he cast itdown on his plateand seemed in thought.

appearance

"

old

The

man

young

gentlemanto

his

his fork twice,and

is rather awkward," afterdinner daughter,

you handed him of the table-cloth."

"

Want

How way of excuse. " with such various and he writes like

the stains

*"

he

the cake will

I

am

vex

a

can

he her sorbed ab-

the

dropped he

be got

never

of education,father,"repliedEmmehne, "

bai^n.

;

the stain of the red wine which

when spilt out

observed

:

by

that be," rejoined her father,

extensive

and is Geliert,

a

acquirements?

"

merchant

bom

then

into the

exceedingly pleasedwith him ; though be got out of tl^t me they will never "

zed by Digiti;


THE

cloth.

GREEN

MANTLE

OF

I belieye I had better make

his board

:

his conversation is none

123

VENICE.

him

for

allowance

an

of the liveliest ; nay,

obligedto ask him twice before he answered my the course of exchange at Basle,so concerning question sparingis he of his words." He may Emmeline, improvein time,father,"replied I

was

**

who

loss to guess the cause of Wilmsen's barrassment emwhen he droppedhis fork and spilt his wine,

at no

was

discovered in his abstraction the tenderest homage

and who ;

for her

fixed upon him when talk about Basle and the course of

was

eye

her father

justthen

began to to which she had exchange. A feeling strangerpervadedher innocent bosom ; laughedand wept at the same moment. her father.

firsttriumph over clerk had been Her

much

stranger,whose

that she

a

she

could have

She

enjoyedthe

The

young and handsome attentive to her than to him.

flattered; and

vanitywas

heart subsided into an the

more

hitherto been

tender emotion

a

of her

interest in behalf of inexpressible whole deportmentplainlyevinced

far from indifferentto him.

was

meal night Wilmsen sent back the parsimonious ordered for him by Mr. Mellinger, for he had bespoken at the firsthotel in the city, a supper he had to which invited allthe clerks of the house. Next morningStipps

At

gave

There

his was

master a

faithful account

of profusion

could furnish. Wilmsen

a

The

of the

entertainment.

all the delicacies that the

firstthree

toasts

city

proposed by Mr.

Miss Mellingfer" MeOinger" Success to Commerce drunk to the ;" and they were sound of drums and trumpets. The most wines, costly circulated ; but Champagne, had been freely particularly for the moment the clock struck ten, Wilmsen apologized anxious to to leave the company, as he was beingobliged were,

"*

Mr.

"

"

"

"

zed by Digiti;


124

GHOST

avoid

STORIES.

causing any disturbance

the

familyof his employer. The rest of the party remained tilla carousing late hour, the landlord having express orders to supply old Tobias was and even whatever was made required, royalwith the good cheer. Mr. Mellinger fore prickedup his ears : he had never bein his counting-house had such a mgn ; neither had his health and his daughter's ever yet been drunk to the and trumpets. Give him two glasses sound of drums when said he to EmmeHne, of wine to-day," old Stipps it must had retired : have cost him somethingto do us this honour, and the peoplein the neighbourhood must to

*'

*^

have been astonished

learn that it was

to

my

clerks who

themselves in such style." regaling At dinner this day Wilmsen at home, more a little was asked by the questions but stillhe did not alwaysanswer did not once open her lips the old gentleman. Emmeline for rested unconsciously, to him, but her eyes frequently the young stranger. Mr. Mellinger on a minute together, thanked him for the toasts of the precedingevening. Wilmsen apologizedfor having presumed to propose were

them

;

"

but," said he,

"

the littleentertainment

which

I

of purchasingmy freedom in the society vice, my comrades,who have the good fortune to be in your serdid not acquire its appropriate character of festivity tillwe rose with brimming glassin hand, to express our which has broughtus ardent wishes to that Providence of our here together, for the duration of the prosperity manifestly young mistress and yourself."Mr. Mellinger, gratified by the honour done him, poured out with his hand a third glassfor the prepossessing speaker. own him too for his have thanked Emmeline would willingly gave

by

way

remembrance

of

of her in the circleof his

new

zed by Digiti;

associates,but


she could

not

moment

Wilmsen

been

vexed with herself:

was

complimenton the What to recur. impossible

past for payinghim

was

it was

now

think of her ?

She

silent!

125

VENICE.

lips. She appearedstrange,nay

mistaken, cast towards her had

OF

eyes ; she

own

to which subject,

must

her

open

in her ridiculous,

the

MANTLE

GREEN

THE

a

a

had, if she

He

look of

not

was

and expectation,

upbraidedherself the whole

she

day

for it.

evening,the frugalsupplyof bread for him by the careful Rosina was out Wilmsen supped out ; and the same for several succeeding days.

and

In the

dealt

made

afternoon

One

an

letterfrom following "

I

am

very

in which Last

wear

nightI

:

your letter to Mr. this table. upon

my

*

"

I

a

ghost to dead,

am

He

; it is

shall soon

your

is not yet

son

ter, letrived. ar-

pered my bedside,and whisfather ; but I delivered

receiptfor it I lay interred me : thank decently

and Mellinger,

dark, cold grave. You

with the

that my Guilielmo, wrapped which he was accustomed to

has

his

him for the last honours that he has

Now, farewell

was

dreamt

like

ear

that my

me

mantle

here, came in my

: Sponseri YesterdayI received

inform

in the green

excuse

the elder

uneasy. you

turned. again re-

arrived from Venice

express

butter

paid to

and I past midnight, The

grave

hear

more

is

a

of me.'

my

must

dismal "

remains. return

to

father. place,

I awoke

"

the

from my figureof my son was gone. On recovering I smiled to think that it was How fright, onlya dream. is it possible, thoughtI,that death should so soon have snatched away my robust,hearty, bloomingGuilielmo,in all the vigourof early manhood ? With this idea I strove awakened when his words to silence my apprehensions, 11*

zed by Digiti;


126

GHOST

STORIES.

recurred concerningyour receipt my

eyes to the table that stands

enough, a piece of

lay,sure breathe fire:

by

I turned

:

bed, and upon

my

I could

paper.

for the servants,

; I rang

mind

to my

scarcely

if the house

as

cold perspiration issued from every pore. !' cried I,in an ! for God's sake, lights lights

it

were *

a

on

Lights! of

agony

instantly brought:I snatched the from the table ; it was written by you, a receipt paper with a trembling but evidently hand. My senses forsook I can but I conjureyou, my tell you no more; me. the mystery. I would come friend,to explain to you myself, terror.

Lightswere

but that I

confined

am

the shock which

bed in consequence

to my

this circumstance

has

of this letterto

the contents

municate Com-

givenme. nobody.

immediately by express, and without reserve Adieu !" preparedfor the worst. old Mellingerwith This letteroverwhelmed

Answer

me

From

date, Guilielmo

the

must

have

of

^I am

"

ment. astonish-

delivered

the

receiptat Venice the firstnightafter his interment.

By

no

human

not

means,

could the distance have been shall record all your Green

powers Mr.

by

even

the

traversed

actions,"were

of flight

a

in that time.

bird, "

I

the words of the mysterious

Mantle, and that he possessed supernatural

plainly provedby this letter. to write to sat down Mellingernow

the disconsolate

faithful account

of all the

was

father,and

gave

connected particulars

him

with

this time forward he became

a

the horrid most

apparition.From

conscientious in allhis

he manifested,to the surprise of all his dealings ; and and the whole city, kind, so humane, so acquaintance nessed that many who had witand so generous a disposition, his severity his former parsimony, to poor artisans, unable and his unfeeling to debtors who treatment were

zed by Digiti;


128 loves he

God

chastens."

and turned away, silence, see

STORIES.

GHOST

Mellingershook that the young

anguishdepictedin

the

man

his head

in

might not

his face at the mention

of

divine visitations.

Germany was reduced to the lowest state of humiliation, a largehody of troops was of the town in the vicinity where Mr. Mellinger quartered time expected, who had been for some resided. A courier, the next station, and not a trace missed after quitting was this time,when

Ahout

could

of him

he discovered.

ever

of the

inhabitants towards

the

this courier

which

he had been to

passport should

have

since been

met

the

hkelyto

disposition general

hostile corps to that improbable

driven the courier the last stage,had never heard of. The were monly uncomgenS'cTarmes into inquiries

every circumstance elucidate this afiair; and in less than a week, to

the consternation seized

the

it was not belonged, who had givenhim a by some desperado The other world. also,who postilion,

active in their

by and

irons,

From

them

of the whole

Mr. Mellingerwas city,

in open

draggedto

house, put in day,in his own ing prisonas the murderer of the miss-

courier. It

well known

that the old

gentlemanin his heart detested the foe who had clippedthe wings of his trade, and diffused inexpressible miseryover* his country ; but was

that this hatred murder

should

be

so

strong

as

to

incite him

the

to

highway,no one could believe. He had in the place; but no man enemies could suppose many that their animosity had urged them so far as to fabricate this falseaccusation, either to bringhim to an ignominious of purchasing life end, or to reduce him to the necessity and Hbertyby an immense self, sacrifice. The accused himwhen firsttaken into custody, lost all presence of on

zed by Digiti;


THE

mind,

that

so

he fonned

GJEtEi3r

MANTLE

opinionof

no

OF

his

himself

close confinement that

How

no

kept in

was

whatever

person

could

he afterwards

known, for he

not

was

innocence

guiltor

from his behaviour.

129

VENICE.

pressed ex-

such

permitted

was

to speakto him.

this

At

Wilmsen took

so

conducted warm

unable

of the

moment

to

himself with

interest in the

an

control her

passionfor the

secret

the real

cause

in her to the

utmost

such

and discretion,

that Emmehne afitir,

: she feelings

young

consternation, young

had She

man.

longcherished a of was ignorant

of the totalrevolution which

had

been

father,but she imaginedthat it was

influence which

Wilmsen

was

fected ef-

owing

had

acquiredover him ; for when the old man threw out the slightest hint of an intention Wilmsen hastened with joyful to do a good action, zeal to carry it into execution ; and by his talents, his and his excellent advice,he gainedsuch an usefulness, that the latter, ascendencyover his employer, by degrees, entered into all his views. A thousand unconsciously times had the gentle Emmeline blessed him in her heart for his efCoTts: she had learned

to

respect and

to love

him

;

from the idea that Wilmsen was arose onlysorrow actuated by duty alone,without feeling any real interest indiflerence for for her father, or any thingbut perfect and her

herself. her modesty,she was sensible that Notwithstanding she had not her equalfor beautyin the city, and that her education and accomplishments of a superior order. were

Hundreds had

had

remained

he had

at

at her

the

had

ever

feet,and yet this young

man

distance at which respectful the very first day ; not one on pered escapedhis lips. Vanitywhis-

same

placed himself

cordial word to

sued

her that his looks had

more betrayed frequently

zed by Digiti;


130

STORIES.

GHOST

than the attention of indifierence; but stillhe had silent.

however, circumstances

Now,

been

wholly

were

beside himself at the sudden changed. Wilmsen was vinced thoroughlyconapprehensionof her father. He was and considered of the innocence of Mr. Mellinger, the whole afiiir as a diabolical plotto striphim of his his recent losses, was property, which notwithstanding stillvery considerable.

As

soon

collected himself,he hastened every save

the

he

had

Emmeline,

somewhat to

offer her

He pledgedhimself to consolation in his power. her in her father, cost what it would ; and requested time

mean

to

his business.

intrust him

of with the management confidence in me," said he with

*"Put

unaffected warmth "

to

as

"

:

Yes, Wilmsen,"

afiected by the

I will justify it by my conduct." said the weepingEmmehne, deeply of the

day, I have confidence in placedher hand in his. He you," and unconsciously had not her heart been op" raised it to his h'ps ; and and her eyes bedimmed with tears, pressedwith grief events

"

hiave then read in his looks that rapture in her of his participation pervadedhim in spite

Emmeline which

must

filial sorrows. this

Stippsarrived with the intelligence that Mr. Mellinger's had been discovered by means guilt of a child. The old gentlemanhad been accustomed littleexcursions into the country in a singleto make horse chaise,which he drove hunself. He was generally At

alone

;

but

moment

on

this occasion he had taken

with

him

a

tle lit-

six years old,the child of one of his clerks,by gir!, whose prattle he was highlyentertained. Her name was

Charlotte. her Charlotte, on

return

home, related to the child of a

in driving that Mr. Mellinger, throughthe neighbour

zed by Digiti;

wil-


THE

GREEN

MANTLE

OF

131

VENICE.

the mill-dam,had discovered at a distance near coppice, all in green ; the fellow went a courier coming, so that she had nearlylost sightof him ; hut Mr. swiftly take leapedout of the chaise justin time to overMellinger him, and that he mightnot keep him longin misery, him right ran throughthe body. One of the gens-d^armes, then to be sitting the step of the door, who happenedjust on low

listened with the

attention to the child's story,and

utmost

the reported immediately

circumstance

to

his superiors.

the parents for the purpose of the child herself;but she had been carried questioning Emmeline

by to

the

be examined, and

She

to

before gens-d'armes

been allowed

"

hastened

to

no

person, not

accompany

returned home

the commandant even

of the

place

her mother, had

her.

and found Wilmsen disconsolate,

busilyengagedin arrangingher father's papers, and in removingall the cash and billsof consequence to a place of safety.The horrid intelligence was soon broughtthat the very next morning her father was to be tried by a This, as every one knows, was in mihtarycommission. those daysequivalent to a death-warrant. of the child,the Immediatelyafter the apprehension willow coppicementioned by her had been searched,and the lifelessbody of the missing courier was found actually there,not, indeed, piercedthroughthe heart,but with several mortal wounds All the efibrtsmade

sightof

in the head.

by

the unfortunate Emmeline

her father

to

proved fruitless: neither bias, entreaties producedany effect. Honest Tonor money who had been in the habit of drinking at the publicence used all his influhouse with the soldiers and the jailer, his master to gain permissionto speak with for a few minutes only in their presence, but in vain. obtain

a

zed by Digiti;


132

STORIES.

GHOST

hoped for

she

from whom

melancholyand "

broken-hearted.

returned home

Emmeline

counsel and

Wilmsen,

consolation, was

; he

evaded her quespurposely tions her father to save thoughtit stillpossible

uneasy

whether

he

whether

she should offerhalf, or

even

the whole of

his property to the commandant ^whether she should repair that nightto the marshal, who resided not far off) "

and herself at his feet,

beg her father's life. terriblenightat lengthcame on, and nothingwas

throw

The

the unfortunate,and, in the estimation yet done to save from the fate which of all,innocent old man threatened him in the

morning.

parents,who that the child this on

was

to remain

with petition

quitelate to

lotte's Char-

her ; that the mother

about

imploredhim with

sent

in great trouble returned for answer, detained at the commandant's, and

all theyknew

her knees

her

was

Emmeline

to

had

release the child,or allow

the little creature, but he had

rejected

and

laughter. The wretched Emmeline passeda restlessnight. She dence in her confihad recourse to prayer; and, strengthened in the Almighty,she fell asleeptowards morning; had slumber diffused its kindlyinfluence but no sooner awakened over her,than she was by an extraordinary her

scorn

bustle in the house.

Rosina

rushed

into her chamber

joyfulexclamation : My master is free ! he has escaped!" for joy,lostnot a moment in dressing Emmehne, trembling with

the

"

"

herself ; the whole house awakened

from

was

assembled

:

sound

Wilmsen,

and he treated the sleep, the jailer's whole story as a fable ; but Betty, daughter, had been herself and communicated the good news sina to Rofrom the street, as the latter, ting situnable to sleep, was

too,

was

at a

a

window.

zed by Digiti;


THE

It was

longbefore a

not

at their

commandant so

that,had strictly, he must

mouse,

it.

The

detachment

133

VENICE.

of

marched military

with the Several officers,

head, searched it from top Mr.

been Mellinger

no

bottom

to

biggerthan

have been discovered if he had

commandant disappointed

hundred

many

OF

the house.

and surrounded

up

MANTLE

GREEN

been

declared,that

prisonersof this kind

not

out

had

one

a

in of

ever

he reflected shp,and that the more the escape of Mr. inexplicable upon the matter, the more tinued Mellinger appeared. I insist on being informed,"con-

before

the

givenhim

"

he in of you

a

firm and authoritativetone, " whether

Mantle

the Green

knows

any

of Venice."

and Emmeline, Stipps, unexpectedquestion, that the lynx-eyed Rosina, changed colour so visibly, isfied commandant, who narrowlywatched all present,was satthis

At

that he should

three.

He

draw

information

some

ordered them

to

commandant

could

remain, and

those

from

the rest

quit the room. He sent Stippsand Rosina, half-frightened to Emmehne and requested to death,into separate closets, the Green Mantle. -tellhim trulyallshe knew respecting The trembUnggirl asked how this mysterous apparition ther. could have any thingto do with the liberation of her faThe that

she,a young

Green

was

was

his

known

his

surprise

to be better

cated edu-

province,not hers,to put questions,

repeatedhis requestthat

knew

conceal

than any in the whole city, should speak of the Mantle as of a supernatural being; but reminded

her that it and

ladywho

not

to

on

a

matter, in which

she would

he

now

relate what

she

began to suspect that

reality. with fear, Emmeline, trembling repeatedallthat she had commandant heard on the subject.The shook silently

there

was

some

his head ; he looked

round

at the officers, significantly

12

zed by Digiti;


134 who

STORIES.

GHOST

astonished equally

were

;

that overpoweredby agitation to leave the herself,

and allowed Emmeline, she could

scarcely support

room.

Stippswas

next

called in,and

Emmeline's.

The

commandant,

than

so

before,desired

his story agreedwith still more

the letters which

to see

staggered Mr.

Mel-

received about the time in

questionfrom the at Venice. house of Sponseri Stippswent, attended by and brought to the counting-house, of the officers, one lettered S, containing the mysterious the packet, epistle, with the contents of which the reader is already acquainted. The commandant, with the two superior read the officers, and then muttered, If this is the case, the jailer letter, and the guardare not so criminal ; and the devil fetch me ation." if I know what I should have done myselfin their situlingerhad

"

ordered

yard pointout the spot in the churchhad been buried. where young Should Sponseri asked the commandant, you know the body again?" gravely who now beganto have some misgivingsabout the If the face be not very much matter. aUered," replied know it again;" and his blood Stipps, I should certainly cold at the thoughtof once ran more beholdingthose which had already filledhim with such features, ghastly Let the grave be opened!" said the commandant horror. take this person,"pointing to his aid-de-camp to : Stipps, alongwith you, and lethim state on oath whether

Stippswas

to

"

^^

"

"

"

"

"

it is the corpse of the same Sponseri of Venice. young and the sergeant of the

who

person Then

guard,and

send

they say

Meanwhile

when

Rosina

was

the

buried for

for the

take down

you show them jailer bringthe button with him." what

was

in

body.

broughtforward, and

jailer writing

Let

the

related


136 and

ant

STORIES.

GHOST

of his officersto the

some

half-smothered

with The

vexation

unlocked

commandant

it

and counting-house, pointedto the iron chest. himself,raised the heavy

started hack three steps ; for,at the first lid,and instantly glancethat he cast into it,what should meet his greedy mantle ! a green eyes but Thrilled with horror,he exclaimed "

be the work

if he had

of the devil himself!*' and

ever

and

clerks

we

Take

"

"

cried the conmiandant, as touch "

the garment

his stick to

a

pickedit up,

the

of

out

and would

It

a

was

piece out

fragmentof of his

oath,that both

durst

himself

not

spectre. Wilmsen

obeyed. commandant, pointingwith

have read it.

Wilmsen

That is not written

"

it snatching

at it for some steadfastly

looked

He

Mr.

the accursed mantle,'*

that fell from the mantle.

paper

"

ourselves about what

for you !" cried the commandant, his hand.

Wilmsen

chest,"replied he,

though he

is this ?" asked the

What

of that

concerned

never

had in it."

master

our

asked

the manlie in the chest before.

seen

alone keptthe key Mellinger ""

Surelythis must

" "

He

written paper.

time. took another

with pocket-book, declaring, in the

of

out

a

vulgar

and, on handwriting, found to correspond the pieces, so exactly fitting they were that there could be no doubt of their belonging to another. A third scrap, however, was one wanting to completethe whole. The seems

were

commandant to

be written in

here understand

when

one

and

more

confounded.

more

said he Italian,"

Itahan ?"

Wilmsen

piecesto

commandant

language. The him.

He

read

as

"

It

does any one offered his service, ;

"

of the officers answered, that he

of that twc

was

same

knew

thing some-

handed

follows :

"

zed by Digiti;

the


MANTLE

GBEEN

THE

137

VENICE.

OF

-conscience; Ood overtakes

end. fearful

a

Trent'

lastjudgment. hie

eternal

"

Pooh

"

night of death.^^

!" said the commandant, with

that he vulsively, "There

is

jaw quiveredso

his nether

; but at that moment

ence

could

somethingmore,"

con

another word.

utter

not

affected indiffei

observed the other oflScer,

to the back of the pa'per. His companionturned pointing both the pieces blank, but on that was ; the back of one

of the other,which the words

:

^Pallasch

StopI"

"

had fallenfrom the green mantle,were

and

"

Wollmar

cried the commandant

heard those

two

to

he

the officer, when

that to

"read

names;

officer steppedclose

to

only."

me

him, and read in

low

a

The

tone

as

follows :

"

and

Pallasch

^^

Wollmar

are

hither,my

Come

"

who

overtake him

judgmentsofAlmighty God a hair of their heads /"

friend,and

May

innocent.

do

the

injures

translate it,"

you

said the commandant, almost beside himself,handingthe to

paper

Wilmsen.

Wilmsen

rendered it thus

innocent.

are

Ood

May

overtake him

:

"

"

Fallasch

Wollmar

and

the heaviest judgments ofAlmighty

who

injuresa

hair

of either of their

heads!'' "Then on

away

may the

the

blast lightnings

lipsof

"

the commandant.

handwriting."Wilmsen

the "

compared it with be the

Look that In

at on

died the the

raising

other

side,and

the

piecesof paper to his face,he turned aside his of loathing. with an expression The commandant

found

both

rest

to

same.

two

head

12*

zed by Digiti;


138

STORIES.

GHOST

the inquired said he, with *"

as

if

corpse."

they had

The

come

cadaverous smeli,"

a

indicative of horror and disgust,

countenance

a

have

They

"*

reason.

of the hands

out

back with

drew

commandant

of

putrid

a

look of

a

the earthly abhorrence,for he, too, could perceive sepulchral

smell.

He

of the officers reminded

One

and of the visit,

The

as

ten

him

thousand

of the

of object

dollars which

to

were

his be

a

"

himself farther

of the chest

let him take what that God who

there

:

of course,

can,

be

no

questionabout giving,but only about taking.

is in the chest I know

What

not

his conscience

if itcontains

;

so

much,

ing will allow him, recollect-

unll overtake with

his

judgments

of injustice." guilty end^'*muttered the commandant, fearful

those

are

A

"

by

flexibleas he

of old Tobias. pledgefor the production commandant,'* cried Wilmsen keenly, has possessed

paid down "

mild and

as

and peremptory. blustering

at firstbeen

had

became

now

Wilmsen's

the Green nal

allusions of the oracular

Mantle

nightof

^"*

"

death.

Last

;

word

and

of hieroglyphics Tremble

"

I will not touch

and I will abate

chest

judgment

reminded

a

"

Eter-

kreutzer in this

half of the

but required sum, that I must side have," added he, casting a positively for the sake of the publicwelfare." glanceat the two officers, Wilmsen that it searched the chest,and finding ofileredhalf the contained not quitefour thousand dollars, if the commandant would pledgehis amount as a deposit, honour

one

that it should

be returned

as

soon

as

Tobias should be delivered up alive^ torily or his death satisfacascertained. The commandant and the complied, officerstook

chargeof the two Meanwhile Stippsreturned and the aid-de-camp, the jailer,

thousand

dollars.

with church-yard sergeantof the guard

from the the

.

zed by Digiti;


THE

GREEN

MANTLE

OF

139

VENICE.

The

which he had aid-de-camp producedthe depositions taken down. Accordingto these,Stippshad recognised the disinterredcorpse as that of young Sponseri of Venice ; and and Pallasch the jailer, SergeantWollmar knew him again immediately to be the same had person who the precedingnight and released Mr. Mellinger come from prison. You seem astonished,"said the commandant ""

Wilmsen, who

to young

believe his

ears.

will

You

"

this declaration could

at

be able

now

the infernalmantle at finding surprise

my

Either God

the devil must

or

have

a

not

for

to account

here in the chest.

hand in thisbusiness."

All present crossed themselves; and even the two officerswho were with the events of the ceding acquainted pre" nightlooked aghast. The green mantle itself,"

aid-de-camp,**I have

the

continued

these words,

corpse." At

taken

from

the

the horror of the whole

to

company, a soldierbroughtin the half-mouldered garment. " the aid-de-camp, which the "The button,"proceeded lastnightlostfrom apparition on

taken

this mantle

pattern as those

same

The

shuddered. found sort "

of buttons,and Let

us

hear

the commandant

no :

to a

cloth ; and button

one

the "

more

Permit of

we

the

the

same

both.

it,the investigate

me,

darker

however. Sir,"said the

concludinghis report, merely "

In the cufl?"! found

to

declared,that,to the best of his was

both had

deficienton

was

you this scrap of paper. of the delivery receiptcertifying submit

commandant

of this infernal story !" exclaimed

more

mystery." aid-de-camp, by way is the

The

is of the

mantles,on being compared, were

same

"

ing wantactually

of the grave, and

out

the latter."

on

two

be of the

to

its mantle,is

letter. Mr.

Stipps judgment,the receipt a

handwritingof Mr. Mellinger.In the pocketof

the mantle

was

this paper."

zed by Digiti;


140

STOBIES.

GHOST

The

unfolded

paper was astonishment

new

the

other

two

of all on

pieces,one

mantle in the chest,and

;

and

who

describe the

can

that it fittedexactly to finding of which

had fallen from

the other had

been

the

droppedby

the

the preceding come apparition night! The words had bedoubt that the no ; but there was very illegible writingon all three pieceswas by the same hand. One the of the officersand Wilmsen endeavoured to decipher time,made contents, and, after poringover them for some

what

out "

O

follows :

"

wretch^ rouse

toUl overtake thee in a

The

end. fearful rendered

hast

God thy slumbering consHence. the path of guiltto which I foresee thou lamentations of those whom

miserable

shall

judgment. Tremble, thou eternal nightof death is but of helV **

Who

teeth

says

thee to the last

summon

scourge of mankind I the thefirst day ofthe torments

that ?" cried the commandant "The

chattered.

while

his

replied grave," emphatically

longpause ensued. The eternal nightof death is but the firstday of the of hell!" slowly repeatedthe commandant. torments Terrific idea ! When, then, is their night? ^when their second day ? ^when their termination ? Observe allof you,"added he solemnly, "the most profound silence what has occurred here. Time may, perhaps, respecting clear up what our limited understandings at precannot sent Wilmsen.

A

"

"

"

"

penetrate." With

and

these words he retired, followed

by

ing the rest, hav-

delivered the keys of the chest to Stipps, previously ordered one of his peopleto carry the mantles after

him. As

soon

as

honest

Stippsfound

himself alone with

zed by Digiti;


THE

MANTLE

GREEN

Wilmsen, he burst into

"

tears.

141

VENICE.

friend !" cried

O, my

day has this been ! I am overwhebned with horror and anxiety.Where is our old master ?" ven Heabe his guide!" said Wilmsen, devoutly foldinghis hands across his breast. "I am extremelyconcerned he,

"

what

OF

a

"

about

him."

Stipps.

At

who

But

"

can

this moment,

have

him

saved

Emmeline

?" asked

the

entered

room,

followed

by Betty Pallasch, the jailer's daughter. be over"Now, my heard girl,"said she, "as we cannot Tell every thing; here,tellus three allyou know. speak the truth,and you shall have money or whatever "

you wish for." said the girl with a They may talk as theyplease," knowing look, theywill not persuademe that the devil hand in it. I can't help thinkingit must had any and have been ten Tobias; for last night,between "

"

he eleven o'clock,

the soldiers

gave

they could hardlystand. rack,or

devil's drink

some

had

He or

much

so

first poured rum

should drink his master's health,and have

was

enough they

three times

as

and set at liberty.The acquitted that as his master would almost to a men laughed,saying, be shot on the morrow, theywould rather have certainty then what theywere Tobias went to have. away crying, and said : wished me good night, Betty,if that which I expect happens, see me again.' I locked you will never the door after him, and carried the key to my father ; but much

he

he

that Tobias,)

tipsy. He said,(Imean

one

or

what other,I forget

called it,into the wine, so that the smell alone to make

that liquor

when

was

*

"

the conversation

made

me

wherever them

so

between

uneasy

I was,

Tobias

and

that I could

not

the soldiers had go

to

help fancyingthat and poor old gentleman,

I could not

shootingthe

old

bed ; for

zed by Digiti;

I

saw

Tobias


142

6R0ST

STORIES.

wandenng over the wide world. I stayedwith my father, who was sitting up with the sergeant ; and theytalked blood

told stories about murders

and

ahout war,

cold.

run

I

never

was

asleep. My father told me for

not

fright.When

laydown

sergeant said he so

was

they would his

ear

to

;

and

have

a

fast

were

bed,but I could

asleep. The lie,since the night

be

besides,while I He

company.

the door of the cell in which

must

man

my

my life.

the third time,I

me

well let me

confined,and knocked

was

who

men,

to pretended

be without

not

his

ordered

and

might as

far advanced

at

twice to go to

he

the bench

on

in frightened

so

sergeant looked around

The

that made

then

the old

three softly

there,

was

clapped gentleman

times.

said he, good conscience,'

'

*

The

old

for he is fast

asleep.' "

Scarcelyhad

struck twelve

;

he uttered these words, when with the last stroke,a

and

the clock

pale,ghastly

out at the door, figure, wrapped in a green mantle,came followed by the old gentleman. All three of us started The up, and I could not help givinga loud shriek.

spectre stared said

:

"

^

I

am

at

with

us

the Green

is the grave. him dies.' With

This

Mantle man

of Venice.

is free

that,both of them

littleplace into the and asleep,

greatcoal-black eyes, and

his

:

the

tion habita-

touches

whoever

walked

guard-room,where

My

throughour men

were

vanished. what

that?' cried I,

wringing my and joy. Did you hands between horror,apprehension, his face ? There was not a drop of life-bloodin it. see !' Death himself,or a dreadful apparition Oh ! it was It was a a dream, child, My father was astounded. fearful dream. It could be nothingelse,for the old man "'Father!

was

*

"

*

stilllieswithin there in irons.'

zed by Digiti;


144

GHOST

**

his report of all this to the

sergeant made

The

latterhad

The

mandaDt.

STORIES.

been yesterday

entertainment,and, as the m

his cups, and " Two hours

splendid

at a

said, returned home

servants

to be

not

was

com-

roused.

elapsedbefore the whole of the guardson duty at the prisonwere relieved. The sentry at the door had disappeared. The sergeant,my father, and all the soldiers, myself, "*

arrested and

were

examined

us

oath

what

as

to

carried before the commandant.

himself.

We

had heard

we

that with

put upon

were

and

our

The

seen.

He

corporal soldiers to

they had seen the Green Mantle pass through with the prisoner, and that they would have stopped have shot him ; but theywere and when theyattemptedto not able to move a finger, a

man

swore,

open

eyes

"

call out, their voices stuck in their throats ; that the Green Mantle had the door when

he

a

and huge cloven foot,

openedbefore

him

longflamingtail; that without his touchingit,and a

gone, he leftbehind him

was

a

strong smell of

brimstone. "*

I knew

well that this was

very

not

all true, and that

they had

perjuredthemselves ; but, as I saw that the commandant and to consider my father beganto be puzzled, I let them swear what less guilty, theyliked,and selltheir souls falseoath is sure no

to the to

devil ; for you know, he who takes a go to hell. But the scoundrels deserve

better. I must, however, except Wollmar, who

nice honest young

When found

man,

theybroughtin at the

of whom

the green

nobodycan

a

speak ill.

mantle that had

door of the house, the commandant

is

been

and

all

for it smelt putrid the oflicersturned away in disgust, with rottenlike corrupted flesh. It almost fellto pieces ness. "

One

of the buttons

rolled towards

the feet of the

zed by Digiti;


THE

commandant

piece of

the

paper, rest

hastened

and

the

; and

The

read.

MANTLE

GREEN

were

to

sergeantfound in the pocketa

writingon detained

of her

rest

Little Charlotte has been

has been

her, or

with discharged,

but I

"

wine

was

The

hardlybe liberty,

set at

a

commandant

is

of his officers.

examined

again;

and

she

stantly threat that she shall be in-

The

whole

commandant

afiair.

quitepuzzledwhat to make of Mantle ; and they say, that there

is

the storyof the Green is somethingon the scrap of paper very

could

torn

shot if she says a word about the questions put to The child is now her answers. as mute as a fish

regardingthe *'

;

which

master.

in consultation with the **

145

VENICE.

gence Rosina, to giveher the earliest intelli-

of the escape now

OF

which

has made

him

uneasy.

Search is he

gave

making everywherefor to

the soldiers has

old Tobias.

been

The

examined, and

poisonhas been found in it." Wilmsen. Only opium, perhaps,"interrupted ty. Yes, that is what they call the stuff,"continued Bet"The soldiers are lying there yet, at full length. believe theywill not They are too illto stand,and I verily outlive this evening. But that is of no consequence they "

"*

"

have

not

an

honest hair

on

their heads,and every

man

of

ing. belongsto the devil after what theyswore this mornI am onlyanxious for poor Tobias : if they catch shoot him without ceremony." him, they will certainly Emmeline rewarded the girl she liberally ; and when themselves with conjectures was gone, all three wearied Mantle of Venice. the Green At last,old respecting Slipps observed, **Let us drop the subject.Mr. Mel ven." lingeris free and safe : the rest we must leave to hea-

them

13

zed by Digiti;


146

GHOST

Wilmsen

said,in

passedhis hand low

a

STORIES.

tone

While

^

:

"

his brow

over

have

we

and anxiously, specting reintelligence

no

him, I shall not be easy." Do

"

not

leave me," said Emmeline

hands

her

both of them

raised

one

to

his

Grod has afflictedme

soul,that the pressure

her forlorn situation. He

an

his

suddenlyreleased

resumed immediately distance of

in his

inferior. Emmeline

In one

word, leftthe

her

looked

aunts

and Kve with her.

to come

heart,however,

Every day she and

learned

without

no

invited

Old

Stipps the superintended

the

such

house order

love the handsome

; in poor

prevailed.

young

sen Wilm-

more.

Little Charlotte, as Her

to

in

deep despondence.

appointedcashier,and Wilmsen correspondence. Thus matters iq were regulated

more

him

at

and

by him,

was

Emmeline's

ful respect-

situation,Emmeline unprotected

now

of her

in

room

her hand,

deportmentthe

shook her head, unobserved silence, another

felt the pressure

delighted Hps reposed The thoughtrushed through his of proceededonlyfrom the sense

it for a second.

and

*'

Wilmsen

lips:

of her soft deUcate hand, and upon

;

I have need of such friends."

and heavily, Each

to

ing extendmournfully,

have

we

parents had

that she returned

from

seen,

taken

the

had been

her, the

commandant,

the country, probably that she

set at

morning

same

to

might escape

a

erty. lib-

relation in the

pressing

of the curious. At the end of a week interrogatories back. the little Emmeline girlcame soughtan opportunity of speakingto her alone,to learn further particulars the murder of the courier by her father'shand. regarding The child who had been so full of prattle during her silent as the grave. walks with Mr. Mellinger, now was

zed by Digiti;


THE

The

she had

of what

terror

The

ing hoth speak a

will

I will let you "

it.

At leasttellme,

girlto her heart, hope of salvation to be

"

father did

stab really

when

that the soldiers

they are

and I

by

swear

gone,

silent

tell me

"

Heaven

and

whether

my

the courier ?"

Charlotte,shaking her head

Yes," answered

"

a

dear,"said Emmeline, and pressed

my

the poor my

father tellsme,

My

always stay here, and know every thing."

not

ihada

shot," said she, lay breast; "I dare not

me

her anxious

on

about

word

through had

gone

will have

commandant her hands

147

VENICE.

the child.

deep impression upon "

OF

MANTLE

GREEN

**

;

did indeed; but stiD he is

did stab the courier,he

he no

murderer." the

On

day

same

found in the river.

the corpse

of

a

drowned

man

was

spect duty it was to inbias; it was the body of old Toconvinced that it was coincided in this and several of the by-standers sent for,that he might was opinion. Young Wilmsen bias. old Togive his evidence on the subject.It was really The in a putridstate, was corpse, being already laid before were immediatelyburied. The depositions

the commandant, Next

thousand and

The

as

officer whose

usual in such

was

morning Wilmsen

cases.

put in his claim for the

two

dollars depositedin the hands of the commandant, reminded

this sum

as

him soon

ascertained.

of his written

are

sure

turn re-

the death of Tobias had been satisfactorily

as

The

are false,"he depositions

who rascals,

undertakingto

commandant

cried ;

to be

in

one

"

you

stormed. are

all a

"

The

pack

of

story !"

The

all regularand authentic.Sir," are depositions answered Wilmsen, firmlybut respectfully and you ; the commandant of a pack of rascals, not are but of a "

"


148

GHOST

STORIES.

of b^ingthe place whose inhabitants have a reputation most uprightcitizens of the empire." the body of the drowned Pray who has recognised "

man

that of your Tobias ?" continued the commandant. Who has the greatestinterest in establishing

as

"You.

that

"

dollars,be

of that.

assured

the

money;

-I shall not refund

You."

point?

two

Besides, I have

officers who

two

the

with

were

thousand the

not

had

me

their

share of it." **

Wilmsen,

That," rejomedyoung

**

I have

high

too

an opinionof your honour to believe. It was a deposit which was to remain untouched, and not a present. If

suffered others

have

you

stillanswerable

take any

to

for the whole

part of it,you

are

if you do not believe the corpse, and the evidence of the officerwho inspected and thoulet the bpdy be taken up again, sands my deposition, who

'*

; and

old Tobias will confirm what I have

knew

What, take up the body again!" exclaimed the

Shall the grave be disturbed a second for the sake of your house ? Would that I to God "

had any "

the

But

restore

of

few hours

peoplewho

never

dispute.

theywere

the horrible work known

had

the spot,some

from

usuallywore.

the surgeon,

a

;

was

the old

man

answered peevishly to be

gone. begun ; hundreds were

attracted

to

others because curiosity, tainly Every one agreedthat itwas cer-

motives

summoned.

old Tobias he

in

the matter

commandant, and ordered Wilmsen a

time

said Wilmsen, dollars,"

grave shall giveit up first!"

The

In

mandant. com-

thingto

to returning "

do with you !" the two thousand

serted." as-

of

the dress alone On

a

more

deep gashwas

was

not

like that which

inspection particular by discovered in the throat of

zed by Digiti;


MANTLE

GREEN

THE

149

^

VENICE.

OF

Everybody shuddered at the sight, Tobias worthy old man, beloved and esteemed by who knew him, and nothingbut the deepest

the corpse. had been a one

every

have

despaircould "

driven him

suicide.

to

This is another victim whose

blood willlieheavyon the

soul of the commandant," murmured their way

found

words

to

his

the crowd. with together

ears,

of the evidence,throughthe officerswho

Enraged

behalf.

the two

the fellow be could

he

the

at

not

as necessity,

loudly. Tobias,theysaid,was wound

such deeds times.

a

man

his

on

he feared,of

funding re-

*"Let

This, however,

peopleopposed it of a quietand religious

of mind, and very unlikely suicide. to commit might have been inflictedby other hands, as

turn

The

attended

cross-road !"

a

into effect: the

carry

the rest

he exclaimed: dollars,

thousand

buried in

These

by no

were

commandant

The

of

means

could

in those

occurrence

rare

againstthe persist

not

honourable

who voice of the people, general

demanded

graVfefor the deceased,and

esced. acquilengthhe silently

Wilmsen two

wrote

thousand

he would

againto

at

the restoration of the

demand

dollars. The

commandant

answered

confer alone with EmmeUne,

the house, on

this

subject.He

endeavoured artfully she referred

him

to induce

her

the

commandant

subjects ; and Emmeline's

was

servant

been delivered Emmeline

turned on

the

to

hands

was

would

the conversation

to

the

settle

different

point of takingleave,when

entered

with

by a little boy who

to apologized

mistress of

and accordingly, resignher claim ; but

of her affairs, entire management and who the matter in a legal way. The

that

came

Wilmsen, in whose

to

an

a

which letter,

was

the commandant

an

utter ;

had

stranger.

and, opening

13*

zed by Digiti;


150

GHOST

"

STORIES.

the letter, changed colour,laughed and

cried,trembled,

to exclaim as lengthso far forgotherself, her hands on her breast in prayer, He folding joyfully,

sobbed,and

at

"

lives !"

emotion, asked, with whose the

at

life appearedto be of moment,

same

took

hand; he ness

happy,and daughter." "

I

hope

soon

to

you I did spoke the truth

and I confess that you another

Emmeline's

to

not :

:

"'

I live ! I

see

my

not

where

he

You

"

was

;

since his escape

believe it. I

but where

am

beloved

he,in astonishment.

declared from the firstthat you knew heard from him that you had never

;

soldier-like blunt-

a

words

these

your father !" cried

From

importanceto -her

much

with

and

read

free and

so

small billetfellfrom

a

it up,

proceededto

itcould be

who air of interest,

an

her

observed anxiously

had

commandant, who

The

;

now perceive

is he ?

There

is

slipof paper in the envelope; perhaps it gives farther explanation." some drew Emmeline which she now forth the slip, first over hastily

observed,ran "*

"

ment it,and with evident embarrass-

folded it up again. Well ?" asked the commandant Excuse

leave the

impatiently.

Sir," said Emmeline, gravelyrisingto

me,

these very extraordinary lines do not appear to be intended for any eye but my own." " I desire, however, to see these very extraordinary room

;

said he, in lineSi^^ withdrawn

"

a

determined

tone.

himself from the hands

of

**

father has

Your

justice.The

ner man-

"

"

of his escape, his present abode The billetcontains no clue to this,"answered

meline, Em-

trembling. '*

I will read

it,however

; I must

read it. It is the

zed by Digiti;


152 which

related immediately

more

by a courier

to

Venice, addressed informed

to be desiring

whose

and an

answer

as

himself,and

the house of

they

knew

short a time

sent

it

Sponseri,

writing, the handas

possible

old

that the enclosure Sponseri, stating the handwriting of his deceased undoubtedly

Guilielmo,but that he

son

In

to

to

whether

it was.

arrived from was

or

STORIES.

GHOST

unable

was

to

tellat what time

what occasion it could have been written.

on

commandant

The himself

unable

began

to

look within.

in any

to account

way

He

for what

found

had

without at lengthadmittingthe belief of the passed, interference of the Green Mantle of Venice, supernatural

Impressedwith the idea that he should,either before or he resolved after death,be punishedby this terriblebeing, in his to set about making all the reparation immediately power two

for his misdeeds.

thousand

His firstact

was

to

refund the

without farther importunity dollars, ; and

dating, so accommocondescending, and so forbearing in the exercise of his duty,that nobody in the town could comprehend the meaning of this sudden change. Most peopleattributed it to the akered state of political affairs. The situationof the French army occupyingthe south of Germany became at this time very precarious,

from

.

this time he became

so

in consequence of the turn which had taken in matters the north. The appeal of the King of Prussia to the

youthof his dominions sounded throughoutthe in the fireof patriotism whole of Germany, and awakened The noblest youthsflocked to Breslau to a heart. many under Prussian colours,impatient to take an active fight lity part in the contest which was to givefreedom and tranquilto Europe. Every day broughtthe most encouraging in every quarter. of the zeal and activity accounts displayed warlike

zed by Digiti;


THE

MANTLE

GREEN

OF

hence," said Wilrasen, one

"*I must

153

VENICE.

evening,in

a

con*

vivial circle of his young friends; "and let those whose and who love their country, hearts lie in the rightplace, follow me."

by

hand

and there *

They unanimouslyrose, and

to enrol

word

to

themselves

health of the

and

him

accompany among

selves pledgedthemto

Breslau,

teers. the Prussian volun-

deeplypledged in Rhenish comrades ; the time and placeof by the new that theymight set out together meetingwere arranged, and the strictest secrecy their journeyinto Silesia, on with regardto their movements was enjoined.When The

the party

about

was

to

King

break

was

up,

Stark, the

most

mental senti-

steppedinto the midst of them, and in those we drank love,a Fidelity raisinghis glass, modest parting kiss,and a happy re-union !" Every one drank a bumper,amidst loud cheers,to the health of their affected, heroines,and Wilmsen, deeply pressedthe hand of their number,

"

"

of the young

enthusiast.

readyto drop with

Stippswas when an

"

Wilmsen

communicated

to

astonishment

and

terror

him his resolution, under

of injunction

" Mr. Wilmsen," said he, laying secrecy. both his hands on the shoulders of the young man, what an unfortunate step you have taken ! War and

have

commerce

will have wish

to

; a

do but

nothingto

merchant

can

other,and

do with each never

make

a

soldier.

somethingfor the generalcause,

never

If you

let it be with

blood and your limbs. When you the road and do not to happiness are on fortune, go and wantonlythrow away your life." money,

To

save

your

fortune !" said Wilmsen,

doubtfully. miss it," answered "You cannot Stipps,familiarly. I have hitherto been silent on this subject, because it did not become refrain to speak first, but I can now me "

"


154

Emmeline

longer. Our

DO

STORIES.

GHOST

Wilmsen

? there is nothing to blush for

good half half

"Leave

million ! so

And

beautiful

house has

our

what

half

or

to talk

so

about.

so,

withstanding notstill,

her experienced,

have

"we

dazzled

be

Mr.

aware,

any

" .

a

if I

by her charms, I have sense enough to that she would have looked upon Stipps,

from proposal

By Heaven,

poor fellow like

a

ladyher

aunt

behaviour towards you,

me

as

mistaken !" cried

are

you

half angry: "I would wager world that she would not say No. from the old

more

rich heiress of half

The

million is destined for somethinghigher ; and, even had been

Mr.

!" -do you know other angirl good,in the whole city?"

a

off jesting," said Wilmsen,

matters

colour

she has

"

the losses

serious

do you

why

"

to

; I

all I

am

ness." absolute mad-

Stipps, growing worth

I have heard

have

too

too much

seen

in the

much, of her

have the least doubt of it."

The

of Stippsprevented the his perceiving simplicity of to Emmeline, or the impreshe was treachery sion guilty

his words

which

concealed

made

within his

upon bosom

The

Wilmsen.

latter

pleasingemotions The planI have which they excited,and merely said : be or we engaged in must be executed immediately, may betrayed. I set out this evening with my friends. I shall give up my accounts Will you into your hands. of my intention ? Not a word to any Emmeline acquaint own

the

"

besides."

one

Stippsmuttered

and shook his head, and Wilmsen

left

him.

to

When

Wilmsen

returned,Emmeline

him.

He

that plainly

saw

this confirmation of what to

his heart.

She

she

desired

had

been

him her hand,

speak

weeping

Stipps had asserted gave

to

was

come wel-

saying,in

zed by Digiti;

:

a


GREEN

THE

mournful

MANTLE

of voice

tone

then, dear Wilrasen

You

"

:

OF

are

155

VENICE.

going to

leave us,

thoughtthat,for the sake of our house, you would have stayedwith us ; but stillI honour privateadvantageought not to be your resolution : our with the publicwelfare. It is a fearful put in competition ! I

time ; thousands"

filledwith

tears

short pause, and

have

to

"

offer yourself upon

to

and

be sacrificed

must

go," she added

a

like you, offermy

ere

the

after a firmly, altar of patriotism

more

the

this

holyaltar offerlikewise what I delivered to him all her jewelsand in gold. considerable sum I cannot,

on loyalty" give." She

ornaments,

continued,while her eyes

thousands

" "

You

crisisis past.

she

"

"

blood and

life at the shrine

my

; but

wives and

daughtersassemble in the churches to of those theylove" offer up their prayers for the safety she stopped, overcome by her feelings.Wilmsen seized itto his lips, her hand, and pressing cried, Yes, dearest, will be with me. heavenlygirl, pray for me, and Qod when

"

**

This

moment,

Emmeline"

addressed her

^he

"

this moment

" "

are

my at

only longer

hours

My situation here is changed: I no of my patron the respected ^Emmeline, daughter "

is before

me.

From

least speakfreely from the

you

few

mine.

in you Emmeline

see

A

liarly fami-

for all I

me

repays

have hitherto suffered in this house. now

before thus

never

"

at the

the moment

moment

when

has been altar, every feeling

^Imay

now

I knelt

near

"

devoted

to

you.

of station,of my consciousness of my inferiority poverty,added to the coldness and occasional haughtiness

The

of your

hope

towards

manner

which

my

But now,

me,

has hitherto

vanitymight at

repressed every

other times

in these few lastmoments,

recompensedby these tears have imposedupon me."

have I

am

for all that love and

zed by Digiti;

gested. sug-

richly duty


156

GHOST

STORIES.

The coldness and

I" repeatof my manner haughtiness ed Emmeline, shakingher head and smiling throughher male tears : My dear friend,how littleyou know of the feheart ! Perhapswe see each other now for the last time ; letthere be no longer The any mystery between us. coldness of which you complainwas occasioned onlyby the caution I was compelledto observe towards all your "

"

sex,

in consequence of the fortune I was known to possess, the various suits to which I must be exposed, and

the

secluded

poor, the obvious ;

Towards She

**

If I had

been

have

been

be reserved.

for it." you I had also other reasons ceased and laid her hand upon her heart his.

upon

"Other

be

no

:

Wilm-

cried he;

reasons!"

promised that there shall

have

you

education.

of my attachment would sincerity but being rich, I was obligedto

placedit

sen

of my

nature

concealment

now." excessive

"Your

diffidence made

you

blind,or

you

might have found her eyes, "in yourself." down them," added "he, casting her to his !" cried Wilmsen, pressing Oh, Emmeline what you Tell me word. breast, speak the delightful would

ask for other

not

You

reasons.

"

"

mean."

"Wilmsen," voice, it "

was

she

answered

a

that you

part firstto tell me

your

in

and trembling,

low loved

me. "

My

own

and

joy; The

a

Emmeline

!" cried

kiss sealed the union

lovers had

Wilmsen, hitherto

a so

of the

overcome

with

happy pair.

thingsto tell each other : and affection, all cordiality distant, was

thousand

developedthe amiable of his glowing heart qualities and

cloud,however, all at

Wilmsen,

once

and, till now, in

overcast

a

unknown

thousand ways.

A

his soul ; Emmeline

zed by Digiti;


MANTLE

GREEN

THE

OF

157

VENICE.

the change,and anxiously inquiredthe perceived

cause.

Wilmsen, dubiously, will he father,"replied His only wish," rejoined Emmeapprove our love T' smile, "is for the happinessof his line,with a sweet

"*

Your

"

"

find it in this world. child,and without you I shall never with my sentiments, He is acquainted and he approves

few

A

them.

the unfortunate affairof the

days before

Bliitenstein called

Count courier,

on

cited and solifather,

my

hand for his son, the Chamberlain.

My father's the ; he painted vanityseemed flatteredby the proposal in the most good qualities glowing young gentleman's that he if this match should be gratified colours ; adding, my

accorded with my wishes,as he trusted it would, since I could not have any reasonable objection to the young Count, on the score of his talents, person and accomplish-

My

ments.

but that I angry.

* "

goingto

that I had

answer,

dislike

could love him, made

never

You

no

love

leave the

said nobody,'

when

room,

he

to

the Count,

father

my

a

httle

peevishly ; and

I mustered

was

and

courage

He was confessed my attachment to you. at staggered he had sevebut afterwards observed that he thought first, ral

times you

poor, yet

were

allhis

perceivedin "

warm

you

so

but

to you. partiality

a

should I repeat to your face of your integrity, your talents

In short he

as sincerely

to

Though

why

commendations

and usefulness ? you

me

declared that,if I loved

prefer you

to

entertained similar sentiments

the young in

Count, and

regardto

me,

he

union." consent to our cheerfully Wilmsen's fears were At this explanation dispelled, and gave placeto the most ardent joy. Thus passedone of the happiesthours of their hves. the last they should spend together. It w", perhaps,

would

Both avoided the

of parting. subject "

You

were

14

zed by Digiti;

talk-


158

GHOST

STORIES.

said Emmeline, at length ing this morning,*' Breslau

to

hope ?'*

"

heart with

"

have

you

"

life

was

of

value

no

that time I doubted your love ; now, to

to me,

that I

am

because

am

to

her

to

desert the comrades

whom

he had

at

justbeginning explained

compelledto keep it." He that honour and duty alike forbade forcibly

Hve, I

so

ing go-

given up that idea now, I rend not my Emmeline,'* replied Wilmsen, that question ! I must I gave my word go. :

honour, when

of

ahout

*'

him

himself enlisted in

her at the same time it would warmly assuring be much more to him to stay than to go, now agreeable that Emmeline suddenlyrose, and fellabout his neck. **No," said she, tenderly, "go; I am sensible that you the

cause,

cannot,

must

wives sisters,

be left behind.

not

and

trialas I shall.

brides will have

My

with you !" of The moment

A

thousand

mothers,

endure the

to

same

: I shall be prayers shall attend*you

ever

of rendezvous there

Wilmsen

inn about twelve miles from the

an

upon

arrived. departure

at

for his young

To

the

cityas

who friends,

four in the afternoon.

had fixed

to meet

were

this inn Emmeline,

accompaniedby her aunt, to the footing words explained on

whom

she -had in

which

she

Wilmsen, attended her lover.

Here

were

in readiness to convey

place

now

a

few

stood with

and carriages

horses

the volunteers with

all sible posof account

despatchbeyond the frontiers; for on of youths who travelled northward the dailydeparture to jointhe Prussian armies,the commandant began to keep a very watchful eye on the young peopleof the

place. At the inn sixteen for huzzas.

ing high-spirited companionswere waitreceived by them wittloud Wilmsen, who was lesttheyshould They urgedthe utmost despatch,

zed by Digiti;


160

GHOST

was

STORIES.

in implicated unaccountably

80

the

of history

her

house. On

her

home

return

the whole

town

filledwith

was

Orders had heen received an hour before that rejoicing. there should break up the next allthe military quartered morning,and proceedby forced marches to the north, of the Russians and Prussians where the warlike preparations to apprehend the speedy commencement gave reason himself packedup of hostilities. The commandant his baggage: and, by the dawn of the following day,the cleared of its uninvited guests. Emmewhole citywas beheld them pass, for her fears representline sorrowfully ed to

her that all those thousands of murderous about

were

She could

be

to

pointedat

weapons

the heart of her Guilielmo.

the whole day. In her composure the evening, with weeping and with the vagaries fatigued

of her alone

at

not

recover

excited imagination, she powerfully

of her absent lover,when dusk, thinking

gentlyrappedat

one

sitting

was

the

started from

Emmeline

Tobias

"

door,and in walked her

^who had

seat

some

old Tobias.

with horror and

been

found with

ishment. aston-

his throat

from the water draggedhalf putrified who had been recognised and who had by so many been consignedto the grave then ^Tobias now stood neatlyand sprucelydressed before her,and said with his usual simper: "Don't be frightened Miss Emmeline, itis onlyI." "Good heaven! exclaimed how is that possible?"

cut

"

^who had been

"

"

"

Emmeline, who

durst

not

believe her

senses.

Tobias

then

related his adventures. briefly On that dreadful day when Enuneline's father was taken into custody, Wilmsen had thus addressed him : "

"

Your

master

is accused of murder

; to-morrow

zed by Digiti;

he is

to


GREEN

THE

be tried by

MANTLE

with acquainted

them

by

these Be

master.

your

The

you.

You *

men

*

;

eleven o'clock.

*

in other words, tomorrow

worthysoul,and

a

have the watch

*

; you

this wine

givethem to taste

not

sure

are

161

VENICE.

commission--or military

a

he will be shot.

allrely upon

OF

kill any

leave

of the

throw them into a prettylongnap.

but it may

are

if from

as

it yourself, and

It will not

we

cals, ras-

When

that the

he will probably guard is asleep avail himself of the opportunity to attempt his escape ; somely and, if he succeeds,depend upon it you shall be handYou must rewarded. not go home to-night ; but and there wait tiU I bring to the house of the executioner, your master

sees

you farther instructions." Rebecca, the executioner's

have been must daughter, apprisedof the coming of old Tobias, for previously to an building outshe sat up for him, and leadinghim softly the dogs in the rear of the house, and silencing keptin it,she made him up a couch of horse and cow

hides. the

"In

had

taken

escapedin

be here "

seen

was

at

but

justup.

said one last,'

*

"

fellow may

must

we

I trembled passed,

for if the scoundrels had found would

The

seen

no

theless never-

of the soldiersdismounting. *

I could hear all that

the

any

Open the door,'cried another,

As

at

was

declared that she had

Rebecca

this way.

person, for she

the

gens

thingof Mr. Mellinger, told,had and, as theywere night,

window, whether she had who

Rebecca, who

asked

arrived, and

d^armes

old Tobias,"the

morning,"continued

me

in my

have

search.'

a

in every limb ; it hiding-place,

have been all over

Rebecca

with poor Tobias. shut the window, and immediately

the house-door,out bounced

big dogs,barkingmost

at

leasta

score

The furiously.

opening

of tremendous man

who

14*

zed by Digiti;

had


162

GHOST

dismounted

STORIES.

his horse

again in a trice. Call oflT cried his companions; the sav"gehrutes hite the dogs,' like devils.' "They don't mind me,' replied Rehecca, At that moment and there is nobodyelse in the house.' of the gens (Tarmes by the leg. He a dog seized one was preparingto fire at the animal, Fire away,'cried the dogsbelongto our prince Rebecca, pointedly : we ; are obligedto send them twice a week to your Marshal on

was

"

'

*

"

*

to

hunt with.

with him

;

will get yourselves into

You

for he is much

fonder of the

a

fine scrape

dogs,than

of

de Dieu /* cried the fellows ; and you.' Sucre nom with rage, and pursued to they gallopped, boiling away while Rebecca stood a considerable distance by the dogs, laughingand clappingher hands. She declared that *

ifshe had but

**

of them

man

every

In about

and told me which Neirt was

of

a

the

on,

pieces. Rebecca fortnight

that I

nightcalled me

one

was

to

street.

the house

travelled with the

We

of his parents.

He

the country itwould

not

take

me

not

was

speed to

had

business at

name was

having given

that while the enemy be safe to return. Three

stay any

corner

that search

chargedwith

with him.

that the commandant

the

another

told me

since,Mr. Wachokovich, senior,was this city: I could

at

utmost

he

there I lived under

makmg for me, as I was and poisonto the soldiers,

at

up,

get into a

Wachokovich, the wine-merchant

transact, and

would

torn

to

where Hermanstadt, in Transylvania, to

have

would

creatures

at the door,in carriage I found a gentlemanwho did not speak a word. I perceivedthat it morning,when it grew light,

Mr. our

them

set

about

to

was

in

weeks

set

off for

and beggedthat he longer,

Before

stillhere

we

; I

arrived I heard therefore

stopped

Mr. Wilmsen Rebecca's,and throughher acquainted


THE

with my saw

GREEN

The

return.

OF

was girl

insistedthat I

She

me.

MANTLE

163

VENICE.

when she first frightened had drowned myselfin the

and that my body had been found and buried. Mr. river, this afternoon to see me, solved the Wilmsen, who came '

Merely with

mystery.

dollars which the commandant notion that I

and

secured

view

he had

on

to

been

the drowned

was

and

story,and

to

the

recover

sand thou-

two

with to deposit obliged

account, he

my

better,to obligehim in the

a

had

man

confirmed who

; many

the

knew

trick the commandant, coincided

Mr. Wilmsen

saved his money, .from the farther pursuitof the gens

me

so

tTarmes.^^ "

And

who

"

a

where

is my

father ?"

listened to this storywith

had

I know

look of

not

word

a

concern.

about him," He

"

the

but whither,God The

Tobias rejoined

went certainly

the strictestsilence in

but her

a

throughthe yard

had

the murder

often tried

and threats, to induce her entreaties,

marched

never

constant

reply was

to :

that the commandant

away,

with

saw

him;

The child had hithertoobserved

regardto

mother

father and

Now

terest. in-

of the parents of littleCharlotte interrupted

entrance

shot."

intense

above knows."

thisconversation.

would

most

the executioner's house, for Rebecca

behind

Her

eagerlyasked Emmeline,

and

by

persuasions,

relatethe circumstances, If I

do, I shall be

his troops had everybodyassured her that the crew

return, she feltherself

circumstantial

"

of the courier.

account

of the whole

and

and liberty, aflfair. They at

gave

fore there-

Emmeline with every acquainting connected with the tragic particular story. Mr. Mellingerwas drivingthroughthe wood, when the child perceiveda beetle, of the speciescalled by lost

no

time

in

zed by Digiti;


164

GHOST

naturalists scarabaeus

STORIES.

sabtUosuSi* and

it

as

was

very

gentleman made her hold the reins while he alighted, and, having caughtthe insect,ran a pinthroughits body and fastened she wished beautiful,

have

to

it to the elbow of the chaise.

The

it.

Such

old

the whole

was

story

of the atrocious murder.

have released Mr. likely Mellingerthe next morning,had he not escaped in the probablyapprehensiveof incurringa night. He was and the ridicule of severe reprimandfrom his superiors, the public, of the blunder which he had com* account on

comn^ndant would

The

mitted

;

and it was

most

for this reason

the child with death if she uttered a aflair. The

that he had threatened the concerning syllable

the cityand the spreadthroughout joiced readjacent country, and there was not a soul but heartily in thisconfirmation of the innocence of Mr. Mellinger. Emmeline now thought of acquaintingher father^ throughthe medium of the publicpapers, that he might without return danger,when he sparedher the trouble, and arrived one eveningsafe and sound, to the great joy of his daughterand his whole house. After his escape he had firstproceededto Raab in Hungary, and thence under a he lived in perfect to Smyrna, where security fictitious On the subject of his escape, or the in-^ name.

storysoon

terference of the Green

Mantle, of which

made

by the loquacious jailerand would not say a word. Mellinger "

"

This

is

a

well-known

the back, and lower

of the

Think

species with elytra. elytra has

swift,and

a

no

more

It is green

five white

bluish is

was

Mr. daughter,

part of the body, the legs,and the antennas,

coloured, with /ery

each

his

secret

no

of

on

spots. The' are

copper-

tinge. It is found on sandy soils,is thence vulgarly called,in Germany, the

Courier.

zed by Digiti;


THE

GREEN

MANTLE

OF

165

VENICE.

hoped,will There clear ap the mystery. are thingsin the many but the supernatural, world which to border on seem which are as simplein reality as the affairof the courier.'* the departure of Wilmsen, espeHe deeplyregretted cially since every one spoke of him in the highestterms. Emmeline longedto be alone with her father,that she him with her wishes and the secret of her mightacquaint love. At length,late in the evening, an opportunity Her father had, duringhis absence,lostmuch occurred. habits ; he was all kindness and affection. of his calculating In a transportof joy at findinghis affairs in the most train,and his only child bloomingin prosperous he pressedher to health and rich in charms and virtues, heart. his enraptured My poor girl,"said he, you have gone througha great deal here, but God has protected

that,"said he abruptly ;

"

time, it is

be

to

"

you.

When

and thoughts,

my

have learned that miserable loves have

;

can

were

dailypresent to

the

dailysubjectof my wealth is perishable, and

to

you soothe my wishes to the utmost how

you

he has

that

about him

none

I

prayers. man

is

a

that he

in the hours of drearysolitude, I therefore,

often vowed

which

far away,

being,when

and

**

reward old age in my

I contribute to your

the filialtenderness with

by

the

of your gratification Tell

power.

me,

my

dear,

?" happiness

Thus

Emmeline revealed the secrets of encouraged, her heart,reserving words of Guilielmo. onlythe parting Her father againclasped her in his arms. Wilmsen is poor,"repliedhe in a kind tone ; but he is a clever, and worthyyoung man. If You love him. industrious, God preserves his lifeamidst the dangers of his new career, "

"

and he remains faithfulto you, I will bless your union."

zed by Digiti;


166

STORIES.

GHOST

I became

Quilielmo

with acquainted

the battle of Culm, I

met

him

at

Breslau.

againamong

in the

been

the

more

had at Toplitz. He hospital leftfoot, and was with many lying, He

straw.

on

and called

recollected to

me

his side.

me

He

the

Afler

the wounded

shot

through

of my I

moment

friends, entered,

extremelypale,and

was

briDiant than ever. his dark eyes appeared more him was accidentally spreada green mantle, lent

Over to

him

by an officerof a rifleregiment. I expressedmy joyat findinghim, in spite of his wound, in such excellent thus conversing, heard the we spirits.While we were of straw on the opposite side of the room : it was rustling a

had

officerwho

French

wounded severely

been

and

prisoner.He raised his seamed and ghastlyface, for some and wildly time at my friend, he suddenly staring exclaimed: "By all the devils,the Green Mantle of Venice ! I know the terrificbeing!" vociferated he, in the frenzyof his fever,tearing the bloodybandagesfrom his dissevered head ; the eternal nightof death is the of hell.*' firstday of the torments With these words, foamingat the mouth, he rent open taken

"

"

with

his hands

the three sabre wounds

skull,sunk back with and

expiredin

hastened

to

shriek on the straw, heart-piercing convulsions. I sprang up and frightful a

him, but he

Guilielmo

dead.

was

in recognised

him

commandant, and related to which moment

he has doomed I

was

in his shattered

me

himself

summoned

to

his old

the acquaintance many of the atrocitiesby to eternal infamy. At this

another

of my friends laywounded could be removed were sent

room,

where

several

morning,all such as gffto Prague,and thus I had no opportunity of obtaining of the an explftnation of the commandant. mysterious expressions more

:

next

zed by Digiti;


168

GHOST

he had

other attachment, he felt the greatest repugnance

no

unite himself for ]ife to

to never

seen,

Heaven

STOKIES.

had

reference to

a

whom

person

he

had

merely for the sake of money, with which him, and without any already amply provided her person, or to the qualities of her heart

and mind. Out

of filial duty,and

"enior clerks in his was Mellinger

an

hecause

his father and all the

assured counting-house

able merchant, of whom

learned,he leftVenice

him

much

that old was

to be

tion completehis mercantile educaunder that gentleman, and, at the same time, to see If he did not like her, he intended his daughterEmmeline. with his sentiments^ his father frankly to acquaint his matrimonial speculation. and to beg him to relinquish Some stages before he reached the placewhere Mr. Mellingerresided,Guilielmo met with young Wilmsen As both were of a lively, from Bremen. tion, open disposiand went, on their arrival, theysoon became acquainted, between to the same inn,where they had a room to

them. who Guilielmo had received directions from his father, had caU

apprisedold Mellingerthat his son his on upon the latter immediately he went

arrival; but, before

his house, he determined

to

coming,to

was

to

mike

some

He conceived him and Emmeline. concerning inquiries would be the more if that his object accomplished, easily he

ill to

quithis explainedhis

received from could the

one

the

to assume

were

not

chamber. reason

him

refuse

was

Wilmsen,

for this the

to pass

who

of Wilmsen,

name

to

whom

change of

utmost

kindness

for the rich

name,

and

was

too

Guiliekno and

who

attention,

Sponseri ; and

thus

taken for the other.

Emmeline, accordingto the information obtained by

zed by Digiti;


THE

MANTLE

GREEN

Guilielmo, was

very

hold her head

to

that she

benevolent

praise. Some, rather

of

modest, accomplished, :

in

red short,all concur-

it is true, added that she seemed too

high ;

had, indeed,had many

nothingshort

169

VENICE.

beautiful and

and good-tempered, in her

OF

Of the father he

others intimated

admirers, but theysupposed

count

a

and

or

heard

a

would

duke

nothingbut

be

what

cepted. acwas

peoplewent too far,perhaps,in their censure, and denied him a single goodquality.The greatestpart of his wealth, they said,was amassed by usury, extortion, and the most They asserted,that when unjustmeans. for lucrative speculation an opportunity presenteditself, consideration could deter him from engagingin it. no tegrity, of religion and inGuilielmo,broughtup in principles resolved to have nothingto do with any of the family: though he might,perhaps,like Emmeline, yet her fortune could not bring any blessing alongwith it, since it had been unjustly acquired. He thanked Heaven that he had not introduced himself to Mr. Mellinger, and determined to return home ; but an accident changedhis bad

:

mind. On

the

of birthday

his beloved

the cathedral and knelt down

mother, Guilielmo

tered en-

high altar from to offer up his prayers for her happiness. On rising of this piousduty,his glancefellupon the performance the step above at a littledistance on a female,kneeling The fervent pietyof him, and wrapt in deep devotion. her attitude and demeanour during the solemn service, face and figure, and the exquisite beautyof her youthful made an extraordinary impressionupon him 5 and he within himself that he had never beheld so protested before the

a creature. lovely

When

the service

was

over,

the stranger

rose

15

zed by Digiti;

ani

left


170 the church.

Guilielmo

her hestow

saw

STORIES.

GHOST

who

followed her at each

on charity

beset the

porch of

a

distance.

He

of the the

and mendicants cripples cathedral ; and silently-

of the gestures,the gait, jay, every movement, She turned into the street in which the fair unknown. admired

Mellingerresided. "If that" thoughtGuilielmo, it not posand smiled without finishing the idea,for was sible that a hundred handsome ladies might hve young in the same ? She presentlystreet with Mr. Mellinger crossed over, with hght step, to that side of the street on Mr.

"

which

the merchant's

house stood.

"

If that

Em-

were

thoughthe again, and his eye followed her with the most intense anxiety. As she approachedMr. the neighbours all saluted her respectfully MeUinger's, : she must live close by,that was evident. She stopped at ^Tobias opened it,and the angel his door she knocked he in disappeared. If that were Emmeline," repeated with nothingbut Mr. Mellow tone, standingstill, a Hnger'shouse in his eye, and nothingbut the lovelyascertained by his inquiries soon stranger in his heart. He meUne"

"

"

"

"

that the latterwas,

indeed,no

other

than

Emme-

line. From

With

this moment,

his views

were

changed. completely

his wonted

taining he formed a plan fof obpromptitude, admission into Mr. MeUinger'shouse under a feignedname, that he might become better acquainted if he could gain her with Emmeline ; and intending, affections, merelyfor his own sake, while she was ignorant of his

would

circumstances,to offer her his hand.

afterwards

induce her father

employ all the to abandon

reparationwherever Ihat he had

not

he

had

means

in his power

He to

his unjustdealings^ to make done

injury,to restore and to become a honourably acquired,

zed by Digiti;

all bet-


GREEN

THE

might rest upon This planwas soon but

Upon

his union

formed

Emmeline.

with :

in his

wpuld end of the

cellent; ex-

him

tain obmightpossibly

Mellinger, once, twice,or

Mr.

three times,

business,and there their acquaintance

on

seeingEmmeline, she usually sat in as question, ; but

her

and

opinion it was

small difficultiesattended the execution.

no

to

speak to

out

171

VENICE.

pretext or other,Guilielmo

some

access

to

OF

of Hea Then, indeed,he thoughtthe blessing

ter man. ven

MANTLE

as

to

that her

quite

was

ment, apart-

own

father received all visitors who

called

on

in his

counting-house. The sudden death of young AVilmsen, by the rupture of a blood-vessel, suggestedto Guilielmo,goadedby passion and solicited for the reformation of Mr. Mellinger, the' reader is already with which scheme the mad quainted. acHe had heard the report that the countinghouse, was haunted,and he surmised that this notion might in its vicinity solved of the dishave originated to the church matters

of business

In this way,

nunnery.

it possible to work

other,was how

he

was

to

he

conceived,and the old

upon

proceedin regardto

in

no

gentleman:

Emmeline

he had

not

yet settled. The to

green

mantle in which

Mr.

Mellingerbelongedto procuredfor him from

was

young

surgeon,

the table

with whom

he

appearedthe

Wilmsen. an

The

anatomical

he had become

d*hdte,and chalk had done

firstnight dead

hand

theatre,by

a

at acquainted

all that

was

sary neces-

for his face. The

porter at the Sun

inn had

seen

the Green

Mantle

back ; for,after his appearquitthe house, but not come ance Guilielmo returned to Wilmsen, to Mr. Mellinger, with the mantle closely rolled up, and concealed under his arm. He spread it over the corpse, and thrust the

zed by Digiti;


172

receiptof wicket as

to

STORIES.

GHOST

to

Mellingerinto church-yardwas

the

Mr.

the

letterto old

Sponseriwas

Tke

iron

opened from within, his fright, represented

not

the eyes of old Tobias had, in him. The

sleeve.

not

forwarded

to

Venice,

at the given back to Guilielmo,on his application As he producedthe seal and handwriting at poet-office. made to deliver the letterto him. the office, no scruple was The letterfrom Venice, broughtby express, was ten writand sent by Guilielmo to an acquaintance who lived

but

on

the

with road thither,

a

request that he

would

spatch de-

and free of expense, to by special messenger, Mr. Mellinger.Guilielmo, when *he took the trouble, could imitate his father's hand so exactlythat nobody could distinguish the one from the other. ject obThe of this letter was to confirm Mr. Mellingerin his of the apparition, belief of the reality and to strengthen the good effectproducedby his words on the mind of the old gentleman. he Without any preciseplan,but merely in case should have occasion to remind Mr. Mellingerof the Guilielmo other green mantles, had two apparition, buried with young made exactlyhke that which was it

ing Wilmsen, and in which the uppermost button wais wantcut off the top button of the other two. ; he, therefore, with He then wrote, in a feigned hand, the Italian billet,

reference

to

the undue

had accumulated

means

by

which

Mr.

Mellinger

the greatest part of his property

; tore

pieces,and shortlybefore the interment df into the pocket Wiknsen, put one of the fragments

it in three

young of the mantle, which He

which

had the

not

two

was

buried with the deceased.

yet fixed in his other mantles

own were

mind to

the

be

purpose

to

applied. He

zed by Digiti;


THE

GREEN

OF

MANTLE

173

VENICE.

would present itselffor his opportunity hoped that some ; he would then leave appearingagainto Mr. Mellinger the second mantle behind ; and, as all good things ought stillpersisted in to be three in number, if the old usurer his hard-hearted courses, he might visit him a third time and dropthe third mantle : after which, in the character of

Wilmsen, he would

seek to contrive

the firstmantle should be

dug

up

and again,

comparedwith the piecesin the two this case he fully expectedthat the

itbe In

whole

paper

would

so

that

the paper

in

other mantles. of the

contents

soul of the selfish

the inmost

shake

matters

and producethe desired efiect. Mellinger, He hoped to induce him to applyso much of his fortune amassed by unjustmeans to beneficent puras he had poses farther ance acquaint; he would next endeavour,if, upon he found the qualities of her heart with Emmehne tions with those of her person, to win her affecto correspond and avaricious

under the character of "

a

and then,and not tillthen,did he

thus of her father,

of

man

young

no

property

hope,that the wealth

would bringa blessing purified, upon

himself and Emmeline. The

advertisement

wished-for

afforded him the

in the newspapers

of opportunity

an

introduction into Mr.

Mel-

house. linger's The

appearance

with such the other

of the firstgreen

mantle

that there beneficial effects,

was

was no

attended need for

Guilielmo

acquired, by his intelligence the mind of his and usefulness, such an ascendency over which was deeplyaffected by the words of the employer, sen, in the character of young Wilmthat, supposedapparition, he had occasion onlyfor friendly or remonstrances, two.

the observation that God and

takes account

to keep judges us accordingly,

of all our

his awakened

16"

zed by Digiti;

actions con-


174

STORIES.

GHOST

path into

science in that

Mantle

the Green

which

had

conducted it. dial a real corwere Mellinger He to Guiliehno. regardedthem as circumstances his prothat were indispensably perty necessary for purifying remained after What of his unjustacquisitions. to his ideas,be about as these losses might,according much as the old gentlemanhad amassed by honest and tween beThe conversation on this subject honourable means.

the latterdissembled

and Guilielmo,in which

him his

hefel Mr.

losses which

The

opinionmerelyfor the served

to

convince him

ployer, soundinghis emMr. Mellinger's position dis-

of

purpose

that

changed,and that he considered his really judgmentsof the Almighty. of discovering this time Guilielmo had thoughts

was

losses as About

himself.

had, from

He

made first,

the

his father

quainted ac-

plan and his motives for adoptingit. Old Sponseri date though,as a sober,seapprovedthe latter, commend the contrivance he could not exactly man, done could not be of the apparition was : but since what with his

undone, and

as

the af"ir had

he Mellinger,

the character of old

the

career

producedthe best effect on

he had marked

out

under

did therefore, Sincerely,

he

a "

hundred

wrote

as

follows :

repairhither

Now

to

but says to her

'

Be

from what

mine

he

pursue

gainthe

his wife when convinced

am

am

was.

a

dred hun-

allparts of the world, meline confident that Em-

all,if poor Wilmsen !'

by

attachment

of Venice, with Sponseri

solicither hand, I

will refuse them

I

to

of Wilmsen.

name

of "nmiehne*s

wealthysuitors from

stillmore

man

**

circumstances little

let Mr. Guiliehno

^now

the

with rejoice "

to

son

for himself,and

afiections of Emmeline

Guilielmo

lefthis

Her father is a All those

of Bremen

ent differtotally who formerly

zed by Digiti;


176

GHOST

letterswere

then

opened "

of his

^he had

his agents;

Napoleonor man

STORIES.

droppeda

word respecting

indiscretion which, for

an

a

wealth,might be visitedwith the forfeitureof of Mr.

thousands ; or well aware many inveterate hatred to the French "

he

"

Mellinger's

conceived

that he

might have been induced by it to enter into a prohibited with some correspondence person in Russia or Prussia, into contracts for the supplyof the armies in those or even the military commission would countries. In this case failto pass seittence of death on him, and the whole of his property would be confiscated. He must therefore not

be rescued,cost what

it would.

promptitude Ingenuity, devoted friends, and decision, and the liberal application the spells of money, were by which Guilielmo,under the of Providence, accomplished the deliverance protection of the old gentleman. of his most The firstthinghe did was to engage one intimate friends, young commandant or

seven

who

were

to an

Carera, the banker, to invite the

entertainment

miles from town, where in the

and plot,

at

his

the

six country-house,

of the company of convivial consisted chiefly rest

with wine as to render to plyhim so briskly were spirits, him incapable of any kind of business. By thisexpedient Quihelmo gainedtime,and insured the absence of this wretch from the city. In the to

course

of the

obtain the necessary

several officersrode afternoon, orders for examiningMr.

over

Mellin-

himself on his ger*spapers ; but the commandant piqued' cunning in havingobligedMr. Melhngerto giveup the in his keys of his chest,which he had at that moment for any suspicious that it was so own pocket, impossible He therefore begged the officers papers to be removed. themselves perfectly to make easy on that score, and to

zed by Digiti;


GREEN

THE

MANTLE

OF

177

VENICE.

and filltheir

that there glasses, sagelyobserving "wf^iildbe another day after the present, and then they his chests,and could go to Meilinger's house, rummage turn every thingtopsy-turvy. Carera and his boon companions, alldevoted friendsof Wilmsen's, loudly applauded the ingenuity of the commandant, pressedthe officers circulated the bottle, to jointhem, briskly and, to blind them more completely, inveighedagainstMellingeras thoughthey had been his bitterestenemies. naturally Young Stark,one of Guilielmo's bosom friends, quietand reserved,and therefore neither remarked when pressedto attend such bouts as this nor missed when absent,hazarded a stroke which, had it failed, might

sitdown

have

cost

by the

him

his life. The

heat of the

day,and

commandant, incommoded that occasioned

by

the old

Perai, the Juran^onand Alicante several times of the which he had swallowed,complained Chambertin

and

St.

of his uniform. Stark jocosely tightness broughthim a nankeen of to the master light morning-gownbelonging the house, and be^ed him to put it on, adding,it but rightthat he, as king of the feast, should be was As the rest at his ease. placed as much as possible joinedin this request,the conmiandant exchangedhis for the more cloth coat, heavy with gold, commodious to enjoy himself without and again sat down gown,

restraint.

hung the uniform in an adjoining apartment, took Mr. Meilinger's keys out of the pocket,sprung upon Carera's Englishhunter,which was dled, standing readysadto the town, and delivered the keys to the galloped astonished Guilielmo,that he mightremove allsuspicious Stark

papers

and

Meanwhile

secure

the cash in the chest.

Guiliehno had

not

been idle.

the Pallasch,

zed by Digiti;


178

STOBIES.

GHOST

and SergeantWollmar, jailer,

had

been

induced, by

a

handful of

gold apiece,to admit Guilielmo for a quarter of an hour to Mr. Mellinger.The latter had not the leastnotion of the cause of his apprehension.The report of the murder

of the courier

was

now

firstcommunicated

him

to

by GuiHelmo, and he solemnlydeclared been engaged in any correspondence or

not

whatever

with the enemies

that from

at

terror at

he felt more

first he

of the French.

that he had

intercourse

He

ledged, acknow-

quiteconfounded,but merely

was

the suddenness

of the event

; now,

however,

mitted beingconscious that he had not comand confidently that,on his expecting any ofience, examination in the morning,his innocence would be so evident that he should be set at liberty.Guilielmo, observed that there not so sanguine. He however, was had been instances enough,in which the French had not linger scrupledto sacrificemen quiteas innocent as Mr. Melhazardous experiment to trust a very ; that it was

easy,

their tender mercies

to

and

;

when

be safe.

would at least, clutches,his life, desired him follow

to

expect him

his implicitly

GuiHelmo

twelve that

He

therefore

and night,

to

directions. Pallasch and Wollmar.

sounded

then

at

of their

out

once

infuriate enemy

an luckily thoroughlydetested

latterwas

to

The

the French, who

rapaciouscommandant. if theywould assist Guilielmo offered them largesums in his plans. Pallasch was him soon gained over. posed also well disWollmar, as far as regardedhimself,was to secure

how

forward

them

we

; but

he

was

at a loss how

to

guard under his orders,or fallibly from the punishmentthat would inIf,indeed," added he, half in jest, of the

the connivance to screen

mean,

his views

await them. **

the

"

could but trump up

some

and tellthem ghost-story,


that

a

carried offthe

had spirit

179

VENICE.

OF

MANTLE

GREEN

THE

prisonerthe "

rascals have

such thick heads you mightbatter down walls with them and swear throughthick theywould believe any thing, the spectre. Then, and thin that they had even seen "

as

to

he is

the commandant, in

nonsense

"

hoves who beonlyan old woman, and all sorts of fortune-telUng, astrology, omens, and why should he not beUeve in a ghost-story

too?"

words decided Guiliehno.

These Green

Mantle

of Venice

told them that the

He

should effectthe release of the

that this was who was a spirit gentleman; observing, known feats in their to have alreadyperformed some town, and therefore the story would gainthe more ready

old

belief when

it should be asserted that it was

liberated the

prisoner.Guilielmo

he who

home

hurried

now

had to

further arrangements, with the

make

trive special designto conthat the pieces of the paper deposited in the pockets of the three green mantles,and originally destined forMr. but equally to the universally Mellinger, applicable crated exe-

ter. commandant, should fallinto the hands of the latOn

his arrival he found

keys. The he

was

and books he leftuntouched

papers

assured

his friend ^Stark with the

by

Mr.

there

that Mellinger,

them.

;

was

because

nothing

took out allthe money, cepting exabout four thousand dollars, and then,putting the

suspicious among third green

mantle

He

into the the

his despatched

friend with the

pieceof

in the

of

paper

which, as

we

keys.

pocketof

have seen,

are

On

the back of the

this mantle,a

fragment

buried with the firstmantle,

was

he had

in

chest,he locked it,and

written in the hastily the words beginning front, : "

same

hand-

as

Pcdldsch and

the hues

Wollmar

innocent J*^ To

find these words in the inside of

a

strongiron chest.

zed by Digiti;


180

GHOST

key of

the

which

STORIES.

had, as he helieved,been in his possession

since the firstminute of Mr.

ever

well have

might

astonished

and firmness of mind

sense

a

rest, arMellinger's of more good

man

than the commandant

could

pretendto. Who but a supernatural being could have known that Pallasch would have any by anticipation Who ? could have guessed thingto do with the aflfair the

of the person

name

the

The

guard?

startled

on

such

eflfect on

he

an

the weak

either Pallasch

Guilielmo,who would

be to

mind

or

ger

by

green

He a

was

Emmeline's

firstwish

might

Wollmar, himself

not

to

suflferher

admitted

and

soon

to

after

introduced, enveloped

mantle,into the cell where

Mr.

Meliin-

was

taining purposelydetained by the enterby her father and Wollmar, that

of additional witness of the appearance Her Mantle. father had, likewise,told her

might be

the Green

an

go to bed, that she at her ejcami nations ; and

several times

of his

swear

the

on

the strictest orders to his

privateway,

stories related

might

terrible

confined.

was

Betty Pallasch she

commandant, that

Wollmar.

imaginedthat

prison.

a

at first

and that their interview her father,

see

eleven o'clock in

of the

of

lines had

of the injunction say a singleword

not

Pallasch and confidants, the

the command

the

to his plans, injurious gave

enter

have

discovery.The

a

Mantle, and durst

to subject

be

such

implicitly compliedwith

Green

would

incredulous would have been

most

making

who

attest

with

with her

own

a

to

might state

the circumstance

thus obviate all suspicion

kept her up, that she navingintentionally this or that. The girlcould,therefore, good conscience that she saw the spectre eyes, and heard with her

own

ears

words.

zed by Digiti;

his fearful


THE

Wollmar

MANTLE

GREEN

made

about the Green

up

dreadful

so

had

taken

181

VENICE.

story to his soldiers he

corroborated

was

to catch at any

drowsiness,were

grossestfalsehoods when Guilielmo

a

Mantle, in which

that they, by Betty, eager intoxication and

OF

ready to

broughtbefore

for their

excuse

swear

the

the commandant.

leave the green mantle the third fragmentof the paper within the containing to

care

which Bettyhad locked prison-door,

;

while he retreated

with Mr.

at

Mellinger throughthe side entrance, and proceeded with all speedto the house of his friend Carera, whose garden-gate ing, waitwas a light travelling carriage which conveyedMr. MeUinger,furnished with passports under a feigned he proceedto Raab, whence ed name, to Smyrna.

The

sentry in front of the prisonabsconded,because

Wollmar as

he

had

givenout

insisted that he

thingof

the

and it was that he

that he would had

He apparition.

not tillafter the

neither

seen

be shot, infallibly nor

heard

concealed himself in the

any

city,

of the 'commandant departure

his hiding-place. quitted

Guihelmo

bad scented the two

mantles with brimstone,

them with vitriol, to givethem the appearsprinkled ance of beingin a state of corruption. LittleCharlotte was broughta second time before the It then came after Mr. Mellinger's commandant escape. innocent of the was out that the old gentleman perfectly fair supposedmurder of the courier ; and that the whole afThe commandant in a mistake. had originated was ashamed of havingmade so much ado about nothing, and he fearful lest he should therebyincur publicridicule, threatened the child with death if ever she disclosed a syllable what had passed, to her parents. It even concerning is probable, too, that he might be desirous of keepingup

and

16

zed by Digiti;


182

GHOST

notion of Mr.

the

might have

STORIES.

in guilt, Mellinger's

that he

order

his property. piausihle pretext for seizing of persons, by bribery Guilielmo had procured a number and various means, to depose to the fact of the body bias: which was taken out of the water being that of old Toa

the multitude

with

went

and the officerbefore whom

in his

billetwhich

taken,

were depositions

cular parti-

too

not

received from her father,

Emmeline

morning received it by an unknown

sent purposely

he knew

time when

reflection,

investigation.

Guilielmo had that he

the

without

of Guiliehno's stanch friends, was

beingone The

them

the commandant

from

Smyrna,and

messenger, was

at

the

with her.

to Venice despatched by the commandant had been anticipated by a letter from Guilielmo to his him in what manner to reply. father,instructing silence on the subject of his escape Mr. Mellinger's occasioned by his havingbound himself,by a solemn was promiseto Guilielmo,not to reveal what had passedtill

The

courier

he should absolve him exacted with at Venice

from

a

his

crew

:

not

seen

Guilielmo

course

and

have

view

the as

been

mo promiseGuiliel-

himself and his house

to secure

resentment

Mr.

This

in person.

of the commandant

on Mellinger,

his return

and

home, had

since his escape, he could not then of He released by him from his oath.

therefore onlyfeignedat that time stillto consider Guiliehno

as

So much

Mantle

poor Wilmsen. in

of explanation

the

of mysteries

the Green

of Venice.

zed by Digiti;


184

GHOST

STORIES.

"

in anninghimself with a sword and pistols, and in solely of his comrades, that,in case with some he concerting should not return hy a certain time,theyshould go to his assistance. His friends, having waited for him in vain tilltwo o'clock, for his safety. began to be apprehensive Another hour passed, back acand stillhe did not come cording in quest of him, but to promise ; theythen went

he

nowhere

was

The

be found.

to

morningbegan to dawn,

ger who

had been

sent

when

theymet a messeu* from the neighbouring

off to them

village.They asked him if he had him, anywhere on describing that a person,

no

doubt the

was lyingat inquiring,

were :

if so, he

that

desired

was

they might fetch

with

the

same

to inform

him

in

away.

hear the

to

young

tleman, gen-

ver violent fe-

a

stance, of the circum-

them

diately They immeof his history

him

removed

and spirit,

a

He rehis way. plied, after whom they

Metternich

hastened thither, curious adventure

seen

to

his

own

home. After the young

exorcist had somewhat

recovered from

into which he had been thrown, and fright the use of his faculties, he related to regained completely

the vehement

them "^

what follows :

"

I had

been scarcely

before the of the river, French

a

quarter of

a

to meet it, resolutely cocked in hand, and pistol

me,

in the

and

horror,that I cannot

was

me.

least daunted, advanced not

above

all at describe,

My blood curdled ; my both sword involuntarily, dropped, fisist as my legswould carry me to over

the bank

I went

with my drawn sword in one the other. The spectre, not

off,when

on

spirit appearedin the well-known

chasseur uniform.

towards straight

hour

an

courage

and

six paces once

came

failed me

and pistol,

Metternich.

zed by Digiti;

ran

; I as

I wished


185 several times

look back,to

whether the spectre was lifeI durst not. Though I am

to

see

pursuingme, but for my convinced that this is not a real ghost, still firmly yet I was gladwhen, quiteexhausted,I reached the village, heartily of my fellow-creatures about me." and had againsome adventure,which

This awkward

soon

creature

with the

apparition.

French

The

commandant

of Coblentz

solved lengthreclosely.His plan

at

the matter more investigate sentries at every point, after posting to to

was,

go in person

the spectre. Ail his arrangements

to meet

with the

utmost

had Scarcely of spirit

The

publicly

a good deal of merriment, but yet not a manifested any inclinationfor a second'rencontre

excited

known,

the

became

secrecy, and every

man

the clock at Coblentz the deceased

commandant, whose to it ;

General heart

his post. twelve,when at

was

struck made

its appearance.

in the

was

made

were

rightplace,

and, at the

same time,ordered directly up the soldiers, They postedat some distance,to advance. riously, the surrounded who, nevertheless, foughtmost fughost, tilla brave grenadier, seizinghim from behind,

made

he

held him fasttillhis comrades, whom the

assurance

cheered

that the spectre had flesh and

with

bone, came

up to his assistance.

The

incarnate

taken alive,disarmed,and

was spirit

he was to Coblentz,where prisoner guard-house.At his examination,the

confined in

carried the

confessed that he

was

to act the

a

part of General

order that his comrades

that character,cross convey

of

to

waterman,

and

next

that he

day,he had

dertaken un-

in Mar^eau'sghost,

might,duringhis

appearance

in

and with greatersecurity, fortressof Ehrenbreitstein supplies

the Rhine

the blockaded

for which they received provisions,

a

highprice

IG*

zed by Digiti;


186

THE

HAUNTED

[The following story,which from be

an

uncle of ours,

perusedby most

of

INN.

than

more

recollectto have heard

we

thirty years since,will

readers with additional interest,

our

from itsevidently beingthe identical German

legendon

which to

is founded the opera of BeUini,*" La Sonnambula," which the talents of Malibran,Mrs. Wood, and Mis.

Seguin,have givensuch remarkable ecleU,'] Robert town was a rich innkeeperin a on Rhine.

All

travellerswho

at

however,

once,

per Up-

fell off; for

custom

him, either avoided the

puttingup with the or preferred placeentirely,

inferior accommodations

of another

this decline

had been

the

in the habit of

that his house

was,

and what traveller, weary have his

broken

rest

a Sigismund,

at

inn.

The

haunted

was

cause

of

by a ghost;

would Uke to journey, nightby the pranksof a spectre? with his

who distant relative,

had

an

eye

on

the

only daughterof the host,had of late in this house,either on visitsto the years been frequently or when family, always travelling upon business. He slept fair Rosina, the

in the the

same

room,

in the upper

so unluckyto discovery,

story ; and there he made

his kinsman, that the house

haunted.

was

One

when night, was

with

familyhad

by the spectre.

terror,he rushed

neck down With

roused

allthe

out

in his

Almost beside himself

shirt, readyto break his

and called up the stairs,

Robert difficulty the

cause

lengthsomewhat

drew

retired to bed, Sigismund

master

specting reexplanation alarm. Having at occasioned by fright

from him

of such vehement

recovered from the

of the house.

an

zed by Digiti;


the

he apparition,

count

:

^"I

gave

in

the landlord the

when asleep,

fast

was

noise awoke

feeble

I had locked before I went

walked

shpped into bed could

how

hideous The

I

got out of bed

!" apparition Robert trembling

He

haunted chamber. far as

bunch

a

to oed.

of

bed, down

gave but paced the room

his

cry out, but

to

God

found

to

the

tured, ven-

approach the

the door fast:

he could recollect, had

to

he

and people,

and well armed,

a

the table and

on

paralysedmy senses. without falling a prey

awoke

keys

which

I endeavoured

me.

in their company

lamp

lamp

and horror

Fear

not.

knows

to

a

past my

several times,then set the

as

spectre had

The

me.

light.It

white, death-like figure

a

hand, and in the other

one

acfollowing

"

openedmy door,which The

187

INK.

HAX7NTED

THE

Sigismund,

pulledit after

him, that

him in ghostmight have less chance of overtaking As the key had been left on the table that his flight. it was stood by the bed-side, found necessary to fetch the before theycould gainadmission. This was master-key the

done accordingly in

but

durst

not

vain

"

night.

Robert could He

kinsman.

and all eyes looked round for the spectre, it was Sigismund,however, gone.

of his deserted bed for the repossession mainder

resume

of the

to

;

not was

think of the story of his well acquainted with his character

tellwhat too

to

; he suspect deception

greatcoward accuracy

:

he

supposedthat he was not a had, therefore, no justcause to doubt the

of his statement.

At the

same

time he

he reflectedthat the spectre might think

when

was

vexed

fit to

turn re-

his house would, in consequence, get a bad name, his business mightbe ruined. To investigate the matter :

and

more

he repaired the following accompanied closely, night, by his trusty servant Peter,well armed, to the

zed by Digiti;


188

GHOST

haunted

chamber.

and honour of

an

The

room.

candle,was

Long

did

He

by

STORIES.

to assigned

Peter the post of danger

the door,while

chair,at

easy

he

himseJf took session posthe remotest of the corner

a great house-lantern, containing

placedon the table. theythus wait in vain

spectre. Both

of them

eyes open, and

nothingbut

lighted

for the visit of the

found it difficultto the

keep supposeddanger(^

their their

furnished them with unusual powers of vigienterprise lance. Sleepnevertheless began to exercise its despotic sway

over

the landlord.

Peter meanwhile

heard, as

he

and imaginedthat somethingcoming up stairs, thought, soft steps. The effecton his sleepy be could distinguish senses was powerfuland instantaneous. He gave his notice of the impending attack. Sleep, master however, had completely overpoweredthe landlord ; and under these circumstances Peter deemed himself justified in leavinghis post,and rousinghis master by no very gentle drew their cutshake to the conflict. Both trembling lasses

was

and took post behind the arm-chair. alreadyat the door,and the bunch of The

carried rattled like chains.

door

The

spectre

keys which

opened,and

it the

itself. It was covered of a living figure corpse presented from head to foot by a white shroud, walked twice round with a deep sigh into the bed. the room, and then glided Glad

to see

the

coast

seized the

Robert thus far clear,

down not retreat stairs, precipitate of the enemy, but, in the possession his arms onlyleaving in his haste,dashingthe lantern with such force against lantern and

made

a

the balusters that it was

Peter,who,

at the

shattered

firstappearance

and squeezedhi^eyestogether, his soul

to

to

pieces. of the

in his

all the saints, had meanwhile

behind the arm-chair.

He

saw

spectre,had

commended fright sunk

on

heard nothing,

the floor

but little

zedbyGOQgle

Digiti;


THE

HAUNTED

189

INN.

passingabout him, and awaited his fatewith The crash of the lantern,which patientresignation. should have recalled his senses, onlyserved to increase his stupefaction. Fatiguedand exhausted with terror, of sleep, and was he sunk into the arms found in the morning snoringat full lengthon the floor behind the of what

was

arm-chair. Robert

hurried

back

and bed, without undressing,

to

head

covered himself

over

had his courage

fallen. The

dispelsfear,and once

in the clothes ;

so

low

of day,which cheeringlight courage

to

the

faint-hearted,

spirits.Accompaniedby his in quest of his lostattendant, to the place

went

left him.

he had

where

ears

raised Robert's

more

he people,

restores

and

He

that rejoiced sincerely

the

bodilycarried off the poor fellow. The adventure of the nightwas known to all the soon sensible of them laughedheartily towns-folk. The more at the landlord's absurd conduct,and called him a stupid, chicken-hearted coward. This language superstitious, reached his ears, and vexed him to such a degree, soon that he repaired of the town, made to the burgomaster of the afliur, and requested affidavitof the particulars the for ascertaining the reality of to take measures magistrate and the truth of his supernatural the apparition, ture advention ; that he might retrieve his losthonour in the estimaof the incredulous public. The compliedwith his request,and the magistrate

spectre had

not

with four courageous fellows to nightin the haunted chamber. Whether the

town-sergeant pass the next

deemed spirit or

was

its opponents in this instance

whether

that it did which

was

sent

it had not

actually decamped,so

think fit to show

anxious for itsappearance.

too

much

ble, formidais

tain, cer-

itselfto the party The

men

zed by Digiti;

repaired


190

GHOST

their post the

to

ghostwas

two

STORIES.

but succeedingnights,

not to be seen.

had thus put himself

Robert

the obstinate

useless expense

to a

been the talk of the whole previously ridicule. became the butt of general now It was in company not longbefore Sigismund, friend, againpassedthroughthe place. He was

if he had

that

the

spectre had his kinsman's.

at

The

he resolved not to

once

to

more

lodgeunder

with

His

a

informed Peter

sleepany

the

over

same

him

he

:

roof with

her, but onlyon the express condition that he should lie in the haunted

he

of the solicitations

courteous

fair Rosina, however, had great influence ventured

and,

town,

terrified the landlord and

almost out of their Hves ; and more

;

not

chamber.

friend,however, desirous of

an

interview with

a

insistedon havinga bed preparedforhim in the very ghost, which the spirit had been accustomed to visit. The room landlord was not a little to think that he had at gratified he termed it,the last met a person willing to avenge, as honour

of his house.

with coolness and friend took his measures Sigismund's deliberation. He placedon the table by his bed a brace, of loaded pistols, dles, providedhimself with a coupleof canin addition to the night-lamp, to bed unconwent cerned, and awoke next sleptsoundly, morning without hearingor seeingany thingof a spirit.He endeavoured of his companionthe silliness to impressupon the mind of his fears, and begged him as a friend to bear him company the following night. Sigismund,sensible that his friend's exhortations were and repaired with him at well-meant,pluckedup a spirit bed-time to his former chamber. Towards mid-night faint heard ascendingthe stairs, and slowlyapsteps were proaching nearer

and

nearer

to

the

room;

"

zed by Digiti;

The

same


192 knew

GHOST

STORIES.

from former

position to

that Rosina experience and she was walkingin her sleep,

convinced of her virtue and innocence

beingin such a situation to any disorder. singular It was longbefore Robert would of his better half or his herselffurnished evidence

too

too

a

pre-dis*

ly thorough-

to attrihute her

than

cause

trust either the senses

;

because in silence,

not had sufficient presence or

because

of

so

they wished

awkward

a

rances assu-

strongto be resisted. She

bed with

followed her

They

that

tillat lastRosina

her eyes shut,took up the which had gone out, and walked through the who made way for her, out of the company,

the quitted

lamp

own

other

had

of mind

to

they

wake

night-

had

her

at

ished astonroom.

either

first,

her the embarrassment

to spare

situation.

All to her chamber. the way down stairs, resumed in particular, to rest,and Sigismund, retiredagain She found

ferent placewhich his Rosina had occupiedwith very diffrom those with which he had leftit. The feelings wards inference which he drew in regardto her sentiments to-

the

him from her behaviour in the liveliestof all dreams, to him. Nothing exceedingly flattering therefore could prevent him next morningfrom making to her Rosina a formal offer of his hand, and explaining and They had littleto object, parents his further views.

could

not

but be

stillless.

the heart of Rosina Thus

the horror

and

visitation terminated

consummated Rosina

had

in the twice

in

apprehensionof a supernatural was a joyous wedding, which chamber

same

filled her

where

lover with

alarm. THE

END.

zed by Digiti;

the innocent

inexpressible


zed by Digiti;


zed Digiti;

by


zed by Digiti;


zed Digiti;

by


zed by Digiti;


zed by Digiti;

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