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insideVOGUE DECEMBER 2016

Regulars 58 EDITOR’S LETTER 66 VOGUE NOTICES Behind the scenes of the issue 70 VOGUE.CO.UK What’s online this month 197 CHECKLIST Festive treats (for self and others). Plus, an evening with Vogue and Chanel 301 STOCKISTS BACK PAGE MIND’S EYE Artist Marcantonio Brandolini finds inspiration in the streets of Venice

In Vogue 85 WHAT’S NEW The people, places, ideas and trends to watch now. Edited by Julia Hobbs

WHAT TO BUY NOW Page 109

93 STRONGEST SUIT The trouser suit is back. What styles make the cut, asks Sarah Harris 101 COVER STORY HOW TO CHEAT A CHIC GIFT Memo to significant other: Vogue’s guide will ensure your presents are at the top of the tree 106 DRESSING THE PART Style supremo Anna Harvey shares her timeless tips in a new book

“Against the room’s stark futurism, Loewe’s pop of red silk feels as vivid as a geisha’s painted lips”

Vogue Shops

AN ARTIST OF THE FLOATING WORLD, PAGE 220

109 WHAT TO BUY NOW This party season, add a veneer of rock-star attitude

COVER LOOK

Lily-Rose Depp wears tulle and voile dress, to order. Metallic leather belt, £530. Both Chanel. Get the look: make-up by Chanel. Eyes: Illusion D’Ombre Velvet Eyeshadow in Melody. Lips: Rouge Coco Ultra Hydrating Lip Colour in Adrienne. Face: Sublimage Le Teint Ultimate Radiance-Generation Cream Foundation. Hair by Wella Professionals: EIMI Perfect Me Smoothing Lotion; Oil Reflections Light Luminous Reflective Oil. Hair: Didier Malige. Make-up: Aaron de Mey. Production: Dawn Boller. Set design: Dimitri Levas. Digital artwork: Samantha Moranville. Fashion editor: Joe McKenna. Photographer: Bruce Weber

View 119 ONE GOOD TURN Coffee-table books that are a feast for the eyes. Plus, one special year in the life of Vogue’s editor-in-chief

138 FASHION TRAVEL TOKYO The Vogue team heads East 143 COVER STORY SPOTLIGHT TWENTY NAMES OF NOW Fresh talents making their mark

123 ANIMAL INSTINCT Tom Ford’s new film is a gripping delight. Plus, other tales to thrill

153 MEMOIR GOLDEN YEARS Dakota Johnson talks to her legendary grandmother, Tippi Hedren

127 WRITTEN ON THE BODY Diana Athill on the lifelong pleasures of dressing well

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133 WINDOWS UPDATE From Dalí’s displays to multisensory spectacles, festive windows have always been big business. By Kirsty Robinson

161 NIGHT VISION Dazzling accessories for evening 163 COVER STORY COCKTAIL MIXES Reboot your partywear

>42 35


The BRITISH WARMER, 2016 Photographed by Steven Meisel #RLICONICSTYLE


insideVOGUE “Paired with dropped-crotch trousers and chunky slides, Fendi’s peplum top signals haute-casual ease”

173 ICE, ICE, BABY Peak performance-wear 181 COVER STORY HOW TO PARTY, VOGUE STYLE Prepping, playlists and the ultimate party pads

FRILL SEEKER, PAGE 246

190 VIEW BOOK CLUB The launch of Vogue: Voice of a Century provided a fitting ending to a centenary year

Features 206 COVER STORY FAIRY TALE OF NEW YORK Lily-Rose Depp talks to William Van Meter about acting, Instagram and growing up in the spotlight. Photographs by Bruce Weber 254 COVER STORY A CHANGE OF HEIR The new faces who are shaking up the status quo. Portraits by Tung Walsh and Skye Parrott 270 DESPERATELY SEEKING CLEAVAGE It’s firmly out of favour, but will the bosom ever return to the fashion fold? Kathleen Baird-Murray investigates

Fashion 220 COVER STORY AN ARTIST OF THE FLOATING WORLD From geishas to androids, Vogue explores the culture clash of modern Japan. By Violet Henderson. Photographs by Tim Walker 246 COVER STORY FRILL SEEKER The quaint ruffle has had a dramatic makeover. Photographs by Gregory Harris 274 NEW MASTERS For a perfect composition of traditional and modern, add pearls. Photographs by Julia Hetta

Beauty 281 COVER STORY WHAT’S YOUR GAME FACE? Everyone’s got their tried-and-tested party look – but is it time for yours to evolve? By Violet Henderson

SUBSCRIBE TO 42

NEW MASTERS Page 274

287 NEW SEASON’S GREETINGS Grace Timothy on the fresh regimes, cult products and beauty hacks for 2017 292 THE HOME STRAIGHT Like you just stepped out of a salon? Lottie Winter asks if it’s achievable 295 MALE ORDER Three of Vogue’s favourite chaps give their views on the latest scents for men 297 OPENING CEREMONY Even the most discerning of beauty sybarites will squeal with excitement 298 BEAUTY BITES Advent calendars that deliver the goods, plus healthy cocktails and a superhero range for children

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Editor’s letter

Below: writer and actress Phoebe Waller-Bridge challenges the status quo in “A Change of Heir” (page 254). Inset: a roll-call of young talent in “Twenty Names of Now” (page 143)

December’s cover girl, Lily-Rose Depp, in “Fairy Tale of New York” (page 206)

i

write this from my bed in my hotel room in Paris. Outside a lovely late September day is breaking, and today I will see the new shows from Max Mara, Fendi and Prada, among others. September is like the new school year in fashion, and at Vogue over the past 12 months we have had the most incredible experience celebrating our centenary. Our exhibition Vogue 100: A Century of Style, at the National Portrait Gallery and Manchester Art Gallery, was a critical and visitor-number sensation; our centenary issue with its now-famous cover of the Duchess of Cambridge has become the collectors’ item I hoped; and we had some wonderful collaborations with many of the leading fashion brands of the world via our Vogue Festival, their shop windows and special one-off products. So thank you to all of you who participated in some way or other and helped us celebrate, including the hundreds of thousands of you who watched part of the process in Absolutely Fashion, the BBC documentary screened in September. The year was a fascinating time for me. I kept a journal of my days – the

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ups and downs, the emotional highs and lows, the gossip and the dramas that took place – which has just been published as Inside Vogue: A Diary of My 100th Year, and I hope you will enjoy reading the story behind so much of all of this. But now it’s time to look forward, and we have dedicated a large part of this issue to exciting new talent, starting with our cover girl, Lily-Rose Depp. She might have the advantage of being the daughter of two international stars – Johnny Depp and Vanessa Paradis – but in a very short time she has managed to stake her own claim on fame as a model and actress. Bruce Weber’s photographs delightfully capture her youth and playfulness (“Fairy Tale of New York”, on page 206). In “A Change of Heir” (page 254), we showcase a number of people new to the spotlight – from the award-winning menswear designer Grace Wales Bonner,

Celebrating a century, Vogue style: below, from left, the Vogue 100 Gala Dinner; Mario Testino attends the opening night of Vogue 100: A Century of Style at the National Portrait Gallery; Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana arrive at this year’s Vogue Festival

whose work is just as loved by women, to our hockey-playing Olympians Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh. We have also chosen a collection of young faces to watch in “Twenty Names of Now” (page 143). Over my years editing Vogue it has been terrific to see how many of our nominees of this kind go on to have really spectacular careers, and I am in no doubt that the selection in these pages will do similarly. Onwards and upwards.

BRUCE WEBER; JODY TODD; MORGAN O’DONOVAN; NICK HARVEY; PAMELA HANSON; TUNG WALSH

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VOGUEnotices ALL ABOUT THIS MONTH’S ISSUE

A GRIMM VIEW Set designer Dimitri Levas (above left) honed his skills styling photographs for Robert Mapplethorpe in the Eighties. For this month’s cover shoot with Lily-Rose Depp, by Bruce Weber (“Fairy Tale of New York”, page 206), Levas turned to children’s storybooks for inspiration. “Because most of the great fairy tales became popular in the early 19th century, I found antiques from that time – along with a beautiful chair carved from the stump of an old tree,” he says. “The shoot called for a whimsical quality. There was even a model in a wolf’s costume.”

Track events Tokyo DRIFT Model Rianne Van Rompaey (above) joined Tim Walker in Japan for “An Artist of the Floating World” (page 220). The flame-haired Dutch beauty lists meeting traditional butoh dancers and visiting the notoriously cramped bars in Tokyo’s Shibuya district among the highlights. “It was like being on a fantasy school trip: the geishas, the enormous hairdos, the crazy one-person helicopters…”

Memoirist Diana Athill, who still writes all her work longhand, reviews her life in clothes in “Written on the Body” (page 127). This month sees the publication of A Florence Diary, the nonagenarian’s whimsical account of a 1947 visit to Tuscany on the Golden Arrow train – a giddy chronicle of Renaissance architecture, cocktail dresses and youthful flirtations.

SCREEN SHOT

Actress Dakota Johnson sat down with her grandmother, legendary Hitchcock heroine Tippi Hedren, at home in Los Angeles for “Golden Years” (page 153). Here, she shares her favourite photograph of the two of them.

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Photographer Retts Wood (right) zipped across London – from the Royal Opera House to Roman Road gallery – capturing the bright young things in “Twenty Names of Now” (page 143). Wood has a unique take on the city after living on a houseboat on a canal for more than a decade: “It was incredible to live in the middle of London yet be surrounded by wildlife,” she recalls. “I would take the boat up the Thames and go swimming at dawn.”

COLIN DODGSON; BRUCE WEBER; BILL DOW

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INSIDE STORY Tune into Vogue Video this month as Lily-Rose Depp (above, and left in Chanel at this year’s Met Gala) stars in our Inside the Bag series – following in the footsteps of Victoria Beckham, Jenna Lyons and Taylor Hill. Our December cover girl reveals her take-everywhere essentials, from her favourite beauty products to the childhood gift she won’t leave home without.

Excess all areas

PEOPLE & PARTIES

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YOU’VE GOT MAIL Think of the Vogue.co.uk newsletter as your fashion front page, landing in your inbox every day to bring you up to speed with: · Must-see headlines from the fashion world · Essential shopping and beauty inspiration · Notes on the latest trends from the catwalk and the world of celebrity style · Dispatches from the red carpet · The latest releases from Vogue Video

FREEZE FRAME Winter weddings inevitably pose a very different set of sartorial challenges to their summer counterparts. Brides will need to choose a dress that’s weather-appropriate, while guests, too, will have to consider what to wear in the face of cold, wet or windy conditions. Our guide to winter-wedding dressing should be your starting point for any upcoming celebration.

Whatever your preferred social-media channel, be sure to get the latest news from Vogue first by following us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+ and Youtube. Just search for BRITISH VOGUE and MISS VOGUE and join the club.

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BRUCE WEBER; MARIO TESTINO; GETTY

Bruce Weber was the photographer of this month’s cover – delve into his Vogue archive and revisit his most famous shoots, featuring Naomi Campbell, Brooke Shields, Brad Pitt and more.

As Christmas approaches, an influx of invitations is inevitable. Let Vogue.co.uk help you navigate the festive period with our guide to the best party dresses, new make-up trends to try, and the essential health tips that will enable you to survive the weeks of excess.


ALEXANDRA SHULMAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR JAIME PERLMAN DEPUTY EDITOR EMILY SHEFFIELD MANAGING EDITOR FRANCES BENTLEY FASHION DIRECTOR LUCINDA CHAMBERS

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EXECUTIVE FASHION DIRECTOR SERENA HOOD ACTING EXECUTIVE FASHION EDITOR LAURA INGHAM SENIOR CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS KATE PHELAN, JANE HOW FASHION EDITOR VERITY PARKER FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR ROSIE VOGEL-EADES STYLE EDITOR NURA KHAN ACTING SITTINGS EDITOR JULIA BRENARD SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT FLORENCE ARNOLD FASHION ASSISTANTS BEATRIZ DE COSSIO, KATIE FRANKLIN FASHION BOOKINGS ASSISTANT KATIE LOWE FASHION COORDINATOR POM OGILVY JEWELLERY EDITOR CAROL WOOLTON MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS FRANCESCA BURNS, BAY GARNETT, KATE MOSS, CLARE RICHARDSON FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR SARAH HARRIS FASHION NEWS EDITOR JULIA HOBBS FASHION FEATURES EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS SHOPPING EDITOR NAOMI SMART BEAUTY & HEALTH DIRECTOR NICOLA MOULTON DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH ACTING DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LOTTIE WINTER ACTING BEAUTY ASSISTANT FLORA MACDONALD JOHNSTON FEATURES EDITOR SUSIE RUSHTON ACTING FEATURES EDITOR NICOLE MOWBRAY EDITOR-AT-LARGE FIONA GOLFAR COMMISSIONING EDITOR VIOLET HENDERSON FEATURES ASSISTANT HAYLEY MAITLAND ART EDITOR JANE HASSANALI DESIGNER EILIDH WILLIAMSON JUNIOR DESIGNER PHILIP JACKSON PICTURE EDITOR MICHAEL TROW ASSOCIATE PICTURE EDITOR CAI LUNN SENIOR PICTURE RESEARCHER BROOKE MACE ART COORDINATOR BEN EVANS TABLET & MOBILE PRODUCER LEE WALLWORK CHIEF SUB-EDITOR CLARE MURRAY DEPUTY CHIEF SUB-EDITOR HELEN BAIN SENIOR SUB-EDITOR VICTORIA WILLAN SUB-EDITORS STEPHEN PATIENCE, EMMA HUGHES SPECIAL EVENTS EDITOR SACHA FORBES PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR CHARLOTTE PEARSON EDITORIAL COORDINATOR ELIZABETH WHITE PARIS COORDINATOR SIGRID LARRIVOIRE

VOGUE.CO.UK EDITOR LUCY HUTCHINGS ASSOCIATE DIGITAL DIRECTOR EMILY SHEFFIELD CN DIGITAL HEAD OF PHOTO & PICTURE EDITOR GABY COVE NEWS EDITORS LAUREN MILLIGAN, SCARLETT CONLON ACTING NEWS EDITOR KATIE BERRINGTON BEAUTY EDITOR LISA NIVEN ENGAGEMENT MANAGER RACHEL EDWARDS DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT NAOMI PIKE ACTING JUNIOR ASSISTANT TAMISON O’CONNOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA ARMSTRONG, CALGARY AVANSINO, LAURA BAILEY, ALEXA CHUNG, CHRISTA D’SOUZA, SOPHIE DAHL, TANIA FARES, NIGELLA LAWSON, ROBIN MUIR, CHARLOTTE SINCLAIR, PAUL SPIKE, NONA SUMMERS EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER CAMILLA FITZ-PATRICK SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES EMAIL SYNDICATION@CONDENAST.CO.UK DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION & RIGHTS HARRIET WILSON

Vogue is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice (www.ipso.co.uk/editors-code-of-practice) and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint please see our Editorial Complaints Policy on the Contact Us page of our website or contact us at complaints@condenast.co.uk or by post to Complaints, Editorial Business Department, The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk


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inVOGUE FashVS TRASH THE DRESS CODE Embrace split-personality dressing after dark. Will you do tongue-in-cheek débutante style with full circle skirts, attention-seeking taffeta, opera shawls and strapless bustiers, as seen at Delpozo and Marc Jacobs? Or will you pay (fashionably) patent disregard to the blacktie dress code with Off-White’s decorated denim, unbuttoning your jeans jacket all the way to the navel?

What’s

NEW THE PEOPLE, PLACES, IDEAS AND TRENDS TO WATCH NOW Edited by JULIA HOBBS

DELPOZO

OFF-WHITE

LUNCH-HOUR BEAUTY FIX

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY

CASADEI LEATHER MULES, £640

Rise and shine The heyday of club culture is your ultimate style reference for next season – get a head start with Casadei’s metallic mules.

THE MICRO FRINGE Your 10-minute hair refresh for the party season comes courtesy of American model Katie Moore (below left), whose flapper-esque fringe ruled the spring/summer runways (picture a more grown-up take on Natalie Portman’s look in Léon). “It’s a tougher, kookier version of last year’s brow-sweeping bangs, and instantly adds confidence,” says Vogue hairstylist Luke Hersheson. Schedule a lunch-break trim, and cheat a bob with a low ponytail tucked into your Blazé Milano tuxedo jacket. 85


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MOVES hen singer and dancer Teyana Taylor appeared in Kanye West’s jaw-dropping “Fade” video (below), single-handedly reviving the athletic choreography that Jennifer Beals first brought to the screen in 1983’s Flashdance, we felt an urgent need to up our dancefloor game. Cancel the spin class and call in choreographer Madeleine Gerosa for private tuition.

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Roots manoeuvre Prepare to be gripped by a duo of novels that put West African roots at the forefront of their storytelling. Twentysix-year-old American writer Yaa Gyasi (left) has released her hotly anticipated debut, Homegoing, which traces slavery’s legacy through the generations – from a pair of sisters living in Ghana’s 18th-century Asante kingdom to their descendants in modern America. Meanwhile, November 15 sees the launch of Zadie Smith’s Swing Time, her first novel since 2012’s NW, in which an unnamed mixed-race narrator leaves behind a north-west London estate to help a pop star build a girls’ school in the Gambia. Both will make you question what we mean by identity now. HM

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Button it Forget any association with championship snooker players – a plush waistcoat (worn with nothing underneath, like Alexa Chung) is heralding a new era in cocktail-hour cool. Bonus points for pairing yours with velvet trousers.

Plunging your face into a sink of ice-cold water is a longstanding model beauty secret – but how about walking into a -90C chamber? Welcome to 111 Cryo at Harvey Nichols, the new outpost of Harley Street cryotherapist Dr Yannis Alexandrides. A five-minute treatment session can boost the metabolism, soothe psoriasis and eczema, and leave you with a feeling of mild euphoria. Which makes this the ultimate preparty prep for the new generation of sober revellers. £95; Harveynichols.com

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his New Year’s Eve, put the pursuit of unspoilt nature above geotagging the latest It-destination. Skip Tulum’s beaches and head to Nosara, Costa Rica’s under-the-radar surf village, instead. (This is where New York’s laidback party set will be ringing in 2017.) Likewise, if you loved Sri Lanka’s pristine white beaches last year, now’s the time to explore Madagascar – the Anjajavy hotel is where abundant wildlife meets discreet luxury. As far as desert-island experiences go, Musha Cay in the Bahamas is luring the St Barths crowd away from the glitz. Meanwhile, a little closer to home, the pristine beaches of the Cape Verde islands (check into the Spinguera Ecolodge) are jumpstarting a new shorthaul winter sun scene.


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Strongest SUIT MAXI SHOULDERS, MICRO CHECKS – WHAT SUIT STYLES ARE COMING UP TRUMPS NOW? SARAH HARRIS INVESTIGATES side from the obvious pitfalls many women tumble into when it comes to trouser suits – poor fit, cheap fabric prone to creasing, boringly corporate styles and so on – there is this: the misconception that a suit slots into the classic category of your wardrobe and therefore is immune to becoming dated. Trouser-suit shapes, like skirt and shoe shapes, go out of style; the jackets marginally more than the trousers, as a recent edit of my wardrobe proved.

RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; ISTOCK

GUTTER CREDIT

a

Jacket length, shoulder width, lapel size, waisted vs boxy, shrunken vs oversize… there is no prevailing silhouette right now (that’s the good news) but, crucially, the wrong combination of the above proportions results in an epic fail (that’s the bad news). Take this season’s broad offering, for example. At Balenciaga, heritage checks were worked into a wasp-waisted, doublebreasted jacket with rounded shoulders, partnered with straight-leg trousers, an ensemble enlivened via a bright purple > 93


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COURREGES

SUITS YOU Above: heritagecheck suits on the catwalk, and, from far left, Giovanna Battaglia, Yasmin Sewell and Caroline Issa

She references photos of Julia Roberts, Kim Basinger and Winona Ryder from the late Eighties and early Nineties as design cues, and cites fabric, cut and, importantly, versatility as the holy trinity. “I always ask myself, ‘Can I wear the jacket over my shoulders with an evening dress? Or with a T-shirt and jeans? And do the pants look just as great with an oversized cashmere sweater or a skinny tee?’ I like to get a lot of wear out of what I buy and design.”

h

er advice is something I bear in mind when I visit the CaselyHayford studio to be fitted for a trouser suit. The vast, corrugated warehouse in east London, furnished with beaten-up leather sofa, retro wicker floor lamp and shelves filled with vintage magazines, is the antithesis of Savile Row’s intimidating workrooms. This tailoring operation – set up by father and son Joe and Charlie Casely-Hayford – can make a >

GETTY; ISTOCK; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

blouse and optic-white boots. Trad That sense of easy luxury extends, fabrics require spiking now, as too, to sportier versions witnessed at illustrated by Erdem, who re-energised Courrèges, where Sébastien Meyer houndstooth with exaggerated turnand Arnaud Vaillant opted for modish, ups and frayed edges; while Phillip shrunken, boyish shapes. Narrow, Lim played with contrast, teaming crease-front, ankle-skimming trousers a macro-check blazer with microwere partnered with abbreviated check trousers. jackets and teamed with white Over at Lemaire, the eponymous polonecks and bowling bags. It looked label set up by the former creative youthful and fresh (no surprise, since director of Hermès, languid trouser the duo are in their twenties). suits in elongated proportions had The right trouser suit will make pockets, lapels and edges outlined in you feel like a better version of you. yellow over-stitching, the And you should know it The right type you typically find on the second you put it on. a pair of jeans. “To make should make you look suit should Ittaller, suiting feel relevant for thinner, richer. It make you should make you feel every day, it has to be very comfortable, light and together, and it look taller, pulled fluid; I like something that should be your best ally; a thinner, feels a little roomier, and fail-safe cover-up for a late more informal,” explains night, say, or a disguise for richer Christophe Lemaire. disorganisation. And so it Barbara Casasola is on the same isn’t surprising that political women page. Hers is a name usually associated are so quick to step into one as soon as with eveningwear, but this season she they have something important to say presented several trouser suits in smart (as opposed to male politicians, who shades of camel, black and grey. “Our now increasingly veer towards a jacket blazers are all unlined and very lightly off, sleeves-rolled-up approach when it structured, which makes them easier to comes to addressing the nation). Few wear and results in a more effortless, female leaders navigate tailoring well. elegant silhouette, but when you take Hillary Clinton’s scores of trouser suits away all the structuring crutches, you come in a spectrum of retina-searing have to rely on the very best fabrics and colours (including turquoise, tangerine considered cuts to get the shape right,” and marigold) and questionable she says, admitting it took almost two styles, too, such as a Nehru jacket years to perfect. and slacks combo that was way off the mark. Women in power would do well to look to Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, who fares very well in navy and steely grey by Austin Reed and Chanel. “If you’re buying a suit, it’s usually because you want to impress, so why choose something average? Suits look dated when they’re too straight,” explains Amy Smilovic, founder of Tibi, who recalls her first suit purchase. “I was the youngest on my team when I joined American Express in the early Nineties, and the first thing I did was buy a navy-blue wool suit from Donna Karan. I was seduced by her giant ad plastered on a billboard in New York’s Soho at the time; I wanted to be that woman so bad, I bought the suit. I think I had two pay cheques tied up in it, but I felt like a million dollars whenever I wore it – and that’s what I try and give back with our suits in the collection.”

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

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Wear with...

Pussy-bow blouse



Fine details and softer fabrics make the look your own

Silk blouse, £595, Miu Miu, at Mytheresa.com

 Fine knit Wool polo shirt, £169, Cashmere in Love

Men’s shirt

Plush slip-ons Velvet slippers, £275, Le Monde Beryl, at Alex Eagle

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; ISTOCK

Cotton shirt, £90, J Crew, at Net-a-Porter.com

BARBARA CASASOLA

bespoke suit within a few days, should bends to cut it exactly. It’s all marked a client request the express service, or in chalk on a toile while every in up to six weeks for those who can measurement is taken. wait. Prices start from about £800, a “Right now, extreme proportions are fraction of the cost of most off-the-peg trending; it could be oddly enlarged designer suits, and by popular demand pockets, super-broad shoulders or they now offer their services to women. outsize pants,” says Amy Smilovic, At Casely-Hayford there are 3,000 citing Tibi’s pinstripe two-piece of fabrics to choose from, including cropped jacket and voluminous cashmeres, flannels, velvets, brocades, trousers. “Those trousers worn lowtweeds and wools – super 120 or 130 slung are incredibly modern and wool is advised for everyday wear, as louche, but hiked up with a belt they anything creeping up towards the drape like a long skirt and look very ultra-fine 200s will be astronomically chic with a heel,” she says. “You’d think expensive and not made for longevity. an oversize pant is easy to cut, but Leafing through an edited selection of you spend a lot of time finding how books, it’s easy to see why clients rarely to get that slouch without feeling leave with only one suit. But before overwhelmed, and making sure the choosing a fabric there are jacket and drape over the hips gives a narrowing trouser samples to try on, in order effect. Our best pattern-makers can to establish what best spend weeks nailing the suits me: single- or “Right now, right fit on jackets, too – double-breasted jacket, the right armhole lift, extreme peaked lapel or shawl getting the sleeve narrow collar, narrow or broader proportions while still achieving a shoulder? I ask for a suit broader shoulder... are that will extend from day the maths behind trending” to night. A tall order, but the perfect fit is these two get the measure complicated.” of you as soon as you walk in. Sensing I Vienna-based Petar Petrov lean towards a more masculine style, agrees. He works with a small Charlie urges me to try a black tux studio in Bulgaria and has jacket from the men’s collection. It’s taught the seamstresses gently oversize, double-breasted with a there himself. “So far it’s satin shawl collar and fabric-covered the best quality I’ve buttons. It’s the sort of jacket you know found,” says the designer, you want as soon as you slip it on; he whose imagination is suggests a baggy, mannish trouser to triggered by images partner it (“a big look right now”) and of men’s tailoring a shape recommended for taller frames. (“Alain Delon always When it comes to what silhouette wore a suit well”) and flatters what body type? Ankle- Nineties fashion shoots skimming, slim-cut trousers without a of women in menswear. turn-up are best for petites, who should This season, his hits also shun ultra-long sleeves (tailor to include an ivory suit wrist bone instead). A slightly roomier comprising cropped wide jacket suits most – although curvier trousers with exaggerated figures should avoid too much volume turn-ups and an elongated (such as double-breasted pieces) and blazer. The same trousers choose fabrics that skim rather than are rendered in navy pinstripe cling; a gently waisted blazer would be but matched with a more perfect. Longer, straight-cut trousers boyish double-breasted blazer, work best for fuller figures and pear and it comes in a camel shapes, while pinstripes elongate any version, too. frame – a softer, less defined pinstripe Petrov’s expertly mixed feels more current now. proportions could be a guide The luxury at Casely-Hayford is to What Goes With What. in the tricks they employ to flatter “I always see it as a puzzle that all frames. Most people (except we have to put together, and we athletes) have one shoulder slightly work out these combinations until higher than the other; only a tailor’s I get this thrilling feeling of seeing trained eye can see it, but they bring up something that works really well,” he the shoulder line on one side to balance smiles, proving that the right suit isn’t that. When it comes to the sleeve, they always a science. As I said, you know observe how the arm naturally falls and as soon as you put it on. Q


5-6 April 2017 Muscat, Oman

Shangri-La Barr Al Jissah Resort & Spa

Join Suzy Menkes, International Vogue Editor, and 500 of the luxury and fashion industry’s top names for two days of learning, discussion and networking in one of the world’s most beautiful and tranquil destinations, Oman.

SPEAKERS ALREADY ANNOUNCED INCLUDE: Goga Ashkenazi, Chairwoman and Creative Director, Vionnet Guram Gvasalia, CEO, Vetements Giambattista Valli Manish Arora Lapo Elkann, Chairman and Founder, Italia Independent Group and Garage Italia Customs Pierre Denis, CEO, Jimmy Choo Raffaello Napoleone, CEO, Pitti Immagine H.E. Minister Sayyid Badr bin Hamad bin Hamoud Al Busaidi, Secretary General, Foreign Affairs, Sultanate of Oman

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THREE GRACES LONDON SILK AND LACE CAMISOLE, £225. SHORTS, £160

THE SLEEP SHIRT COTTON SHIRT, £146, AT SELFRIDGES

ASCENO SHIRT, £125. SHORTS, £105

SLEEPING BEAUTY Christmas wisdom dictates that every woman will be delighted with a dressing gown come December 25. Not true. Chances are she’d prefer the indulgence of exquisite sleepwear. From Three Graces’ beautiful silksatin pieces in muted tones, to The Sleep Shirt’s old-school nightshirts, it’s carefully considered nightwear that will guarantee sweet dreams. GLASS AND CHROME, FROM £2,247

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BRASS, FROM £1,952 & OTHER STORIES METAL EARRINGS, £25

WRAP STARS Swap marbled wrapping paper for traditional fruity patterns and top with a thick gold ribbon.

POWER BAUBLES Know she loves sculptural jewellery but can’t stretch to the real deal? Look to Finery, & Other Stories and Cos for off-beat, avantgarde fripperies.

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SNACK HAPPY The appeal of edibles should never be underrated: the more exotic, rare and storied the better. And if they like wine, Anna New York’s wine-chilling rose-quartz gems will be gratefully received. HEDENE RASPBERRY HONEY, £15, AT HARRODS

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STUDIO PEPE MARBLE MIRROR, £389, AT MONOLOGUE LONDON

AESOP REVERENCE AROMATIQUE HAND WASH, £27

No dressing room is complete without an elegant velvet armchair. Silk hangers always prompt smiles. Perfume, however, can be a tricky gift – especially if she already has a signature scent. Try Le Labo’s handbag vials, which might prompt a new purchase. Failing that, Diptyque’s limited-edition cracked-glass bottle will sparkle on any shelf.

IL BORRO OLIVE OIL, FROM £6

ANNA NEW YORK WINE-CHILLING GEMS, £115 FOR SIX, AT HARRODS DIPTYQUE KIMONANTHE EAU DE PARFUM, £130 LE LABO DISCOVERY SAMPLES, £20 FOR A SET OF FIVE THE PERFUMER’S STORY BY AZZI BLACK MOSS CANDLE, £49, AT LIBERTY

VOTARY ROSE, GERANIUM AND APRICOT CLEANSING OIL, £42

KELLY WEARSTLER JEWELLED BOTTLE OPENER, £419, AT HARRODS

BOBBI BROWN LIP BALM SPF15, £16.50

ATT PYNTA VELVET ARMCHAIR, £895

ZARA HOME COAT HANGERS, £12 FOR A SET OF THREE

CHAPON CHOCOLATIER CHOCOLATE PRALINES, £28, AT THE CONRAN SHOP

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inVOGUE COS & HAY TIMEGLASS, £17

PENTREATH & HALL NOTEBOOK, £16.50

CHOOSING KEEPING SET OF 10 WOODEN PENCILS, £120 JOCHEN HOLZ GLASS JUG, £155, AT THE NEW CRAFTSMEN

KATE SPADE NEW YORK STAPLER, £25, AT HARRODS

ANGLEPOISE & PAUL SMITH DESK LAMP, £160

CHOOSING KEEPING CELLULOID PENCIL CASE, £35

HOT DESK BLOOM & WILD SUCCULENTS, £25

MORGAN PECK CERAMIC PEN POT, £80, AT CHOOSING KEEPING

DOT MUSEE CRAYONS SET OF SIX CRAYONS, £20, AT THE CONRAN SHOP

If she’s working as hard as she says, pimp her desk. From unusual ceramics to a beautiful water jug (hydration is paramount) or rare Japanese pencils from Choosing Keeping, a boutique stationery shop in Hackney, these are the items that will bolster an office profile, or reboot a freelance career.

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CHEMICAL REACTION An automatic 24/7 valet, eco-friendly service, competitive pricing, shops as lovely as a branch of Bamford… There’s a reason Blanc dry-cleaning is Vogue’s favourite in London. Save her time (and money) and give her a voucher pre-loaded with credit. Email info@blancclean.com

OP-VASE KALEIDOSCOPIC VASE, £390, AT MONOLOGUE LONDON

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inVOGUE TECH HEAD Get her to ditch the novelty phone case for one that guarantees perfect selfie lighting, and match her headphones to her tan Loewe Puzzle bag.

SUBSCRIBE HERE

LIFEPROOF DAMAGE-PROOF PHONE CASE, £65, AT AMAZON.CO.UK

A yearly subscription to Vogue is a must, of course (go to Vogue.co.uk/subscribe), but it’s also worth broadening her horizons with our pick of other offers. Persephone Books supplies a monthly pick-me-up in the form of a new book, mailed out with a vintage-fabric-print bookmark; while Cult membership at the Curzon gives free entry to all films, plus the satisfaction of supporting the specialised art cinema (the Soho and Mayfair branches face the threat of closure).

HERMES LEATHER MAGAZINE RACK, £10,238

LOUIS VUITTON PASSPORT COVER, £190

SOME LIKE IT HOT Hotel Del Coronado, Miami

MASTER & DYNAMIC WIRELESS LEATHER HEADPHONES, £419

NATIVE UNION CHARGING CABLE, £20

LUMEE LIGHT UP PHONE CASE, FROM £45, AT SELFRIDGES

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CAROL The Drake Hotel, Chicago

HOTEL CHEVALIER Hôtel Raphael, Paris

INSTANT UPGRADE Consider an upgrade on plane tickets. Or a reservation at the hotel where her favourite film was shot.

STOW TECH TRAVEL CASE, £325

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inVOGUE Timeless style tips

Dressing the PART ANNA HARVEY HAS BEEN ON THE FRONT LINE OF FASHION FOR DECADES. NOW SHE’S PASSING ON HER KNOWLEDGE. BY ELLIE PITHERS

harity auctions can be dangerous places. Two enthusiastic nods of the head and suddenly you’re on your way to a Paris atelier, having bid on a couture outfit – and won. Several Eurostar fares and one highly opinionated vendeuse later, you find yourself the owner of an entirely bespoke suit. “It never looked very good on me and was seldom worn. It ended up at a charity shop in Chelsea,” says Anna Harvey, who cites the experience as proof that you should never be talked into spending money unless you are quite sure about what you’re buying. “And don’t be bullied by shop assistants!” It’s heartening to hear that even Harvey makes mistakes. The former deputy editor of Vogue and Condé Nast stalwart – she oversaw the launch of Vogue in India, Russia, the Netherlands and Greece in her time as Condé Nast International’s editorial director for new markets – is known for her formidable sense of style. In the Eighties she supervised Diana, Princess of Wales’s wardrobe makeover, switching her Laura Ashley for Jacques Azagury and Catherine Walker. No wonder, then, that she is sharing her bountiful knowledge in a new book, Timeless Style: Dressing Well for the Rest of Your Life (£18.95, Double-Barrelled Books).

SHAPE UP Become familiar with the way your body is at the moment, and accept what you see

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“The real truth is that camel doesn’t suit everyone”

The handbook ranges from the gently instructive (“The real truth is that camel doesn’t suit everyone”) to the punitive (“Let’s be clear: leggings are really tights with the feet cut off ”). Leggings are Harvey’s bugbear. “They are for lazy people, although I must admit they have improved and become so much more robust,” she says. She prefers trousers (“Margaret Howell makes the best”) and classic dresses (she cites Bottega Veneta), but points out that most of her wardrobe comes from the high street. “Topshop is completely brilliant. Get there early in the morning,” she says, also mentioning Cos and Uniqlo as good sources for women who are getting older and subsequently feeling “invisible”, as she puts it. Her book is packed with gems (there is advice from Grace Coddington and Suzy Menkes, among others), perhaps the most pertinent of which is that “it’s you people are interested in – not your clothes. You’re not being judged.” That said, she can’t resist a jewelled Manolo Blahnik pump. “High heels make you feel better.” Q

“Wear fewer white shirts as you grow older – try colour instead, such as deep red, purple, dark green” Grace Coddington DARK DENIM IS ALWAYS MORE FLATTERING… And smarter, no matter what cut you choose

GOING OUT It’s vitally important to feel relaxed about what you are wearing, but it’s also fun to dress up a bit – after all, when are you going to, if not now?

ANNA HARVEY; OLIVER HARVEY

“I love colour and pattern on holiday,” says Anna Harvey, photographed here in a Toast swimsuit and a dress from Bombay Electric

SKIRTING THE ISSUE Long skirts should not be straight; this is never a good look. Instead go for a softer, flowing silhouette – perhaps a soft skirt that grazes the upper calf


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VOGUEshops What to buy

NOW Photographs by RORY PAYNE

Party LINES PART GLAM, PART ROCK, WINTER’S WINNING PARTY PIECES PAIR TOUGH WITH TENDER. TIME TO GET YOUR LOOK ON LOCKDOWN

Velvet dress, £120, Asos.com. Leather boots, £155, Comptoir des Cotonniers. Zirconia stud earring, £15, Covet by Stella & Dot. Gold hoops, throughout, model’s own. Rhodiumplated and zirconia necklace, £245. Silver bracelet, £285. Both Eddie Borgo, at Harvey Nichols and Neta-Porter.com. Hair: Naoki Komiya. Make-up: Jenny Coombs. Nails: Lyndsay McIntosh. Set design: Sophie Durham. Model: Heather Kemesky. Fashion editor: Julia Brenard

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Sequined top, ÂŁ1,005, Tibi, at Matchesfashion.com. Crystal earrings, ÂŁ125, Kate Spade New York

The sequined poloneck takes a leading role for starry nights. Play up the drama with super-spangled earrings


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Forget the fishnets. The only thing a Lurex minidress needs now is a frosting of Swarovski crystals and undone hair

Halterneck minidress, £36, Next. Crystal drop earrings, £99, Swarovski. Silver bracelet, £180, Eddie Borgo, at Harvey Nichols. Rings, from £6 each, River Island

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Sequined halterneck top, £100, Gigi & Tommy. Trousers with sash waist, £40, Zara. Gold-plated earrings, £115, Elizabeth & James

RORY PAYNE

Master desk-to-disco dressing with nonchalant neutrals and an at-ease stance


VOGUEshops

A fringed skirt doesn’t have to spell showgirl. Set it singing with languid shirting and rodeo boots

Silk shirt, £180, Scotch & Soda. Tassel skirt, £120, Whistles. Leather boots, £355, Toga, at Net-a-Porter.com. Metallic clutch, £35, Topshop. Silver choker, £285. Silver bracelet, £160. Both Eddie Borgo, at Harvey Nichols. Crystal and rhodium-plated ring, £99, Swarovski


VOGUEshops

Gilding the lily is no bad thing when it comes in the form of an embellished blazer. Avoid the coat check: a piece this prized deserves the spotlight all night

Velvet jacket with chain detail, £200, H&M. Lamé dress, £400, Isabel Marant Etoile. Tiger’s-eye ring, £203, Pamela Love, at Net-a-Porter.com


RORY PAYNE

Take five: Eighties-inflected loafers will have you dancing ’til the sun comes up

Lurex jacket, £325. Matching trousers, £235. Both Tara Jarmon. Sequined camisole, £240, Joie, at Harrods. Leather loafers, £375, Rag & Bone. Ring, on thumb, £6, River Island. Silver and tiger’seye ring, from £150, Pamela Love


Asymmetricshoulder top, £79, Gestuz. Denim jeans, £40, H&M. Leather belt, £28, Urban Outfitters. Bow mules, £120, KG Kurt Geiger. Solid vermeil earrings, £300. Vermeil circle earrings, £220. Both Charlotte Chesnais

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Reconnect denim with the dancefloor; a metallic coating and kick-up-your-heels mules guarantee a good night


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Precious metals are best twisted with no-fuss make-up and the only earring update you need to know: long and lone

Beaded minidress, £300, Ganni. Backless loafers, £345, Dorateymur, at Net-a-Porter.com. Tassel earring, £12, Urban Outfitters. Silver rings, £50 each, Pandora. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information


VOGUEview

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE OF THE CAFE SOCIETY: SCRAPBOOKS BY THE BARON DE CABROL Revisit the golden age of European café society with the socialite Baron de Cabrol’s whimsical scrapbooks, reproduced for the first time by Thierry Coudert. Made between 1938 and the Sixties, his collages of the beau monde at play feature everyone from Charlie Chaplin to Winston Churchill to the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Flammarion, £75

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THE LATEST CROP OF COFFEE-TABLE BOOKS ARE PURE VIEWING PLEASURE, SAYS HAYLEY MAITLAND

SLIM AARONS: WOMEN American photographer Slim Aarons once said that he made a career of capturing “attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places”. Women rounds up the most attractive of them all, from Fifties holidaymakers playing in the Bermudan surf to sunloungers in Las Vegas, and a young bride outside her family’s plantation house in New Orleans. Abrams, £65.60

VOGUE: VOICE OF A CENTURY In a nod to Vogue’s birthday year, only 1,916 copies of Voice of a Century were printed – each one leather-bound, gilt-edged and wrapped in a silk case. The definitive guide to the magazine’s history includes exclusive features and photography from the last 100 years alongside behind-the-scenes commentary from Kate Moss, Mario Testino, Grace Coddington and others. Genesis, £695 119


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VOGUEview THE LANDSCAPE OF DREAMS: THE GARDENS OF ISABEL AND JULIAN BANNERMAN Prince Charles wrote the introduction to this survey of designers Isabel and Julian Bannerman’s Eden-like gardens, from Highgrove to their 9/11 Memorial in Manhattan. Dream of spring while poring over the flower-lined path to Houghton Hall’s rustic temple, Woolbeding Gardens’ romantic vistas or the meticulous grounds at Waddesdon Manor. Pimpernel Press, £50

Book of days As Vogue’s centenary year closes, editorin-chief Alexandra Shulman’s new book, Inside Vogue: A Diary of My 100th Year (Fig Tree, £16.99), is a personal record of the magazine’s 100th anniversary. Here, she reveals her past 365 days in numbers…

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STEPHEN JONES: SOUVENIRS From lampshades-cum-hats at John Galliano to peacock headdresses for Louis Vuitton and plastic headscarves at Christopher Kane, Stephen Jones is the quintessential Mad Hatter. This book traces his headline-making designs from creations for Boy George and Diana, Princess of Wales in the Eighties through to today. Rizzoli, £95

photos in Vogue’s exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, seen by

152,300 PEOPLE

58 DINNERS PREPARED AT HOME

ALEXANDER McQUEEN: UNSEEN Robert Fairer’s book includes photographs of every single Alexander McQueen show, from his first catwalk collection, Nihilism – staged in the grungy Bluebird Garage off King’s Road in 1993 – to his exquisite final presentation, Plato’s Atlantis, along with backstage photos and commentary by Savage Beauty curator Claire Wilcox. Thames & Hudson, £48

154 6,000 FASHION SHOWS ATTENDED

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DIOR: THE ART OF COLOR Amp up your beauty routine for the party season with the The Art of Color. Each chapter is dedicated to a particular hue, as seen on Dior’s models. Flip through for photographs by Irving Penn, Guy Bourdin, Richard Burbridge and more – all interspersed with musings on colour by artists from Leonardo da Vinci to Edgar Degas. Rizzoli, £75

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Tom Ford on set with Amy Adams for Nocturnal Animals, based on Austin Wright’s novel Tony & Susan (below)

Animal INSTINCT Tom Ford is back in the director’s chair for a taut new thriller – and it’s the perfect vehicle for his precise focus, he tells Horatia Harrod hen Tom Ford made his first film, seven years ago, it was an act of almost reckless daring. How easy that is to forget, because from the moment A Single Man premiered at Venice, this elegantly devastating story of a bereaved professor was lavished with praise, and when awards season rolled around, the film was nominated for Baftas and Golden Globes, as well as an Oscar. Everyone had expected the beauty – Colin Firth’s impeccable suits and the architectural perfection of his home – but many were surprised by the depth. It seems, in hindsight, like another effortlessly astute move on Ford’s part. The risks, however, were huge. Not only was Ford writing and directing for the first time, he also put up the money to make the film – almost unheard of in Hollywood. Friends later confessed that they’d thought his making a movie was “ridiculous”. How wrong they were. In the years that have passed since A Single Man’s release, Ford hasn’t exactly

MERRICK MORTON

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been idle: he’s opened 100 stores around the world, launched a womenswear label, and had a son, Jack, who is now four. It was only last autumn, then, that he managed to carve out the time to make a new film, Nocturnal Animals,

“I vacillate between being energised by contemporary culture and sickened by it” a queasy love-story-cum-thriller. “I’m very highly scheduled,” he says. “In fact, to make a film, there’s only really one window every year – in the late summer and fall, where I can actually concentrate on shooting. I made it the exact same time of the year that I made A Single Man.” Already the dark charms of Nocturnal Animals have bewitched audiences: the film received a 10-minute standing ovation at Venice before carrying off the Festival’s Grand Jury Prize, and

there is talk of Academy Awards for its stars. First among those is Amy Adams, who plays Susan, a Los Angeles gallerist disillusioned with her sleek lifestyle. One day she receives a package from her first husband, Edward ( Jake Gyllenhaal), who was a struggling writer when she left him for a handsome financier. It contains the manuscript of his novel and, as she starts to read, we watch it unfold on screen: an irresistible, blood-drenched howl of pain, in which Tony (Gyllenhaal, again) tries to track down the men who have killed his wife and daughter, two redheads who both bear a striking resemblance to Susan. As Tony is repeatedly brought to his knees, Susan is forced to reflect on the price of the life she chose. “It’s fundamentally a morality tale about loyalty and true love,” says Ford. “I remember my grandmother telling my sister, ‘If you don’t date poor boys, you won’t fall in love with a poor boy and you won’t marry a > 123


VOGUEview poor boy.’ Susan’s character is a victim of that mentality.” Loyalty is a quality Ford mentions often. For all his dash, he cleaves to remarkably old-fashioned values, and he’s a true romantic: he’s been with his husband, the fashion editor Richard Buckley, for 30 years.

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he story is based on Austin Wright’s 1993 novel, Tony & Susan. Ford loves the book – “it’s beautifully written and spectacular” – but in order to make it a film, he had to rip it up and start again. Ford moved the thriller part of the story from Ohio to the wide skies of Texas, his home state, while the polish and glamour of Susan’s world reflects the way he lives now. “I told Amy Adams early on that Susan was somewhat autobiographical,” he says. Surely, though, he’s not as disillusioned with his glittering existence as she is with hers? “Perhaps I have made some of the choices Amy’s character has,” he says. “Is anyone going to have any sympathy for me? No. And I would not expect them to. I found out years ago that, even though I am very lucky to have all of the material things that I have, my real and ultimate happiness comes from the people in my life and not the things.” Ford’s relationship to consumer culture is, naturally, a conflicted one. “I realise of course that as a fashion designer I help to create this world,” he says, “and I have very mixed feelings about that. I vacillate between being energised by contemporary culture and sickened by it.” That’s never more apparent than in the film’s opening sequence, a blast of cinematic shock and awe in which a succession of obese women, naked but for peaked majorette caps, dance uninhibitedly for the camera. It turns out to be a video installation in Susan’s gallery – an artwork specially

created for the film. “Having lived in Europe for the past 27 years” – Ford divides his time between homes in London, Santa Fe and Los Angeles – “I decided to make a somewhat European commentary on where American culture is today,” Ford says. “We used to have this vision of America as the land of tits and ass, Farrah Fawcett with beautiful white teeth and amazing hair… And now those tits and ass are bloated, overfed, ageing, which is why these women are wearing bits and pieces of Americana.” When the day came for filming, the satire became something more exultant. “On the set I fell so in love with them all. They were so incredible and so happy to be there and so joyful that I have to say the whole thing took on a different meaning. There was a beauty to it, a beauty to those women that I hadn’t necessarily expected.” There is much more to Nocturnal Animals than beautiful surfaces, although it has those in abundance. As Ford was writing the screenplay, he visualised it shot by shot, drawing together hundreds of photographic references. When he talks about making films, he often refers to it as pure “fun”, but he takes it deeply seriously. At the Toronto Film Festival, he was at pains to point out that the film does not feature any Tom Ford clothing: his costume designer, Arianne Phillips, drew on the collections of Ford’s friends and contemporaries, from Marc Jacobs to Alessandro Michele. Fashion may be Ford’s business, but film, it seems, is sacred.

Top: Ford directing Jake Gyllenhaal on location in Texas. Above: Gyllenhaal, Michael Shannon and Karl Glusman in a scene from Nocturnal Animals

In every aspect of his life, Ford is known for his meticulousness. It’s in film, perhaps, that he can see the fullest realisation of his vision. “Directing is the greatest job of all, because you are creating a world,” he says, “and you are responsible for the people in it, what they say, what they do, how they look, whether they live or whether they die, and it is forever hermetically sealed in a film. As someone who likes to design, build, make things, express themselves in that way – that is the greatest.” Q “Nocturnal Animals” is released on November 4

THE THRILLER MEMORANDUM Don’t miss these upcoming edge-of-your-seat tales SPLIT M Night Shyamalan returns with Split, the chilling story of a paranoid schizophrenic (James McAvoy). In cinemas January 20 RILLINGTON PLACE Tim Roth and Nico Mirallegro star in this twisted tale about John Christie, the Notting Hill serial killer. Begins on BBC1 this month

MERRICK MORTON

HOLD BACK THE STARS In Katie Khan’s debut novel, a couple adrift in space have 90 minutes of oxygen left. Doubleday, £9.99


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VOGUEview

Written on THE BODY AUTHOR DIANA ATHILL CHARTS HER LIFE OF SELF-EXPRESSION – THROUGH CLOTHES

COURTESY DIANA ATHILL

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magine life in the Twenties and awestruck, but frightened – as if she Thirties, with no television, no might have come from outer space. newspaper but The Times, and no Luckily for me, Ma had a secret radio. Where could a child discover yearning to dress, expressed by glamour or style? In fairy tales. The making party dresses for me. Day princesses illustrating such stories clothes were dull. Dance frocks could with their splendid be fanciful and fun. robes and flowing locks I longed, at 15, She made me a new – they were what I one every winter and for gold lamé, I learned to appreciate dreamed of. This in spite of one invader them. Unchecked, I’d trimmed at from real life: my run amok – oh hem and bust have mother’s copy of Vogue, how I longed, at 15, which was, to tell the for gold lamé, trimmed with mink truth, almost as unreal at hem and bust with to us Norfolk gentry as the princesses mink – but Ma knew best. – apart from its dressmaking patterns. None of us were ever told we were Fashion didn’t exist for us, but pretty, so we didn’t think we were, but morals did and vanity was bad. None we did not find this discouraging – I of the adults in my life talked about remember being surprised by a girl clothes except to disapprove of the who said she hated her looks. In our freakish. In my early teens a really world, dresses were valued because stylish woman did once float by. I was vanity was suppressed. Complimented

Top left: Diana, in her seventies, bound for a publishing lunch. Top: in one of her shop-bought dresses, 1939. Above: the first of many equestrian photographs

at a dance, you supposed it was because your dress was pretty. And dances were by far the most important way of intermingling the sexes. They ranged from big affairs like hunt balls to modest little ones in private houses – drawing rooms cleared of furniture and someone at a piano. Granny gave our dance every winter, the piano played energetically by the village organist. We never sank to a gramophone and rather despised the dances that did. At first we went to dances in my grandparents’ car, driven by their chauffeur. Later our partners turned from boys to young men with cars, and they drove us: the start of the > 127


century’s sexual revolution, as our parents failed to notice. In 1939, war put an end to dances and pretty dresses. We had coupons for clothes, but only a few, so for six years I wore almost nothing but my two tweed suits, the wellmade, very conventional “uniform” of young women of my kind, comfortable and almost everlasting. Then Dior’s influence began trickling through – slowly but surely – and we started looking like women again. In wartime, shoulders were square, waists almost non-existent, and skirts ended precisely two inches below the knee. Straight up and down was the thing. How we welcomed the bosomy “new look”! I even toyed with the idea of padding a bra, but thought better of it on envisioning the embarrassment of revealing the deception to a lover. I had few other responses to fashion, because I had become involved in launching a new publishing house, and had started living with a man who would not have noticed if I had been wearing a sack with holes cut in it. It was an exciting time. As a founder (the one who chose the books, rather than ran the business) I got to know many interesting people to whom dress meant little. When I went to New York on a book-hunt, I took my best suit because it packed easily, rather than for its smartness. And if I gradually began to dress better (as I did), it was because 128

Inset top: Diana, aged seven, with her brother Andrew and little sister Patience. Above right: at a wedding with a friend during the Sixties – the author, on the left, wears a dress she made herself. Above: in her eighties, in a knitted top from the Wall catalogue

I was discovering a pleasure in designing and making things, a joy inherited from my mother. It was a great time for markets at which people sold their knitwear and so on, which I haunted, and I still have a few “finds” from those days, as wearable as ever. (“Fashionable” and “becoming” are not the same, and I always preferred the second.) At 75 I retired, and soon afterwards began to write, starting with my memoir. It was a success, as were the three following books, so they began bringing in cash. Simultaneously, I discovered that mail-order was no longer a matter of thermal vests and slippers for old women. How I came across a catalogue from a firm called Wall I don’t remember, but it happened – and there before my eyes was a musthave outsize silk shirt. Suddenly I

knew I hated shops, and what bliss it would be to sit quietly at home leafing through catalogues, as one leafed through Vogue, and just lift a phone when I saw something I wanted. It’s a matter of knowing your own body: what needs bypassing, where you can take a risk, and how unexpectedly colour can kill or cure. When I hit on the right thing I know it at once. I put it on and feel confirmed. Nothing boosts self-confidence better than a becoming garment. It is hard to say how or why the magic of the right clothes works, but work it does. Sometimes I tell myself, “What rubbish, taking so much thought about dress at your age” (which is now 98). But it’s not rubbish. It’s one of the reasons I can still call myself a happy woman. Q “A Florence Diary”, by Diana Athill, is published by Granta Books at £9.99

COURTESY DIANA ATHILL

VOGUEview


VOGUE the shoe

ON SALE NOW £75 ISBN: 978-1-84091-659-1


VOGUEview

Windows UPDATE WHEN ART MEETS COMMERCE IN THE WINDOW DISPLAYS OF THE WORLD’S GREATEST STORES, SOMETHING MAGICAL HAPPENS. BY KIRSTY ROBINSON

SI WEST; TIFFANY & CO; VIRGINIA ROEHL STUDIO, TIFFANY ARCHIVES

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n 2003, on one of my first dates traditional mannequins in suits. with the man who was to become And between 1956 and 1958 Robert my husband, creative director Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns were Luke Williamson, we visited Selfridges given free rein on Tiffany & Co’s Fifth store front, where he had been working Avenue windows by the legendary on installations for the conceptual window dresser Gene Moore, where artist Barbara Kruger. The windows they set jewels against dramatic were freshly wrapped in enormous landscapes lit to Hitchcockian effect. shrieks of red paper with In 1961, it was a 8ft-high letters spelling Salvador Dalí Bonwit Teller display out Kruger’s arch slogans, of stylishly dressed created such as “I shop therefore mannequins juxtaposed I am” and “Buyer beware”, with five paintings – window daring people to go in and consumerism displays in decrying part with their cash. It and featuring was brilliantly subversive the Thirties images from comic yet still as playful and strips and newspaper imaginative as the magical Christmas advertisements – that catapulted scenes that had transfixed me as a Andy Warhol from outré pop child on trips to the West End. artist into the mainstream. And The idea of art as advertising is before writing Where the Wild nothing new. Surrealist Salvador Dalí Things Are, children’s author and created window displays for the now illustrator Maurice Sendak tried defunct New York department store his hand at visual merchandising, Bonwit Teller in the Thirties – too, and spent three years dressing although, much to his disgust, his 1939 the windows of Manhattan toy masterpiece, a bloody-faced, greenstore FAO Schwarz. feathered mannequin in a blackThese windows can be seen lambskin-lined bath, was replaced by as incubators for the whole >

Top: set designer Anna Burns’s procession of wooden animals for Hermès. Above: a 1956 window at Tiffany & Co by Gene Moore, inspired by 17th-century still lifes. Left: a design by Rachel Zoe for Tiffany & Co in 2012, a homage to the red-carpet era of the Fifties

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VOGUEview tradition of disruption, spectacle and provocation in window displays that has grown in ambition and scale ever since – whether that’s Yayoi Kusama’s magnificent rippling polkadot tentacles at Louis Vuitton, a Marc Quinn flower sculpture at Selfridges or an illustration by the street artist Kaws on the façade of Colette in Paris.

Top: Anchored, by Anna Burns, for Christian Louboutin’s Mount Street store last summer. Above: sketches for Liberty’s Christmas 2016 windows, inspired by The Nutcracker. Below left: polka-dots and tentacles by Yayoi Kusama at Louis Vuitton

skates and skateboards. “The idea is to make people stop, enjoy, then take pictures and put them on Instagram,” she laughs. “The trend is for ‘experience’, which is why many brands are producing in-store exhibitions. Window displays are the entry point.” For Simon Millington, who has been designing arresting installations for luxury brands such as Burberry for almost three decades, immersion is the ultimate goal. “In 2016, you want people to interact,” he says. “Fendi did it earlier this year with their Fendirumi pop-ups – the furry character bag accessories, inspired by the Japanese craze for kigurumi, were life-size in store.” Back at Selfridges, Hannah Emslie, the department store’s head of creative presentation, tells me that, “Ultimately, we want the designers of our windows to take an approach that you simply wouldn’t see anywhere else.” Which begs the question: what haven’t we seen before? What’s next, though, is anyone’s guess. Brands are notoriously tight-lipped about their forthcoming concepts – not least for fear of losing the wow factor that comes with the on-the-street reveal. But one thing’s for sure, the pressure to keep upping the ante grows every season. Q

LIBERTY; LOUIS VUITTON/STEPHANE MURATET; SI WEST

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ngenious, elaborate statements are part of the fabric of life on the streets in big cities. Displays are planned months – sometimes even years – in advance. It’s big budget, too, and never more so than at this time of year. Take Liberty, on London’s Great Marlborough Street, which has orchestrated a super-collaboration with the Royal Ballet and the Royal Opera House to interpret The Nutcracker. It’s taken almost 12 months and half the set-production budget for always on to produce the the entire year. “It will also be the first most captivating displays. time Liberty hasn’t had any product in Rivalry between stores is the windows at Christmas,” says Liz fierce and secrecy paramount Silvester, head of visual identity. – particularly in the run-up “Instead they will feature moving to Christmas, when everyone puppets in costumes and sets inspired is trying to hire the best by the 1984 production of the ballet.” craftsman and technicians at The Liberty spectacle the same time, will be multisensory and The Liberty and production deadlines come complete with become tighter. Heads scented windows – a spectacle will of visual merchandising custom-made Diptyque come complete keep contact books close fragrance spritzing out their chests and their with scented to into the festive bustle – eyes open for the slightest and “whispering window” clue about what the windows technology, which uses competition is planning. magnets to turn the glass into speakers. “You might go to a mannequin sprayer As Liberty’s Christmas windows and catch a glimpse of how someone attest, the aim of a store’s front is to else is spraying theirs,” confides one push brand identity and forge an insider. “People don’t want to copy, instant connection with shoppers – though. In fact, it would be a disaster when the same pair of jeans, for if you were doing something similar.” instance, are on sale in numerous shops Hermès window installations are nearby, or online, a stylish window regarded as something of a gold display is one way to lure customers in. standard, whatever the season. Every With so much at stake commercially year the brand’s artistic director and so much invested, the pressure is Pierre-Alexis Dumas sets a theme, then each store asks local creatives to interpret it in a way that is specific to their region. The aim is to produce a host of diverse displays with a handmade quality and an almost tribal feel. This year’s theme was “nature at full gallop”, and interpretations ranged from an elaborate paper sculpture of a tiger pouncing through a screen in Melbourne to an octopus sculpture juggling china plates in Düsseldorf. In London, set designer Anna Burns met Dumas’s brief by building a procession of wooden animals on roller


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VOGUEtravel

SHOP BIG LOVE RECORDS This store – and

independent record label – has the coolest vinyl from Japan and around the world. We couldn’t stop listening to Sapphire Slows (from £13) – it made a beautifully trippy Tokyo soundtrack. TOKYU HANDS A must-visit stationery/department/lifestyle store. Stocks everything from kawaii stickers to ceramics and tabi socks. J’ANTIQUES You can’t leave Tokyo without popping into one of the hundreds of vintage shops. J’Antiques (top), in Nakameguro shopping district, is a superb example of Japanese curation and taste.

TOKYO

EAT & DRINK

For “An Artist of the Floating World”, on page 220, Vogue’s fashion team embarked on a journey to the land of the rising sun. By Florence Arnold GOLDEN GAI

SEE Yoyogi Park and Tsukiji Fish Market are about as authentic as Tokyo experiences come. One is a slice of greenery where locals go to listen to music, chat and dance; the other is the world’s largest fish market and has to be seen to be believed (go at 5am and have breakfast in one of the sushi bars).

PACK CELINE RESIN NECKLACE, FROM £240. EARRINGS, FROM £395 HEAD PORTER RUCKSACK, FROM £146

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COACH LEATHER JACKET, £1,195

NICHIGEKKA

To pick one sushi restaurant from Tokyo’s thousands is almost impossible, but if you’re looking for the ultimate foodie experience head to Nichigekka – in the smart neighbourhood of Ginza – for its delicate and delicious plates.

TIM WALKER; A CONTINUOUS LEAN; GETTY; ISTOCK; ALAMY

A twinkling strip of tiny bars, each with only five or six seats, this district is a favourite with locals and the perfect place to spend the evening with a few friends, tucked away in your own private drinking spot. A Tokyo treasure.


VOGUEspotlight

20 names of NOW

“One girl said, ‘Don’t look scared.’ From that moment on, I learned to trust myself”

ALL AGED 30 OR UNDER, MEET THE YOUNG INNOVATORS WHO ARE REDEFINING THEIR FIELDS

THE BALLERINA

COMPILED BY VIOLET HENDERSON AND HAYLEY MAITLAND. FRANCESCA WEARS DRESS, ALEXANDER McQUEEN. BALLET SHOES, HER OWN. JEWELLERY, FERNANDO JORGE. HAIR: DIANA MOAR. MAKE-UP: CELIA BURTON. CHARLOTTE PATMORE

Francesca Hayward Francesca Hayward was two years old when she watched a video of The Nutcracker with her grandmother. It triggered an obsession with ballet that saw her pirouetting around her sitting room for hours on end. “I would dance all of the parts of every ballet I watched. I had to be pulled away and made to eat,” she remembers. At 11 she won a place at the Royal Ballet School, but was so sought-after by the Royal Opera House that she didn’t have time to graduate. “There were lots of injuries in the company at the time, and I would be pulled out in the middle of an A-level class to stand in. It was nerve-racking because everyone would be waiting for me, but one of the girls said, ‘Don’t look scared.’ From that moment on, I learned to trust myself.” Her attitude has served her well. The 24-year-old has become the Royal Ballet’s first mixed-race female principal, critically acclaimed for her lead roles in Romeo and Juliet and Manon. What’s next? The Sugarplum Fairy. And Lesley Collier, the star of that first VHS tape of The Nutcracker, will be training her for the part.

Francesca Hayward, photographed at the Royal Opera House by Retts Wood. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

THE BAND: BLACK HONEY Brighton indie band Black Honey were catapulted into the spotlight when Peter Dundas asked them to play Just Cavalli’s a/w ’16 show in Milan. “We’d just driven overnight through the Swiss Alps in a car

TUNES EIR ON TH STEREO

with dodgy brakes,” says lead singer Izzy Baxter, 24. “All of a sudden I was in a sparkly pink dress in a studio that looked like Andy Warhol’s Factory.” She came up with the name to reflect the group’s bittersweet blend of pop and rock.

1. “Bang Bang” Nancy Sinatra 2. “Eleanor Rigby” The Beatles 3. “Smells Like Teen Spirit” Nirvana 4. “Remember (Walking in the Sand)” The Shangri-Las 5. “Debaser” The Pixies 143


“I guess this series of pictures began as a pulling technique”

THE ARTIST Hetty Douglas is a painter for the Instagram generation. The 24-year-old’s tonguein-cheek works feature slang phrases (“You’re peng”) and blunt declarations (“I’m not fucking cute”) on top of smears of bright acrylic paint. “I guess this series of pictures began as a pulling technique,” she deadpans. “I did a painting for a girl that I had fallen for and she loved it.” Plenty of others love her work, too; Douglas has had two shows and collaborated with Story on their s/s ’17 collection.

Hetty Douglas at her studio in south-east London, photographed by Retts Wood. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

THE TECH-TALENT SPOTTER: ALICE BENTINCK Bentinck, 30, is doing extraordinary things for the development of technology. Entrepreneur First – the business she started with her partner Matt Clifford five years ago – finds, mentors and funds new tech-talent (the company takes 20 per cent equity in each business it rears) at its London and Singapore centres. “There is an assumption in the start-up world that coming up with an idea is the easy part,” says Bentinck. “We think it’s the other way round.” This pioneering formula is really successful…

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THE DIRECTOR Dexter Navy London-born director Dexter Navy, 25, got started when he was rejected from the University of the Arts London – twice. He moved to Los Angeles with just $500 in his pocket, slept on a friend’s sofa, and by day photographed street culture, meeting local hip-hop artists Travis Scott and the Peas & Carrots Crew. Back in England, he “pestered” A$AP Rocky, and the resulting project, a music video for “L$D” shot in Japan, has received a Grammy nomination, 50 million views on Youtube and an adoring tweet from Kanye West. Up next? His first feature-length film.

HETTY WEARS SHIRT, CHRISTOPHER SHANNON. POLONECK, UNIQLO. JEANS, GUCCI, AT MRPORTER.COM. SOCKS, MUJI. LOAFERS, WEEJUNS. GOLD CHAIN BRACELET, SLIM BARRETT. ALL OTHER JEWELLERY, HER OWN. HAIR: DIANA MOAR. MAKE-UP: CELIA BURTON. ADDIE CHINN; ALASDAIR McLELLAN; DEXTER NAVY; ELLIE SMITH; ELLI IOANNOU; HETTY DOUGLAS; LETTY SCHMITERLOW; PETER SEARLE

Hetty Douglas


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20 names of NOW WHO A team of more than 70 women of colour. WHAT An online magazine committed to representing female diversity.

WHY

VOGUEspotlight THE TASTE-MAKERS:

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al -dem T G e e

“To have a space where we can represent experiences within the bracket ‘women of colour’,” says 22-year-old founder Liv Little. “Gal-dem is a political movement.”

Models Freya Lawrence and Lucan Gillespie, photographed by Letty Schmiterlow, inset below, for Miss Vogue, October 2015

%THE PHOTOGRAPHER % LETTY SCHMITERLOW, 26

Letty’s photographic style in three words…

FACES I LIKE

TOM SELLERS Nottinghamshireborn chef Tom Sellers, 29, began his career by turning up on Tom Aikens’s doorstep “without two pennies to rub together” and asking for a job in his Chelsea restaurant. Aikens acquiesced. Later Sellers did a stretch in Manhattan’s three-Michelin-starred Per Se and a year under René Redzepi at the legendary Noma. In 2013 he opened Restaurant Story in Bermondsey, earning his first Michelin star at just 26 with a menu divided into “chapters”.

DOUGLAS McMASTER McMaster, 29, is the man behind Silo. The Brighton restaurant pioneers zero-waste, reusing containers and composting leftovers, while local produce headlines the menu. Here are three of his favourite sustainable ingedients: 1. Marigolds for a floral garnish. 2. Lovage goes well with soft cheeses and tomatoes. 3. Sea buckthorn is a sour berry that grows all over the country.

THE PARTY BOY Charles Jeffrey Charles Jeffrey’s Loverboy club night in Dalston features a stylish genderqueer crowd and outlandish fashion. It’s also the source of inspiration for the Scottish designer’s menswear label by the same name. Here, the 26-year-old club kid imagines his fantasy night out… DREAM WINGMAN: Quentin Crisp. DRINK OF CHOICE: Vodka and Irn-Bru. You can take the boy out of Glasgow… GO SEE: The Sex Pistols in Manchester in 1976, the gig that spawned punk. Joy Division and Morrissey were in the audience. RAVE AND MISBEHAVE: At PDA in Dalston.

LOVERBOY PEA COAT, £1,190, AT DOVER STREET MARKET LOVERBOY VEST, £210, AT DOVER STREET MARKET

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VOGUEspotlight

%THE RAPPER: LADY LESHURR %

Lady Leshurr learned to rap at a youth club near her Solihull home. Now 27, she’s shaking up American hip-hop. Her big break came after her Youtube series, Queen’s Speech – freestyled in a Brummie accent and peppered with Midlands slang – racked up nearly 100 million views. Now signed to RCA, her debut album is out next year, backed by the producers of hits by Beyoncé and Rihanna

THE ACCESSORIES DESIGNER: LOTTE SELWOOD Lotte Selwood, 27, lives in London. Brands under her belt? Selwood has worked for Stella McCartney, Balenciaga (“for a hot minute”) and Saint Laurent – she moved to LA for five years to be close to Hedi Slimane, and is now in the process of setting up a sustainable British fashion brand. The design she can’t take off? The Saint Laurent Candy Shoe (below) – after all, she created it.

20 names of NOW THE COMEDIAN Elf Lyons Elf Lyons, 26, is brave. Hilariously brave. The comedian, who has won plaudits and peals of laughter for her one-woman shows Being Barbarella, Underground Success and Elf Lyons Is a Pervert, has also done stand-up, naked. But it was fashion that helped her after an aggressive heckle shook her confidence. “I opened a gig at the Comedy Store with a joke about hummus and a man in the audience shouted, ‘I’ll fucking kill you, you posh git.’” The next time Lyons stood on stage she masked any vulnerability “by dressing up like I was going to a prom. That built me back up.”

THE CREATIVE

OUTLET

LUCY BROWN; THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX/EYEVINE; OLIVIA ROSE; RORY DCS; SASKIA SELWOOD

Bruta Arthur Yates, 26, and his girlfriend Phoebe Saatchi, 22 (daughter of Charles), are co-founders of Bruta. Maker of unisex shirts, embroideries, carpets, tapestries, pottery and even murals, the company owes much of its aesthetic to Hockney, Gauguin and Matisse. Assorted whimsy is its USP: “You’ve got to find a new approach to the industry,” says Yates. And as for working with someone you love? “Ours is a Diego Rivera/Frida Kahlo relationship, without the cheating,” he laughs. The pair mostly run the company from their London apartment, but the Bruta show moves about, too. To shoot their s/s ’17 collection they travelled with their wares, two models and photographer Rory DCS to Venice, where they staged the story of a road trip.

THE PLAYWRIGHT: ALICE BIRCH Raised on a commune in Worcestershire, Alice Birch, 30, was never going to have an ordinary life. She joined the Royal Court’s young writers programme aged 18. Fast-forward a decade and her breakthrough play, Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again., recently transferred to New York. Stay tuned for the British release of her first screenplay, an adaptation of Susan Fraser King’s novel Lady Macbeth, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this year to glowing reviews.

MY

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TOP PLAYS 1. FAR AWAY by Caryl Churchill 2. ON RAFTERY’S HILL by Marina Carr 3. PRE PARADISE SORRY NOW by Rainer Werner Fassbinder 4. THREE SISTERS by Anton Chekhov 5. MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA by Eugene O’Neill 147


VOGUEspotlight THE GALLERIST Marisa Bellani

“I set up Roman Road with no business plan – I just opened my computer”

Originally from Guatemala, Marisa Bellani, 30 – who specialises in photography – studied art in Paris and London before completing her master’s at Sotheby’s. But her career really began in 2013, when she fell in love with a house in Bethnal Green. It came with a “ridiculously small” shop in its garden that Marisa didn’t want, but then she saw a weathered plaque saying “art gallery” swinging from its clapboard front, changed her mind, signed on the dotted line and turned the shop into exactly that – it’s now known as Roman Road. “I set up Roman Road with no business plan. Nothing. I just sat down and opened my computer,” she says. The space has since held 22 exhibitions, and represents Antony Cairns and Thomas Mailaender.

20 names of a el a C o e

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Michaela Coel, 28, is a two-time Baftawinning playwright and poet, who wrote and starred in Chewing Gum, an E4 comedy following the adventures of a sexually frustrated, religion-obsessed 24-year-old on a London estate. “I don’t write with this thing in the back of my head about carrying the weight of young black women on my shoulders,” says Coel. “I’d like the colour of my skin to not be a factor in my life at all.”

NOW

THE ILLUSTRATOR Esme Chapman The 17-year-old daughter of Matches founders Tom and Ruth is, when not at school, an illustrator who painted Malone Souliers’ s/s ’17 look book. We asked her a few questions, which she answered with drawings.

? 1. WHO IS YOUR STYLE CRUSH

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2. WHAT IS TOP OF YOUR jacket G LIST? da padded SHOPPIN ques Almei A Mar

3. WHAT’S YOUR MOST TREASURED POSSESSION?

My Malone Souliers shoes

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THE VIDEOGRAPHER: EMILY FORBES Three years ago, 29-year-old Emily Forbes, then a budding videographer, went to film a protest in Cape Town but found the crowd already doing it. “I knew I couldn’t keep up with their insight,” she recalls, so she ran from person to person asking them to send her footage which she would then edit 148

into a single film. And so Seenit began. Today the tech service – based in London but working with 50 film editors around the world – enables companies, from the BBC to Benefit cosmetics, to engage fans and employees through video that they upload to an online platform, and which the Seenit team then fashion into a finished film.

MARISA WEARS DRESS, JOSEPH, AT FENWICK. EARRINGS, JESSIE HARRIS. HAIR: DANIEL DYER. MAKE-UP: ALICE HOWLETT. AMELIA ALLEN; DAVID LEVENE/EYEVINE; DAVE STARLING; ESME CHAPMAN; OLLIE HAMMICK; STEPHANIE SIAN SMITH

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Marisa Bellani at her E2 gallery. Photograph: Retts Wood. Sittings editor: Florence Arnold

THE YOGA GURU: GABRIELLE HALES Hales, 30, founder of the Secret Yoga Club, holds classes in surprising places. At the Royal Academy of Arts, for example, where “100 people moved together, like one giant organism, under the Grafton Installation while an opera singer sang. Then we all ate a supper cooked by Trullo.”


From morning to evening, the Michael Kors Access Smartwatch is made for the multi-tasker

MICHAEL KORS ACCESS SMARTWATCH Style has many faces: with countless ways to customise your watch face, you can change your dial as often as you change your mood. My Modes: your fashion changes by day and by night. So should your watch. In My Modes, you can personalise your day and night watch face, which will automatically switch at 6pm.

Fashion meets i FUNCTION Wearable technology is entering the fashion world in a big way. Jo Holley, Vogue’s executive retail editor, reveals how the Michael Kors Access smartwatch plays an essential part in her working day and wardrobe Photographs by Rodrigo Carmuega

always start my day by checking the weather, which luckily I can do easily on my smartwatch. This helps me to plan my outfits for the day and the rest of the week. I then make my way to Vogue House, grabbing a coffee on the go, and check through the notifications set up on my Michael Kors Access smartwatch. This reminds me of the meetings I have scheduled and any email reminders I need to make a note of for the day ahead. It also works brilliantly for when I receive incoming calls, texts and other smartphone alerts.

My job involves me being very active, as every day is quite diverse. Wearing my Michael Kors Access smartwatch allows me to do my job on the go. I am constantly out liaising with PRs and brands, viewing new collections or discussing collaborations and strategies. I recently managed the opening of the Vogue pop-up café, which meant I was out at frequent planning meetings. Wherever I was, my smartwatch allowed me to discreetly check reminders and emails from the office. Powered by Android Wear™ and constantly connected, the Michael Kors Access smartwatch is compatible with iPhone and Android devices, making it easy to stay in touch stylishly. I can keep updated with Vogue Instagram and Facebook notifications, as well as use other essential apps, such as Uber, to help me get from meeting to meeting quickly and easily.

HAIR AND MAKE-UP:CELINE NONON

ON THE GO


VOGUE PROMOTION For a smart but more relaxed look the brown leather strap is ideal

Staying constantly connected makes busy days run smoothly

“The appeal of being stylishly connected while staying on top of my daily life gives a new allure to wearable technology”

TIME CHECK With my work I am lucky enough to travel often, but that means my body clock is sometimes out of sync. Happily, my Michael Kors Access smartwatch displays multiple timezones, allowing me to use my iPhone to email and call London at the appropriate time. This is crucial as I need to keep in contact with our sub-editors and art teams to make sure they have everything they need for my Checklist pages – ensuring that I meet my deadline, no matter where I am in the world. Of course, the aesthetics of my watches and accessories are also very important to me. The beauty of the Michael Kors Access smartwatch is that it not only has interchangeable watch straps, but also customisable watch faces. This means that I can personalise and style it differently every day, depending on my look. My job involves many evening launches and parties, so being able to wear the same watch in different styles is fantastic. Just a quick swap of the strap and swipe of the screen, and I’ve gone from day to evening in no time at all. Available at Ernest Jones and select Michael Kors stores, starting at £329

The customisable dials work perfectly in transitioning a look from work to evening


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VOGUEmemoir

Hedren on the set of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds – the film, released in 1963, that made her famous. Below: with Dakota Johnson

Golden YEARS TIPPI HEDREN, ONE OF HITCHCOCK’S MOST CELEBRATED BLONDES, TALKS TO HER GRANDDAUGHTER DAKOTA JOHNSON ABOUT LEADING MEN, LIONS AND HER NEW MEMOIR

CORBIS/GETTY; GETTY

d

akota Johnson seems to be in a mild state of shock as she approaches her grandmother Tippi Hedren’s home on the Shambala Preserve – the sanctuary for lions and other big cats that Hedren founded in the Seventies in the wilderness north of Los Angeles, writes Tim Walker. It’s the first time Johnson has visited since a wildfire swept right up to the property in the summer, leaving rows of charred tree trunks just yards from the animal enclosures. “This is so weird for me,” she says, staring at the apocalyptic scene from

behind the wheel of her Audi SUV. Still, the cats and Hedren’s house remain unscathed, and the 86-yearold welcomes her granddaughter looking as poised and elegant as ever in a black, sleeveless, spot-print blouse with a simple diamond necklace given to her by her daughter, Johnson’s mother, Melanie Griffith – the missing link in this three-generation acting dynasty. Johnson greets Hedren affectionately as Mormor, the Swedish word for granny. Dressed down in a crisp white T-shirt, her blue jeans cinched with a

Gucci belt, the Fifty Shades of Grey star, 27, hands over the gifts she has brought: a Marc Jacobs handbag and sunglasses. “These are great! I left my other pair at your mother’s,” Hedren says, trying on the shades – and flashing, as she does so, her long, gold-lacquered nails. Formerly (and famously) a Hitchcock blonde, today her hair is grey and cropped. Hedren’s housecat, Johnny Depp, prowls the kitchen. He’s not allowed outside, in case he should wander into one of the big-cat enclosures, the closest of which is about 10ft beyond the dining room window and home to a 13-year-old tigress called Mona, who is nowhere to be seen as Hedren and Johnson sit down for lunch. “I have no sense of taste or smell any more, so I don’t care about food,” says Tippi. “I had two falls and hit my head in the same place, which affected my olfactory nerves. It was over 10 years ago.” “But you do love chocolate…” says her granddaughter. “Yes, but that’s because I loved chocolate before. It’s dangerous having no smell though, because I can’t smell smoke. I’ve had all the gas appliances taken out of the house!” It was with Noel Marshall, the second of her three husbands, that Hedren spent most of the Seventies making the film Roar. Their shared passion project – often referred to as “the most dangerous movie ever made” – Roar featured 150 untrained wild animals. Some 70 members of the cast and crew, including Griffith and Hedren, were injured during production, which ultimately led to the creation of the Shambala Preserve. The house itself was originally a mobile home, to which Hedren has added several extensions over the decades. “They brought it in on wheels,” she says. “I’ll never forget the day it came down the hill.” Inside, the walls are filled with photos of her family and of Shambala’s big cats, while the shelves are lined with books that reflect her multiple careers: books on fashion, on movies, on Africa and its wildlife. Now, Hedren > 153


has collected her memories in her own book, Tippi, a candid memoir that looks all the way back to her midwestern childhood and her modelling career in Fifties New York. DAKOTA JOHNSON: Mormor, how did you start modelling? TIPPI HEDREN: I was walking down the street in Minneapolis when I was 18, and a woman stopped me, handed me a business card and said: “Would you give this to your mother and have her bring you down to Donaldson’s department store? We’d like to have you model in our Saturday morning fashion shows.” I thought, what fun! DJ: They had shows every week? TH: Yes. We lived in a suburb called Morningside, and every Saturday morning I’d go into the city. The clothes were very Forties: plaid skirts with cashmere sweaters, bobby socks and loafers. It was cute. DJ: What are you wearing today? TH: My top is not from a prominent designer but it’s cool. Your mother gave me the diamond necklace. The pearl earrings I have had forever. I rarely lose anything, so if they don’t break I keep them. My style is sort of elegant and simple. Nothing gaudy, nothing over the top.

Above: Tippi with husband Noel Marshall and daughter Melanie Griffith in 1966. Below: at home with Neil the lion in 1971

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DJ: Had you been to New York before you moved there? TH: I worked in Minneapolis for a long time, but New York was always saying, “Yoo-hoo!” New York was the place to be if you were going to be a model. Eileen Ford of Ford Models had told me to send her my photographs, which I did, and then she called me to say, “Come to New York.” I had just enough money to get there, sitting up on the train for three days! And then enough to keep me for a week at the Barbizon Hotel for Women. DJ: It sounds like The Bell Jar! How did it feel to arrive in Manhattan for the first time? TH: I’d been living in Minneapolis, so I wasn’t afraid of being in a city. But then, I don’t know if I’ve ever been afraid of anything, really. New York models were chic, business-like, career-minded. And I’m not very tall. But New York was fun and exciting, I was learning a lot about clothes and absorbing everything I could. I don’t know how many magazine covers I shot, especially with Seventeen. I still have a whole trunk full of them. DJ: Were you always keen on fashion? What were your dreams growing up? TH: I wanted to be a figure skater – there are 10,000 lakes in Minnesota – but my parents didn’t have enough money to send me to classes. I used to watch my friends’ lessons, then I’d go out to one of the little lakes in our neighbourhood, and practise and practise. DJ: Was your mum supportive of you modelling? TH: Yes. We were Lutherans, and our parents brought me and my sister up with strong morals, and felt I knew how to handle any “situation” that came along – and I did. I handled a lot. The first thing I did when I arrived in New York was find a Lutheran church close to my living quarters. In Los Angeles, I taught Sunday school.

The actress with Charlie Chaplin, who directed her in 1967’s A Countess from Hong Kong

I got this call: “Hi, Mum! It’s Melanie. I’m with Don. Guess what? We just got married!” I cried: “Oh no!”

DJ: How did you meet Pop-Pop [Dakota’s grandfather, Peter Griffith] in New York? TH: I was asked to do a small role on TV, and Peter was one of the actors. DJ: You can’t get away from actors in our family. They’re everywhere. TH: They’re still coming out of the woodwork. We were working on a set with a stage and I fell off it and hurt my shin, and Peter came to my rescue, which is how that whole thing started. DJ: What was it like when you found out you were pregnant? TH: I was thrilled. We came to California and went down to Mexico and got married secretly a year and a half after we met. DJ: That’s not dissimilar to how my mum and dad [actor Don Johnson] got married the first time. Maybe I should continue the tradition and get secretly hitched to a semi-suitable male? If it doesn’t work out the first time, I’ll just do it again with somebody else! TH: Peter and I had another wedding in a beautiful Lutheran church on Long Island. The pictures are too cute for words: it looks like two children getting married. He was 19, I was 22. DJ: And Mum was married at 18. I’d better get to work! How old was Mum when you married Noel [Marshall, Hedren’s second husband]? TH: She was still a little girl. DJ: She still is a little girl. TH: She’ll always be my little girl. But she grew up to be a powerful and magnificent woman. DJ: Mum was 14 and Dad was 22 when they met and fell in love, and that was the end of that. You were not very happy were you, Mormor? TH: No! Here’s this slick young actor, charming and handsome as you could find – he had it all. And my little girl involved with that? That was asking way too much. She is very wilful, though. She eloped, too… >

GETTY; MICHAEL ROUGIER/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY

VOGUEmemoir


Below: Tippi with Alfred Hitchcock during the filming of Marnie (1964). Right: a poster for The Birds

DJ: To Vegas. TH: I remember exactly where I was when I found out. We had a phone on the wall by the staircase at our house and I got this call: “Hi, Mum! It’s Melanie. I’m with Don. Guess what? We just got married!” I cried: “Oh no!” DJ: We’re all so stubborn. How old were you when you stopped modelling? TH: Thirty-one. I had modelled for a lot longer than most models do. I was getting older, so I started doing television commercials. I received a call on Friday 13 October 1961, from a man asking if I was the girl in the Sego TV commercial. I said, “Yes, why?” He said that somebody was interested in me, but they couldn’t tell me who. Finally, they admitted Alfred Hitchcock wanted to sign me to a contract. Being under contract to Hitchcock was very exciting. But the longer it went on, the more control he wanted. And we aren’t that kind of people – we don’t control well. DJ: Nuh-uh. Not in this family. How drastically and how quickly did the relationship change? TH: It was a long period of time, which allowed me to do the The Birds and Marnie. But when Hitchcock’s demands became unbearable, I said I wanted to get out of my contract. His last words to me were: “I’ll ruin your career.” I said: “Do what you have to do,” and slammed the door on him. And I really 156

slammed it! He kept me under contract for two years, paying me $600 a week. He was miserly as well as a mean bastard. DJ: Everything is so public now. There’s not a lot of space for people to be sneaky or immoral. TH: He was a master at it. It got to a point where he wanted to make me jealous, so he hired another model and put her under contract. When I asked who it was, he said “Claire Griswold.” I said “Claire? She’s a good friend of mine! We worked together in New York! I can’t wait to see her!” He was deflated because I didn’t turn green with envy. And then all of a sudden she was gone because he told her she could not have any children while she was under contract to him. DJ: But you went to his funeral? TH: I did, because I knew both sides of the man: what he had done, and who he was in the motion picture industry will be known forever. DJ: What was it like working with costumier Edith Head? TH: Working with Edith was such a wonderful time for me. What I learnt from her more than anything was how brilliantly she manipulated her producers and directors into loving what she designed. She got them thinking her ideas were theirs. I did get tired of that green suit I wore in The Birds: I had six of them! But in Marnie, the white gown that I wore when I get busted stealing was my favourite. I felt like I was 6ft tall wearing it. DJ: What did it feel like when you became successful? Were you recognised on the street? TH: On occasion there would be people running down the street after me. I guess the fact that I had an elegant image meant everybody treated me as such, which was nice. I did learn never

Hitchcock’s last words to me were: “I’ll ruin your career.” I said: “Do what you have to do,” and slammed the door on him

to go out without my mascara on. DJ: You taught me how to put mascara on. I think I got my long eyelashes from you. TH: I think it’s fabulous that you and Melanie are actors. I didn’t suggest it to her; she just came home one day and said: “Mum, I’m going to be in a movie!” DJ: I grew up on sets. I thought, “This is their job; this is what my job will be.” Did you ever fall in love with any of your co-stars? TH: No. DJ: Not even a little bit? TH: Maybe with Sean [Connery], a little bit. But I said to myself: “Tippi, don’t get involved.” And I didn’t. He was a great gentleman. And he was probably told: “You will not touch the girl.” That’s what Hitchcock would say. Working with Charlie Chaplin was pretty amazing. I was just free of my contract with Hitchcock when I got the call for A Countess from Hong Kong. Charlie directed by acting out all of our different roles. Marlon [Brando] wanted to quit because that was totally against his method acting. For him to have to watch Charlie Chaplin doing his role was insulting. But I loved it: I thought it was wonderful watching Charlie. Marlon and I had a good time. He thought we ought to have an affair, and I said “Well, I don’t think that’s going to happen.” I don’t do that with my leading men. DJ: So, Neil was your first lion? TH: Yeah. He was owned by Ron Oxley, who was charged with finding the animals for Roar. During a Life magazine photo shoot for the film, Neil leapt over the banister from the landing and crashed on to the dining table. His front leg landed on my plate and the whole table came down and everything landed on me. The wine glasses… everything! I considered them pets at first, when we first got the little lion cubs – oh God, they were so cute! But boy, you can’t take a chance on when those instincts are going to kick in. One of the lions bit me on the head when we were shooting footage for Roar. DJ: Mormor, you have done so many things in your life – what do you still want to achieve? TH: I just wait for what’s going to happen in my life. I’m steered in directions that I find to be more and more interesting as the years go by. I’m amazed looking back at what doors were opened for me and the ones I chose to go through. Q “Tippi: A Memoir”, by Tippi Hedren, is published by William Morrow at £20

CORBIS/GETTY; GAMMA-KEYSTONE/GETTY

VOGUEmemoir


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Wool Blend Coat £149.90 Faux Shearling Scarf £12.90

LAUNCHES 3 NOVEMBER


take a JOURNEY What happens when two Italian symbols of style and luxury converge? A rather dashing little number with a whole lot of attitude‌ Photographs by Theresa Marx Styling by Julia Brenard

t

he Italians certainly know a thing or two about luxury. And detailing. And comfort, for that matter. They pride themselves on their stylish dolce vita, which is embraced in every facet of their lives. Which is why our ears perked up when we heard that the classic Italian marque Fiat was launching a limited-edition Fiat 500, inspired by the superyacht Aquariva, no less. For those of us who may not be familiar with the boating world, the Aquariva is the current jewel in the crown of the superyachting Riva family. Established in 1842 on Lake Iseo, the Riva became a glinting synonym of elegance, status and that enviable Italian summer dream. Taking inspiration from the clean lines, sporty interior and nautical themes of the superyacht, the Fiat 500 Riva echoes daydreams of gleaming Mediterranean holidays, deep blue oceans and a life well-


VOGUE PROMOTION

HAIR: STEPHEN BEAVER. MAKE-UP; NOBUKO MAEKAWA. SET DESIGN: THOMAS BIRD. OPPOSITE, TOP LEFT: DRESS, PAULE KA. LEATHER TROUSERS, HAIZHEN WANG. MULES, LOEFFLER RANDALL. RING, URIBE. OPPOSITE, TOP RIGHT: SWEATER AND TROUSERS, BOTH TOGA. SHOES, REJINA PYO. OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: DRESS AND NET POLONECK, BOTH DOROTHEE SCHUMACHER. LEATHER JACKET, ALEXANDER LEWIS. SHOES, KURT GEIGER. THIS PAGE, TOP LEFT: SWEATER, ELLERY. BRACELET AND RING, URIBE. TOP RIGHT: DRESS AND CARDIGAN, BOTH PRINGLE. LOAFERS, ELLERY. RING, H&M. BOTTOM: STRIPED TOP, HAIZHEN WANG

This season we’re coveting sporty stripes and a sultry attitude – no matter the destination, the look is hot to trot

The nautical stylings of a superyacht make the Fiat 500 Riva a luxury traveller’s dream – this is the modern dolce vita

heeled. Think of an iconic silhouette, glinting chrome finishes, specially designed 16in, 20-spoke alloy wheels and a double aquamarine line running along the delightfully curvy body. Nearly every detail is bespoke, including the Sera Blue body colour found only on this model. Even the mats are specially created, with ivory hems and contrasting Sera Blue stitching. Naturally we’re dreaming of the convertible option, which features a new blue soft top – a world traveller’s dream – but the hatchback is just as agreeable, with a panoramic roof as standard. But where the Fiat 500 Riva really shows off its luxe appeal is on the inside. Climb aboard and wrap up in ivory-leather seats created by Italian furniture maker Poltrona A nation’s constant search for Frau, known for its quality standards modernity juxtaposed with a love exhausting and 21-step leather tanning of historic craftsmanship… process; this is not a seat to

take for granted. A hand-painted mahogany dashboard runs seamlessly alongside state-of-the-art technology, a hint of the nation’s constant search for modernity juxtaposed with a love of historic craftsmanship. Automatic climate control, a 7in HD Uconnect™ Live infotainment system, bluetooth voice calls and voice recognition keep the car’s occupants comfortable and in touch. This new collaboration comes from a marque that since 1957 has provided the world with a means of not just car ownership, but a sense of personal freedom as generations of Fiat owners become inextricably linked to those dolce vita years we dream of. So whether it’s a scenic meander down the Italian riviera or you are just popping to the shops, in this little number your destination will certainly be worth the ride. Q To book yourself in for a test cruise, or to get more information on the Fiat 500 Riva, visit Fiat.co.uk


DECEMBER ISSUE ON SALE NOW ONLY £2.99 OR INCLUDED WITH YOUR PRINT MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION Vogue.co.uk/subscriptions

BRUCE WEBER; GREGORY HARRIS

INTERACTIVE VOGUE EDITIONS FOR iPHONE AND iPAD


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METALLIC LEATHER AND CRYSTAL SANDALS, £1,180, GUCCI. PLEXIGLASS AND SWAROVSKI-CRYSTAL CLUTCH, FROM £2,340, DOLCE & GABBANA. SEQUINED AND BEADED VELVET BAG, £1,985, SAINT LAURENT

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AS THE INVITATIONS MOUNT UP AND THE LIGHTS GO DOWN, SPIN THROUGH COCKTAIL HOUR IN BEADED VELVET, GLITTERING CRYSTALS AND DISCO METALLICS

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Little is more eye-catching across a bustling room than a flash of jewel colour.

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DOLCE & GABBANA

If you only buy one cocktail-party piece this season, invest in a statement sequined skirt. It goes with everything – from a favourite sweater to white shirt to a camisole.

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI SEQUINED VELVET SKIRT, £1,260

MIU MIU SATIN AND FEATHER SANDALS, £790

THE TWIST: A LACE VEST TIBI VELVET TOP, £430, AT FENWICK

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Elegantly soften the regal overtones of gold by pairing it with sumptuous cream. A shimmering skirt is enriched further when paired with touch-me mohair or velvet.

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GETTY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ; REX FEATURES

Infuse: gold with cream

For those seeking a new office-toparty spin, a lace vest is equally at home under a heritage tweed blazer as it is layered over a slinky slip skirt.


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FROM LEFT: PEACH MORGANITE RING, £2,750. PEACH MORGANITE AND SEA BLUE AQUAMARINE RING, £1,699. PEACH MORGANITE RING, £1,150

JEWELLERY IS NOT JUST FOR CHRISTMAS, AS THE LATEST BEDAZZLING OFFERING FROM LE VIAN PROVES

i

t’s no secret that the smaller boxes placed under the Christmas tree are often the most cherished. Those that are larger might masquerade as the most indulgent, but it’s the neat hold-in-the-hand boxes protecting small treasures that stand the test of time, passed down through generations, countless memories attached. And now, with jewellery taking centre stage in the catwalk collections, there seems no better time than to add to one’s own personal collection or to share the joy of sporting a handsome gemstone with a loved one. Le Vian’s Morganite offerings add the right amount of decadence for those wanting to sport an earthy palette without sacrificing on holiday sparkle. Think a slinky dress in dusky rose velvet, a sprinkle of Le Vian’s Chocolate diamonds catching the candlelight. What could be more alluring?

For those ready to embrace the more masculine proportions of winter, a statement ring in a vibrant colour never falls out of favour. Choose a style that is as unique in setting as it is in shade – the Le Vian Morganite ring is made for cocktail hour. When it comes to the minimalist selection of a tux worn sans blouson, jewellery should also be kept streamlined. A dainty pendant swinging across the décolletage, like Le Vian’s opal style, needs little else and will sit just as comfortably over a camel cashmere jumper. With a storied history spanning three centuries, Le Vian’s pieces have the legs to see beyond the winter months, ready and waiting to complement the first spring blooms. Q Available exclusively at Ernest Jones. To view the full Le Vian collection, or to find your nearest store, visit Ernestjones.co.uk

Choose a style that is as unique in setting as it is in shade – the Le Vian Morganite ring is made for cocktail hour

NEOPOLITAN OPAL RING, ABOVE RIGHT, £1,599. NEOPOLITAN OPAL RING, RIGHT, £1,750

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Charlotte Rampling, photographed for American Vogue, November 1970

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EMILIO PUCCI

Ice, ice BABY

SUIT WChampion your own black (and white) run with a timeless geometric stirrup two-piece

SKI R KASK SKI HELMET, £400, AT HARRODS

UN

ARNAUD DE ROSNAY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

TOPSHOP JACKET WITH FAUX-FUR TRIM, £95

MONCLER GRENOBLE DOWN JACKET, £1,660. TROUSERS, £785

Nordica’s skis will offer an Olympic-worthy performance

NORDICA SKIS, £530, AT ELLIS BRIGHAM

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VOGUEspy MR & MRS ITALY SHEARLING COAT, £2,600

SCOTCH & SODA SLEEVELESS COAT, £170

NORD I

DRAMA

C Hit a mountain high with an après-ski wardrobe in soft snow white. Drinks at the Eagle in Gstaad call for cosy Aran knits and plush sheepskin

APRES SKI DKNY WOOL JACKET, £698

CHLOE

TOMMY & GIGI WOOL-MIX POLONECK, £190, AT VERY EXCLUSIVE.CO.UK

DIOR SUNGLASSES, £455

MARNI WOOL SWEATER, £830

JW ANDERSON WOOL SWEATER, £425

3

of the best… mountain boots

PENELOPE CHILVERS SUEDE AND PONYSKIN , £499

STUART WEITZMAN LEATHER, £459

WHITE S

OFF-WHITE

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PES TRI

UNIQLO U CASHMERE POLONECK, £100

A classic racing knit never fails to impress chalet guests. Choose winning stripes and pair with sleek ski pants

JIMMY CHOO SHEARLING LINED, £1,095

ALASDAIR McLELLAN; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

TONI SAILER SKI TROUSERS, £400, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM


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Mix-and-match your textures for an elevated evening edit: velvet finishes come into their own right about now Dress, £10. Clutch bag, £5. Earrings £1


VOGUE PROMOTION

Padded jacket, £23. Top, £5. Leggings, £6. Clutch bag, £5. Shoes, £10. Earrings, £3.50

We like to

PARTY Primark’s luxe-looking event edit has everything you’ll need this festive season – at prices that will amaze he time is fast approaching to slip into something a little more standout, statement and sizzling. Partygoers must tick all the requisite style boxes, too, of course, and there is one place offering all these qualities at the sort of affordable prices that won’t leave you all dressed up with nowhere to go: Primark. Long the hot tip on the high street when it comes to mirroring the season’s most integral trends at democratic price points, this year, Primark’s partyseason edit of delectable looks has the Vogue stamp of approval. Sugar-pink crushed-velvet jumpsuits contrast with sweet-wrapper-metallic platforms; dark-mint-green cigarette pants are given a delicate counterpoint with a black lace bra top; there are deliciously marshmallow-soft padded jackets; while glittering jacquard suiting and shimmering lamé lengths

t This picture: coat, £30. Dress, £13. Shoes, £14. Earrings, £2. Below: blouse, £12. Trousers, £6

exude Studio 54 appeal. All suitably indulgent for a season synonymous with decadence. What’s more, this clever and comprehensive Primark edit allows for a mix-and-match approach to dressing. Not feeling sparkly stilettos? Swap

Put simply, Primark has the answer, whatever the demands of your festive-event dress code them for metallic sneakers that will have you bouncing from party to party with ease. Want to combine comfort with your high-street couture? Choose a pink padded jacket instead of that long black coat for a street-inspired update. Put simply, Primark has the answer, whatever the demands of your festive-event dress code. Q Visit Primark.com


VOGUE PROMOTION Challenge the Christmas-soirée status quo: opt for sugary shades over traditional tinsel hues Below left: jumpsuit, £15. Clutch bag, £10. Shoes, £14. Earrings, £1.50. Below right: padded jacket, £18. Dress, £12. Trainers, £10. Earrings, £1

For glamorous head-to-toe looks that make party season easy on the eye and your pocket, choose Primark


Co-ordinated separates strike a confident note: especially when crafted in intergalactic green and cobalt blue Jacket, £25. Trousers, £15. Bra top, £8. Earrings, £2


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USING


MARIO TESTINO; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; SUDHIR PITHWA; WIRE IMAGE; REX FEATURES; GETTY

VOGUEparty

How to PARTY, VOGUE style Forget catwalk rivalry – the new generation of models is more about off-catwalk revelry. When it comes to picking a plus one, look to the likes of Edie Campbell, Mica Arganaraz, Daphne Groeneveld and Jean Campbell, who make campaign comrades their numberone nocturnal companions.

Elbow room Look to Chanel couture, and consider elbow-length fingerless gloves the new opera glove. Ensure no skin is visible (aside from fingers); the tops of gloves should creep all the way up under shorter sleeve lengths. Follow through with over-the-knee boots, to be worn with belowthe-knee hemlines.

Break For Love Raze Do It (Till You’re Satisfied) BT Express

STYLING TIP NO 2

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STYLING TIP NO 1

Queen of Chinatown Amanda Lear Love Come Down Evelyn “Champagne” King

From barefoot house parties to what not to say at dinner, here’s how to win the December scene

Saturday Love Cherelle and Alexander O’Neal

Buy a cluster of diamanté brooches and pile on to lapels and neckline – ideal to update a favourite dress from last season. Tell everyone they’re heirlooms, because paste will shine like a diamond in evening light. Feeling alternative? Pin them ad hoc into a messy updo.

All the Critics Love U in New York Prince Love Is a Stranger Eurythmics I Don’t Wanna Lose Your Love The Emotions Dazz Brick Die Hard Lover Loverde Drum Smash Band

ERDEM HAIR JEWEL, FROM A SELECTION

ALEXANDER McQUEEN

Wing WOMEN

VOGUE’S RETRO PLAYLIST

State Trooper (Trentemoller remix) Bruce Springsteen Baby’s On Fire Superpitcher

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COLOURING BOOK

by Iain R Webb

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VOGUEparty PERFECT 10 BLACK LABEL

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THE PARTY PADS TO ESCAPE TO

Often able to get someone to you in an hour, Priv is fast – but do check the ratings. Download the Priv app and you’re ready to go.

SIBTON PARK

Grab a gang of (up to 24) mates and head to this Georgian manor and wilderness reserve in Suffolk, left. Dine by candlelight, retreat to the home cinema or lounge in the hot tub. From £3,000 a night; Wildernessreserve.com GLIN CASTLE

Soak up the opulent Irish glamour of Glin Castle, below left, owned by Catherine Fitzgerald and her actor husband, Dominic West. With 18 bedrooms and a professional chef. From £4,300 a night; info@glincastle.ie

FRAGRANCE FOR NIGHT TOM FORD JASMIN ROUGE, £148 Bold yet beautiful. The olfactory equivalent of a slick of red lipstick

BELMONT HOUSE

Fancy staying in a pineapple-shaped summer house? The Landmark Trust’s properties can be rented for a song. Try Belmont House in Lyme Regis, a maritime villa that sleeps eight. From £647 for four nights; Landmarktrust.org.uk

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High style If you can’t face pouring yourself into a dress, simply up your sartorial game with a pair of “I hate to see you go but I love to watch you leave” heels. Sequined, feathered, beribboned or encrusted, these trophy shoes mean you can be lazy with everything else because they require little more than tuxedo trousers and a black tee or white shirt.

DIOR DIORAMA, £83.50 Old-school glamour – and it’s just one short leap from Diorama to drama. Spray on for devastating self-assurance

THE PERFUMER’S STORY TWISTED IRIS, £95 She’s the girl sitting by herself at the party, but the one everyone wants to talk to

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VOGUEparty

Jourdan Dunn. Right: Caroline Sieber and Sabine Getty

Christopher Bailey and Simon Woods

Book CLUB THE LAUNCH OF A LAVISH ANTHOLOGY PROVED A FITTING AFTERWORD TO VOGUE’S CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

t

he release of the highly anticipated limited-edition anthology Vogue: Voice of a Century was celebrated at 5 Hertford Street as London Fashion Week was in full swing. Contributors past and present assembled with models and designers from throughout the generations – Twiggy to Jourdan Dunn, Celia Birtwell to Christopher Bailey. Barney Wan, Vogue’s legendary art director from 1968 to 1973, leafed through the book with Genesis co-publisher Nick Roylance, as Vogue regulars Mario Testino and Sam McKnight charted their own work among its pages. The recently aired Vogue documentary was the hot topic of conversation – as the magazine’s editor-in-chief Alexandra Shulman mused in her introductory speech, “I think you’ve all heard enough from me recently!” Sabine Getty and Caroline Sieber admired the club’s new upstairs rooms, recently designed by Rifat Ozbek; Poppy Delevingne laughed with her girl gang of Jessica Hart and Lauren Santo Domingo; Isabeli Fontana sported Temperley London fresh from the catwalk; and Victoria Beckham and Vogue’s fashion news editor Julia Hobbs swapped stories about the stage school they both attended. What a finale to a remarkable centenary year. SF

Derek Blasberg with, from left, Fiona Golfar, Poppy Delevingne, Lauren Santo Domingo and Jessica Hart. Below: Natalie Massenet, Matthew Williamson and Suzy Menkes

DARREN GERRISH

Twiggy, Leigh Lawson and Laura Bailey. Below left: Catherine Roylance, Victoria Beckham and Nick Roylance. Below: Jacquetta Wheeler

Jemma Mornington and Anna Wintour

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Frances von Hofmannsthal and Jonathan Newhouse. Right: Alexandra Shulman. Far right: Felicity Clark and Lucinda Chambers


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flash DANCE With coveted collections from luxury brands popping up every day, Vente-Privee owns the online fashion landscape when it comes to discounted brands we love

w

hile we all have experienced the euphoric sartorial highs of online shopping, when it comes to the sales it can be something of a minefield. How to stay on the ball with updated stock? Will there even be your size? After hours of incessant scrolling, will the discount compensate for the repetitive muscular ache in your fingers and thumb? Will it make up for the two hours’ sleep lost after falling into a vortex of options in bed – when all you originally reached out to do was set the alarm on your phone for 6am? Fellow shoppers, we present VentePrivee – the online flash-sale site which has taken the hardship out of the aforementioned distress. With a focus on the most insouciant of French chic – think a wardrobe amalgam of Clémence Poésy, Marion Cotillard and Caroline de Maigret – Vente-Privee is the global industry leader in giving its buyers coveted fashion at a reasonable price point, while at the same time helping

labels – all 9,500 of them – reach the customers they missed first time round. Its three-to-five-day limited sale periods prove its authenticity; its real-time alerts show how efficient it is; while 50 million users worldwide, who have enjoyed discounts of 50 to 70 per cent, are testament to its success. While you have to be quick (the platform encourages you to shop the sale in the first hour of it being online to secure your style and size), there are new sales every day to ensure every shopper is satisfied. Sales open at 6am, meaning you can grab a bargain with your granola to wear at the weekend. It’s not just fashion – there’s an inventory of purchases that will give you that flip of consumer satisfaction, as well as putting you in that hallowed group of people that other people actually want to receive presents from. Membership is free, with no strings attached. See you at the breakfast table. Q


VOGUE PROMOTION

HERE’S HOW The Vogue guide to navigating a Vente-Privee flash sale with ease

1 23 45 67 89

Create a profile in three easy steps to shop the sales

Download the app to make sure you don’t miss a thing in simple swipes

Favourite the brands you love so that you get notified when to shop and secure your size and style

Don’t just hold out for the trophy buys – look for a staple that will give instant gratification

Look to the catwalk and the very best of street style trends to inspire your purchase

Don’t get hung up on something you missed – brand sales reappear multiple times a year

Use the five-second swipe rule – if you’re still thinking about it, snap it up

DO: be an early bird – sales start at 6am weekdays and 8am on weekends

10 ILLUSTRATION: HELEN HIRD

Invest in classic styles, as well as the latest trends for wardrobe balance

DON’T: forget to set your alarm

A LITTLE SOMETHING To get you started, Vogue readers are offered an exclusive £20 off your first order, with a minimum spend of £80. Go to Vente-privee.com/vogue to have your account credited for 30 days


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VOGUEchecklist Glorious gifts and party attire to welcome the festive season, plus an exclusive invitation to a Vogue and Chanel reader event Edited by JO HOLLEY

MIU MIU

READER EVENT

FIVE LIVE ROCHAS LEATHER AND SILK, £530, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

To celebrate Vogue’s December cover star, Lily-Rose Depp, becoming the new face of Chanel No 5 L’Eau, Chanel and Vogue are hosting an exclusive reader event. Join us from 5pm to 8pm on November 23 at Chanel, 6 The Market Building, Covent Garden, London WC2. Chanel make-up artists will be offering one-to-one Vogue cover make-up looks in the exclusive backstage area. These looks can then be shared with friends through the Chanel photobooth. Enjoy delicious refreshments and canapés while creating your own personalised postcards before sending them via the Chanel postbox. Places are strictly limited. To reserve yours, email your name and a guest’s name to Vogue@chanel.co.uk.

Sole of the party Embrace the glitz and draw everyone’s eyes south with these jewelled hot-steppers

MANOLO BLAHNIK SATIN, £725, MANOLO BLAHNIK.COM

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; COURTESY CHANEL

CARTIER CLE DE CARTIER IN SAPPHIRE, CRYSTAL AND STEEL, £3,800, CARTIER.CO.UK

TICK OFF THE LIST

DIOR LA D DE DIOR SATINE IN DIAMOND, MOTHER OF PEARL AND STEEL, £4,700, DIOR.COM

LITTLE GEMS Christmas is the season to sparkle…

ALEXANDER McQUEEN SWAROVSKICRYSTAL BROOCH, £245, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN.COM

TAG HEUER LINK LADY IN MOTHER OF PEARL AND STEEL, £1,250, TAGHEUER.CO.UK

CHAUMET LIENS LUMIERE TIMEPIECE IN DIAMOND, PINK GOLD AND MOTHER OF PEARL, £12,450, CHAUMET.COM

LE VIAN STRAWBERRY-GOLD DIAMOND-SHAPE BAND, £850, EXCLUSIVE TO ERNEST JONES (ERNESTJONES.CO.UK) PATEK PHILIPPE LADIES’ CALATRAVA IN WHITE GOLD, £36,220, PATEK PHILIPPE SALON, 16 NEW BOND STREET, W1

CHANEL MONSIEUR DE CHANEL IN OPALINE AND WHITE GOLD, £24,500, CHANEL.COM

CHOPARD ROSE-GOLD, AMETHYST AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, £7,440, CHOPARD.CO.UK

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VOGUEchecklist Pavé the way A new wave of big, bold and ultra-modern showstoppers to create a statement on the wrist…

I NEED MY SPACE… Anya Hindmarch’s calf-leather Space Invader Bathurst wallets are cute, fun and practical. £450, Anyahindmarch.com

NIRAV MODI PINK-DIAMOND AND ROSE-GOLD BANGLE, PRICE ON REQUEST, UK.NIRAVMODI.COM

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS DIAMOND AND PINK-GOLD CUFF, £286,200, VANCLEEF ARPELS.COM

Present and correct

SEREN LONDON SILK JUMPSUIT, £695, SERENLONDON.COM MANGO VELVET JACKET, £89.99, MANGO.COM

To fill the stocking and stir the senses BURBERRY MY BURBERRY BLACK PARFUM, £92, BURBERRY.COM

YSL BLACK OPIUM WILD, £47, YSLBEAUTY. CO.UK SANDRA MANSOUR BROCADE COAT, £1,265, AT BLUEBIRD AND MODA OPERANDI

NARCISO RODRIGUEZ ROSE MUSC, £125, AT HARRODS

AMANDA WAKELEY SATIN TROUSERS, £595, AMANDA WAKELEY.COM

Party pieces CREED AVENTUS FOR HER, £210, CREEDFRAGRANCES. CO.UK

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Whether they’re sequined, embroidered or embossed, black and gold pieces will set the celebratory tone

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; KAI Z FENG; LIZ COLLINS; PIXELATE.BIZ

BULGARI MALACHITE, PAVE-DIAMOND AND PINK-GOLD BRACELET, PRICE ON REQUEST, BULGARI.COM


Haute Couture ZZZFHOLDNULWKDULRWLFRP


The Rose of Hope collection Rose gold & diamonds Pavillons de Monte-Carlo, Place du Casino, Monaco www.hrhjewels.com


vogue

TIM WALKER. STYLED BY KATE PHELAN. HAIR: SHON. MAKE-UP: SAM BRYANT. MODEL: RIANNE VAN ROMPAEY

Sequined dress embellished with flowers, to order, Dolce & Gabbana

Here’s to ambition both raw and developed; to style that’s legendary and burgeoning; to generations on the cusp of dreams and others still living out the fantasy. A new illuminated age has arrived: live it! 205


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Fairy tale of

NEW YORK Lily-Rose Depp spins a fantastical dressing-up story in the Hamptons, and talks to William Van Meter about growing up at Chanel, shutting down on Instagram and why she has no reason to rebel Photographs by Bruce Weber. Styling by Joe McKenna

Trust Chanel to hit reset on the princess gown. These strands of torn silk dance to a new and rebellious tune of their own Fringed tulle and voile minidress, to order. Leather belt, £530. Both Chanel. Straw boater with veil, £480, Benoît Missolin. Hair: Didier Malige. Make-up: Aaron de Mey. Production: Dawn Boller. Set design: Dimitri Levas. Digital artwork: Samantha Moranville

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Where the wild things are: switch last season’s soft frills for the lichenlike contours of JW Anderson’s sinuous skirt Black and white asymmetric jacquard top, £1,375. Black quilted leather capelet, £535. White skirt with black ruffle trim, from a selection. All J W Anderson. Boots, throughout, courtesy of National Theatre Costume

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BRUCE WEBER


Dream on: Marc Jacobs’s decorated gown tells of a storybook fantasy fit for Hollywood’s new star Embellished tulle dress and pink bra, to order, Marc Jacobs. Straw hat, from £320, Gigi Burris Millinery

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I

t’s late morning in New York’s Soho, at the perennially hip Mercer Hotel, a long-time hub for visiting fashion and Hollywood dignitaries. And yet the current It-girl nonpareil, LilyRose Depp, doesn’t necessarily look the part. The actress (and now fashion plate) is in her favourite black Chrome Hearts sweatshirt, which is enormous and fits her like a Jedi cloak. The hood is decorated with an expletive phrase in Old English letters. “I wanted to sit outside!” sighs the 17-year-old gently, after striding through the lobby and peeking her head out to see that the benches on the pavement are no longer there. She plops down on a sofa and off comes her grey leather Chanel chevron rucksack, with the brand’s signature chains instead of straps. Removed, too, is the hoodie, revealing a natural, magnetic beauty. In a white camisole tucked into tight black jeans, Lily-Rose is both wispthin and curvy, with delicate bones. There is something almost Disney about her heart-shaped face and wide-set eyes, while the strength of her jaw and the height of her cheekbones say nothing Disney at all. Lily-Rose has exceptional genes. After all, her mother and father aren’t just famous but legendary – Hollywood star Johnny Depp and the singer-model Vanessa Paradis had Lily-Rose and her younger brother, Jack, during their 14-year relationship (they separated in 2012, but remain close). Through Paradis, Lily-Rose grew up knowing fashion, particularly Chanel. “Chanel has always been part of my life,” she explains. “My mom has worked with them since she was 18 and I’ve gone to the store with her since I was little. There are pictures of me literally in diapers wearing her Chanel pumps. I met Karl when I was eight and I had horrible side bangs – like a Donald Trump comb-over.” Lagerfeld remembers the young Lily-Rose fondly: “She used to come to the Chanel studio with her mother. She was a very sweet child, but who would have thought she would have such a strong and defined personality this early on? The good thing is that she doesn’t look like her father or her mother. With her fragile physique, the mix is surprising and it creates something that is completely different. Lily-Rose is a young girl from a new generation with all the qualities of a star.” It was fitting, then, that Lily-Rose first entered pop culture’s consciousness through her own affiliation with the fashion house. She walked in Chanel’s autumn/winter 2015

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couture show (it had a casino theme, and she sat at the roulette table, looking every inch a Bond girl), and today she has two Chanel advertising campaigns under her belt, as well as being the face of Chanel No 5 L’Eau. She has also been pursuing acting – her other heritage. And the roles she has so far played are diverse. She was Isadora Duncan in a supporting role in the French biopic The Dancer, and she unleashed her inner ham in Yoga Hosers, a comedy where she plays a Canadian cashier who battles miniature Nazis made out of sausage. Directed by Kevin Smith, Lily-Rose stars alongside her father, and Smith’s daughter, Harley Quinn Smith. “I’ve been best friends with her since I was five,” Lily-Rose says matter-of-factly. But it’s in the upcoming Planetarium that she really gets to test her dramatic mettle. This eerie drama set in the Fifties is a French production, partly spoken in English, about two sisters who communicate with the dead. Lily-Rose plays opposite Natalie Portman, and the resemblance is uncanny. Portman was key in casting Lily-Rose. “I knew that she obviously spoke both French and English, which is necessary for the film,” says Portman, calling from Paris. “I said to Rebecca [Zlotowski, the film’s director], ‘Why don’t you meet her and see if she’s

trailing her. “I’m obviously used to the media attention because I grew up with it, but my parents shielded me and my brother as much as they could. It’s only recently that they’ve gotten more interested in the dull things that I do. It’s so uninteresting. I got coffee!” The children of celebrities are usually either over-sharers on reality shows and social media or averse to the limelight. LilyRose falls into the latter category. She may have 2 million followers on Instagram, but she admits, “I’ve really stopped using it in a personal way. I never like revealing too much about myself. Once you start giving people that look into your life, then they just want more and more.” Her work provides a contrast. “When you’re an actor, your job is to be able to morph into different characters and be seen as someone completely separate from yourself. You forget everything and put yourself in that person’s shoes.” Earlier this year, Lily-Rose left her exclusive Los Angeles prep school – she won’t be completing her senior year. Her parents were supportive. “They both left school when they were 15, so they can’t really say anything. You know what I mean? I’ve never thought of university as my goal. I’ve always just wanted to work and be independent. I didn’t have any incentive to

“My parents weren’t very strict. They always trusted me to be independent and make my own decisions” interested in acting?’ – and is good at it, of course. Rebecca was blown away by her talent and her personality.” Lily-Rose also impressed Portman, who adds, “She’s daring artistically. She has a very emotional scene in the film where she has to lose control and she went for it. When I was a teenage girl I was much more self-conscious.” While Lily-Rose may look like a teenager, the way she carries herself belies her years: she’s devoid of any hunched-over, adolescent sheepishness. “I’ve always felt older than my age. I’ve spent a lot of time around adults, and I relate more to them,” she says in a slightly nasal Los Angeles accent, which can switch smoothly to perfect Parisiantoned French. She grew up in both cities but now spends most of her time stateside. It’s where all of her friends live, while her Paris life is centred on family. Just yesterday she was back home in California, as evidenced by various news stories tracking her every move. One insightful headline read: “Lily-Rose Depp makes an afternoon Starbucks stop in LA.” “You can usually spot them in the bushes,” says Lily-Rose of the omnipresent paparazzi

keep doing all that work. I read a lot of books, and I research stuff myself that interests me.” She’s finishing The Catcher in the Rye, and the best book she’s read this year is Haruki Murakami’s Norwegian Wood. Lily-Rose is surveying the lobby. This New York trip is a brief pit stop – tomorrow she will fly to Paris to see her mother. She periodically plays with her necklace, a gold chain with two diamond-encrusted safetypin pendants. It was given to her by “a friend”, but who this friend is, she won’t say. She has been photographed with the 25-year-old model-actor Ash Stymest, and it’s speculated that he is her romantic interest. In many ways, though, Lily-Rose leads a typical teenage life. She taught herself to cook from Pinterest, and is particularly proud of her chilli (“I put chorizo in it to make it spicy”) and cornbread. She listens to “a lot of rap, also Aretha Franklin and Sinatra”, and is, she insists, a homebody. “My parents weren’t very strict,” she says. “They’ve always trusted me to be independent and make my own decisions. There wasn’t really anything to rebel against.” Q “Planetarium” is out next year BRUCE WEBER


“I’ve always felt older than my age. I’ve spent a lot of time around adults and I relate more to them” Smocked net minidress, £1,400, Molly Goddard, at Dover Street Market

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What makes a natural redcarpet style leader? Beauty that shines through, and John Galliano’s lightness of touch Nude embroidered tulle dress, to order, Maison Margiela Artisanal by John Galliano. Cape, stylist’s own

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Ease up on the formality. Exposed bra straps and an unzipped skirt now spell out an easy confidence rather than a fashion faux pas White cotton-jersey and silk top, £1,045. White guipure-lace and silk skirt, to order. Metallic leather belt, £640. Metal charm belts, also on pony, £640 each. All Chanel. Black jersey bra, £29.50, Petit Bateau

BRUCE WEBER

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Eye of the tiger: McQueen’s sylphlike gown belies a fearless attitude Embroidered lace and tulle dress with marabou feathers, to order, Alexander McQueen

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“When you’re an actor, your job is to be seen as someone completely separate – you forget everything and put yourself in that person’s shoes” Fringed minidress, belt and hat, as before

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The best accompaniment to the drama of Christopher Kane’s jetblack gown? Workaday boots This page: embellished satin dress, £2,295, Christopher Kane

“I’ve stopped using Instagram in a personal way. I never like revealing too much about myself” Opposite: silk and lace dress, from a selection, Dolce & Gabbana. With thanks to KelterMalce Antiques, Montauk Yacht Club, the Mercer Hotel, New York. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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An artist of the floating world

Vogue travels to enigmatic Japan to consider the season’s most visually arresting looks. Intricate embroidery, ornate florals and graphic silhouettes come to life against the dazzling backdrop of Honshu. Violet Henderson tells the story behind the shoot

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Photographs by Tim Walker. Styling by Kate Phelan


The industrial flatlands of Matsumoto, in Nagano Prefecture, prove a fertile playground for models Mari and Yubi, dressed as apprentice geishas, to try their hand at operating GEN H-4 helicopters – the smallest in the world Hair: Shon. Make-up: Sam Bryant. Local production: Iino Productions, Tokyo. Production: Jeff Delich at Padbury Production. Printing: Graeme Bulcraig at Touch Digital. Model: Rianne Van Rompaey

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With Yoshito Ohno, a legendary butoh dance performer, dressed as a white rabbit (the Japanese folkloric equivalent of the man in the moon), it’s up to Marc Jacobs’s nosegay prints to create a complementary Alice Silk-mix dress with neck-tie, £3,145, Marc Jacobs. Velvet MaryJanes, from a selection, Christian Louboutin for Jenny Packham

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The twilight zone: dusk falling at the botanical gardens of Yamaguchi House, in Nagano, lends Balenciaga’s ornamental florals and candy-cane tights a surreal charm Crêpe, silk-georgette and stretch-jersey dress, £2,815. Striped tights, £85. Both Balenciaga. Leather ballet flats, £385, Junya Watanabe

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There’s an enchanting parallel between the movement of the butoh dancers and the expressive drapery of Rick Owens’s separates Cotton/silk draped top, £1,166. Matching draped shorts, £737. Both Rick Owens. Dancers: Masaharu Imazu, Yuta Ishiyana, Masashi Nakamura and Barabbas Okuyama

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Louis Vuitton’s athletic circular cut-outs are imbued with new energy in the light of the Japanese belief in the circle as a symbol of divinity and enlightenment Cut-out dress and asymmetric jersey skirt, from £5,500. Patentleather sandals, £760. All Louis Vuitton. Tabi socks, stylist’s own. Geisha models: Chiharu Okunugi and Maaya Yoshiyama

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Rain on me: the finely executed handiwork of Red Valentino’s embroidered tulle feels right at home among rigorously clipped Nagano topiary Embroidered dress, £2,410, Red Valentino. Patent-leather sandals, £760, Louis Vuitton

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Yoshito Ohno, 83, is the son of Kazuo Ohno, a co-founder of butoh. He was dressed for his portrait by his wife and his make-up was applied by his daughter, as is the case when he is preparing for his astounding performances

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owhere else in the world can make a Westerner feel so entirely what it is to be foreign, in all its thrilling, unnerving “otherness”, as Japan. A constitutional empire that straddles 6,800 islands, it is a place of ancient rituals and mythologies, where the Shinto religion imbues nature with life-enhancing spirits, yet bullet trains hover above rails as they hurtle at over 300 miles per hour, conveying a society bewitched by technology. In Tokyo, the largest metropolis in the world, beyond the megawatt strobing of the famous Shibuya crossing, lanterns twinkle along Yokocho’s ramshackle low-rise alleys. Here, 90 per cent of mobile phones made are waterproof, to cater for the populace’s demand to shower with them, while geisha girls in traditional kimonos, their faces painted white, their movements balletic, continue to enthrall. But Japan’s dichotomies are more nuanced than just old versus new; beneath a veneer of manners – bowing has been an established greeting since the year 538 – and colourful traditional dress, there are tattoos, rebellion and counterculture. Tim Walker had never been to Japan before this year, but its dramatic incongruities had long piqued his interest. Months before he landed on Japanese soil, conversations had begun with Vogue contributing fashion editor Kate Phelan on how best to capture “everything that you are feeling about a place. It becomes a challenge, as the whole of Tokyo rises up around you, to bring such a huge vision into a small frame,” recalls Walker in his east London studio, surrounded by the albums of research he makes for each of his stories. Walker concluded that he would discover Japan through people, because “extraordinary people make a good photograph”. But where to find them? Walker’s full-time producer, Jeff Delich, joined forces with Iino Productions, a Japanese company whose job was to scout talent and locations to fit specific requirements: the botanical gardens in which Dutch model Rianne van Rompaey is pictured are neither Japan’s largest or most spectacular, but they are “small, because anything that is built on small human scale tends to be incredibly photogenic.” Occasionally Walker wanted the impossible. Some years before, leafing through The Week magazine, he spotted a picture of an early version of the GEN H-4 by Adeyto, the world’s smallest manned helicopter, made in Nagano Prefecture, selling for ¥30 million (£230,000) mostly as a toy for the very rich. Walker kept the picture, hoping one day to make use of the helicopter. Now he wanted to shoot two, at their factory, operated by two geishas. But to fly the helicopters you need airspace permission, and this was not going to happen. And no geisha (the name means artist and it takes six rigorous years of studying the 230

arts, music, dance and tea-ceremony rituals to lay claim to it) would agree to sit for this sort of photo shoot, governed as they are by strict principles. So Walker needed cranes and pulleys to suspend the helicopters, and models wearing the colourful dress of the maiko (apprentice geishas in the Kyoto region). The production company even found the woman who took the helicopter picture for The Week; she came along to the shoot to watch. Walker was in Japan for two weeks, basing himself in Tokyo; remarkable in an era of fast fashion and even faster photoshoots. Week one he travelled around, meeting the people he would photograph. Week two he spent shooting, all day, every day – the schedule was tight, the distances long. From London, Phelan brought 19 trunks of clothes, brimming with 74 looks, 60 pairs of shoes, 34 pairs of gloves. This is the 28th Vogue story that they have worked on together; Walker says Phelan’s ability to read his scenes and translate them into fashion “is extraordinary and intuitive”. He points to his photographs of models dressed as geishas rising up, peering in, wittily – and a little ominously – through holes cut into the white set, round parasols full splay, the thick raven hair of the traditional geisha wigs clasped into buns. The fashion that Rianne wears here “says something of Japan’s old versus new tension” says Walker. Of course, the images say more besides. In part they are a conscious homage to the American photographer Melvin Sokolsky, who spent much of his career obsessing over the visual power of the circle, in part they reference Japanese thinking and architecture, where the circle is a recurring symbol of enlightenment. And there is something of the Sixties about these studio pictures, a stylisation, a bend in the body: “I wanted to evoke that time when Japan itself was a kind of fashion,” says Walker. Walker had not photographed Rianne before: a 21st-century pre-Raphaelite with auburn hair and wide-spaced eyes, her aesthetic is the perfect foil in its otherness to that which he uncovered in Japan. And besides, “I was bowled over by her. She’s probably the best model I’ve worked with in a very long time,” he says. By chance, Rianne was also ballet trained, useful because the Japan that Walker discovered sprung around the country’s obsession with dance: specifically, butoh dance. Developed during the aftermath of the Second World War, which had heaped human loss, humiliation and occupation on the country, the sinewy chalked-white near-naked practitioners of butoh reject earlier Western and Japanese conventions. The result is a strange, highly charged series of movements, which explores stillness via shaking limbs. Walker shot a clutch of dancers led by Kumotaro Mukai, a maestro, but he also features 83-year-old Yoshito Ohno, whose father, Kazuo, was the one of the two founders of butoh. Diminutive, muscled and melancholic, Yoshito’s > 237

Birds of a feather: Alexander McQueen’s pearlescent eiderdown coat draws out the spectacle of the boudoir Embroidered and quilted satin coat with marabou feather lining, to order. Embroidered tulle slip dress, to order. Both Alexander McQueen


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Comme des Garçons’ silk jacquards mutate into samurai armour when paired with faux-leather sleeves This page: silkjacquard dress, £9,075. Faux-leather sleeves, to order. Both Comme des Garçons. Opposite: printed cotton-mix jumpsuit, to order. Burgundy overalls, £9,075. Sneakers, £575. All Comme des Garçons. Beauty note: channel your inner samurai with fearlessly bold, bright blue brows. Try Max Factor Wild Shadow Pot in Sapphire Rage, £4.99

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Caught in the crossfire: Constance Blackaller’s silk wrap dress holds its own against the chalky drama of the butoh dance troupe, steered by Kumotaro Mukai Hand-quilted silk wrap dress, £3,100, Constance Blackaller. Leather ballet flats, £385, Junya Watanabe

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Even today, Japanese tattoos borrow from its traditional iconography. Gucci’s printed dress is less of a commitment, but just as riveting Printed silk-crêpe dress with pleat detail, £3,670, Gucci. Male model: Yukihide Harada

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performances are odes set to music. In Japan, the Ohno name is legendary. Before Walker photographed the dancers, they performed. “We watched in silence, because you don’t want to over-direct people into doing something they wouldn’t do. Our job, in a way, was to amplify the most beautiful aspects of what they say,” he remembers. It was also to peel back to the veneer of manners and, as Phelan says, “catch a glimpse of Japan’s underbelly”. Nowhere is this objective more successful than in the inky-blue light of the tattoo parlour. There the air is charged with tension, and well it might be: while calligraphy is one of the country’s most celebrated skills, tattoo art troubles mainstream Japan thanks to its historical connections to punitive branding and gangster culture. Tattooed Japanese are not allowed to enter public pools, while in rural areas the sight of them can still inspire fear among the older generation. And yet, Japan’s tattoo artists borrow again and again the typography and aesthetics of ancient calligraphy. Over the past decade Walker’s photography has subtly changed focus: it has turned darker, a little more subversive. “Darkness fascinates me,” Walker says quietly. “I think there is great beauty in darkness.” The photographer read Junichiro Tanizaki’s In Praise of Shadows before the shoot. First published in 1933, this essay – part rumination on architecture, part philosophy – considers Japan’s appreciation of light. “We delight in the mere sight of the delicate glow of fading rays clinging to the surface of a dusky wall, there to live out what little life remains to them,” Tanizaki writes. Walker’s manipulation of light has been thoroughly Japanese, then: this story tells of a world of margins and half-lights, where what lurks in the shadows says as much as that which the light shines on. And straddling the most disturbing margin of all, that shaky, ineffable line that makes us human, is the Geminoid, an unnervingly lifelike robot, created by Hiroshi Ishiguro in his own image. Operating at the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, the Geminoid can read and mimic human facial reactions, walk, sit and respond to simple questions. “He was quite unnerving,” concedes Walker. “To touch, he was cold and rubbery with bones of metal. It is that whole ‘uncanny valley’ concept, which we tend to find very difficult to digest.” But the Japanese find it less difficult, captivated instead by the progress of technology – whether or not that entails human estrangement. Q 237


There is no denying the ceremonial authority of Junya Watanabe’s avantgarde dress, even barefoot on the beach at Kujukuri, in the Chiba Prefecture Laser-cut dress, £1,660, Junya Watanabe

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Turning Japanese: JW Anderson’s leather cape and Jetsons minidress have a Sixties spin that evokes a time when “Japan itself was a kind of fashion”, as Walker puts it White cotton dress with striped hem, £795. Quilted leather capelet, £535. Both JW Anderson

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Twin set: Hiroshi Ishiguro, a leading roboticist at Osaka University, sits beside the Geminoid, the doppelgänger android he made in his own image

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Against the stark futurism of a room riddled with Swiss-cheese holes, Loewe’s pop of red silk feels as vivid as a geisha’s painted lips Layered cotton/silk dress, to order, Loewe. Resin earrings, £185, Giorgio Armani. Rings, £120 each, Uncommon Matters, at Valery Demure. Beauty note: only the sleekest topknot is fit to adorn a geisha. Apply Kérastase Laque Couture, £16, for a flawlessly smooth hold

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Line in the sand: Awake’s floral robe makes a louche contrast with the traditional kimono Red floral-print silk-mix dress, £832, Awake, at Matchesfashion.com

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In the ramshackle Tokyo backstreet known as Nonbei Yokocho – “drunkard’s alley” – Gucci’s silk flounces invite a moment of reflection Pink silk-satin dress with lace flounce and velvet ribbon belt, £3,670, Gucci. Socks, £11, Falke. Leather ballet flats, £385, Junya Watanabe

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Miuccia Prada’s goal this season is “to share with other people, other cultures”. Indulge her vision of a techno vagabond and take to the skies Faille coat, £2,715. Sleeveless faille dress, from a selection. Black jacket, £865. Sleeveless poloneck, £370. Elasticated belt, £115. Faille hat, £250. Rubber sandals, from a selection. Socks, from £105. All Prada. Leather trousers, £945, Sadie Williams. With thanks to Adrian Joffe at Dover Street Market, GEN Corporation, Minoru Asada, Hisashi Ishihara, Osaka University, Mineko Hayashi and Sagami Ningyo-shibai Shimonakaza, Ojoya Yamaguchi, Todoroki, Azumino Tourism Association, Masashi Nagai, Jeremy Joyce, Yu Sakaguchi, Sarah Lloyd, Tony Ivanov, Studio Nana-iro, Iino Studios and staff, and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Tokyo. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Step up to mannish proportions and pair Louis Vuitton’s rippled confection with Giorgio Armani’s generously cut trousers – then let it all hang loose This page: ruffle-trim leather top, from a selection. Ruffle-trim leather wrap dress, £2,480. Both Louis Vuitton. Wool trousers, £700, Giorgio Armani

Hustle and bustle: take a ruffled bustier into day with Carolina Herrera’s bodyswamping trousers and classically proportioned jacket Opposite: crêpe jacket, £1,920. Crêpe trousers, £920. Both Carolina Herrera, at Harrods. Ruffle bustier, from £770, from a selection, Cédric Charlier. Leather sandals, from £640, Céline. Hair: Shon. Make-up: Sally Branka. Nails: Yukie Miyakawa. Digital artwork: Studio RM. Model: Iselin Steiro


Frill SEEKER Ruffles and peplums have always injected fashion with a playful flourish, but this autumn they get a game-changing monochromatic makeover in these striking looks for day. Meet the new tough ruff Photographs by Gregory Harris. Styling by Verity Parker


A change of heir From the Globe Theatre to the British Consulate General in New York to the fields of Glastonbury, the status quo is shifting. Introducing Vogue’s portfolio of the new guard Photographs by Tung Walsh and Skye Parrott

Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh “When that gold medal went around my neck in Rio, it was as if the past 17 years, all the effort and sacrifice of trying to achieve this moment, flashed before my eyes. I was completely overcome with emotion,” remembers Kate Richardson-Walsh, captain of the British Olympic hockey team. The victory was made more singular by the fact that she shared it with her wife of three years, Helen Richardson-Walsh (they combined their surnames when they wed), a midfielder on the 16-strong team. The engaging pair are the first same-sex married couple to have taken part in the Olympic games. Their golden moment was seen as an extra victory for gay women. “It certainly has been something that gets talked about a lot in the press,” says Helen, “and although it seems perfectly normal to us – we’ve been together for eight years – if it helps raise awareness, that’s great. We know just how important that is.” Beyond its personal significance for the pair, the team’s victory helps cement a banner era for women in sport. The couple were themselves star-struck to meet Venus and Serena Williams at the Olympic 254

village in Rio one night: “We swapped our flag pins with them,” says Helen. “It was a ‘wow’ moment!” The dedicated sportswomen started playing hockey at the ages of seven (Kate) and 12 (Helen), met as teenagers and have been together since 2008, making more than 600 international appearances. But what comes after winning gold? “There is enormous emphasis throughout the team on having ‘something else, something to go on to’,” explains Kate, who retired from the Olympic team after Rio. “I’m training to be a coach and Helen, who is still in the Olympic team, is studying psychology. It’s part of our training to think about the future.” The couple are currently playing for a professional hockey club in Amsterdam, where they often take their gold medals to show off to budding hockey stars. “We are very competitive but in a very healthy way,” Kate continues, “there’s no bitchiness in the team; we all have regular group therapy.” But what’s home life like for a pair of Olympians? “We’re both bossy in our own ways,” she grins. FG

HELEN WEARS SLEEVELESS TOP, MO & CO, AT FENWICK. SKIRT, ROKSANDA, AT SELFRIDGES. SHOES, PAUL SMITH. KATE WEARS SHIRT, UNIQLO. STRIPED SKIRT, GUCCI, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM. SHOES, DKNY

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Helen and Kate Richardson-Walsh, photographed at the Bloemendaal Hockey Club in the Netherlands. Hair: Esther van Maanen. Make-up: Ellen van Exter. Stylist: Katie Franklin. Sittings editor: Fiona Golfar

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Héloïse Letissier, photographed at the Old Truman Brewery, E1. Hair: Philippe Tholimet. Make-up: Rebekah Lidstone. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

Héloïse Letissier “The roaring, tiny thing, battling on stage – that’s the real me,” says Héloïse Letissier, 28, sitting in a corner of the Old Truman Brewery, her slim legs folded, head tilted, jaw jutting. “I feel extremely powerful up there. I’m not ashamed to say it – I feel like nothing can hurt me.” There aren’t many pansexual, suitwearing French women in the charts right now. The figure known as Christine & the Queens cuts a striking presence. With her jerky moves, warm synth dance jams, poetic lyrics and androgynous aesthetic, Letissier is the epitome of post-gender, post-sexuality, post-genre pop integrity. Her album, Chaleur Humaine, may have been released in France in 2014, but this summer saw her single “Tilted” explode into British consciousness following a lastminute booking on the Graham Norton Show and a perfectly choreographed set at Glastonbury. Watching her slide across the floor in front of the mirror for the photographer, she certainly embodies a rock star’s bulletproof confidence and charisma. “When I love music, I have to dance on it; when I’m angry, I have to dance as well.” The energy for performance is, Letissier says, like an infatuation. “The only thing that soothes me between gigs is if I’m in love,” she says, looking suddenly serious. “It’s the same state of enchantment. Otherwise I’m just waiting and waiting to get back on stage.” Nell Frizzell

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HELOISE WEARS SUIT, TURTLENECK, NECKLACE AND RINGS. ALL HILLIER BARTLEY, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

aka Christine & the Queens


Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz, photographed at the Mercer Hotel in New York. Hair and make-up: Miguel Lledo

Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz Editor-in-chief of Vogue Arabia If there’s one stereotype about Arab women that Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz cannot abide, it’s that they have a surfeit of money and a dearth of taste. “It’s the absolute contrary,” the Saudi native insists, in her impeccable American English. “Arab women have been couture clients since the late Sixties. They are discreet society women who do not necessarily announce what they spend. It’s considered vulgar to show it off, to be photographed.” Abdulaziz, 41, may be the exception: during fashion week the photographers can’t get enough of her gamine crop and elegant-with-an-edge outfits. The former owner of the members-only D’NA boutique is credited with introducing British designers such as Mary Katrantzou and Erdem to the Arab region, as well as persuading others to adapt their designs by dropping a hem, as Diane von Furstenberg did with her wrap dress, or raising a neckline. This intimate knowledge of Arab consumers makes Abdulaziz well placed to take the helm at Vogue Arabia, which launched digitally in early November and will publish 11 issues a year from March. She says the magazine, published in partnership with Nervora, which also runs Style.com/arabia, will respect traditional Islamic modesty but square it with aspirational fashion, mixing Western labels with the Arab designers, such as Reem Al Kanhal, that she herself wears. The publication will be based in Dubai, and Abdulaziz, being Riyadh-based, will commute by jet. “It’s only an hour away by plane,” she says breezily. EP SKYE PARROTT

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Writer and actress “You have to make an audience feel like they can – and want to – change something about what they are watching. And that might be the thing that galvanises them in the end, that makes them come out of themselves, and say, ‘No! Don’t do that!’” says Phoebe Waller-Bridge, 31. She should know. Since the summer, she has been galvanising hefty audiences both sides of the Atlantic through Fleabag, a comedy she first wrote as a 10-minute sketch, which evolved, via her one-woman show at the Edinburgh Fringe and an Olivier nomination for it, into a BBC series. She plays the titular character who is broken, complicated and hilarious as she regularly interrupts the narrative to ask her audience to laugh at the joke that is her life. Except, like many a Beckett character found before her, it is this acknowledgement – that all she is, and does, is risible – which makes the show profoundly sad. Later in the series, she says, turning to camera, “Either everyone feels this a little bit, and they’re just not talking about it, or I’m really fucking alone, which isn’t fucking funny.” 258

Women have long been isolated on stage. The fact that Fleabag, in all its dark, perverse humour, has been compared by reviewers to Sex and the City, a series so completely different in tone and content, proves just “how small the pond is”, says Waller-Bridge. And the palpable sense of disappointment that skewers Fleabag is the feminist disenchantment of Waller-Bridge’s twenties. Having graduated from Rada “assuming I would be fine because being posh with curly hair basically equals a Shakespearean career,” not only did she “not get a job for two years”, she discovered that, in comedy, where she wanted to be, female roles fell into two categories: “Girl the main guy wants to fuck, or girl the main guy totally does not want to fuck.” Instead of losing herself to either, WallerBridge started the Dry Write theatre company with director Vicky Jones, with whom she now does all her writing – “I write down everything I’ve ever thought of, not really understanding any of it, and she’ll say, ‘What you are trying to do is this…’” While Fleabag developed, Waller-Bridge wrote and starred in another television series, Crashing; appeared in

numerous plays; and “fell in love” with Olivia Colman, whom she met on the set of The Iron Lady and performed with again in Noël Coward’s Hay Fever and the second series of Broadchurch (Waller-Bridge was the ambitious barrister). She ended up writing a part for Colman in Fleabag. “I thought she’d really relish the chance to play that bitch,” she says, looking wicked. Waller-Bridge laughs readily. Hers is a naughty schoolgirl laugh – a bit goofy, a touch dirty – and it is forcible enough to throw her rangy 5ft 10in frame forward. And, as you would hope, she is funny. She says she started dating her husband, director and writer Conor Woodman, after he watched her disrobe in a play which was “all legs and labia”. She would like her style to be “Parisian chic”, but really it’s “unreliable and erratic”, she says, regaling a story about a hat she wore solidly for three years “that no one could bring themselves to tell me how hideous it was because I looked so happy in it.” It is only when I ask her what she does in her spare time that her droll front falters a little, “I don’t really know because… this last year…” She looks incredulous. “It’s been genuinely amazing.” VH

PHOEBE WEARS SWEATER, BELLA FREUD, AT FENWICK. SHORTS, SIBLING. SOCKS, AMERICAN APPAREL. EARRINGS, MAGDA BUTRYM. THANKS TO WEST THIRTY SIX

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Phoebe Waller-Bridge, photographed at Kensal Rise Skate Park. Hair: Karin Bigler. Make-up: Lucy Bridge. Sittings editor: Katie Franklin

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“I assumed I’d be fine after Rada because being posh with curly hair basically equals a Shakespearean career”

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Emma Rice Artistic director of the Globe Theatre

Emma Rice in the props department at the Globe Theatre, SE1. Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Celia Burton. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

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From the verbal parries of Benedick and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing to the men dressed as women pretending to be men, Shakespeare’s plays are powered by sexual politics. Emma Rice, the Globe Theatre’s first female artistic director, hopes to emphasise these themes by bringing women into his plays in fresh ways. For Rice, who came to the Globe in April from the anarchic Kneehigh Theatre company, the traditional Shakespearean formula of 10 interesting men and two women per play is ripe for an update. “That isn’t what you see at home, it’s not what you see on the Tube and we have to make these plays relevant to today,” she says. Rice, whose Globe debut was a production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream featuring gay lovers, hipster fairies and roller skates, wants to bring a democratic, contemporary edge to the timber-framed theatre. Her inaugural season ended this October with Imogen – a retelling of Cymbeline from the point of view of the king’s daughter, Imogen, played by Maddy Hill. “The man who authored these plays and the characters he wrote are no different to the people walking past by the Thames,” explains Rice. “I mean, we’re called the Globe. We have to keep up.” Nell Frizzell


Grace Wales Bonner Designer

Grace Wales Bonner, wearing her own designs, available at Matchesfashion.com. “A sense of intimacy is crucial to how I work,” she says. Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Celia Burton. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard

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In the two short years since her prize-winning Central Saint Martins graduate collection, and at the tender age of 25, the diminutive Grace Wales Bonner has not only sparked fresh excitement on London’s menswear scene, but attracted an ardent female fanbase for her opulent designs. At Men’s Fashion Week, her African craft-meets-couture clothes –wide-leg jeans and velvet suiting scattered with crochet appliqué and hand-stitched pearls – are presented on a cadre of street-cast male models, some of whom go on to become her muses. Shows are themed on her perceptions of male beauty. She was awarded Emerging Menswear Designer in 2014 at the British Fashion Awards and, in June, won the prestigious LVMH prize.Wales Bonner’s designs are the result of deeply personal historical research into her roots. “Being mixed-race plays an important part in my work,” she says. “My connection with Africa and traditional African techniques is a way for me to understand my own history.” Collections have been variously inspired by her Jamaican father, and characters borrowed from history: “I was thinking about Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the Caribbean’s first classical composer,” she says of the inspiration for her s/s ’17 collection. JH 261


Karam Sethi Restaurateur Karam Sethi is changing London’s eating landscape. Working alongside his sister Sunaina (responsible for front-of-house and wine development) and brother Jyotin (who conducts the company’s business affairs), Sethi now commands an empire – JKS Restaurants – spanning eight venues and eating styles, from unfussy fine dining at Indian restaurant Gymkhana in Mayfair, to hotdogand-champagne joint Bubbledogs in Fitzrovia. The siblings spend all their free time “eating, trying new restaurants, going to food markets”, but it’s Karam who has second sight for knowing what we want to eat next. His current feeling is for “authentic, ethnic-style cuisine – anything from Persian to Malaysian”. Citing as inspiration Chris Corbin and Jeremy King, the restaurateurs behind the Wolseley and Café Colbert, Sethi is the equivalent of their younger, punkier brother – pork buns to Corbin and King’s Dover sole – but with the same obsessive focus on quality, service and style. He enjoys the upstart role. “Even with Gymkhana we were doing something young, accessible, fun; somewhere for people to come and have a good time,” he says. His latest innovation is an upscale Deliveroo-style takeaway called Motu – Hindi for “fat man” – soon to be on everyone’s speed dial. If there’s a secret to his success, he says, “The food has to be delicious.” Charlotte Sinclair

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SUNAINA WEARS DRESS, HERMES

Karam Sethi and his sister Sunaina in Gymkhana, one of their restaurants. The Sethi siblings spend all their free time “eating, trying new restaurants, going to food markets…” Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Jessica Mejia. Stylist: Beatriz de Cossio. Sittings editor: Fiona Golfar

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Professor Louise Richardson Professor Louise Richardson heads up the world’s top university. Where others might be tempted to brag – and Richardson, with her 20-year career at Harvard and status as a world expert on terrorism, has much to brag about – instead, her focus is her ambitions for Oxford. “My first aim is to maintain our position,” she says in a soft Irish brogue. “Secondly, I see myself as a modernising influence. I want to challenge the stereotypical image of Oxford as stuffy and elitist. You know, I am fairly different from my predecessors.” No kidding. Richardson is the first woman to assume the VC role in the university’s 800-year history. Born in County Waterford, and the only one of seven siblings to go to university, Richardson was formerly the principal and vice-chancellor at St Andrews University, where she weathered a puerile ban on her admission to the town’s male-only Royal & Ancient Golf Club. “I think the fact that I grew up with three brothers means that I just never accepted the myth of male superiority,” she smiles. In the rarefied world of academia, a rebellious streak has become an asset. “I’ve always felt like an outsider,” Richardson says. “Perceptions are more acute when you have an outsider’s perspective. You don’t take things for granted.” Charlotte Sinclair

“I work in terrorism, so I’m very used to being the only woman in the room.” Professor Louise Richardson in Oxford’s Radcliffe Square. Hair: Alexis Day. Make-up: Caroline Sims. Sittings editor: Florence Arnold

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THIS PAGE: LOUISE WEARS BLOUSE, THEORY, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM. JACKET, ARMANI COLLEZIONI, AT HARRODS. TROUSERS, MAX MARA, AT FENWICK. SHOES, JIMMY CHOO. OPPOSITE: EMMA WEARS DRESS, STELLA McCARTNEY. SHOES, CHURCH’S

Vice-chancellor of the University of Oxford


Emily Eavis Heir apparent to the Glastonbury Festival Emily Eavis’s earliest memory of the festival that her farmer parents, Michael and Jean, founded in 1970 – nine years before she was born – is of people’s knees. “I must have been five or six,” she says. “I remember looking at lots and lots of legs. It was a child’s perspective on Glastonbury,” she smiles. The hippy spirit of those days prevails, yet the scale has altered immeasurably. What started as 1,500 visitors in a field, at a cost of £1 a ticket (including free milk from the farm), has become a behemoth. Glastonbury now sells on average 200,000 tickets a year, hosts 1,400 acts over 100 stages and employs at its peak over 50,000 people. It generates at least £100 million for the local economy. Although Eavis has been involved in organising the festival with her father since 1999, she is increasingly taking over the immense responsibility of producing an epic that’s an integral part of Britain’s cultural landscape. (Rumours that her 81-year-old father is stepping down are, she assures me, premature.) Eavis, her father and her husband, Nick Dewey, oversee a team of 100 to curate the festival’s unique mix of music, theatre, art and food: “The first question I ask myself, whatever the artist or medium, is: will it work for Glastonbury?” As to what Glastonbury should be and the acts it should cultivate, she says the process is democratic: “Everyone contributes ideas.” There is talk of a spin-off visual arts festival at a secret location in 2019. And then there’s the festival’s legacy to secure: “I want it to go forward with the integrity with which it started. Protecting Glastonbury’s values is what’s precious.” And which one act of the incredible live music she has seen over the years will always stay with her? “David Bowie in 2000. It was unbelievable!” FG

“I want Glastonbury to go forward with the integrity with which it started…” Emily Eavis, in the offices of Worthy Farm – where the festival is staged – in Pilton in Somerset. Hair: David Wadlow. Make-up: Rebekah Lidstone. Stylist: Beatriz de Cossio. Sittings editor: Michael Trow

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Jonathan Saunders, photographed at the Diane von Furstenberg Studio in New York’s Meatpacking District. Grooming: Miguel Lledo. Sittings editor: Sarah Harris


Jonathan Saunders Chief creative officer, Diane von Furstenberg It’s a bright, sunny morning after the night before in New York. Yesterday, British designer Jonathan Saunders presented his debut collection for Diane von Furstenberg, which was followed, naturally, by an afterparty. The timing for Saunders’s hangover isn’t ideal; upstairs, 200 colleagues are piling into the showroom for a global sales meeting where he’s due to present his vision for the future of the brand. “Why don’t I ever learn?” he laughs, head in hands. He has a lot to celebrate. After a mere three months, Saunders has turned out a hit collection, taking the house codes of this all-American brand – vibrant colour, easy dressing, all-out femininity – and working them into a modern proposition that every woman wants; from graphic scarf-print spaghetti-strap silk wrap dresses, to floral-print trousers and silky blouses with cascading ruffles. Saunders’s own label was shuttered last year. He was about to launch a furniture line when he received a call from Diane von Furstenberg and her CEO, Paolo Riva. “The fact that print and colour are part of the DNA here really resonates with me,” says Saunders, “but I was at a point in my life where I no longer wanted everything to revolve around work. I worked three jobs just to get through college, I started my line very young, I’d spent my whole adult life chasing this thing, and then you actually get what you’ve been running after and you realise you’re in your mid-thirties – late thirties – and you’ve done nothing except this.” The idea of uprooting his

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life and moving to America to helm a fashion house wasn’t at the top of his agenda. Instead, he agreed to come over to consult – and never went home. “Jonathan’s extraordinary passion for colours and prints, his effortless designs, and his desire to make women feel beautiful make him the perfect creative force to lead DVF into the future,” says von Furstenberg. The feeling is mutual. “Diane believes in clothes built for real life that have a point of view,” says Saunders. “That’s an ethos I’ve always held.” “Real life” equates to clothes for real women, the type of woman who won’t spend the equivalent of a month’s mortgage payments on a pair of trousers. Saunders delivers on that front and more. There’s a new elevation in quality – at no extra cost – that will no doubt appeal to the consumer. “I’ve always struggled with pricing architecture but when you’re working on this scale, you understand how you can manage that and get something accessible but still designed,” he explains. Butter-soft suede jackets in expensive-looking, just-right hues have lambskin cuffs and zips that glide rather than chug along. As for his new life in New York, Saunders already feels remarkably at home. “I live in a cartoon house here – in a cartoon life,” he laughs. “My house is covered in ivy; it’s like living in a tree. Birds flit by the front door every morning,” he says. “What happened to me?” SH

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Antonia Romeo

Antonia Romeo, photographed at home in New York. Hair and make-up: Miguel Lledo. Sittings editor: Jessica dos Remedios

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Antonia Romeo, who holds the impressive title of Her Majesty’s consul general in New York – the first woman to do so in the role’s 241-year history – started her job 10 days after the EU referendum vote. “Someone asked me before I took up the role what impact a Leave vote might have on the position,” Romeo recalls. “I said, ‘Well, if that happens, then my job becomes the most interesting job in government.’” Her remit, as she puts it, is to “run the commercial and economic relationship between the US and UK.” The 41-year-old is now responsible for maintaining the staggering half a trillion dollars of British investment into America and the US’s $588 billion investments into the Britain. A self-declared “numbers geek” with a background in criminal justice, Romeo previously ran economic and domestic policy for “three flavours of government: Labour, Coalition and Conservative”. Her diplomatic skills are well-honed. In the space of a single week post-Brexit, Romeo went from hosting George Osborne’s talks with chief executives to holding a round table for the new foreign secretary, Boris Johnson. Fortunately she has charm and energy in abundance. “I like people and I like numbers,” she says. “This is the best job in the world, actually.” Charlotte Sinclair

SKYE PARROTT

ANTONIA WEARS BLOUSE, BONNIE YOUNG. SKIRT, ERDEM

HM consul general in New York and director general of economic and commercial affairs, USA


The Design Museum Founded in 1989 by Terence Conran and Stephen Bayley – and currently under the directorship of Deyan Sudjic – the Design Museum’s impressive new iteration occupies Kensington’s former Commonwealth Institute building. Opening this month, it is the work of minimalist architect John Pawson. Light streams through huge glass windows overlooking Holland Park and soft white spots pick up the grain of new oak panels below soaring concrete struts. “I wanted to open it up to make it physically and emotionally accessible,” explains Pawson, who, while retaining the building’s distinctive Sixties exterior, has turned the interior into a clean-lined cathedral that’s as much a paean to the power of good design as the exhibitions that it will host. “The idea is that people can nip in and either see all the exhibitions or just go to the loo. I don’t mind.” Three times larger than its previous digs in a converted warehouse on Shad Thames (now the home of Zaha Hadid’s architectural archive), the museum will feature exhibitions devoted to design in all its forms, the first being Fear and Love: Reactions to a Complex World in which Hussein Chalayan and Kenya Hara (the artistic director of Muji) will respond to the challenges facing design today, from climate change to sentient robots. “The primary thing for me is that people feel good in the space and for the stuff to look good,” says Pawson. “It’s complex to make things look simple.” Nell Frizzell

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Desperately

seeking

cleavage


ONCE A PROUD SYMBOL OF SEXUALITY, THE EMBONPOINT HAS FALLEN FROM FAVOUR. BUT ARE WE TO REMAIN BUTTONED-UP FOR GOOD? By Kathleen Baird-Murray

DANIEL JACKSON

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t’s another balmy evening on the terrace at the Chiltern Firehouse, early in September. Five girlfriends, all of us former colleagues, down caipiroskas. Everyone’s dressed differently but stylishly: a crisp white Equipment shirt; a button-through MIH denim dress; a Vetements bomber jacket; a Roksanda maxidress; and one in a Prada-esque corset worn over a T-shirt, with jeans. Our waitress arrives to tell us it’s last orders, and we compliment her on her uniform – the now famous Emilia Wickstead jumpsuit with a cut-out back, form-fitted but somehow fluid, comfortable looking yet sexy in a vibrant jade. Comfort, sensuality, style – sartorially speaking, the Chiltern’s got it all, always has done. But look a little closer, and there’s one – or is it two? – crucial components missing. Not one woman in the entire place is showing even the tiniest amount of bosom. Whatever happened to the cleavage? Remember the Jean Paul Gaultier bra tops? Gone. The Vivienne Westwood corsets that beautifully uplifted even the flattest of chests and allowed the wearer to appear – for one night only – as Nell Gwyn? In storage. Understandable, perhaps, seeing as both had their heyday in the Nineties. But now? On the red carpet, where you might expect to see overspill, all the cool girls are either braless (Alia Shawkat at the Emmys), in a cape (Natasha Lyonne) or striking a pose with one leg thrust from a side split, like Robin Wright. And what about the recent round of catwalk shows? When even labels such as Versus and Roberto Cavalli, usually known for their ample displays, instead send out girl after girl with legs, midriffs and cut-outs on show but no cleavage (at most a sliver of bare clavicle), you know that something’s up. Or more pertinently, not up.

The cleavage – those magnificent mounds pushed together to display sexual empowerment, to seduce, to inspire lust or even just to show off – is over, or at least, taking a well-earned break. The tits will not be out for the lads. Or for anyone else, for that matter. Instead, they are in the white shirt, the Prada underwear-as-outerwear corset, the Roksanda highnecked maxi-dress. As for that denim MIH buttonthrough? Full disclosure: the buttons were done up practically to the top, as the two moon-shaped domes staring back up at me looked a little too eager to escape. (Not really full disclosure, then.) Nor am I alone in suddenly wanting to cover up. A friend emails: “Last night I was going to wear a red Chloé halterneck to a fashion dinner at 5 Hertford Street but for some reason it felt so completely revealing that I had to put on a white rollneck underneath.” Suddenly cleavage feels wrong, and in its place we’re loving the soft chiffon blouses at Chloé; the prim prissiness of Gucci’s pussycat bows and bejewelled necklines; polonecks at Céline and Valentino; the undulating simplicity and sensuality in The Row’s silks and cashmeres. When an item formerly reserved for plumping up and pushing out does meander down the catwalk – the corset, for example – it plays a different role. “Prada’s collection was very much about using old-fashioned cotton corsets,” says Topshop creative director Kate Phelan, “but they weren’t enhancing the bosom; it was more about putting the underwear on the outside, so taking something that’s usually invisible and making it more prominent.” The focus has shifted on the red carpet, too. “Have you noticed how for a while now, the red-carpet pose that’s popular is all about looking over your shoulder?” says stylist Elizabeth Saltzman, who recently put Gwyneth Paltrow in an Emilia Wickstead jumpsuit, and Gemma Arterton in a Ralph & Russo dress that revealed plenty of thigh but no cleavage. “The absence of cleavage has nothing to do with how young or old > 271


Above: Kate Moss at the 2008 Met Gala. Above centre: Eva Herzigova in the 1994 Wonderbra ad. Above right: Gwyneth Paltrow wears Emilia Wickstead, March 2016

HELLO, GOODBYE Two decades of necklines: the highs and the lows

Far left: Emma Watson wears Osman, May 2016. Left: Alicia Vikander in pleated Louis Vuitton at the Golden Globes, 2016. Above: “voluptuous curves seductively encased in a swathe of velvet” – Cindy Crawford wears Dior Couture for Vogue, October 1990, photographed by Arthur Elgort

Left: Helena Christensen, Versace a/w ’94, Milan. Right: Eva Herzigova at London Fashion Week in September

they are. I can’t think of a single person who’s ever asked me for something where they can get their tits out and show them off. And yet I’ve had several who say, “I’d like to show a bit of leg.” Besides leg, they’re showing a perfectly toned back, a honed midriff or a shoulder, all of which have become the conduit for a new type of red-carpet message. “When they’re standing on the red carpet they’re happy to say, ‘Hey, I’ve got a great figure and I’ve worked really hard,’” says Saltzman. “But they don’t need to go, ‘Hey, here are my Dolly Partons for you all to enjoy.’” Actresses aren’t the only ones forsaking the in-your-face charms of the cleavage in order to be taken more seriously. Alex Eagle, whose expertly curated fashion and lifestyle store in Walton Street caters to a demanding fashion-conscious clientele, says she has no calls for cleavage, seeing this in part as a practical response to what’s required of a woman at work. “Most of my clients are businesswomen, and they want clothes that make them feel confident in the workplace, but ultimately they’re dressing for themselves.” It’s not uncommon for new employees in corporate workplaces to be issued with dress codes stipulating that they must not reveal too much. Like it or not, the amount of skin there is on show is an indicator of how little power you really have. Victoria Beckham’s cleavage was on display when she was primarily known for being a footballer’s wife and a pop star – and receded as soon as she became serious about being a designer. “It’s a fine line with cleavage in the workplace,” says designer Emilia Wickstead. “I think it’s important to be natural and comfortable but also to be respectful – to have fun with your own personal style but also to acknowledge and be aware of your environment and what is suitable for it.” Of course, while in some respects that’s progress, it’s also frustrating that in order to be taken seriously, the cleavage has to go. “Why is it still about the tits or the brains,” says stylist turned restaurateur Margaret Crow. “Why do you have to choose a high neckline to be taken seriously?” Working in the restaurant business, she’s continually frustrated by the way male colleagues will listen to what she has to say but then respond to her (male) business partner. “I have days when men will look at my chest before they’ll look at my eyes,” she says, “and I resent the fact that it’s become my problem to take care of.” Having decided a few years ago to stop wearing bras, preferring her natural shape to “being all gussied up and forced”, she argues that if seeing nipples through her top doesn’t bother her, then it shouldn’t bother other people. “I have big boobs,” she says, “and I grew up in Texas, where any reference to


clothes her mother wore – Jil Sander, Giorgio Armani, Max Mara – or what Eagle notes is very much “the flip-side of the Nineties cleavage movement”. She says, “There were a lot of dusty-pink, chocolatebrown silk camisoles, and I remember thinking, ‘That’s how women should dress!’” Phelan agrees that the lack of cleavage is a sign that designers are finding different ways for women of all ages to express their femininity. “It’s more subtle, with designers seeing a blurring of genders and a more fluid sensuality in young women, rather than any over-sexualisation.” Phelan started out in fashion at the tender age of 19 and remembers being on shoots with supermodels such as Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington and Linda Evangelista. “Seeing these girls, who were all the same

Like it or not, the amount of skin there is on show is an indication of how little power you really have

GUCCI

PRADA

CHLOE

age as me, being transformed into these incredibly voluptuous, desirable women was incredible, but the cleavages never looked vulgar; they gave the girls a powerful confidence. Girls who wore Alaïa looked like they could take over the world.” Now, however, it would look dated. Rejecting the stereotypes of gender has been brought sharply into focus, with the days of women as eye-candy, their sexuality positively smouldering rather than subtly played out, officially over. “Now, there’s a mutual respect and equality between boys and girls, men and women, and young women don’t

VALENTINO

ARTHUR ELGORT; AP/PA PHOTOS; PICTURE PRESS/ALAMY; GETTY; REX FEATURES; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

female sexuality or pleasure is squashed, and there’s a lot of slut-shaming. I was always called names at school, and it was assumed I was of the racier sort. It’s bizarre how breasts communicate that more than any other body part.” Art director Lotte Andersen has also given up wearing a bra, in part because of her fear that it makes her cleavage look unnaturally big. “I didn’t like how it made my boobs look,” she says. “Plus, the way that men behave here in London… In New York, I could wear a push-up bra and no one would look at me. Here, if I wear a bra I get hassled because it makes my boobs look bigger and more visible.” That risk of being harassed is something Saltzman takes into consideration when dressing others for the red carpet. “One of the women I’m lucky enough to dress on the red carpet is super chest-heavy, and I try not to focus on that when I dress her,” she says. “But on those occasions where her cleavage is more visible, I see what happens on her Instagram feeds afterwards, and out of 100,000 comments, 90,000 will be about her boobs. That’s not healthy, it’s creepy.” A case in point: actress and model Emily Ratajkowski was heavily criticised on social media for turning up at a New York Fashion Week party wearing a Julien Macdonald dress that left little to the imagination. She responded on Twitter. “Western men in 2016: want to ban women abroad from voluntarily covering themselves at the beach,” she wrote, “then want women to cover up their ‘vulgar’ bodies at home. Who controls women’s bodies in 2016? It’s 2016. Why keep trying to dictate what women can wear?” A few days later at the Emmys she was the epitome of elegance in Zac Posen. But while our motives for less cleavage at work may be about de-sexualisation, or even self-protection, non-cleavage clothes can be every bit as sexy – possibly even more so, expressing eroticism through a sense of mystery. Wickstead’s signature cutouts – which expose the waist and shoulders as opposed to celebrating the cleavage specifically – are a deliberate exploration of female-centred sexuality, drawing attention to hitherto unexplored erogenous zones. “I like to guide the gaze to those parts of the body that have been deemed less sexy than others,” she says. “It’s much more about what works for the individual and their body type, what they want to flaunt and what they choose to conceal.” “From a flat-chested person’s point of view, I don’t lust after cleavage,” says Eagle. “It’s far more elegant, chic and sophisticated to wear clothes that skim what’s natural and real rather than shoving them upwards and outwards.” As a child she admired the

see themselves as gay or straight; they just want to experience everything,” says Phelan. The decline in overt sexualisation on the catwalk has in turn prompted a demand for more natural-looking breast implants. “The excesses of the Eighties and Nineties meant that cleavage gained popularity,” says cosmetic surgeon Patrick Mallucci, who has been championing a more natural-looking breast implant with great success. “My patients would talk about augmentation, saying they wanted to look ‘natural’,” he says. “But they were thinking of how they’d look fully clothed, or in a bikini – in other words, cleavage – and that’s not how the breast looks in its natural state.” Mallucci, who has a poster of Kate Moss on his office wall (lest we forget, her perfectly pert breasts were once the model for a champagne glass – in fact, is there anything that Moss isn’t the poster girl for?), talks them out of anything unnatural looking. “It’s not about stuffing a couple of footballs in there – no one likes those, and you stretch the skin and ruin the breast tissue.” His braless implant is the opposite of the forced cleavage look that dominates breast-implant surgery. “It’s such a liberating procedure because you restore the breast into a more pert position either with a lift or an implant or both, and it’s amazing – you can wear a T-shirt without a bra.” Equally, the days of Wonderbra padded cups and uncomfortable wiring may be on the wane. (Also spotted at the Chiltern, Wonderbra’s erstwhile face and bust Eva Herzigova, wearing a high-neck, buttonedup white shirt.) Net-a-Porter reports its sales of soft-cup bras are now the top-performing products within the lingerie category, making up over half of their total bra sales; while at Selfridges it’s the CK bralette that is the biggest seller, along with pretty lacy halterneck styles from Free People and Daydream Nation, which are designed to be worn with a plain white shirt or simple top, revealing subtle lace details. “It’s almost as if women are refusing to buy into the sexy image that dominated media campaigns in the lingerie industry for so long,” says Perrie Reynolds, the buyer for Body Studio. But before we all burn our bras, take note. Currently on display at the Barbican’s Vulgar exhibition is an 18th-century stomacher, a stiff triangular panel worn over the breasts and extending to the waist. Heavily adorned with embroidery, pearls and jewels, this particular “bra”, which was designed to raise the breasts and make the waist look smaller, transitioned in and out of fashion several times in the late 1700s. In other words, it may be in a museum for now, but the cleavage, that magnificent, fun-loving, good-time-girl of a bustline, never disappears for long. Hello, girls. Q 273


NEW

masters Pearls are adding a modern, painterly lustre to winter dressing Photographs by Julia Hetta

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Shell seekers: gunmetal-grey orbs spiral up a rose-gold Hermès cuff From left, pearl necklace with diamond clasp, price on request, Louis Vuitton. Pearl, black-diamond and rubellite drop earrings, price on request, Chopard. Baroque pearl and diamond ring, price on request, Van Cleef & Arpels. Black-diamond and three-pearl ring, £41,300, De Grisogono. Pearl, morganite and spinel ring, £19,000, Cartier. Grey Tahitian pearl and white Akoya pearl bracelet, price on request, Hermès. Set design: Max Bellhouse. Digital artwork: Björn Weidinger. Jewellery editor: Carol Woolton

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Diamonds and pearls: the essential components of a 21st-century masterpiece From left, white-gold, pearl and diamond cuff, price on request, Chanel Fine Jewellery. Akoya pearl and diamond necklace, £24,900. Matching bracelet, on tray, £12,400. Both Tiffany. Diamond earrings with pearl drop, price on request, Boghossian. Pearl ring with pavé-diamond surround, £10,500, Mikimoto. Blackened-silver and white-gold earrings with pearls and diamonds, price on request, Nadia Morgenthaler. White-gold and pearl earrings, £9,000, Yoko London

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Modern art: young masters Kova and Sabba work pearls into dazzling contemporary compositions From top left, Akoya pearl collar with diamonds, price on request, David Morris. Golden pearl ring, £7,000, Solange Azagury-Partridge. Pearl, diamond, spinel and pink-sapphire long necklace, price on request, Chaumet. Baroque pearl rings, both price on request, Alexandra Jefford. Tahitian pearl and pavé-diamond globe pendant necklace, £22,500, Saqqara, at Browns. Jade, pearl and diamond ring, £12,400, Kova. Gold, pearl and diamond brooch, £18,000, Jojo Grima. Pearl and diamond fan-shaped ear clips, price on request, Sabba, at Symbolic & Chase. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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HUGOBOSS.COM


VOGUEbeauty What’s your

GAME FACE?

PERFECT PARTY MAKE-UP MAKES YOU FEEL AS GOOD AS YOU LOOK. VIOLET HENDERSON SHARES THE TRICKS t this time of year, another indistinct festivity finished, as I stand before a mirror, removing my make-up the wrong side of midnight, I always think of Jonathan Swift’s exquisitely twisted poem “A Beautiful Young Nymph Going to Bed”. As the “nymph” perches beside her dressing-table, Swift makes a ghastly inventory of all that went into her game face earlier that night: “Now, picking out a crystal eye, / She wipes it clean, and lays it by. / Her eye-brows from a mouse’s hide, / Stuck on with art on either side, / Pulls off with care, and first displays ’em, / Then in a play-book smoothly lays ’em.” The

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

a

powers of party make-up can be considerable. The run-up to Christmas is the season for it, as skin – sun-starved, heat-blasted, frost-bitten and exhausted in equal reddening measure – becomes less and less pretty the deeper it ventures into December, which says nothing of make-up’s well-known power to dispel social insecurities and turn party talk that bit more fluent, more coquettish, less plain awkward. And yet party make-up is not stage make-up. Nor is it an armour, or a mask, or any of those tired metaphors that suggest extreme coverage. At its best, party make-up conveys the most romantic version of yourself, be she gregarious

and wild – like Sharon Stone as the sassy, golden, lip-lined Ginger in Casino – or a beguiling wallflower, as was Leslie Caron’s transformed Gigi, pale as porcelain with big batting lashes in a white winged dress designed by Cecil Beaton. Model Jacquetta Wheeler, who always looks picture-perfect at parties, keeps her game face evolving by watching make-up artists at work backstage at the shows. “I love asking them questions and learning from them. Occasionally I’ll get an idea – a new eyeshadow shape or a lip colour I haven’t tried before. But it’s rare that I take a strong look off the > 281


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“Lips should be full and lip liner invisible – precision is key” posting online video tutorials, there is so much information out there for people to update their look.” For fail-safe impact this season, Harrington suggests the attractive strategy of emulating the high-octane glamour that Italian model Bianca Balti paraded on the Cannes red carpet earlier this year: a composition of butterfly lashes, precise eyeliner flicks, strong red lips, soft eyebrows, and cheek bones illuminated and flushed with a creamy blush. “This is a celebration of natural female beauty,” says Harrington, “and a celebration of women taking centre stage and being strong.” Heady words – who can resist partying with a cause? – but you need

to do a bit of preparation in the skin department first, with gentle peels, serums and illuminators: this time of year turns faces dull from dehydration, and this look is grounded in beautiful skin. “What you want to create is a see-through veil of foundation, transparent enough to see freckles beneath,” says Harrington, who recommends either Shiseido Perfect Refining Foundation or Estée Lauder’s new Cushion Stick, applied all the way down your neck should your décolletage be on show. There should also be an element of colour-matching with your fashion: if you are wearing red, rim your eyes in copper (Chanel’s Stylo Yeux in Ardent); if you are wearing dazzling diamond and emerald earrings (as Balti did at Cannes), tone down your lip shade – you don’t want to start a competition. “It is all about conveying an attitude,” is, in the end, make-up artist Mary Greenwell’s verdict, delivered with her special brand of rapid-fire enthusiasm. “For me the best night-time looks

DIOR

runway and wear it in real life because it’s probably not very ‘me’ – unless of course, the party is fancy dress. I went to a party as a punk recently and I got very smudge-happy with Charlotte Tilbury’s Colour Chameleon eyeshadow pencils.” If you happen not to be opening the shows next London Fashion Week, “there is still no excuse not to try out new make-up,” says Amanda Harrington, whose at-home beauty service In Parlour gets Poppy Delevingne ready for her near-constant carousing. “Make-up is so good right now, it has never been easier to try new products. And now that makeup artists such as Lisa Eldridge and Charlotte Tilbury – and Vogue – are

LOUIS VUITTON

VOGUEbeauty

GAME-FACE ICONS

BRIGITTE BARDOT And God Created Woman (1956)

LESLIE CARON Gigi (1958)

SHARON STONE Casino (1995)

suggest hedonism, and no one style does so better than the swinging Twenties and Thirties.” But Greenwell is not suggesting that we rush to fashion our hair in finger waves and buy drop-waist dresses, saying, “I mean this in the specific terms of the dark mouth of the era, which is now so of the moment.” On the autumn/winter runways, plum pouts glowered at Louis Vuitton and Erdem, while over at Dior, lacquered lips in deep claret drew attention. “This season it is all about focusing on one feature. Lips should be full and lip liner invisible – precision is key.” Everything else is quiet; skin is luminous, “but absolutely not contoured,” insists Greenwell. “We are pulling away from that.” Eyes are neither lined nor shadowed, “but, unlike the models wearing this look on the catwalk,” she adds, “do use lots of mascara. No eyes at all is not flattering”. What could be sexier, more suggestive of heady sophistication and late-night shenanigans than big beestung lips in foreboding shades? And yet, think of this: the other week I sat opposite a woman at dinner who looked pristine in that polished European way that always makes me feel unkempt and English. Her Chloé blouse was creaseless, her hair as reflective as a flat pond on a bright day, and her crimson mouth entrancing. > 283


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THE NEW PARTY ESSENTIALS SOAP & GLORY SUPERCAT CARBON BLACK EXTREME EYELINER PEN, £6 LANCOME CUSHION HIGHLIGHTER, £28.50

MAC STUDIO EYE GLOSS, £16

CHANEL STYLO YEUX WATERPROOF LONG-LASTING EYELINER IN EROS, £19

MAX FACTOR FALSE LASH EPIC MASCARA, £11.99 BOBBI BROWN SHEER COLOUR CHEEK TINT IN SHEER PINK, £19.50

STILA MAGNIFICENT METALS EYELINER IN METALLIC VINTAGE GUNMETAL, £24

BURBERRY SHIMMER DUST IN GOLD, £20 SISLEYA LE TEINT ANTI-AGING FOUNDATION, £98

GIVENCHY MISTER BROW GROOM, £17.50

MARIO TESTINO; PIXELATE.BIZ

Then she took a sip of champagne, and make-up. A lot of make-up looks her myth unravelled in messy lip marks good in photographs, and I’m vain. on her glass. I spent the entire evening So vain that I don’t switch it up, mesmerised by her mouth’s steady however much I would like to try leakage, on to her fork, above her top bleaching my eyebrows for a night, lip, on to her front teeth. Greenwell is or dusting my cheekbones with sensitive to this issue and firm in her a constellation of golden glitter, advice: “You absolutely cannot do the as Anna Ewers wore for a May dark mouth at dinner. It is oh so uncool 2015 French Vogue disco shoot, to have that glass bearing the mark of photographed by Inez & Vinoodh. your mouth sitting in front of you Habit is, as Samuel Beckett for everyone to see. This is a look grizzled, “the great deadener”. for cocktail parties, where no one is Like all of life’s extravagances, looking at what you are drinking, and party make-up should not be rushed. there is plenty of opportunity to nip Harrington takes an hour to get away and re-apply.” clients ready to frolic. Illustrator Fin But it seems that no matter how Fellowes, who paints her face as willing we may be to change our expertly as she does her bespoke fashion to accommodate every kind stationery, is adamant that this time of party, often even the suggestion is not wasted. “There’s something of slightly altering what we wear on very meditative about the ritual of our faces induces anxiety. There is make-up,” she says. “These days psychology behind this. In our youth everyone finds it increasingly difficult we experiment with trials and travails to switch off completely, and I love the through garish eyeshadow misapplied opportunity to drift off as I mindlessly and too much bronzer and blush. daub, dab and blend. Some of my Thankfully, youth is forgiving, because most important decisions are made in it is full of promise, a time when front of the magnifying mirror.” getting ready for the party exceeds Of course, the best parties are those even the fun of the party itself. Then, where you forget that you are wearing of course, we get older, and hit on a make-up. And the best make-up is make-up formula or reference, and the sort that will last however long the that is such a relief because we party does. Or even through to the next suddenly realise how dodgy everything day. For this year’s March Vogue cover we applied with a brush was before shoot, Edie Campbell arrived on set and we know that it will no longer be having slept in her make-up from a so. For me that moment came when, party the night before. And she looked aged 17, I watched Brigitte Bardot so good, Mario Testino shot her like sashay through Roger Vadim’s 1956 that – smudged, distressed, just right. Q And God Created Woman and, like many before me, I fell in love. Her huge kohl cat eyes and mountains of messy blonde hair appealed to my own look. More than a decade on, it still does. The more anxious I am about a party, the more extravagant my eye-liner flick; there is safety in that flick, and by now I’m pretty expert at executing it. I’ve established my own set of rules: I know that the thicker the dash of top liner, the smaller your eye appears beneath it; that the longer you wing out the liner, the more widely spaced your eyes appear; and that the higher the contour, the more the eye is lifted. Above and beneath the liner Edie Campbell I smudge a rainbow of photographed by black with a finger. Pale blue Mario Testino, eyes can take a lot of March 2016


ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

E VE RY G R E AT H A I R STORY S TA R T S H E R E MOROCCANOIL T R E AT M E NT AND M OROCCA N OIL TREATMEN T LIGH T: T HE ULT I M AT E F OU NDAT I ON F O R A L L H A I R C A R E A N D S T Y L I N G INFUSED WITH NOURISHING ARGAN OIL


VOGUEbeauty

New season’s GREETINGS New year, new regime… Grace Timothy tracks down the people, places and soon-to-be-cult buys for 2017

MAKE MATTE PALETTE, £20

THE MODELS TO WATCH… KAIA GERBER Still only 15 years old, but set to be the next model royalty. Daughter of Cindy Crawford, muse of Marc Jacobs Beauty DS & DURGA ITALIAN CITRUS EAU DE PARFUM, £98

PAUL BOWDEN

American idols New York hipster brand Make – multi-use make-up for millennials – is coming to Britain at the end of the year. Keep an eye out for the Custom Finish Effects Matte/Dew palette (£20) for touch-ups, and the Moonlight Primer (£40), a gel cream that protects skin from the damaging effects of artificial light. Another New York original, Brooklyn’s cult perfumery DS & Durga, launches its 11 distinctive scents at Liberty this month. Rose Atlantic is the salty twist on a classic that we’re awaiting with bated breath. Makebeauty.com; Liberty.co.uk

CAMI MORRONE Friends with Kaia, Cami is famously athletic and already signed to Victoria’s Secret Pink

INKA WILLIAMS A Bali-based beauty, with doll-like looks and an Instagram to drool over

Nailed it If you like your manicures bright, give new Fitzrovia nail salon Colour Riot a try. And if you’re in LA, check out Olive and June, right, in Beverly Hills. It shot to fame offering manicures at Chanel’s “I Love Coco” pop-up at Bar Marmont in February, and the Laurel Canyon-vibe nail art is cool and relaxed rather than blingy. Products are now in the pipeline, and looking even further ahead, founder Sarah Gibson Tuttle has her sights set on London. Colourriotnails.co.uk; Olivejune.com

CLAUDIA GOULD Brit girl as comfortable on the runway as she is hitting the festival circuit


VOGUEbeauty

SOAPER DUPER ZESTY LEMON BODY LOTION, £8.50

CLEAN CONSCIENCE Brands on a mission are making waves in the beauty world, and they don’t get more purposeful than Soaper Duper, the brainchild of Marcia Kilgore (of Bliss Spa fame). This is a great, hardworking bath-and-body line with an emphasis on ethical sourcing and packaging, plus a donation to Water Aid and Clean the World projects. Available at Liberty

Step change

Taking the minutes Hayo’u is a new online wellness programme masterminded by acupuncturist Katie Brindle. The one-minute relaxation techniques are easy to slot in to your day, and we love the products, which combine Chinese medicine with a no-nonsense British approach. It’s also worth checking out Indian-inspired brand Uma for relaxing oils and massage tools, which come with instructions for DIY acupressure and breathing techniques, helping to calm your mind and bolster your skin’s natural repair processes. Or if insomnia is your bête noir, try Uma’s aromatherapeutic Pure Rest Wellness Oil, out now (£60). Hayoumethod.com; Cultbeauty.co.uk

Hot on the heels of this summer’s Korean-inspired splash masks, we segue into the latest K-beauty craze: step masks. The country’s skincare regimes are more comprehensive than the average European’s, and the three adjoining sachets usually contain a cleanser or prep solution, a serum to treat and finally the mask itself. Try Holika Holika’s Pig-Nose Clear Black Head 3-Step Kit (£4.50), or its Golden Monkey Glamour Lip 3-Step Kit (£8.50) to exfoliate, plump and hydrate lips. Thisisbeautymart.com

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@OMGBART He’s a male-grooming obsessive, but with some interesting insights into products for women, too. Great on face masks

JOSH OLINS; PAUL BOWDEN

@SKINOBSESSOR A cheerful New York-based twentysomething skincare guru who’ll talk you through everything from morning cleansing routines to the best bathtime skin rituals

BEAUTY INSTAGRAMS TO FOLLOW NOW…

@BEAUTYBYTHEGEEKS This group of science graduates are on a mission to debunk the beauty industry

HOLIKA HOLIKA PIG-NOSE CLEAR BLACK HEAD 3-STEP KIT, £4.50


Give glamorously ’Tis the season to be fabulous – indulge in the most gorgeous and glitzy gifts this Christmas

hether looking to spoil someone special, or indulge in a few winter comforts of your own, give the gift of beauty this Christmas with Boots. It’s every girl’s one-stop shop for favourites including Real Techniques, whose make-up brushes are loved by Vogue beauty editors for their tapered tips and luxurious design, and Soap & Glory, whose sassy bath and body products are always a failsafe festive hit. For those who love a bit of glitz and glamour, there’s a vast

w

array of premium gifts from luxury labels such as YSL Beauté, which means there really is the perfect gift for everyone.

Boots is every girl’s one-stop Christmas shop with cult beauty favourites Other Christmas treats loved by beauty insiders include the No 7 Classic Beauty Collection (a carefully crafted edit of the must-have make-up for a showstopping look) or the Smashbox Lipstick

and Lip Mattifier set, showcasing six shades of its pigment-packed, hydrating formula and a mattifying top coat to switch up the finish – making it everything a true lipstick-lover could wish for. Festive delights don’t stop with make-up: there’s also luxurious botanical beauty treats from Liz Earle, at-home spa indulgences from Champneys and cosy winter coffrets from Jack Wills. With so many beauty treasures to choose from, Christmas has never looked so good… Q


VOGUE PROMOTION

REISS LUXURY WASH BAG, £25

REAL TECHNIQUES BOLD METALS COLLECTION 100 ARCHED POWDER BRUSH, £22

Divine scent Let Boots take you on an olfactory journey through fine fragrance this season. Here are a few recommendations…

GIORGIO ARMANI SI EAU DE PARFUM, £69.50

SMASHBOX LIGHT IT UP LIPSTICK AND MATTIFIER SET, £25

REAL TECHNIQUES BOLD METALS COLLECTION 301 FLAT CONTOUR BRUSH, £22

NO 7 CLASSIC BEAUTYVANITY BAG, £45

YVES SAINT LAURENT BABYDOLL MASCARA SET, £25

YVES SAINT LAURENT MON PARIS EAU DE PARFUM, £68

YVES SAINT LAURENT BLACK OPIUM EAU DE PARFUM, £66

Getting personal Nothing feels as luxurious as unwrapping a one-of-a-kind, specially made present; this year Boots is offering a very special in-store engraving service, allowing you to create truly bespoke gifts for that extra element of luxury. Select from a choice of fragrances, make-up compacts and brushes and have your own personal message engraved as you wait, for a gift that truly says: I’m yours. See the Boots Emporium Store Locator on Boots.com for engraving services; charges apply

LANCOME LA VIE EST BELLE EAU DE PARFUM, £64


VOGUEbeauty JOHN FRIEDA FRIZZ EASE 10 DAY TAMER, £12.99

PANTENE PRO-V AIR-LIGHT FOAM CONDITIONER, £3.99

OUAI HAIRCARE TREATMENT MASQUE, £25 FOR EIGHT

The home STRAIGHT YOU CAN NOW ENJOY UP-TO-THE-MINUTE SALON TECHNOLOGY AND FORMULATIONS WITHOUT LEAVING YOUR FRONT DOOR, FINDS LOTTIE WINTER

t

hink you can’t emulate salon is permanently plugged in beneath hair at home? Think again. You the Vogue beauty desk.) Babyliss has just have to believe – and also launched a Diamond Heated invest in a few key bits of kit. Smoothing Brush (£80), which uses First, you need to get to grips ceramic, fin-shaped bristles to detangle with heated brushes, those Eighties and straighten, while ion-releasing favourites that have had ports fight off frizz. a 21st-century makeover. If you prefer a traditional Finally, Dafni – the name belies blow-dry, up the ante if all else with Dyson’s much-talkedits cutting-edge technology – is a new ceramic fails, let the about Supersonic hairdryer straightening brush (£140) (£299.99): it definitely that uses heat-dissipating salon come lives up to the hype. Use it with a root booster and bristles to leave hair salon to you you’re pretty close to salon straight (softly smoothed out rather than poker-like) and perfection. Label M Texturising Volume damaging it less than if it were clamped Spray (£13.50) is so good that you’ll between ceramic plates, as with have to wash your hair the next day or conventional straighteners. (If further risk waking up with ultra-bedhead hair proof were needed of its efficacy, ours (not necessarily a bad thing). A gentler

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ONIRA ORGANICS THE OIL, £42

L’OREAL PROFESSIONNEL TECNI ART WILD STYLERS NEXT DAY HAIR, £11.95

option is L’Oréal Professionnel Next Day Hair. As an extra precaution, use a hybrid spray that covers all bases, from frizz-fighting to body-building to shineboosting. Our favourites are Redken One United Multi-Benefit Hair Treatment (£12.75), Philip Kingsley PK Prep Perfecting Spray (£18.50) and Shu Uemura Straightforward Time-Saving Blow Dry Oil (£24). But salon-worthy hair isn’t just about the styling. It has to look, smell and feel expensive, too. Start with the shampoo. Or rather, don’t start with the shampoo – start with the conditioner. Tresemmé’s Beauty-Full Volume range is a “reverse system” of hair care, which means you use the conditioner before the shampoo, so hair stays bouncier for longer. In addition, Pantene’s new Foam Conditioner is air-light, “to condition without the weight”. And for the ultimate salon scent, Ouai Haircare’s elegant products, created by chic Los Angeles hairstylist Jen Atkin, leave hair looking and smelling as luxurious as the most lavish treatment. Finally, if all else fails, let the salon come to you. Perfect 10, our go-to mobile beauty site, offers wet, dry or up-do options. Dry By, the New Yorkinspired hair and nail salon, has just launched a new luxury at-home service – at the moment reserved for loyal customers and premium hotels – taking a homely and comfortable experience to the next level. As for colour, Gina Conway Privé offers a full range of to-your-door services, from the obligatory pre-colour patch test to a full head of highlights, all performed by expertly trained colourists. Or, of course, there’s always Gucci’s silk headband – frankly the chicest hair-disaster saviour we’ve ever seen. Q

VENETIA SCOTT; PIXELATE.BIZ

REDKEN HEATCURE PACKETTES, £25 FOR FOUR


VOGUEbeauty

JUSBOX BEAT CAFE

VILHELM PARFUMERIE SMOKE SHOW

ROJA PARFUMS VETIVER

MON CUIR BY RAMON MONEGAL

APSU BY ULRICH LANG

£130, at Selfridges

£145, at Liberty

£225, Rojaparfums.com

£130, at Harrods

£75, at Liberty

“It’s quite a light fragrance; it might be ‘beat café’ inspired but it’s not smoky and dingy. It’s got a vanilla overtone. I think it would be quite easy to wear” PB

“I was a bit worried by the idea of cigar smoke but, actually, it’s quite fresh. It would be a good bet to buy for someone as it’s masculine-smelling and fairly safe” PB

“An obvious classic – this was my favourite. It is easy to wear, and it lasts. In my job I mostly photograph women’s scents, which I always try. This borders on feminine; it’s very elegant. If I were given this, I’d be thrilled” PB

“Unusual and unexpected, it’s very reminiscent of wood. The more you wear it the more you get to like it” PB

“This is weird. It smells like cucumber or cut grass but it dries into something less obvious and more wearable. This would be a good choice for someone who is really fascinated by scent” PB

“It definitely feels like someone in a Sixties kaftan has just wafted past. I like that there are lots of different smells going on. Very bohemian, but I’m not sure it’s my thing” JC

“I really like the tanned, leathery, smoky thing that’s going on here. It might be good for someone who doesn’t always wear fragrance as it’s quite subtle and understated” JC

“A blockbusting men’s scent. You’d wear this and feel invincible” JC

“Quite a hefty one – dark and mysterious. If you wandered into a furniture shop in Jaipur, this is what it would smell like – sandalwood cupboards. It’s a bit heavy for me” JC

“Not unpleasant. A real hit of cucumber, peppery celery and a sharp appley sort of thing. You’d wear it in the daytime, going out for a nice summer lunch” JC

“This is boozy; almost edible. Every time I held it to my nose I smelt something different, the cognac eventually smoothing out and becoming more stoned” SS

“This claims to be one for smoke-filled rooms, and I agree – but more Mayfair than Harlem. My favourite part was the pink pepper, which came through half an hour after application. This, to me, is a safe buy, but there are affordable alternatives that smell very similar. That said, it stands out for its longevity” SS

“Bold but wonderful. As often happens, the vetiver really brings out the alcohol, before lending it a comforting, earthy character with a citrus twist. And although it’s not intended as a young man’s fragrance, I’d consider it a go-to from the latter half of summer until the end of the year” SS

“This opens with a strong hit of spice and fruit, but some initial sweetness is quickly taken over by a serious – possibly too much so – leather base note. I’d recommend it if you were looking for a unique fragrance, but it’s certainly not a safe bet” SS

“I’ve never smelt anything like this. It describes itself as ‘the greenest scent ever made’. The opening smells exactly like damp cut grass, but it quickly turns into something more textured. I felt that this was too concept-driven – a well-executed experiment, but not something you’d really want to wear” SS

MALE order

THE PANEL

PAUL BOWDEN Beauty still-life photographer

JAMES COCHRANE Backstage beauty photographer

SAM SPIKE Student

THIS CHRISTMAS, BUY A MAN A FRAGRANCE HE’LL ACTUALLY LIKE BY HEEDING THE VIEWS OF THREE OF THE VOGUE BEAUTY DESK’S FAVOURITE MALE FRIENDS AND CONTRIBUTORS…

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VOGUEbeauty TOM FORD TOBACCO VANILLE CANDLE Tom Ford’s first ever candle range is this year’s must-have accessory for your home. £165

CHANEL No 5 THE BODY OIL The newest body product in the No 5 range, and by far the most glorious. (We suggest you avoid excessive gifting envy by buying one for yourself, too.) £62 ROUGE DIOR LIPSTICK IN MONTAIGNE MATTE Dior has produced its first matt lipstick range, sending us all into a spin. Festive colour of the season: Montaigne Matte. £26.50

BOURJOIS PALETTE LES NUDES This neat eye compact comes with a large mirror and a handy 360-degree swivel base, so you’re guaranteed to create the perfect angle. Great stocking filler. £11.99

SENSATIONAIL POLISH TO GEL TRANSFORMER STARTER KIT This clever kit (which includes an LED lamp) allows you to turn any nail polish into a chipresisting gel. £49.99

Opening CEREMONY IN YOUR GIV E THE BEAUTY ENTHUSIASTS RESS. IMP LLY REA L LIFE A GIF T THAT WIL ON NST JOH D NAL BY FLORA MACDO

PAUL BOWDEN; PIXELATE.BIZ

MICHAEL VAN CLARKE No 1 BRUSH Do not be fooled by the rather boring appearance – the perfect combination of stiff and soft bristles has got beauty insiders talking. £24.50

FACE GYM PRO DIAMOND FACETED FACIAL FITNESS TOOL Face Gym caused a real stir when it launched in Selfridges last year. Now you can boost its face-firming benefits at home with this sleek gadget. £399

THISWORKS SCENT WELL PORTABLE DIFFUSER For bad sleepers/jet-lag sufferers. This brilliant portable aromatherapy diffuser will boost mental wellbeing and energy. £55

JO MALONE LONDON GERANIUM & WALNUT HAND CREAM Jo Malone’s Geranium & Walnut range is already a firm favourite, but this addition means it’s quite the chicest hand cream to gift. £22

CLEAN RESERVE SMOKED VETIVER EAU DE PARFUM For perfume addicts who are also ecologically minded, Clean Reserve makes sustainable fragrances that you can layer and mix to create unique scents in your home. £79 297


VOGUEbeauty SCAMP & DUDE SWEATSHIRT, £32, AT LIBERTY

CLEAN COCKTAILS Vogue contributing editor Calgary Avansino suggests the healthiest drinks for the party season DESIGNATED DRIVER What to drink when you’re not drinking? Seedlip is a distilled non-alcoholic spirit to mix with tonic. Serve the Spice one with a red grapefruit twist, and the Garden one with sparkling water and a cucumber ribbon. From £27.99, Seedlipdrinks.com

BEAUTY SUPERHERO When beauty-industry executive Jo Tutchener Sharp survived a brain tumour last year, she resolved to put her years of experience with brands such as Tom Ford and Estée Lauder to good use and launched her own children’s range. Scamp & Dude includes super-cute clothes and two cuddly “superheroes” (with space for a photograph of loved ones) that kids can use as comforters when their parents are away. For each one sold, another is donated to children’s charities. At Liberty and Scampanddude.com

JENNA’S SKINNY LEMON

Jenna Zoe (founder of Upcakes) says she created Jenna’s Food & Drink because “the biggest challenge to eating healthily is social situations.” Skinny Lemon, with Sicilian lemon juice and stevia, works well as a mixer or on its own. £2.10, at Selfridges ESSENCE OF LIME WOOD

Take your lead from Lime Wood Hotel in the New Forest, which has created special “clear conscience cocktails” for Christmas: • 3 parts Lime Wood tea • 2 tsp agave syrup per serving • 1 part Seedlip Garden 108 • Jax Coco coconut water (to taste) Brew a strong pot of Lime Wood tea (a blend of peppermint/camomile/dandelion/burdock/red clover) with the agave syrup and allow to cool. Add the Seedlip and a splash of Jax Coco to taste. Serve in a teacup and saucer, ideally vintage, garnished with a mint sprig, lavender stick and rosemary stick bound by twine as a herbal teaspoon.

Beauty BITES WHAT TO TRY AND WHAT TO BUY THIS MONTH

EARLY DOORS We randomly chose December 17 (OK, it’s the birthday of a member of the Vogue beauty department) in order to gauge the spoils from this year’s selection of advent calendars. Here’s what we found behind the windows… DECLEOR ADVENT CALENDAR, £60 DIPTYQUE ADVENT CALENDAR, £250, AT SELFRIDGES

THE BODY SHOP ADVENT CALENDAR, £99

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LIBERTY LONDON ADVENT CALENDAR, £149

L’OCCITANE ADVENT CALENDAR, £42

CLARINS ADVENT CALENDAR, £95

WALTER PFEIFFER; PAUL BOWDEN

COWSHED ADVENT CALENDAR, £85

JO MALONE ADVENT CALENDAR, £280


Š Quentin Blake

Buy our specially drawn Quentin Blake Christmas Cards and support Survival International Visit www.survivalinternational.org/shop

Survival International is the global movement for tribal peoples’ rights

UK charity no. 267444


VOGUE INFORMATION IN THE USA: CONDÉ NAST Chairman Emeritus: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. Chairman: Charles H. Townsend President & Chief Executive Officer: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. Artistic Director: Anna Wintour IN OTHER COUNTRIES: CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Nicholas Coleridge Vice Presidents: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert, Elizabeth Schimel Chief Digital Officer: Wolfgang Blau President, Asia-Pacific: James Woolhouse President, New Markets and Editorial Director, Brand Development: Karina Dobrotvorskaya Director of Planning: Jason Miles Director of Acquisitions and Investments: Moritz von Laffert GLOBAL President, Condé Nast E-commerce: Franck Zayan Executive Director, Condé Nast Global Development: Jamie Bill THE CONDÉ NAST GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES: US Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, Condé Nast Entertainment, The Scene, Pitchfork UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes International, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, Vogue Travel in France, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Bambini, Glamour, Vogue Sposa, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, Vogue Accessory, La Cucina Italiana, CNLive GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Myself, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico and Latin America, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE: BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure PUBLISHED UNDER LICENCE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION: AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, Vogue Collections, Self, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W, GQ Style MIDDLE EAST Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall, GQ Bar Dubai POLAND Glamour PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ ROMANIA Glamour SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style THE NETHERLANDS Glamour, Vogue THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, La Cucina Italiana, GQ Style, Glamour UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev

The merchandise featured editorially has been ordered from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you phone to make sure they have your size. In case of difficulty, contact Vogue’s Merchandise Department (020 7499 9080). Where unspecified, stockists are in London or general enquiry numbers are given.

& Other Stories Stories.com A Acnestudios.com Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Alexandrajefford.com Alexeagle.co.uk Apple Watch Hermès Apple.com Arjumandsworld.com Asceno.com Atelier Swarovski by Rosie Assoulin Atelierswarovski.com Attiliocodognato.it Attpynta.com B Balenciaga 020 7317 4400 Benoitmissolin.com Bloomandwild.com Boghossian 020 7495 0885 Brownsfashion.com Bulgari 020 7297 4440 C Cartier.co.uk Casadei.com Cashmereinlove.com Cedric-charlier.com Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel Fine Jewellery 020 7499 0005 Charlottechesnais.com Chaumet 020 7495 6303 Choosingkeeping.com Chopard 020 7287 8710 Christian Louboutin for Jenny Packham 0843 227 4322 Christopher Kane 020 7493 3111 Coach 020 7479 7940 Comme des Garçons 020 7518 0680 Comptoirdescotonniers.co.uk The Conran Shop 020 7723 2223 Constanceblackaller.com Cosstores.com Courreges.com Covet by Stella & Dot Stelladot.co.uk D Davidmorris.com Degrisogono.com Dior 020 7172 0172 Dkny.com Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680 E Elizabethandjames.com Ellis-brigham.com

Emporio Armani 020 7823 8818 Erdem 020 3653 0360 F Falke.com Fendi 020 7927 4172 Fenwick.co.uk Finerylondon.com G Ganni.com Gestuz.com Gianvito Rossi 020 7499 9133 Gigi & Tommy 020 3144 0900 Gigiburris.com Giorgio Armani 020 7235 6232 Giuseppezanottidesign.com Gucci 020 7235 6707 H H&M Hm.com Harrods 020 7730 1234 Harvey Nichols 020 7235 5000 Headporter.co.jp Hemmerle.com Hermès 020 7499 8856 I Ilborro.it Isabel Marant Etoile 020 7499 7887 Isabellatownsley.com Italiaindependent.com J Jimmy Choo 020 7493 5858 Jojo Grima 07900 590123 Junya Watanabe 020 7518 0680 J-w-anderson.com K Kate Spade New York 020 7287 1581 KG Kurt Geiger Kurtgeiger.com Kovajewels.com L Lagunab.com Lanvin 020 7491 1839 Loewe 020 7499 0266 Louis Vuitton 020 3214 9200 M Maison Margiela Artisanal by John Galliano 020 7629 2682 Manolo Blahnik 020 7352 8622 Marc Jacobs 020 7399 1690 Marni 020 7245 9520 Masterdynamic.co.uk Me & Em 0845 680 0975 Mikimoto 020 7399 9860 Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Moncler.com Monologuelondon.com Mr & Mrs Italy Mmi.it N Nadia Morgenthaler, Geneva 00 41 22 312 12 57 Nativeunion.co.uk

Thenewcraftsmen.com Next.co.uk O Openingceremony.com Oscar de la Renta 020 7493 0422 P Pamelalove.com Pandora.net Papier.com Paulsmith.co.uk Penelopechilvers.com Pentreath-hall.com Perfectmoment.com Petit-bateau.co.uk Prada 020 7647 5000 Preenbythorntonbregazzi.com R Rag & Bone 020 7730 6881 Redvalentino.com Repetto.com Rick Owens 020 7493 7145 Rimowa 020 7629 8131 Riverisland.com S Sadiewilliams.co.uk Saint Laurent 020 7493 1800 Sandro-paris.com Scotch-soda.com Selfridges.com Solange Azagury-Partridge 020 7792 0197 Stowlondon.com Stuartweitzman.com Stubbsandwootton.com Swarovski.com Symbolicchase.com T Tarajarmon.com Threegraceslondon.com Tibi.com Tiffany 0800 160 1837 Tom Ford 020 3141 7800 Topshop.com U Uniqlo.com Urbanoutfitters.com V Valentino 020 7235 5855 Valerydemure.com Van Cleef & Arpels 020 7493 0400 Vibivenezia.it W Whistles.com Y Yoko London 020 7589 1564 Z Zanzan.co.uk Zara.com Zarahome.com

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301


VOGUE’S TRAVEL GUIDE

EDUCATION •

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Oia, Santorini Island 84702 Cyclades, Greece La Perla Villa & Suites is a luxury boutique hotel situated in the heart of Santorini, Greece. Located on the renowned caldera of Oia, each cave house or villa boasts unobstructed views of the stunning volcano and Aegean Sea below.

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An impressive waterfront address

Luxury 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments and penthouses. PHASE I NOW COMPLETE There’s no location quite like this. The ocean sits at your feet, the sky sweeps from wall to wall, and that’s only the beginning at Brighton Marina. Promenades offer bars, restaurants and shops aplenty, ensuring that your lifestyle is befitting of your exquisite apartment. A new life or a second home, an apartment in this tastefully designed collection is the perfect investment.

85% NOW SOLD Secure your viewing:

01273 921 167 or visit: www.brighton-marina.com

• • • • • • •

New marina view apartments now released 24 hour security Available now for sales and lettings Shops, restaurants and bars in close proximity Europe’s largest marina London Victoria just 51 minutes away by train Gatwick Airport 30 minutes away by train


ADVERTISING FEATURE

A SPECTACULAR RESIDENCE READY TO MOVE INTO

W

ith apartments in Goldhurst House ready to move into this year, Fulham Reach by St George offers the ultimate lifestyle at this thriving new waterfront development. The regeneration of a former distillery, Fulham Reach capitalises on an exceptional riverside location overlooking Hammersmith Bridge and the famous Harrods Furniture Depository. Set in beautifully landscaped gardens with a selection of on-site shops, cafés and restaurants, Fulham Reach also offers residents a host of leisure and entertainment facilities at the Tamesis Club, a luxury lifestyle club featuring a 16 metre swimming pool and spa, fully equipped gymnasium and a virtual golf simulator giving residents the opportunity to play on some of the finest courses in the world. If you prefer to sit back and relax with friends there is also a 12 seater private screening room to watch everything from Hollywood releases to major sporting events and a wine cellar to host your own private wine tasting evenings or store your personal collection. Set on the riverfront at Fulham Reach is Goldhurst House, a stunning glass building with floor to ceiling windows and wraparound balconies

For further information or to book your personal appointment contact:

+44 (0) 20 3773 6851 enquiries@fulhamreach.co.uk Fulham Reach Show Apartment and Marketing Suite Parr’s Way, Distillery Wharf, London W6 9GD www.fulhamreach.co.uk

offering panoramic views towards the River Thames and the landscaped gardens of Fulham Reach.

Apartments available from £1,999,950* Computer generated images are indicative only. *Price correct at time of going to press.

Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies


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condenastjohansens.com Grandes Alpes Private Hotel & Spa, France


PICTURE YOUR HOME P I C T U R E

M A R Y L E B O N E

If you can picture living in a luxurious, beautifully appointed apartment at The Chilterns, on Chiltern Street in the heart of Marylebone Village, you’ll understand why there are only three apartments remaining. After all, you’re only moments from boutiques, galleries and world-class dining; in addition, you’re minutes from Mayfair and the Regent’s Park - and within The Chilterns itself, you have your own private art gallery, five-star concierge, spa, gym and cinema. So discover The Chilterns – and picture yourself living the perfect luxury life in Marylebone.

thechilternsw1.com

For more information about The Chilterns or to arrange a private appointment, please contact Oksana d’Offay on +44 (0)20 3770 2100 or email oksana@thechilternsw1.com


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Stunning new Show Home open daily London Square Chigwell Village is a stunning gated development of individually designed four and five bedroom family homes. Set back from the road around a beautifully landscaped central park, each house benefits from a spacious driveway. Open plan kitchen, living / dining areas, with bi-fold doors to private terraces and gardens, create the ideal space for entertaining. Further reception rooms are complemented by large double bedrooms, luxurious bathrooms and sumptuous master bedroom suites. Every house enjoys the highest specification; Siematic kitchens with granite worktops and integrated appliances to underfloor heating as standard. Five bedroom houses from ÂŁ1,075,000

To arrange an appointment please call 0333 666 0103 The Sales Suite and Show Home, Chigwell Grange, High Road, Chigwell, Essex IG7 6BF, open daily.

0333 666 0103

www.londonsquare.co.uk

External computer generated image depicts London Square Chigwell Village and is indicative only. Details and prices are correct at time of going to press, September 2016.


mind’sEYE You will always find a great piece of Murano glass to collect at L'Angolo del Passato, my friend Giordana Naccari's gallery in Venice

ALANUI CASHMERE CARDIGAN, £2,110, AT NET-A-PORTER. COM

ATTILIO CODOGNATO SKULL RING, TO ORDER

Codognato jewellery represents the excellence of Venetian creativity

ARJUMAND'S WORLD SWIMMING SHORTS, FROM £105

Marcantonio Brandolini THE ARTIST REVEALS WHAT’S INSPIRING HIM NOW

LAGUNA B GLASS CUP, FROM £76

When you really want to appreciate Italy’s beauty and food, the Boscareto Resort & Spa in Piedmont is perfect – especially in autumn

FREDERIC MALLE VETIVER EXTRAORDINAIRE, £120, AT LIBERTY

Designed by my mother 25 years ago for Laguna B, the Goto series makes my home look warm and intriguing because every cup is different

VIBI VENEZIA VELVET SLIPPERS, FROM £55

ITALIA INDEPENDENT SUNGLASSES, £193, AT MAVERICK & WOLF

Mattaccino Lab is a restaurant on a traditional Venetian boat, with contributions from young chefs from around the world. You sail around the lagoon as you eat. Info@mattaccino venice.com

COMPILED BY NAOMI SMART. TOMMASO CAZZARO

DAYS GONE BY (NEVER ENOUGH EDITION), THE DEBUT ALBUM BY BOB MOSES

This scent makes me feel I'm home wherever I go


dior.com - 020 7172 0172

La Mini D de Dior Satine Steel, diamonds and mother-of-pearl


VOGUE - December 2016