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EXTRA EDITION SAG PREVIEW

PETER TRAVERS

“INTIMATE

AND EPIC.

A SIMPLY STELLAR PERFORMANCE BY AMY ADAMS.” KENN NETH H TURA R N

“DEEPLY HEARTFELT AND EMOTIONAL. ‘A R R IV VA L’ IS S E X P E R T LY R E A L I Z E D B Y D I R E C TO R D E N I S V I L L E N E U V E .

B IA BR IAN AN TR TRU UITT UI T

“OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD AMAZING. ‘ARRIV VAL’ IS A BEAUTIFUL AND THOUGHT-P PROV VOKING FILM. A M Y A DA M S DE E L I V E R S O N E O F H E R BE E S T PE E R F O R M A N C E S, AND DENIS VILLE ENE EUVE PUTS A GORGEOUS AND RIC CH NARRATIV VE on screen thaat’s as mucch about misscom mmunication amongg humanns as itt is communicaationn with exttraterrrestrialss.”

NOVEMBER 17, 2016

F O R YO U R C O N S I D E R AT I O N I N A L L C AT E G O R I E S

DIRECTED BY DENIS VILLENEUVE | SCREENPLAY BY ERIC HEISSERER PARAMOUNTGUILDS.COM

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“BECKINSALE MAGNETIZES THE SCREEN coolly imbibing one of the most satisfying screen roles of her career.”

“A TRIUMPH.

A master class on the art of comic timing, in its filmmaking and acting.”

“THE BEST, most ENTERTAINING

performance of Kate Beckinsale’s career.” “Kate Beckinsale tosses off Jane Austen’s dialogue with IMPECCABLE comic timing.” “Kate Beckinsale is

BRILLIANT!”


INSIDE Gray’s Gold

18

Facetime

28

Sag Preview

30

Actor Preview

37

Actress Preview

49

NEWS BRIEFS

OVERHEARD

HBO Orders Second for Three

“I would love to work with fitness, with that department.”

HBO has given second season pickups to its trio of new fall series — fantasy drama “Westworld” and comedies “Insecure” and “Divorce.” The renewals are a welcome relief for HBO and its new programming president, Casey Bloys, after a tough year in which HBO suffered a big miss with the period drama “Vinyl,” amid internal changes. “Westworld” in particular had a lot riding on its success as HBO looks to restock its drama series bench with its tentpole original “Game of Thrones” now heading into its final two seasons, starting next summer.

DuVernay’s ‘Time’ Has Been Set

BLOYS: MARION CURTIS/STARPIX/SHUTTERSTOCK; DUVERNAY: GILBERT FLORES/VARIETY/SHUTTERSTOCK; WINKLER: GREGORY PACE/BEI/SHUTTERSTOCK; WALLER-BRIDGE: BFA/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; HARDY: RICHARD YOUNG/SHUTTERSTOCK; PARSONS: BROADIMAGE/SHUTTERSTOCK; INHUMANS: JIM CHEUNG FOR MARVEL

N T ITOR A GE DEIX T O P B» IELXLTIRN A EDITION

Disney has set Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time” for release on April 6, 2018. The time-travel tale stars newcomer Storm Reid, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Zach Galifianakis, Chris Pine, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, and Mindy Kaling. Jennifer Lee, who wrote and co-directed “Frozen” with Chris Buck, is penning the adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s book for Disney. Shooting started last week in Los Angeles. DuVernay came onboard the adaptation in February.

ANTONIO SABATO JR. On his possible role in the Trump administration

ABC, Imax Join Forces for ‘The Inhumans’ ABC has ordered a new series, “Marvel’s The Inhumans,” based on the classic comic-book characters, in partnership with Imax. Under a production, marketing and distribution agreement with the theater chain, a version of the first two episodes of the live-action series will premiere in Imax theaters next summer. ABC will then debut the weekly hour-long drama on TV the following fall. The series will be produced by Marvel Television in conjunction with ABC Studios.

LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA On his songwriting role for Disney’s “Moana”

“I had big shoes to fill.” MILES TELLER On playing boxer Vinny Pazienza in “Bleed for This”

PLAYERS

“She had to stay much more public than I’ve ever been.” NATALIE PORTMAN Commenting on playing Jacqueline Kennedy

Lionsgate Puts Parks in its Sites Lionsgate and Madrid-based leisure center specialists Parques Reunidos are developing facilities based on Lionsgate brands including “The Hunger Games,” “Saw,” “Now You See Me,” “Orange Is the New Black” and “Nashville.” The companies said they plan to open the centers in hightraffic shopping areas. Parques Reunidos is negotiating the development of 20 such centers over the coming years; the company oversees 62 parks in 14 countries.

“I was so thrilled and surprised by how much collaboration goes into it. You’re working with unmatched visual storytellers.”

The Producers Guild of American will honor Irwin Winkler with its 2017 David O. Selznick Achievement Award.

BBC America has greenlighted series “Killing Eve” from Phoebe Waller-Bridge.

Tom Hardy’s eightepisode series for FX, “Taboo,” will makes its debut Jan. 10. Hardy also produces.

Jim Parsons is in talks to star in feature “Brother Orange” from Warner Bros. and Buzzfeed Films.

“It was one of the most beautiful things I’d read in a long time and something about it just felt so difficult. Like, ‘How are we going to do this?’ ” AMY ADAMS What she was thinking when she read the “Arrival” script


“A STIRRING DRAMA. ANDREW GARFIELD

GIVES A FIERCELY

DRIVEN PERFORMANCE... A DEEPLY MOVING PORTRAIT OF FEARLESS, SELFLESS HEROISM.

HE IS THE FILM’S

ANCHOR, ITS MORAL COMPASS AND ITS CONSIDERABLE HEART.”

“A HUGELY ENGAGING PERFORMANCE

BY VINCE VAUGHN.”

“VINCE VAUGHN, TERESA PALMER, RACHEL GRIFFITHS AND HUGO WEAVING

GIVE SOME OF THEIR

BEST WORK

EVER ON SCREEN.”

“ANDREW GARFIELD’S BEST PERFORMANCE

OF HIS CAREER TO DATE.”

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A CAST IN A MOTION PICTURE ANDREW GARFIELD | SAM WORTHINGTON | LUKE BRACEY | TERESA PALMER | VINCE VAUGHN OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE SAM WORTHINGTON | LUKE BRACEY | HUGO WEAVING | VINCE VAUGHN

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE TERESA PALMER | RACHEL GRIFFITHS

OUTSTANDING ACTION PERFORMANCE BY A STUNT ENSEMBLE IN A MOTION PICTURE LionsgateAwards.com


“ANDREW GARFIELD

IS CAPTIVATING.”

CONSIDER THIS

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

ANDREW GARFIELD


F O R

Y O U R

C O N S I D E R A T I O N

Lily Tomlin

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES

For additional information please visit our website at fyc.netflix.com


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- PETER TRAVERS, ROLLING STONE

“...LIVEWIRE COMEDY THAT

SNEAKS UP AND

GRABS YOU...”

nk u p , y t r e b i l their d n a m e h t ’ “Liberty...F

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(14;174%105+&'4#6+10+0#..%#6')14+'5+0%.7&+0)| BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY AND BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

CLORIS LEACHMAN

For more on this film, go to www.isthatagun.com


Contenders 11

BLUE HEAVEN

Lupita Nyong’o, who made a huge impression on the 2014 Oscar red carpet, worked with stylist Micaela Erlanger.

RED CARPET READY

Today, Stylemakers Are New Starmakers Cutting-edge stylists are essential partners for brand-friendly thesps

A

CLAIRE COGHLIN

MATT SAYLES/INVISION/AP

@coghlinclaire

t the outset of awards season three years ago, few people had heard of Lupita Nyong’o, a former production assistant who’d made her feature film debut in the historical drama “12 Years a Slave.” Within months, the actress had won an Oscar, become the new face of Miu Miu and Lancôme, graced the cover of Vogue

and topped best-dressed lists the world over. The architect of her rapid rise to red carpet fame was stylist Micaela Erlanger, who says the profession has never been more pivotal in the birthing of a star. “The power of styling can quite literally shape an actress’ public persona and affect the trajectory of her career,” Erlanger says. “When our clients step out onto the red carpet, those images are disseminated, immediately, to millions and millions of television sets, computer screens, and mobile devices. These moments, and the reactions to these moments — both positive and negative — can have a ripple effect into many facets of her career.”

The power of styling can quite literally shape an actress’ public persona and affect the trajectory of her career.” MICAELA ERLANGER

Both on and off the screen. “It’s not just professional dress-up, it’s so much more,” Erlanger says. “We’re the dot connectors between the brands and the talent. We put talent on brands’ radars and are responsible for cultivating and fostering those relationships that often lead to bigger things.” Namely, lucrative deals with such brands as Miu Miu, Lancôme, and Tiffany & Co. — which recently tapped Nyong’o to become one of the first celebrities ever to star in its Legendary Style campaign. But who are the new power brokers? Variety highlights nine stylists lending their power to Hollywood’s brightest stars.


12 Contenders they dress. Emma’s got a great wit about her and she’s very smart. She admires fashion and is very much entertained by it and spirited when it comes to it.” In contrast, “Amy’s got this amazing beautiful classic look, but I really love to bring out a modern edge to her, too.”

Petra Flannery

“Lupita and I got on the same page very early on,” says Erlanger of Nyong’o’s 2014 Oscar campaign. “We had a very clear direction and then it evolved from there. I was working hard to do the best styling job I possibly could; she was working hard to work that carpet and promote a film she was proud of. It was just really good synergy.” Indeed, it was synergy that brought the pair together in the first place, through Michelle Dockery, Erlanger’s first client as a solo stylist. “[Nyong’o and Dockery] worked together on a film called ‘Non-Stop,’ ” Erlanger says. “Michele knew that Lupita had this movie coming out and she asked if I’d be interested to meet her friend, and I said, ‘Of course!’” Erlanger also put Dockery on the fashion map by way of a stunning Alexandre Vauthier Couture gown at the 2013 Golden Globes. “That’s the power of being a stylist — we have the ability to influence and shape someone’s personal image and brand on a very public level,” she says. Erlanger also works with Meryl Streep, who cut a super stylish swathe through Rome during that city’s film festival in October, Hilary Swank, Jennifer Hudson, and Jared Leto, as well as Marc Jacobs muse Winona Ryder, plus Wonder Woman Gal Gadot.

With Oscar buzz already swirling around Emma Stone (for “La La Land”) and Amy Adams (“Arrival” and “Nocturnal Animals”), Flannery is gearing up for a busy awards season. It’s nothing new to the stylist, who also counts Claire Danes, Zoe Saldana, and Gwen Stefani among her clients. “It’s definitely a competitive field,” says Flannery of the pressure to constantly up the ante. “My clients are at the top of their field. They take on these daring roles and I want to do that for them with fashion.” The stakes are higher than ever before. “Today, fashion and film have all merged, and the actresses are doing campaigns and covers and so they have to be good at it all,” she says. “I’m just part of this big business.” Flannery sees her role as being a “connector” who inspires both parties. For example, a coffee date arranged between an actress and a designer during a trip to Paris might lead to a friendship that might lead to an ad campaign. “You never know what can happen — we all get inspired by each other,” says Flannery, who’s been working with Stone since the actress was just 19. “The beauty of working with someone that long, almost 10 years, is that you get to know them really well, and over the years you draw out this personality in the way that

Today, fashion and film have merged, and the actresses are doing campaigns and covers and so they have to be good at it all.” PETRA FLANNERY

The Red Carpet’s Most Transformative Moments BY CLAIRE COGHLAN

LUPITA NYONG’O In 2014, the “12 Years a Slave” star crowned a glorious red carpet season — and cemented her style icon status — when she won the Oscar wearing a Prada gown she co-designed with her stylist Micaela Erlanger.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE The “Silver Linings Playbook” star won the 2012 actress Academy Award in a Dior Haute Couture gown, which she tried on for the first time that morning, earning a place on Oscar’s bestdressed list.

Leslie Fremar What do Charlize Theron, Julianne Moore, Reese Witherspoon, and Jennifer Connelly have in common — apart from a stylist and Oscar statuettes? “They’re all very smart, very savvy, very independent women, who are very strong,” says Fremar, who advises young stars to not get too sidetracked by the glitz and glamour of the red carpet. “It’s become a huge part of the job in terms of promotions and recognition and contracts and all that stuff.” Fremar’s clients enjoy enduring relationships with such brands as Dior (Theron), Louis Vuitton (Connelly), and Chanel (Moore). “It’s part of the puzzle now and it’s definitely important, but I don’t think you have to participate in order to have a successful acting career.” Fremar believes the role of a stylist is to ensure that her clients can focus their attention on their craft. “I think it’s important for new girls coming up in the business to recognize that it’s crucial to have this team that

NATALIE PORTMAN In 2011, the “Black Swan” star, pregnant with her first child, redefined maternity style at the Oscars in an ethereal purple gown by Rodarte.

ANNE HATHAWAY Although the “Rachel Getting Married” nominee didn’t take home the Oscar in 2009, she certainly

won the best-dressed prize in an iridescent Armani Privé column adorned with Swarovski crystals.

SHARON STONE Stone redefined red carpet glamour when she paired a Gap button-down she plucked from then-husband Phil Bronstein’s closet with a lilac Vera Wang evening skirt at the 1998 Academy Awards.

LAWRENCE: RICHARD KENDAL/BAFTA/SHUTTERSTOCK; PORTMAN: MATT BARON/BEI/SHUTTERSTOCK; HATHAWAY: JIM SMEAL/BEI/SHUTTERSTOCK; STONE: DAVE LEWIS/SHUTTERSTOCK

Micaela Erlanger


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST DIRECTOR

BEST ACTOR

BEST ACTRESS

JEFF NICHOLS

JOEL EDGERTON

RUTH NEGGA

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY JEFF NICHOLS

++++.”

Ann Hornaday, THE WASHINGTON POST

“‘Loving’ is deeply romantic and irresistibly human.” Ben Dickinson, ELLE

“Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga give performances that will be talked about for years.” Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga are superb.” Chris Nashawaty, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

Written and Directed by JEFF NICHOLS

© 2016 BIG BEACH, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ARTWORK: © 2016 FOCUS FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

For more on this film, go to www.FocusFeaturesGuilds2016.com


14 Contenders

and Cox’s — reach. “It’s a constant process of researching designers from around the world, emerging and established and everywhere in between, who are willing and excited to work with us.” Pacelli sees herself as an image consultant. She also dresses “OITNB” actress Jackie Cruz, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’s” Lauren Adams, and “Transparent’s” Trace Lysette. “I mean, these are artists who have visions for their future,” she says. While Cox hasn’t yet inked any deals with designer brands, Pacelli hints that it’s only a matter of time. “I can’t say too much about that yet, but certainly her brand is expanding at a really rapid pace.”

Christina Pacelli Three years ago, Pacelli was introduced to relatively unknown actress Laverne Cox. “Ever since, it’s been fireworks and unicorns and rainbows,” says Pacelli of her client, who became the first-ever transgender person to be nominated for a primetime Emmy award (for “Orange Is the New Black”). “I mean, how many non-sample size transgender actresses — who’s also a social figure and pioneer — are in this position to work with high fashion brands and push the fashion boundaries?” Pacelli dresses her statuesque, 5-foot, 11-inch client in custom creations. “Laverne is not a sample size, so we have to creatively work to dress her,” says Pacelli. She found plenty of supporters early on. “There were designers off the bat like Marc Bouwer and Ports 1961, who are big advocates for the transgender and LGBT community, and loved what Laverne was doing.” Since then, the stylist has actively expanded her —

over the past three years. “It happened organically,” says Reilly. “When we shot the video for ‘PrimeTime’ with Miguel, she wore a skirt and crop top, and then when ‘Yoga’ came out, we did this athleisure kind of vibe, but keeping it in the same color palette. And now, moving forward into this acting lane, it’s a completely different world, and we’re really excited.” Reilly is also the force behind Hailey Baldwin’s explosion as a supermodel and Instagram superstar this past year. “Hailey hired me two days before the Oscars and then five days later I got on a plane and went to Paris fashion week with her, and we’ve been inseparable ever since,” she says. Baldwin, who’s got a line of cosmetics on Modelcocosmetics.com, has just launched a footwear collaboration with British brand Public Desire. It’s impossible to underscore the role of a stylist. “I honestly think it’s everything. Not to take away from someone’s talent — clearly their talent has to shine through, but our responsibility is to help it shine.”

Maeve Reilly How many transgender actresses are in this position to work with high-fashion brands and push the fasion boundaries?” CHRISTINA PACELLI

With two of her films already generating awards buzz — “Moonlight” and “Hidden Figures” — Janelle Monáe is about to become an awards season red carpet fixture. Her stylist relishes the challenge. “Janelle’s never really worn a gown, it’s definitely new for us both,” says Reilly of the singer who’s famous for her signature black and white suiting. “I respect so much of what that means to Janelle and the branding behind it, and I never ever wanted to change that.” Reilly has subtly softened Monáe’s look

NICOLE KIDMAN Arriving on the arm of then-husband Tom Cruise, Kidman took a chance on a chartreuse creation by newly minted Christian Dior designer John Galliano at the 1997 Oscars. Her gamble paid off, and she raised the bar for red carpet style.

ELIZABETH HURLEY The relatively unknown British

actress became an overnight sensation after accompanying then-beau Hugh Grant to the premiere of “Four Weddings and a Funeral” in 1994 wearing the now infamous Versace “safety pin” dress.

CHER Long before J. Lo flaunted her curves in that sheer, plunging Versace number at the Grammys, Cher

Law Roach At just 20 years of age, Zendaya Coleman is a force to be reckoned with. She not only takes on fashion — she just launched her

stunned onlookers at the 1987 Academy Awards in a Bob Mackie art decoinspired creation that spawned the advent of the “naked” dress.

GRACE KELLY One of the most enduring style icons of all time, “The Country Girl” star — later to become Princess Grace of Monaco — accepted her Academy Award in a creation

by fabled eighttime Oscar winning costumer designer Edith Head in 1955.

AUDREY HEPBURN Hepburn, one of the first stars to establish a relationship with a fashion designer, had her longtime collaborator Hubert de Givenchy alter her costume from “Roman Holiday” to accept the actress Oscar in 1954.

KIDMAN: CHRIS PIZZELLO/AP/SHUTTERSTOCK; HURLEY: RICHARD YOUNG/SHUTTERSTOCK; CHER: JIM SMEAL/WIREIMAGE; KELLY: AP/SHUTTERSTOCK; HEPBURN: AP/SHUTTERSTOCK

works really hard for you.” She’s been working with Connelly and Moore for more than a decade. “When you jump around to different stylists and you don’t have that rapport, it can fall a little short,” says Fremar, who’s forged such strong relationships with the world’s top fashion houses that her clients wear mostly custom-made pieces.


“Hailee Steinfeld’s performance is

raw and breathtaking.” – Jenn Ficarra, BUSTLE

“Ever since her big-screen debut in 2010, playing Mattie Ross in True Grit, Hailee Steinfeld has gathered confidence as a performer and The Edge of Seventeen is

her breakthrough. She’s a fantastic actress, with a sharpness and verve that belies the catlike softness of her features. She’s like the young Elizabeth Taylor, with playful flexing eyebrows that italicize her every thought. Even when she’s just tossing off lines, Steinfeld makes Nadine a hellion you can’t tear yourself away from. She isn’t just the star of The Edge of Seventeen —

she’s its center of gravity.” – Owen Gleiberman, VARIETY

“This is Hailee Steinfeld’s

best performance since True Grit.” – Matthew Jacobs, THE HUFFINGTON POST

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EDGE of Seventeen

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©2016 STX Financing, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


16 Contenders not the basis of a fashion choice,” says Stewart. “I think brand pairings don’t work unless there’s an organic truth behind it. Julia and Givenchy are a great example. I introduced her to the clothing because I knew she would love it. And she truly, truly does love Riccardo and everything he does,” she says of long-time friend and Givenchy creative director Riccardo Tisci. “Armani has played a huge role in the modern history of fashion, much like Cate has played a huge role in the modern history of film, and it’s a natural pairing — Cate’s red-carpet Armani moments have been transcendent.” Stewart sees her role as more service than strategy. “I love to, and take pride in, understanding my clients’ tastes and getting to express their individual approaches to the wide world of fashion. It’s important for me to really understand what they want out of the looks. … Comfort? Image? Security? Simple pleasure in a beautiful thing? Basically, I’m here to serve.”

Daya by Zendaya clothing collection, following on the success of last year’s shoe launch, and will next star in Dolce & Gabbana’s spring/summer 2017 campaign — but also uses her substantial platform to tackle such social issues as race and equality. The creative vision behind her look and line, who’s been by her side since she was 14, isn’t the least bit surprised. “Zendaya has no fear,” says Roach of the Disney star turned mini-mogul. “What she does best is show her audience you can do whatever you want.” Like sporting a menswear-inspired tuxedo and a mullet to the Grammys and pairing faux dreadlocks with a Vivienne Westwood bridal gown at the Oscars. “Fashion is the most interactive art form and you should be able to play around with it,” says Roach of his client’s motto. Yet styling is a business Roach takes very seriously. “I call myself an image architect, because I either build or repair client’s images, and create their fashion footprint,” says Roach, who orchestrated Celine Dion’s dramatic transformation this summer. “Celine has kids, so she knew Z from the Disney Channel, and when she started to notice her in magazines, she Googled, ‘Who is Zendaya’s stylist?’” The result was a series of “fearless” fashion choices during Paris couture week that included an acid-green Balenciaga dress and a Vetements Titanic hoodie that went viral. “For Celine Dion, the queen of sequins and rhinestones, to wear a sweatshirt and to look so cool and effortless, it just blew people’s minds.”

Stewart’s clients — who include Cate Blanchett, Julia Roberts, Sandra Bullock, Viola Davis, Jessica Chastain, and January Jones — are almost as well known for their fashion prowess as their acting chops, evidenced by the fact that they’ve served as the faces of Giorgio Armani (Blanchett), Givenchy (Roberts), and Prada (Chastain). However, Stewart is slow to take credit for playing Cupid on the red carpet. “I have lots of friends in fashion, but that’s

Kate Young

Karla Welch

For Celine Dion, the queen of sequins and rhinestones, to wear a sweatshirt and look so cool and effortless, it just blew people’s minds.” LAW ROACH

It’s safe to say that the belle of this year’s Emmy Awards was Sarah Paulson. Not only did she win a trophy for her role in the FX miniseries “People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” she also arguably scooped the award for best date (Marcia Clark) and best dress (custom Prada). The stylist responsible for Paulson’s chic style evolution says they bonded over a fashion disaster. “We met randomly entering an after-party for the Met Ball maybe three years ago, and she was like, ‘The press doesn’t like my dress,’” says Welch. “I turned to her and said, ‘Do you like your dress?’ And she was, like, ‘Yeah.’ And I said, ‘Well then, I don’t think you should care.’” Two years later, when the actress was looking to make a direction change, “we met and that was it,” says Welch. Equally serendipitous was the stylist’s meeting with Ruth Negga, star of “Loving.” “I was reading a little about the film and thought, ‘Oh wow, that sounds amazing,’ and literally a day later I get a text from her publicist, ‘I’ve got this girl, she’s in Albuquerque, would you fly in to fit her?’ Normally, the last

Natalie Portman, Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz, Sienna Miller, Felicity Jones, Margot Robbie, Dakota Johnson — Young’s roster reads like a who’s who of Hollywood. The stylist responsible for Selena Gomez’s ultra-sophisticated transformation, which culminated in a starring role in the Louis Vuitton fall/winter 2016 campaign, is nothing if not modest. “I’m friends with [Vuitton creative director] Nicolas [Ghesquière]. She went to his show in Paris and they hit it off,” Young says. “It’s just like going on a date. You either have chemistry and speak the same language or you don’t.” While Young is slow to take credit — “I think brands look at women based on how they look, and also their reach. What I do factors into that, but if somebody’s in the blockbuster film of the moment or is winning the Oscar, that has a lot more to do with it than whether I dress them in Prada” — her clients do enjoy enduring relationships with such brands as Dior (Portman), Bulgari (Weisz), and Calvin Klein (Robbie). Like Fremar, Young believes a stylist’s job is to relieve the pressure put on stars today to be all things to all people. “Actresses are expected to behave like stylists and fashion editors and beauty editors now, when really their craft is acting.” What her clients want, she says, is what everybody wants: for her exterior to match her interior. “The best hair and makeup people have huge opinions, the best stylists have huge opinions, it’s a lot of opinions, and sometimes the end result doesn’t represent who you are. I’m more interested in making my clients feel strong and powerful and gorgeous.”

YOUNG: INEZ AND VINOODH

Elizabeth Stewart

thing I would do is get on a plane to Albuquerque, but I just had a feeling, so I replied, ‘Yes, I’d love to.’ I flew in and met her and now we’re off to the races,” says Welch, who also works with Olivia Wilde, Amy Poehler, America Ferrera, Mandy Moore, Karlie Kloss, Lorde, and Justin Bieber, with whom she collaborated on a capsule collection for Barneys and Urban Outfitters.


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GRAY’S GOLD TIM GRAY

The Kids Should Stay in the Picture Could Academy revive ‘juve’ Oscars for young thesps?

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scar-show producers always try to trim the running time, so the last thing they want is another award category. But the films of 2016 have offered some remarkable work, so this might be the perfect year to revive a long-dormant Academy Awards tradition: A special Oscar to young actors. There are a flood of knockout performances by actors as characters of high-school age or younger. Viggo Mortensen has rightly received a lot of attention for “Captain Fantastic,” but how about those kids? George MacKay is terrific in a complex role as the oldest, teenage son. And the five actors who play his younger siblings each create a distinct character and manage to work well as

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

ROBERT DE NIRO

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

LESLIE MANN

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

DANNY DEVITO

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

PATTI LUPONE

But often young actors are unknown, so it’s hard to tell whether they’re just being themselves of if the director used a lot of takes.” @timgray_variety

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

the

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GUTTER PHOTO CREDITS

EDIE FALCO


“ISABELLE HUPPERT IS ONE OF THE MOST TALENTED, VERSATILE ACTRESSES IN CONTEMPORARY CINEMA.” -Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

an ensemble. Other standout performances: Lucas Hedges, “Manchester by the Sea”; JohnPaul Howard, as Chris Pine’s son in “Hell or High Water”; and Jovan Adepo, who holds his own with a powerhouse cast in “Fences.” They certainly merit supporting consideration. But a trickier question is young actors who carry the movie, or at least large chunks of it: Sunny Pawar, age 8, in “Lion”; Lewis MacDougall in “A Monster Calls”; Neel Sethi, “The Jungle Book”; Madina Nalwanga, “Queen of Katwe”; and Jaden Piner and Ashton Sanders, as the same character at different ages in “Moonlight.” It’s possible that some will be nominated in the lead or supporting categories. But, as Jacob Tremblay of the 2015 “Room,” proved, young actors have an extra hurdle with the Academy Awards. There’s always a yin-yang reaction. Audiences are impressed by young performances; great work is great work (and Tremblay got a SAG Award nomination). But often young actors are unknown, so it’s hard to tell whether they’re just being themselves or if the director used a lot of takes/tricks to pull out that performance. There’s another hurdle with Oscar and SAG Awards, where nominations are made

by actors. For someone who’s worked hard at their profession, it can be unnerving to realize a kid can do what you do, at a fraction of your age. In 1934, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences handed a special miniature Oscar to Shirley Temple “in grateful recognition of her outstanding contribution to screen entertainment.” And why not? She was the world’s biggest movie star. There were 11 more juvenile Academy Awards (or “juve Oscars,” as Variety called them back then), including to Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. The 12th and final one went to Hayley Mills in 1960. Two years later, Patty Duke (“The Miracle Worker”) and Mary Badham (“To Kill a Mockingbird”) were nominated as supporting. Since then, young actors have occasionally competed in the four main acting categories. Back in 1979, 8-year-old Justin Henry was nominated for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” where his competition included 78-yearold Melvyn Douglas of “Being There.” (For the record, Douglas won.) Tatum O’Neal and Anna Paquin won in 1973 and 1993, respectively, for supporting actress while Timothy Hutton won supporting actor in 1980. It’s never easy to gain Oscar attention, but sometimes — as in 2016 — ya need to give the kid a break.

“ONE OF THE BEST, AND CERTAINLY MOST THRILLING PERFORMANCE IN ISABELLE HUPPERT’S ASTOUNDING CAREER.” -Scott Roxborough, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

GOTHAM AWARDS NOM I NE E

BEST ACTRESS

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EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS NOMINATIONS BEST PICTURE • BEST DIRECTOR • BEST ACTRESS

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

The young actors in “Captain Fantastic” not only created distinct characters, but were also harmonious.

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

ISABELLE HUPPERT SAÏD BEN SAÏD

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THIS IS ACTING OF THE HIGHEST CALIBER.” “THE FINEST PERFORMANCE OF CASEY AFFLECK’S CAREER.” “MICHELLE WILLIAMS, RADIATING FEROCITY AND FEELING, HITS A NEW PEAK AS AN ACTRESS.” “LUCAS HEDGES PERFORMS SUBTLE ACTING CARTWHEELS… HE DELIVERS LONERGAN’S LINES WITH A TOUR-DE-FORCE TOUGHNESS.”


22 Scene Stealer

Aaron TaylorJohnson

“Nocturnal Animals” (Focus) Written and directed by Tom Ford

B

est known for his roles in comic-book hits “Kick-Ass” and “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Aaron Taylor-Johnson delivers a strikingly transformative performance in Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals.” His character, East Texas psychopath Ray, targets family man Tony Hastings (Jake Gyllenhaal) one dark and tragic night and changes both of their lives forever. It’s a despicable role, and TaylorJohnson makes an indelible impression in the part — the end result of intensely focused preparation and a grueling, but fulfilling, shoot. GEOFF BERKSHIRE Taylor-Johnson: “I got a call saying Tom was interested in me and I was extremely flattered. And also slightly perplexed why

he thought of me for this role, considering [Ray’s] a psychopath. I was very grateful for the opportunity — [the role is] very complex, very different and a real challenge. “I was a little hesitant, to be honest; the aura of darkness surrounding this character was going to be intense. I was a little worried, with a family, how I would go about doing my job and put that much focus and time and preparation into it? But I guess the opportunity was too good to pass up, especially with someone like Tom, who I had many discussions with. He was very open about his vision for the film and the role and the character. Ultimately, I fell in love with his presence and what he had to say. “We had the luxury of having three months prior to making this movie. These things take time — you’re Play-Doh to begin with and you’re molding yourself together. It’s always quite scary when you dive into a job and think, ‘I don’t know this person.’ You’ve got three months to discover him. “Tom said, ‘Grow your hair out, grow your beard out, and I really want you to grow your fingernails out.’ I said, ‘Don’t cut them?’ He said, ‘Yeah, for three months, just to see what we get.’ I thought, ‘This is gonna be bloody disgusting.’

Tom said, ‘Grow your hair out, grow your beard out, and I really want you to grow your fingernails out.’ I thought, ‘This is gonna be bloody disgusting.’ ”

“I started to research and study serial killers and psychopaths. I dropped weight, about 20 pounds. I wanted to pick up dirty habits — smoking and drinking. I wanted to feel toxic on the inside out. I wanted to start seeing it on my skin. I had this pale, milky, sweaty sort of skin. I started to inhabit what that character would wear, how he’d walk, how he’d smell. The sort of things I was soaking in were not very pleasant. I wasn’t very approachable in that time. “My character [needed to] pop on the screen. [Tom] wanted him to be quite overbearing. [Because he’s a character in a fictional book] we have creative license to be a bit more free. We can blur the lines a little and be a bit bigger and bolder than reality. But it still needs to be menacing and feel threatening and be unpredictable, all those things. “As an actor you’re always a little bit worried, ‘Is it going to be too much? Am I playing it too big?’ But ultimately Tom is so particular and so precise and has such a great eye for detail. The way he expresses it is very eloquent and articulate. It doesn’t come across as condescending or patronizing; you feel very secure in his hands. I felt like I wanted to turn up and never let him down, and give him a variety to play with in the edit. “Psychologically it got quite abusive; it took a toll on our minds and our bodies. [The roadside confrontation] scene was three nights in a row where we literally pushed each other to the brink of madness. That was my job, to manipulate and provoke Jake to get a reaction. “Each take was completely different and each take we shot until the film ran out and we had big rolls. One take probably went on for about 13 minutes. The choreography and geography of that scene — trying to match so the editor could have fun cutting it together — wasn’t easy. “Tom gave everyone patience and time and allowed everyone their process because everyone’s different. We got lost in ourselves — that was the beauty of making this movie. We were having an out-of-body experience. “When I saw the movie for the first time, that scene, some of the things that came out of my mouth and some of the things I was doing, I can’t even for the life of me remember. I was shocked to see what looked like me up on the screen doing things I never thought I would’ve done. That was quite disturbing but also quite remarkable. “Tom really took us to a place where all we were doing was acting instinctively and he was there to capture and document it. It was the most challenging scene I’ve done in a long time but also the most rewarding in a way.”


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST DIRECTOR TOM FORD

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR MICHAEL SHANNON

“BOASTS RICH, SCENESTEALING TURNS FROM AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON AND MICHAEL SHANNON.” LOS ANGELES TIMES

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A SUPREMELY CLEVER AND PULSATINGLY GRIPPING EMOTIONAL THRILLER.” DAILY MAIL


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST DIRECTOR TOM FORD

BEST ACTRESS AMY ADAMS

“A KNOCKOUT... TOM FORD SURPASSES ALL EXPECTATIONS...A MASTERFUL PIECE ABOUT CRUELTY, WEAKNESS AND THE PAIN WE INFLICT ON EACH OTHER BOLSTERED BY SUPERB PERFORMANCES FROM GYLLENHAAL AND ADAMS. DON’T SLEEP ON THIS ONE.” FINANCIAL TIMES

+++++”

THE GUARDIAN


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE BEST DIRECTOR TOM FORD

BEST ACTOR JAKE GYLLENHAAL

“GYLLENHAAL’S PERFORMANCE GOES TO A PLACE OF REAL TERROR AND DESPAIR.” VARIETY

+++++

A TOUR DE FORCE FROM TOM FORD.” THE INDEPENDENT


26 Artisans

AUSTEN CITY LIMITS

Kate Beckinsale, right, sets the style of Whit Stillman’s “Love & Friendship.”

ANATOMY OF A SCENE

Love & Friendship

Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh, costume designer

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he idea of making a period film based on a Jane Austen novella for just $3 million seems absurd on its face: Surely the costumes alone would eat up half to twothirds of that budget. But costume designer Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh made what seemed impossible possible for Whit Stillman’s “Love & Friendship.” Experienced with stretching a dollar on the other indie films she’s worked on, the Dublin-based costume designer knew how to create a lush look without an open checkbook, and says she enjoyed herself in the process. “The tiny budget gave me a free hand, really,” she says. “We had a lot of freedom because there wasn’t a studio, and everyone was working for nothing, or much below their rate. I thought this was a pet project; I never expected the film to be as successful

as it became.” Ultimately the film went on to gross $19.1 million in worldwide box office, and is now in the running for awards season, indicating that her free hand was the right choice for Stillman. But coming in on budget was only one ball to juggle if the Austen tale was to feel authentic. Picking the right time period was tricky. Austen films tend to feature actresses in loose Empire-waisted dresses of the Regency period. Stillman wanted to sex things up. “I went through this process with [1998’s] ‘Last Days of Disco,’” he recalls. “People’s idea of what disco was was very ugly and in bad taste. So we looked for the period when things started looking good. We wanted sharper and more tailored looks and flattering figure enhancing looks for the fashions.” Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh agreed, and so they kept the period focused in the late 1700s, when Georgian fitted dresses were still fashionable. “We wanted a boldness, and corsets give such a great shape — they’re much sexier dresses than Empire-line dresses,” she says. Why so sexy for Jane Austen? Because the focus of the film is on Lady Susan (Kate Beckinsale), a clever, scheming widow on the prowl to get her daughter married off and keep her own measure of freedom in

We wanted a boldness, and corsets give such a great shape — they’re much sexier dresses than Empire-line dresses.” EIMER NÍ MHAOLDOMHNAIGH

the process. She had to be seen as a seductive showstopper. “We wanted to use a real bold color palette to show how adventurous and naughty she could be,” says Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh, who started Susan out in widow’s weeds and veils and moved her smoothly into grays and lilacs as she emerged from mourning. “She’s so witty and funny, there seemed a real opportunity to have a little fun with her.” To complement and contrast with Susan, Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh dressed Lady Susan’s friend Alicia Johnson (Chloë Sevigny) in ornamental blues and golds, as well as patterns. “Alicia Johnson’s clothes were very cheerful,” says Stillman. Yet it was important to understand Alicia’s background: Yes, she was an American character, but that did not affect her choice in outfits. “Fashions were being influenced by French design by then,” she says. “They all were buying from the same shops. She doesn’t need to wear anything that would single her out as American.” Meanwhile, Lady Susan’s daughter Frederica evolved, moving from mourning (like her mother) into a wedding gown by the end. “Her dresses are very simple, and when she falls in love with Reginald we see her in a garden in a lovely pale dress, blossoming,” says Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh. In gathering inspiration for the dresses she designed (budget was largely spent on Susan and Alicia; other costumes were hired and adapted), Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh didn’t have to look far: several mansions around Dublin were built in the period during which the film takes place, and she visited them to look at their paintings for representations of the right kind of frocks. But there was one outfit that was particularly hard to research: maternity wear. Stillman may have wanted to avoid the “maternity” look of Empire dresses, but Lady Susan turns up at her daughter’s wedding with a baby bump. That meant Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh had to once again get a little creative. “They did have maternity dresses then, but a lot of upper-class women would be confined to home, to rest,” she says. “So it’s hard to come across paintings of women pregnant, since it was such a private time.” In the end, though, all of the costume choices came out of understanding the characters and knowing the film was a comedy. “We just wanted to inject fun into it,” says Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh. “Lady Susan is a woman who takes the bull by the horns and won’t fade into the background. Every time she walks into a room everyone goes ‘Oooh!’ and all the men go, ‘She’s fabulous.’ And it worked.” RANDEE DAWN


© 2016 EUROPACORP – FRANCE 2 CINEMA


28 Facetime

‘She’s got a great number, “Miss Baltimore Crabs” ’

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ristin Chenoweth, who’s been performing since childhood, has made her mark on the stage, screen and television, with memorable roles on “Wicked” and “The West Wing.” Never one to sit still, she’s taking on the role of Velma von Tussle in NBC’s upcoming “Hairspray Live” (Dec. 7) just as she’s wrapped a two-week run in New York City with her concert “My Love Letter to Broadway.” DEBRA BIRNBAUM How do you juggle everything? Girl, I’m tired! I’m going to be honest: It’s my Achilles heel. The thing I have to work hardest at is finding those times to take a break, to refuel, to recharge, to get alone time. As soon as “Hairspray’s” done, I’m going to take a month and chill out. I’m probably going to get bored day two! Why did you sign on for “Hairspray Live”? I love the part. She’s got a great number called “Miss Baltimore Crabs.” It’s about living in the past, about her former days as a beauty queen. I also think it’s interesting to watch a mom live vicariously through her daughter. That’s always been a fascinating relationship — an unfortunate trait that I’ve witnessed. My challenge will be to make a very unlikable character fun and likable.

You’re an accomplished performer — but how will you prepare for doing a musical on live TV? Oh God, I’m a wreck. I’m so nervous. The deal is this is a onetime shot. When we’re on Broadway, we get the next night to make it better, to fix the mistake. But this will be mistakes in front of millions of people. My goal will be not to fall in a pit. Or have something fall on me or blow myself up. Of course I’m kidding. I want to totally be the character. I want to nail it. You’ve had such a great partnership with “American Gods” creator Bryan Fuller. We’ve never left each other’s side since “Pushing Daisies.” Not just professionally, but as friends. We shouldn’t get along on paper. But he’s like my brother. We both love horror films. We love weird stuff, like taxidermy. Lots of stuff that people wouldn’t know about us. What he thinks is funny, I think is funny. What he’s drawn to, I’m drawn to. He’s a complete Trekkie. I’m a sci-fi fanatic. It makes sense that we found each other. What role is still on your bucket list? The usual suspects, like Dolly, “Mame,” and “Gypsy.” But I think the role that’s next may not even be written yet. I have this weird feeling it’s being written now.

P H OTO G R A P H BY PATRICK JAMES MILLER


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OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

WAGNER MOURA


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SAG PREVIEW

TV Latecomers Still Have a Shot at Guild Rewards With so many new and heralded shows premiering after the Emmy Awards deadline this year, some fresh faces could ďŹ nd themselves making the cut at the SAG Awards By Rob Owen

ILLUSTRATION BY CRUSCHIFORM & GAZHOLE


THE FUNNIEST

SHOW ON TV

–USA TODAY

FLAT-OUT BRILLIANT

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CONFIDENT, SEARINGLY FUNNY AND UNCOMMONLY INSIGHTFUL” –THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

A BIGGER HEART “

THAN IT’S EVER HAD BEFORE” –YAHOO

OUTRAGEOUS FUN

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SAG PREVIEW

STATE OF PLAY

Donald Glover and Keith Stanfield lit up FX’s “Atlanta.”

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TV SERIES ARE PREMIERING WITH SUCH FREQUENCY nowadays that there’s a whole raft of shows that debuted after the Emmy eligibility period that could prove to be disruptors in the upcoming SAG Awards. With May 31 being the cut-off for Emmy Awards, that left months of new shows that could still make the SAG Awards’ Oct. 24 deadline.

I don’t say I’m going to work, I say I’m going to play with my friends. It’s like an evening at Chuck E. Cheese as an adult.” BRYAN TYREE HENRY

HBO’s “The Night Of,” “Insecure,” “Westworld,” and “Divorce”; FX’s “Atlanta” and “Better Things”; Netflix’s “The Crown” and “Stranger Things”; plus NBC’s “This Is Us” could all be in the running for SAG Awards. “I hope we shake shit up as much as possible because that means people are paying attention,” says “Atlanta” actor Brian Tyree Henry, who plays Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles on the comedy. He says award nominations would be icing on the cake of his “Atlanta” experience. “I don’t say I’m going to work, I say I’m going to play with my friends. It’s like an evening at Chuck E Cheese as an adult.” Henry says he was drawn to “Atlanta” for many reasons, including recognizing others in his character. “Everyone has an Alfred somewhere, right? I wanted to make sure I portrayed that as close as I could,” he says, never referring to the character by his rapper name, Paper Boi. “Paper Boi is the public persona. I feel like Alfred doesn’t want to get those two confused.” John Turturro says viewer reaction to “The Night Of” included people asking him about his character, John Stone, and Stone’s eczema, or what would happen to Stone’s cat, as much as fans inquired about the whodunit aspects of the series. “I think one of the interesting things about the writing is that you see someone who has all the potential to be a great lawyer but he doesn’t have the constitution or the stomach to carry a man’s life in his hands before a jury,” Turturro says. “Westworld” star Evan Rachel Wood says she signed onto the HBO drama knowing her character, wholesome prairie girl robot “host” Dolores, would have an arc but she didn’t know specifics until


THE YEAR’S BEST

NEW COMEDY

ENGROSSING, DEEPLY RELATABLE, HUGELY FUNNY” –BUZZFEED

SMART, FUNNY AND UNFAILINGLY REAL...FRESH,

SHARP-EDGED COMEDY

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REVOLUTIONARY

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INSIGHTFUL...THE RESULT IS A RARE TV TREASURE” –THE ATLANTIC

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SAG PREVIEW

GO ‘WEST’ FOR ‘BETTER’

Both “Westworld” and “Better Things” began after the Emmy deadline.

SAG TV Ensemble Winners

2015/ 2014 Drama: “Downton Abbey” Comedy: “Orange Is the New Black”

2013

Drama: “Breaking Bad” Comedy: “Modern Family”

each episode’s script arrived. “I don’t think I realized how meta and intellectual the show was, while also being a thriller and a drama,” she says. “I don’t think I realized the weight my character held and what she means for women and our roles in the world.” Matthew Modine says there wasn’t one scene that was more difficult than others when playing the heavy, Dr. Martin Brenner, in Netflix’s “Stranger Things.” “Those who’ve seen the show know how specific Dr. Martin Brenner is,” Modine says. “There could be no wasted gestures. No random movements. Breathing and blinking were all conscious acts.” Regarding the potential for “Stranger Things” to disrupt the SAG Awards, Modine says he wishes all actors well as awards season warms up. “Those of us who do it know that every show, play, or film requires an ensemble. No actor acts alone,” he says. “I wish the highest-earning actors were more conscious of this and helped to make the lives of the least-earning actors more manageable. That was the spirit and foundation of why the Screen Actors Guild was founded.” For Pamela Adlon, creator and star of “Better Things,” this latest role proved particularly difficult because it’s based, loosely, on her own life. “It was almost harder to create this character because she is so based on me, but it’s not me,” she says. “How do I make a person and create a life and story for them and find her voice? The daughters are based on my girls and the mother on my mother and the friends on my friends, but they’re all quite different. And when I hired the actors, they were fleshing them out in ways that made me go, ‘Oh my god, I have to write to this strength of this person.’” Adlon says she tries not to consider awards when in the throes of working. “I think that would be poison for anybody to think about doing their work to get an award at the end,” she says. “What am I, in an ice skating competition where everybody gets an award for stepping on the ice and running away like when you’re a kid? That would be way too greedy and it would fuck with my head if I thought it even for a heartbeat.” But she won’t turn any awards down. “I would like any kind of recognition,” Adlon says. “I owe it to all the people who are in my employ now and my wonderful network how they went so far out on a limb for me. The reward for me is the response we are getting. It’s everything.” Turturro says he hopes “The Night Of,” which ended its run in August, will be remembered come awards time. “It’s certainly in the zeitgeist and people are all talking about it,” he says. “It would be great if people keep discovering it. … We are really appreciative of how well the show is


SAG PREVIEW

doing with people, to the deep response we get to the series, and I think this is the most meaningful thing. Anything else that comes after is the cherry on top of the cake, but we’ll take that, too!” Wood says she’s hopeful about the potential for “Westworld” to score nominations in the SAG Awards. “I think the SAG Awards, in general, always hold a special place in every actor’s heart because it’s your peers, actors paying tribute to other actors,” she says. “For me, that’s always been something special about them and makes them stand out from other awards shows.” Ensemble acting awards, which are unique to the SAGs among the largest American awards shows, serve a special purpose, Modine says, as he witnessed after making Robert Altman’s 1993 “Short Cuts.” “ ‘Short Cuts’ received a best ensemble award from the Venice Film Festival and a [special] Golden Globe. These awards were very important for Altman because ensemble acting was the nature of most of his films,” Modine says. “I think the Duffer brothers would be very honored that they, like Altman, were recognized for putting a terrific group of actors together to tell their tale.”

35

PEOPLE ARE ‘STRANGER’

Matthew Modine plays the villain in Netflix hit “Stranger Things.”

The SAG Awards, in general, always hold a special place in every actor’s heart because it’s your peers, actors paying tribute to other actors.” EVAN RACHEL WOOD

“SUSAN SARANDON IS A STAR SHINING ON HER HIGHEST BEAMS. SARANDON DIVES INTO HER JUICIEST ROLE IN YEARS— WATCHING SARANDON CHART MARNIE’S SLOW-GROWING SELF AWARENESS IS A THING OF BEAUTY.” -Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Susan Sarandon

The Meddler Written and Directed by Lorene Scafaria


“SO COMPLETELY HILARIOUS FOR A VERY LONG TIME.” -SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE-

S E E S O

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ACTOR PREVIEW

Real Life Offers Best Research for These Roles Actors use archives, visit hometowns, and if they’re lucky, get to know the people they’re playing onscreen By Bob Verini

ILLUSTRATION BY JA S O N R A I S H

37


38

ACTOR PREVIEW

PEACE AT WAR

Andrew Garfield plays a war medic in “Hacksaw Ridge.”

M MANY ACTORS’ SUCCESS AT PLAYING REAL-LIFE characters has much to do with a passion for homework. By all possible means, they aim to achieve communion with the actual human being they propose to impersonate. Andrew Garfield says he “obsessed over” all possible evidence of Medal of Honor winner and pacifist Desmond Doss for “Hacksaw Ridge” in order to “capture his external qualities … but maybe, most importantly, to attempt to know his essence, his insides, that deepest part of himself.” The goal was to “do justice and honor to this amazing man that walked humbly among us.” Thesps usually turn first to whatever images they can get their hands on. Garfield and David Oyelowo — playing Ugandan humanitarian Robert Katende in “Queen of Katwe” — studied 12-minute documentaries on their subjects. Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga had the full-length “The Loving Story,” plus outtakes, to use in absorbing details about Richard and Mildred Loving, the persecuted interracial couple of “Loving.” “It was an actor’s handbook,” Negga says. “A 360-degree look at Mildred, so helpful to create body language and dialect. And most importantly, that space between them, the relationship between people.” Edgerton professes to be “terrified” about an out-of-place accent, but “there it was, all perfectly laid out for me.” Candid snapshots brought insight into the couple’s relaxed intimacy when newsreel cameras weren’t turning. A rich visual trove was available for “Jackie.” Natalie Portman, portraying first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, studied the televised 1962 White House tour led by Kennedy “hundreds of times, to get the voice, the rhythms and the pauses.” Millions have a clear sense of Kennedy, and those who don’t can readily check out the real thing. Portman’s convinced “you have to have a threshold of believability that’s more specific. The accent, the movement, the gestures — all of

You’re having to do a bit of an acting job. Yes, you’re interested in what he’s saying, but you’re also watching what he does and how he says it.” DAVID OYELOWO

that becomes very exact.” First-hand interviews are eagerly sought. For “Hidden Figures,” Taraji P. Henson sped to Virginia for quality time with the woman she portrays, Katherine Johnson, who’s now 97. Henson found her “poised and lovely and an amazing conversationalist” talking about her years as a NASA “computer.” Dev Patel attended an Australian family barbecue with Saroo Brierley, whose quest to find his Indian birth mother is dramatized in “Lion.” Oyelowo, who clocked his man on Kampala streets, chuckles, “You’re having to do a bit of an acting job. Yes, you’re interested in what he’s saying, but you’re also watching what he does and how he says it, looking for clues to tell the truth of the character in a nuanced, interesting way.” And clues do emerge. Henson notes that Johnson “never used the word ‘I.’ It was always ‘we,’ and she thinks of her contributions as a shared endeavor.” Watching this “team player” who “doesn’t easily call attention to herself” informed Henson’s steely modesty in the role.


40 ACTOR PREVIEW

QUEEN AND KING

Lupita Nyong’o and David Oyelowo star in “Queen of Katwe.”

Patel remembers a scary ride with Brierley at the wheel. “‘He’s a total Aussie’ was the first thing I thought of. I was searching for the Indian inside him, but there’s something so confident and Australian about him.” Then again, “you’ve really got to sit down with Saroo and peel the onion to get down to his sensitive place. We needed that too.” The actor’s ultimate impression? “Such an impressive human being. I said to myself I’ve really got to step this up a gear, because I don’t want to let this man down.” Every source is critical when time or circumstance places obstacles to research. Few recall St. Clair Bayfield, the husband of dotty diva “Florence Foster Jenkins,” and records are scanty. So Hugh Grant hunkered down in a Lincoln Center reading room to pore over Bayfield’s diaries and letters. “He was this lost soul, the illegitimate grandson of a British aristocrat, who loved acting but wasn’t very brilliant at it. To me that was the amusing and tragic heart of the character. Underneath his polished exterior, he was just a failed and not very talented actor.” At the same time, the documents revealed Bayfield’s feelings for Florence as “very, very profound, and heartbreaking. On the day she dies, he writes something like, ‘The heavens wept’ and, ‘My darling is gone.’ Honestly, it brought a tear to my eye.” Visits to actual story locales promise what Patel calls “real memories to draw upon, to create these big beats of emotion.” Henson was only one of several who found their way to Virginia, home of the Lovings as well as of Cpl. Doss, whose old stomping grounds brought Garfield “a deeper connection with Desmond’s spirit than I could have imagined. His energy was left profoundly on the place.” Negga and Edgerton visited the authentic jailhouse and court-

On the day she dies, he writes something like, ‘The heavens wept’ and ‘My darling is gone.’ Honestly, it brought a tear to my eye. HUGH GRANT

house, winding up at the Lovings’ side-by-side gravesite. “Incredibly moving,” Negga recalls, and “incredibly useful.” Watching his co-star’s grief, Edgerton says, “I could totally see how Richard could fall in love with Mildred. She was a princess, shy but incredibly eloquent, and willing to take steps because, as she said, it was going to help a lot of people.” Eventually, research ends and the actor assumes the role in full. Does one work from the outside in (the right nose or walk) or inside out (the old Method thing)? “It’s both,” Portman says. “You’re looking at the way the character moves and speaks. But she was so concerned with presentation, how she presented herself to the world, it was sort of a preoccupation with her. So that’s key to the inside as well.” Sometimes, Negga points out, “the way they move or speak can crack a character and it opens up, while sometimes it’s a reference to your emotional self that you just turn the volume up on.” Edgerton warns of the danger of focusing too much on appearance. “Energetically, it’s really got to come alive. Otherwise it’s just a costume and a walk — just trickery.” While trickery is to be avoided in the search for authenticity, nevertheless “you’re looking for magic,” according to Oyelowo. “There is something alchemic that goes on that is pretty difficult to express. It’s a combination of the work you’ve done, the place itself, and the likelihood that there are people who have experienced what you’re experiencing, or whose parents have.” Even with cameras in your eyeline and a crew looking on, “you can’t help but feel you’re somehow being held by something more than your ability, when you have all those things working for you at the same time.”


“SPLENDID AND PROFOUND. A MASTERPIECE.” “ADAM DRIVER IS ONE OF THE FINEST ACTORS OF THE MOMENT. A JOYOUS FILM ABOUT LOVE AND POETRY AND DREAMS.” “ADAM DRIVER DELIVERS A QUIET, SOULFUL, KINDHEARTED PERFORMANCE.” “ADAM DRIVER’S FINEST PERFORMANCE TO DATE.”


VARIETY P ODCAST SERIES

I N T R O D U C I N G O U R N E W W E E K LY P O D C A S T

Insights on the year in film, reflections on the ups and downs of awards season and in-depth interviews with leading industry talent. EPISODE 10

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BEST PICTURE BEST DIRECTOR TOM FORD

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“EVERY ROLE HAS BEEN IMPECCABLY CAST AND EVERY ACTOR MAKES AN INCISIVE IMPRESSION IN THIS CEASELESSLY GRIPPING STUNNER.” THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“AN EXPLOSIVE TALE OF LOVE, VIOLENCE, AND REVENGE.” VARIETY


44

ACTOR PREVIEW

FRONTRUNNERS

ON THE BUBBLE Ben Affleck “LIVE BY NIGHT”

Robert De Niro “THE COMEDIAN”

Adam Driver Casey Affleck

“PATERSON”

“MANCHESTER BY THE SEA”

Andrew Garfield “SILENCE”

Viggo Mortensen “CAPTAIN FANTASTIC”

DARK HORSES Warren Beatty “RULES DON’T APPLY”

Don Cheadle “MILES AHEAD”

Michael Fassbender “THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS”

Joseph GordonLevitt Joel Edgerton

“SNOWDEN”

“LOVING”

Ethan Hawke “BORN TO BE BLUE”

Tom Hiddleston “I SAW THE LIGHT”

Michael Keaton “THE FOUNDER”

Andrew Garfield “HACKSAW RIDGE”

Nate Parker “THE BIRTH OF A NATION”

Chris Pine “HELL OR HIGH WATER”

Brad Pitt “ALLIED”

Ryan Gosling “LA LA LAND”

Ryan Reynolds “DEADPOOL”

Will Smith “COLLATERAL BEAUTY”

Mark Wahlberg “PATRIOTS DAY”

Miles Teller “BLEED FOR THIS”

Jake Gyllenhaal “NOCTURNAL ANIMALS”

Lead Actor Race Looks Like a Wide Open Field

Tom Hanks “SULLY”

With several films left to be seen, frontrunner status is uncertain

E

arlier this year, Leonardo DiCaprio finally took home the gold for “The Revenant” after four previous acting nominations. This season could see another first-time winner in the likes of Casey Affleck for “Manchester by the Sea” or Ryan Gosling in “La La Land.” Both have been nominated before, and both have festival hits expected to go the distance. And previous nominee Viggo Mortensen was stellar in “Captain Fantastic.” Or it could go the way of a veteran, with two-time winners Tom Hanks (“Sully”) and Denzel Washington (“Fences”) earning raves for their performances. But it’s hard to say, with many unknown

factors left in the race. Martin Scorsese’s latest film “Silence,” has yet to screen, and star Andrew Garfield could find himself competing aginst his own performance in Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge” for a nom. Likewise, it remains to be seen how critics and audiences will embrace Ben Affleck in “Live by Night” and Mark Wahlberg in “Patriots Day.” There are also several great actors seeking their first noms: Joel Edgerton brings subtlety and stillness to the moving “Loving,” Miles Teller delivers a knockout turn in “Bleed for This,” Joseph Gordon-Levitt channels “Snowden,” and Adam Driver is the heart and soul of Jim Jarmusch’s “Paterson.”

Recent Winners

Matthew McConaughey “GOLD”

2015

Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”

2014

Eddie Redmayne, “The Theory of Everything”

2013

Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”

Denzel Washington “FENCES”


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F O R Y O U R C O N S I D E R AT I O N

“Absolutely outstanding performances” — VO GUE


46

ACTOR PREVIEW

FRONTRUNNERS

ON THE BUBBLE Stephen McKinley Henderson “FENCES”

Andre Holland “MOONLIGHT”

Jeff Bridges “HELL OR HIGH WATER”

Chris Messina “LIVE BY NIGHT”

Trevante Rhodes “MOONLIGHT”

Aaron TaylorJohnson Kevin Costner

“NOCTURNAL ANIMALS”

“HIDDEN FIGURES”

DARK HORSES Jovan Adepo “FENCES”

Chris Cooper Aaron Eckhart

“LIVE BY NIGHT”

“BLEED FOR THIS”

Ralph Fiennes “A BIGGER SPLASH”

Ben Foster “HELL OR HIGH WATER”

John Goodman Hugh Grant “FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS”

“10 CLOVERFIELD LANE”

Armie Hammer “THE BIRTH OF A NATION”

Simon Helberg “FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS”

Eddie Murphy Lucas Hedges

“MR. CHURCH”

“MANCHESTER BY THE SEA”

David Oyelowo “QUEEN OF KATWE”

Edgar Ramirez “GOLD”

Alan Rickman

Mahershala Ali

“EYE IN THE SKY”

“MOONLIGHT”

Liam Neeson “SILENCE”

Peter Sarsgaard “JACKIE”

Timothy Spall “DENIAL”

New Nominees Lead Supporting Actor Race

Dev Patel “LION”

Only a few previous winners and nominees seem to be in play “Silence” has yet to screen) have previously been nominated for an Academy Award. Then there is John Goodman, so heralded for his work in “10 Cloverfield Lane,” who consistently delivers standout turns but has failed to ever land a nom. That probably won’t change this year since “Cloverfield” is a genre pic, which is a shame. Fresh faces abound, such as Lucas Hedges (“Manchester by the Sea”) and the formidable casts of “Moonlight” and “Fences.” (The latter has some well-known faces but not necessarily household names.) In fact, the two films offer up enough great performances to fill out the entire category with deserving actors.

Michael Shannon “NOCTURNAL ANIMALS”

Recent Winners

2015

Mark Rylance, “Bridge of Spies”

2014 J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”

2013

Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”

Mykelti Williamson “FENCES”

WILLIAMSON: ALEX J. BERLINER/ABIMAGES

B

eloved veteran actor Mark Rylance quietly slipped in and took the gold for his subtle work in “Bridge of Spies” last year, and this year could see another longtime actor finally get his due, should Mahershala Ali (“Moonlight”), Hugh Grant (“Florence Foster Jenkins”), Dev Patel (“Lion”), Michael Shannon (“Nocturnal Animals”), or Aaron Eckhart (“Bleed for This”) land the prize. But while these actors are well established, few of them are previous nominees. Only Shannon, Jeff Bridges (“Hell or High Water”), Kevin Costner (“Hidden Figures”), and Liam Neeson (an unknown quantity as


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BOB ODENKIRK AS JIMMY MCGILL

FYC

JONATHAN BANKS AS MIKE EHRMANTRAUT

“BETTER CALL SAUL HAS ALREADY EARNED ITS PLACE AS ONE OF TELEVISION’S TOP DRAMAS.” —TV GUIDE


I VOTE. I READ VARIETY.

Connie Sawyer Actress Awards Voter


ACTRESS PREVIEW

Prior Nominees Spice Up Race in Awards Season Richly written roles give actresses a lot to build upon By Gregory Ellwood ILLUSTRATION BY LO L A B E LT R A N

49


50

ACTRESS PREVIEW

SLICK ‘SLOANE’

Jessica Chastain could be a three-time nominee for playing a lobbyist.

T

THERE’S A REASON people pay attention every time Jessica Chastain appears onscreen. The two-time Academy Award nominee has a unique talent for conveying depth to her characters that many of her peers can only dream of. That’s once again apparent in her latest role as Elizabeth Sloane, a savvy Washington, D.C., political lobbyist who finds herself potentially outsmarted in John Madden’s “Miss Sloane.” Chastain is one of a number of familiar faces returning to the awards arena this season. In the lead actor category you have former winners such as Tom Hanks (“Sully”), Matthew McConaughey

Every character I play I fill another level of a story you wouldn’t know and I keep it a secret from the director, the screenwriter, and everyone.” JESSICA CHASTAIN

(“Gold”), and Denzel Washington (“Fences”). In the supporting actor race, Jeff Bridges (“Hell or High Water”) is facing off against previous nominees including Michael Shannon (“Nocturnal Animals”) and Liam Neeson (“Silence”). The supporting actress field potentially features three former Oscar winners in Nicole Kidman (“Lion”), Lupita Nyong’o (“Queen of Katwe”) and Octavia Spencer (“Hidden Figures). Two-time nominees Michelle Williams (“Manchester by the Sea”) and Viola Davis (“Fences”) are also in play. The most competitive race, however, is lead actress, in which Chastain is joined by former nominees Emma Stone (“La La Land”), Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”), Taraji P. Henson (“Hidden Figures”) as well as previous winner Natalie Portman (“Jackie”) and the venerable Meryl Streep (“Florence Foster Jenkins”). Chastain analyzes her technique: “Every character I play I fill another level of a story you wouldn’t know and I keep it a secret from the director, the screenwriter, and everyone, because at some point you have to take ownership of your character,” Chastain says. “And just like every person has their own secrets, Elizabeth needed to have hers.” She continues, “In any script you read there are clues that tell you a backstory. Her real name is Madeline Elizabeth Sloane. Only her mother used to call her that. And why doesn’t she use Madeline anymore? There’s something with her mother. You think in terms of when she says, ‘I grew up lying for it. I didn’t want to. I had to. That’s why I excel at it.’ So, why would she be in a situation as a child where she was lying all the time? You find those tiny little nuggets and from there you build on it. And, hopefully, when you’re playing those scenes the character for me becomes so real that when something happens an audience sees me react or sees my eye do something or I go into a memory or whatever it is that they can’t quiet guess, but that’s just like real life. I mean Elizabeth would never tell you about her childhood if you met her. And I like that.”


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“THE WALKING DEAD HAS PROVEN, AGAIN, IT IS A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH.” —COMICBOOK.COM


52

ACTRESS PREVIEW

The performances from leading ladies are so remarkable this season that five-time nominee Amy Adams has not one, but two different roles vying for recognition. In “Arrival,” Adams portrays a noted linguist who is recruited by the U.S. government to assist in attempting to communicate with an alien race, whose presence has put the world on edge. The Denis Villeneuve film is much more than a genre piece, however, filled with an emotional storyline that weaves in and out of present day, and that’s what intrigued the star from the beginning. She notes, “It was one of the most beautiful things I’d read in a long time and something about it just felt so difficult. Like, ‘How are we going to do this?’ So, for me that’s when I say, ‘This is special. If we do it right it’s going to be awesome.’ And it was worth taking the risk.” Adams took a dramatically different turn in Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals,” based on the 1993 novel “Tony and Susan” by Austin Wright. Adams plays Susan Morrow, a privileged art gallery owner who becomes enthralled in the new book her ex-husband Edward (Jake Gyllenhaal), a man she hasn’t seen in years, has sent her before publication. “It was funny to me. I always saw it as Edward’s story — I don’t know why I didn’t see it as Susan’s story. I think because so much of what she does is by herself, and it doesn’t take up a lot of space in the script,” Adams says. “But, what I love about it is that everything you don’t see her current self in, it’s all inside of her memory and her imagination. But also that’s what I was drawn to thematically when I read the book. It’s about regret, about loss. About loss of one’s sense of self in sort of what we trade in terms of comfort.” As with any Oscar season, there are always a number of players on the board who have still have not had the opportunity to sit in the Dolby Theatre as actual nominees. While there are fewer of them than usual, this season the Academy has a number of impressive performances from potential first-time nominees to consider, including Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga (“Loving”), Mahershala Ali and Naomie Harris (“Moonlight”), Molly Shannon (“Other People”), Andrew Garfield (“Hacksaw Ridge,” “Silence”), and Lucas Hedges (“Manchester by the Sea”). The 19-year-old Hedges has already had a remarkable career starring in films from renowned filmmakers such as Wes Anderson, Jason Reitman, and Terry Gillam, but it’s his role as Patrick in Kenneth Lonergan’s poignant drama that is drawing serious attention. He spent hours listening to audiotapes to nail his character’s Boston accent, but admits one of the harder aspects was portraying Patrick’s charismatic confidence. “I guess that was one of the things we worked on most,” Hedges recalls. “How can I be tougher as Patrick and still allow the toughness to come from me and not come from an idea in my head, but rise naturally? And some of it was simply just doing daydreams about Patrick’s life and imagining scenarios where I got into fights as a kid and was triumphant. People have memories of intimidating people, or they have memories of humiliation or [being] embarrassed. And I gave myself [memories] of striking fear into other people’s hearts. That was enough to change my physical chemistry as I moved as Patrick.” The most notable “newcomer” is hardly a newcomer at all. Isabelle Huppert is a legendary actress who is an icon of global cinema and has won actress honors twice at both the Cannes and Venice film festivals. Shockingly, she hasn’t felt Oscar’s golden glow, but that may change after her acclaimed turn in Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle.” Huppert initially reached out to producer Saïd Ben Saïd after reading Philippe Djian’s novel “Oh…,” because she was so enthralled by its main character, Michèle Leblanc. A character Huppert describes as “fearless, lonely, brave, and manipulative and caring and generous and very free” is also someone whose reaction to being sexually assaulted at the beginning of the picture will be unexpected to many. “First of all, she doesn’t want to be a victim and in her own way she has a plan,” Huppert says. “She might know exactly what this plan is, but she has a plan after the rape happens. I like the fact that

LEADING LADY

Isabelle Huppert could score her first Oscar nom for her work in “Elle.”

Previous Nominees Amy Adams Five nominations Annette Bening Four nominations Michelle Williams Three nominations Viola Davis Two nominations Jessica Chastain Two nominations

something happens to her and we don’t really understand her reaction, but I’m not sure she understands her reaction either. She’s pushed by something. Something we gradually might be able to understand and explain, but she is more pushed by her intuition, instinct, and desire. There is a kind of attraction to this violence.” Many people in the industry are rooting for Huppert this season, but she’s taking such talk in stride and, frankly, we’d expect nothing else. “I’m in Paris and this all happens in Los Angeles and New York, so it’s a bit far from my reality at the moment I have to say. Which is good,” Huppert says laughing. “It’s the French entry for best foreign[-language] film, but being far away gives it a certain … it’s real and not so real for me.”


54

ACTRESS PREVIEW

FRONTRUNNERS

ON THE BUBBLE Kate Beckinsale “LOVE & FRIENDSHIP”

Emily Blunt “THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN”

Amy Adams

Sally Field

“ARRIVAL”

“HELLO MY NAME IS DORIS”

Rebecca Hall “CHRISTINE”

Susan Sarandon “THE MEDDLER”

Annette Bening “20TH CENTURY WOMEN”

DARK HORSES Amy Adams “NOCTURNAL ANIMALS”

Sonia Braga “AQUARIUS”

Jessica Chastain “MISS SLOANE”

Lily Collins “RULES DON’T APPLY”

Greta Gerwig “MAGGIE’S PLAN”

Isabelle Huppert “THINGS TO COME”

Jennifer Lawrence Marion Cotillard

“PASSENGERS”

“ALLIED”

Hailee Steinfeld “THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN”

Alicia Vikander “THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS”

Taraji P. Henson “HIDDEN FIGURES”

Meryl Streep “FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS”

Isabelle Huppert “ELLE”

Lead Actress Turns Into Battle Royale of Greats

Ruth Negga “LOVING”

Stellar performances light up a long-underserved category

B

rie Larson was unstoppable in 2015 with her stunning work in “Room.” This year, lead actress could be a showdown of the redheads with Emma Stone (“La La Land”), Jessica Chastain (“Miss Sloane”), and Amy Adams (“Arrival” and “Nocturnal Animals”) all looking to land nominations. But they’ll face stiff competition from such previous nominees as Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”) and Taraji P. Henson (“Hidden Figures”), not to mention past winners including Marion Cotillard (“Allied”), Natalie Portman (“Jackie”) and Meryl Streep (“Florence Foster Jenkins”). Then there are the newcomers: both Ruth Negga (“Loving”)

Natalie Portman

and Isabelle Huppert (“Elle”) could land career-first nominations for their work. It’s been a refreshing change of pace in recent years to see so many excellent roles for women, even if it means many great artists vying for a spot on the ballot. Women of all ages and backgrounds are represented in films this year, including Oscar winners Sally Field (“Hello My Name Is Doris”) and Susan Sarandon (“The Meddler”) delivering standout turns after long careers made up of many great roles. Then there’s 19-year-old Hailee Steinfeld, a previous nominee for “True Grit,” who lights up the coming-of-age gem “Edge of Seventeen” and could prove a true dark horse.

“JACKIE”

Recent Winners

2015 2014

Brie Larson, “Room”

Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”

2013

Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”

Emma Stone “LA LA LAND”

Rachel Weisz “DENIAL”


56

ACTRESS PREVIEW

FRONTRUNNERS

ON THE BUBBLE Aja Naomi King “THE BIRTH OF A NATION”

Margo Martindale “THE HOLLARS”

Viola Davis “FENCES”

Sienna Miller “LIVE BY NIGHT”

Lupita Nyong’o “QUEEN OF KATWE”

Rachel Weisz “THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS”

Greta Gerwig “20TH CENTURY WOMEN”

DARK HORSES Jennifer Connelly “AMERICAN PASTORAL”

Elle Fanning “20TH CENTURY WOMEN”

Naomie Harris “MOONLIGHT”

Elle Fanning “LIVE BY NIGHT”

Bryce Dallas Howard “GOLD”

Leslie Mann “THE COMEDIAN”

Rooney Mara Felicity Jones

“LION”

“A MONSTER CALLS”

Helen Mirren “COLLATERAL BEAUTY”

Kristen Stewart “BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALFTIME WALK”

Tilda Swinton Nicole Kidman

“DOCTOR STRANGE”

“LION”

Rooney Mara “LION”

Kate Winslet “COLLATERAL BEAUTY”

Octavia Spencer “HIDDEN FIGURES”

Helen Mirren “EYE IN THE SKY”

Supporting Actress Shows Mom Knows Best

Janelle Monae “HIDDEN FIGURES”

Roles that focus on motherhood and family populate category

A

licia Vikander walked off with the prize for “The Danish Girl” earlier this year, and 2016 could find another first-time nominee victorious in the supporting actress category, with the likes of Naomie Harris (“Moonlight”), Janelle Monae (“Hidden Figures”), Molly Shannon (“Other People”), and Greta Gerwig (“20th Century Women”) in the running. But they’ll have to battle such powerhouse previous nominees as Viola Davis (“Fences”), Nicole Kidman (“Lion”), and Michelle Williams (“Manchester by the Sea.”) In many of the performances, actresses are taking on maternal roles with strength

and compassion. Shannon, Felicity Jones (“A Monster Calls”), and Margo Martindale (“The Hollars”) play dying matriarchs who try to console their children through difficult times. Williams’ role of a grieving parent is a gut-wrenching portrait of loss. Davis struggles to maintain her family’s unity opposite Denzel Washington, who plays her husband. Kidman is the embodiment of unconditional love as an adoptive mother of two Indian boys. Gerwig delivers one of the best performances of her career as a maternal figure, though not related by blood, to a teenage boy. Even mothers who are less than stellar at the job, such as Harris’ crack addict, earn our compassion.

Molly Shannon “OTHER PEOPLE”

Recent Winners

2015

Alicia Vikander, “The Danish Girl”

2014

Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”

2013

Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”

Michelle Williams “MANCHESTER BY THE SEA”


58 Final Cut

Aye, There’s the Snub February 8, 1965

N

ow an annual ritual of Oscar night, the “biggest snubs and oversights” tweets, posts, and columns remind film lovers that for every actor who’s honored there are inevitably the also-rans. These unconscionable omissions are accompanied by countless gnashing teeth, as experts, armchair and otherwise, utter lamentations over the sterling performances that have been overlooked. It will take a hard search of the record books to find a film featuring two actors responsible for more “snub” hubbub than the 1965 drama “Becket.” Between them, Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole racked up 15 actor nominations with no wins. This was only marginally ameliorated in 2003 when O’Toole collected an honorary statue from the Academy, a late career recognition that Burton sadly never received. Silver screen lining: thanks to 21st century home entertainment options, all 15 performances are easy to see, even if teeth-gnashing might still ensue. STEVEN GAYDOS

Variety, VOL. 334, NO. 3 (USPS 146-820, ISSN 0011-5509) is published weekly, except the first week in July, the fourth week in November, and the fourth and fifth weeks in December, with 40 special issues: Jan (8), Feb (8), June (7), Aug (6), Nov (5) and Dec (6) by Variety Media LLC, 11175 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90025, a division of Penske Business Media. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA and at other mailing offices. Postmaster send address changes to: Variety, P.O. Box 15759, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5759. Canada Post International Publications Mail Product (Canadian Distribution) Publications Mail Agreement No. 40043404. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: RCS International Box 697 STN A, Windsor, Ontario N9A 6N4. Sales agreement No. 0607525. Annual subscription rates: USA, $329; Canada, $359 (includes GST); Europe, $399; rest of world, $599. Single copies are available for $8; back issues $11 U.S., $15 International. A reasonable fee shall be assessed to cover handling costs in the event of a cancellation of a subscription. Subscription customer service is available by phone: (800) 552-3632 or email: variety@pubservice.com. For content licensing, editorial re-use requests or custom ePrints or reprints, please email us at licensing@variety.com. Variety © 2015 by Variety Media, LLC. Variety and the Flying V logo are trademarks of Penske Business Media. Printed in the U.S.A.


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