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o 5 THE HOT

September/October 2016

Good food straight from the garden

Fresh & fast meals / Spring greens / Hot 50 / Orchard picnic / Tamarillos

Fresh & fast Light & bright seasonal suppers

Lemon polenta cake, page 10

foodtolove.co.nz

SEP/OCT 2016 $8.50 INCL GST

Issue 119

Spring

What we’re eating, imbibing, learning and loving

Celebrating citrus • Fried haloumi with lemon • Preserves • Lemon syrup • Lemon butter sauce • Lemon ricotta bruschetta

Kitchen know-how

Stir-fry, sauté and steam like a pro + prep your pantry for spring


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T H I S PAG E

No. 1 vanilla cheesecake with rhubarb & red alyssum. See page 44 for recipe.

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Contents September/October 2016

The Scene

Eat

Learn

The Scene 50 hot new products, places, events, trends 15 and people

Warm welcome Fiona Hugues creates a lavish spread of spring-inspired 38 dishes

A fantastic spring fritatta for lunch

Wine Bob Campbell shares some new, controversial 28 wine styles

P HOTOG RA P H JA N I SHE P HE RD ; STYL I N G F I ON A H U G U E S , G ATHE RU M COL L EC TI F

Kitchen tools Organic and natural 30 tableware pieces Eatery Wild One Wholefoods Eatery at The Mount 32

Change your tune Flavoursome and inspiring international 46 dishes Al fresco impulse Easy outdoor eating to celebrate the season 54 Food for friends Luca Villari and a few friends meet for 60 an Italian feast

81

Sophie Gray’s guide to stir-frying, sautéing and steaming spring 82 veg Delicious ways with watercress and 84 asparagus Three tasty and speedy 85 prepared lunches How to pick, dry and store your spring herbs 86 for later use

Local

Wander

Tasty tamarillos Make magic with the exotic ‘tree tomato’ 90

Taking it global The regional cuisine of New Zealand and the 114 people behind it

Garden glories A food tour and feast with Giulio Sturla of 100 Roots restaurant In season Quick ideas with parsnips, yams and 106 lemons Raise a toast Josh Emett prepares a lunch to celebrate Queenstown’s Clicquot 108 in the Snow

Style and sustenance A tasting tour of the 120 Italian city Milan

Extras Welcome Menus Taste 24/7 Recipe index and measurements Bake the back page

6 12 112 127 130

Spring loaded Emma Galloway cooks with new-season fruit 70 and vegetables

On the cover

Connect with Taste FAC E B O O K I N S TAG R A M WEBSITE

A wonderfully moist, rustic lemon polenta cake. See page 10 for recipe.

facebook.com/tastemagazine @tastemagnz foodtolove.co.nz

TA S T E

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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WELCOME

Season of change The most abundant produce at this point is winter-hardy salad greens, spinach and kale. But hey, it’s still technically spring! Warm weather, bountiful produce and daylight savings are at our fingertips, so let’s celebrate, I say. Spring has always been enjoyed as a time of growth, renewal, new life and better times, so it’s no surprise that many feel the need for a personal shake-up come September. Blossoming trees, the scent of new growth and longer daylight hours send a mental trigger for change. For me, this is as simple as spending more time outside, reconnecting with nature and freshening up my food to shake off a bit of winter apathy. We’ve tried to capture this new-season feeling within the pages of this issue, and I’m hoping it will read like a breath of fresh air. Fiona Hugues prepares a gorgeous spring lunch, while Sophie Gray teaches us how to pick, prep and cook seasonal greens to maximise their goodness. Emma Galloway looks to her kitchen garden for inspiration, and Luca Villari celebrates the upcoming Festival Italiano with foodie friends. We travel New Zealand to unearth fascinating local foodies, discovering a tamarillo nursery (page 90), a root-to-stalk restaurant (page 100), and our annual Hot 50 list of new products, people and places you need to know about. Other than in the psychological sense, there is another change on the horizon this month. While I’ll still be a big part of the Taste team, I’m taking on a new Editor-In-Chief role over a group of magazines (including Taste, of course). So I’m handing over the editor’s seat to our current deputy editor, Kristina Rapley. Just like this issue, she’s a breath of fresh air – a proud Kiwi, lover of all things local, and an unashamed foodie. She knows, loves and lives Taste, so you’re in good hands! Have a wonderful month,

YES, IT’S STILL FREEZING.

Managing Editor

P HOTOG RA P H G E T TY I M AG E S

Shelley Ferguson

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NEW YORK by

Discover the CitiZ&milk machine new design and add a touch of elegance to your coffee rituals around the globe.

The ultimate coffee in town.

www.nespresso.com/citiz


Shelley Ferguson Mike Watson D E P U T Y E D I T O R Kristina Rapley S U B E D I T O R / W R I T E R Nick Russell S U B E D I T O R Stephanie Attwater E D I T O R I A L A S S I S T A N T Fiona Williams MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR

F O O D W R I T E R S Emma Galloway, Karla Goodwin, Sophie Gray, Fiona Hugues, Dariush Lolaiy, Giulio Sturla, Tracey Sunderland, Luca Villari W I N E W R I T E R Bob Campbell mw COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

Paul Gardiner

Stuart Dick Kath Gola C L A S S I F I E D A D V E R T I S I N G S A L E S Kim Chapman B R A N D M A N A G E R S U B S C R I P T I O N S & R E T A I L Lauren Dyke

GROUP SALES DIRECTOR PREMIUM LIFESTYLE TITLES COMMERCIAL BRAND MANAGER

Paul Dykzeul Brendon Hill P R O D U C T I O N / A D V E R T C O - O R D I N A T O R Raewynn Cowie D I S T R I B U T I O N Gordon & Gotch P R I N T E R Webstar CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

PUBLISHER – PREMIUM/SPECIALIST TITLES

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES

postal address: Taste, Private Bag 92512, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141. street address: Bauer Media, Shed 12, 90 Wellesley Street, Auckland. ph: (09) 308 2739 email: taste@bauermedia.co.nz. ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

auckland: Kath Gola, ph: (09) 308 2723, email: kgola@bauermedia.co.nz. classified advertising sales: Kim Chapman, ph: (07) 578 3646, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz. sales manager wellington & christchurch: Ros Ellison, ph: 021 626 669, email: rellison@bauermedia.co.nz. sales manager australia, nz titles: Rachel McLean, ph: (09) 308 2760, email: rmclean@bauermedia.co.nz.

Taste (issn 1177-0414) is subject to copyright in its entirety. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled ‘Not for Publication’. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group (nz) lp. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. This magazine is subject to NZ Press Council procedures. A complaint must first be directed in writing to the editor’s email address. If not satisfied with the response, the complaint may be referred to the Press Council, po Box 10-879, The Terrace, Wellington 6143. Or use the online complaint form at presscouncil.org.nz. Please include copies of the article and all correspondence with the publication.

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P H OTOG RA P H G E T TY I M AG E S

SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES

auckland subscribers: ph: (09) 308 2721 or call tollfree on: 0800 magshop (0800 624 746), fax: (09) 308 2769, or email: magshop@magshop.co.nz or visit: magshop.co.nz. Please advise change of address as soon as possible. bulk/corporate subscriptions email: corporates@magshop.co.nz or ph: (09) 308 2700.


LONDON by

Discover the CitiZ&milk machine new design and add a touch of elegance to your coffee rituals around the globe.

The ultimate coffee in town.

www.nespresso.com/citiz


COVER RECIPE

Cook the cover Polenta is a staple of northern Italian cuisine and works wonderfully in this moist, rustic cake which is flavoured with seasonal lemons and topped with crunchy pistachios food and its neutral flavour makes it very versatile. The cheap instant stuff has next to no flavour, so source a good Italian stoneground polenta, especially when polenta is the star of the dish. As with wheat flour, polenta that is stone-milled contains a lot more of the oil of the grain, which shortens its shelf-life but gives it a vastly superior texture and flavour.

P O L E N TA I S G R E AT C O M F O R T

Lemon polenta cake 1 hour 15 minutes plus cooling time S E R V E S 8-10

R E A DY I N

110g fine polenta 80ml boiling water 200g butter, softened 130g caster sugar 1 Tbsp honey 3 large eggs 90g self-raising flour 60ml milk Zest 1 lemon ICING

BAUE R SY N D I CAT I O N

110g icing sugar 1½ Tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp lemon zest, to garnish Chopped pistachios, to garnish

Preheat oven to 160°C and line a 20cm cake tin with baking paper. Soak polenta in boiling water in a heatproof bowl for 10 minutes. 2 Beat the butter with the caster sugar and honey with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. 3 Beat in eggs one at a time. Stir in flour, milk, lemon zest and the soaked polenta along with a pinch of salt. 4 Tip mixture into tin, smooth top and bake for 50-55 minutes until golden and a skewer withdraws clean (cover cake with foil if it colours too quickly while cooking). 5 Cool cake in tin, then turn out onto a wire rack to finish cooling. 6 Mix icing sugar with the lemon juice and drizzle onto the cooled cake. Sprinkle over lemon zest and scatter with chopped pistachios. ○ 1

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PERFECTION ON A PLATE?

Precision is a key ingredient for serious cooks. Fisher & Paykel’s sleek five-zone Touch&Slide induction hob takes culinary control to a whole new level.

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Menus

Escape the winter cooking rut and brighten up your repertoire with these spring-inpired dishes. Whatever day you have planned, you’ll find a menu to suit

Lazy Sunday

Dinner party

94 Tamarillo confit with pinot noir

44 Parmesan-crusted lamb rack with mint, pea & broad bean smash

67 Zeppole di nonna

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Lighten up

43 Tuna carpaccio with blueberries, lemon & spring micro greens

51

43 Grilled asparagus with pecorino & sunny-side eggs

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Veal schnitzels with burnt caper butter

44 No 1 vanilla cheesecake with rhubarb & red alyssum

Quinoa salad with pomegranate, pumpkin & ashed goat’s cheese

92 Fruity yoghurt icy pops ○


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TA S T E P R O M O T I O N

The

perfect time for

dining Food has never been more creative and delicious or the dining out experience more exciting

W

ellington fosters an amazing cuisine climate with creative dining option for visitors and locals – as for the “other” climate, Wellington on a fine day is always a glorious thing! Among the capital city’s gastronomic delights is the Museum Art Hotel. Known for its art collection and quirky but sophisticated aesthetic, The Museum Art Hotel keeps things artistic in the kitchen as well as on the walls. Hippopotamus Restaurant and Cocktail Bar, led by Executive Chef Laurent Loudeac, has distinguished itself with a number of awards and a menu that is unmistakably French with a fresh New Zealand approach. Winner of the Dilmah Global High Tea Challenge

2015, the restaurant serves a high tea worthy of taking time over – something that’s becoming more valuable these busy times. Elegant treats piled on gleaming cake stands satisfy the eye as much as the taste buds. If it’s fine dining you’re longing for, the midday brasserie at Hippopotamus features star dishes from the dinner menu. And at dinner, the main dishes revel in New Zealand seafood, steak and venison with stylish French-influenced flavours, while the wine list matches the menu in pairings better than any dating app could make. For a comprehensive dining experience, settle in for an intriguingly delicious degustation menu or book one of the luxurious private dining rooms. The Museum Art Hotel is a special place to

stay when visiting Wellington. They have recently joined the QT Hotels & Resorts, and will become the first QT Hotel in New Zealand, as QT Museum Wellington. Despite a formal name change by Summer 2016, the hotel will preserve its well-known brand of arty chic. “We want to focus on attracting people from the arts community,” QT Managing Director, David Seargeant says, “those who enjoy architecture, fashion and fine dining.” There is $8 million being spent on the evolution of the lobby, guest rooms and public spaces. All changes will maintain the ethos of the Museum Art Hotel and evolve the property with signature QT quirks and style.

Find out more, visit www.museumhotel.co.nz | www.qthotelsandresorts.com


HOT 50

The Scene

Products, people and places we’re loving right now...

WINE

KITCHEN TOOLS

CAFE

Exciting new wine styles with Bob Campbell

Give your table setting an organic refresh

A wholefoods eatery at The Mount

o 5 THE HOT

P HOTOG RA P H A N N A K I D M A N

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New products, places, trends, events or people we love right now

New Zealand World Class Bartender of The Year Kneale Brown of Matterhorn in Wellington has been named New Zealand’s World Class Bartender of the Year 2016, after the New Zealand finals of Diageo World Class, one of the world’s premium bartending competitions, designed to discover the next generation of behind-the-bar talent and celebrate the creativity and skill of mixology. Kneale is in Miami to compete in the World Class Global Finals as we speak, and as the winner of the New Zealand final, he’s also won the opportunity to open and run his own bar with support from leading local beverage company Lion Co. Nice one Kneale!

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HOT 50

4 Cricket flour With the world population estimated to exceed 9 billion by 2050, Kiwi business Live Longer has developed an interesting solution to feeding them all. They have released New Zealand’s first cricket flour. It’s high-protein flour made by milling roasted crickets. Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it! RRP $24.99 for 100g. livelonger.co.nz

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5

RRP $5 per bottle manukee.co.nz

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WilliamsWarn BrewKeg50

It’s never been easier to get crafty with beer. Kiwi master brewer Ian Williams and food technologist Anders Warn present the BrewKeg 50, which produces 50 litres of beer or cider in five to seven days, with no formal training required. It’s ideal for smaller bars and cafes wanting to put their own individual touches on a beer or the home brewer with a raging thirst. RRP $1299. williamswarn.com

Tasti Smooshed Wholefood Balls Bliss balls are showing no signs of slowing down in the popularity stakes and there’s a new kid on the block – Tasti Smooshed Wholefood Balls. Sweetened only with dates, this delicious new snack with no nasties comes in three flavours - Brazen Berry, Mocha Macchiato and Orange Zinger. RRP $2.29 per pack.

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T RU E FO OD & YOG A P H OTOG RA P H S BA B I CH E M A RT E N S

True Food & Yoga Celebrated restaurateur Nic Watt and wife Kelly have leased the Okahu Bay waterfront space to start a wellness hub and yoga centre. True Food & Yoga embraces the ever-increasingly popular health and wellness movement while also offering food that supports an active, healthy lifestyle. The 80-seat café serves healthy take-out soups, salads and smoothies, and you’ll bend over backwards for their consciously sourced breakfasts, lunches and dinners. truefoodandyoga.co.nz

Manukee UMF 10+ Manuka Honey Daily Wellness Drink A drink sweetened with manuka honey and made in two flavours: fresh lemon juice & natural elderflower, and pear & ginger.


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7 Devon on the Wharf

MoVida

Legendary Melbourne restaurant MoVida has taken over the kitchen at Auckland restaurant Ostro’s new-look City Terrace for a pop-up until the end of September. Fans of chef Frank Camorra’s inventive tapas-style Spanish cuisine can get their fix without having to cross the ditch. seafarers.co.nz/movida

Occupying a beautifully renovated space in Auckland’s Devonport Wharf, Devon on the Wharf is husband and wife hospitality duo Alex Isik and Nigar Ivgen’s latest venture. The new all-day eatery pays homage to their Turkish heritage, while drawing inspiration from the stunning coastal views. It’s the fourth new opening in less than two years for the couple behind Nazar Group, following in the footsteps of Nomad in Point Chevalier, Deco in Titirangi’s Lopdell House, and Bodrum Kitchen in New Lynn. devononthewharf.nz

TRENDING Oatcakes They’ve been around for an age, but oatcakes are enjoying a moment in the limelight and Huntley & Palmers have come to the party with a new range of Baked Oat Thins. They’re fantastic with a wedge of creamy brie and a thick, rich, fruit compote. The oatcakes come in three flavours: Quinoa, Toasted Sesame & Cracked Pepper; Cranberry, Coconut & Honey, and Pumpkin, Sunflower and Chia. RRP $3.99 available from

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all leading supermarkets nationwide.

Lonely Planet From The Source We love their travel tomes and were chuffed when they segued into culinary titles with their ‘From The Source’ series last year. New to the Lonely Planet stable this October is From The Source: Japan, and From The Source: Spain, with authentic dishes direct from the kitchens where they were perfected. RRP $34.99.

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Nut Brothers It’s a familiar story: three mates buy a peanut butter machine off TradeMe and build a successful nut butter empire. Wait, no, that’s nutty! Still, their crunchy peanut, smooth peanut, almond with sunflower seed, and chia fibre nut butters have been a nationwide hit. They’re just added a decedent peanut butter & dark chocolate spread as well. RRP from $5.99. nutbrothers.co.nz

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THE SCENE

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HOT 50

14 Deep Creek Brewing Co

With a brewery and taproom in Auckland’s Silverdale and a brewhouse and eatery in Browns Bay, Deep Creek are a Shore thing. For those not in the hood, they sell their award-winning smallbatch beers, in nifty 330ml cans.

15 Cheese month Cheese fans unite! For the whole month of October, New Zealand-made specialty cheese will be celebrated around the country thanks to the New Zealand Specialist Cheese Association. To see what’s on in your area, visit nzsca.org.nz/ cheese-month

RRP $18 a six-pack. dcbrewing.co.nz

12 TRENDING

Heritage seeds

There’s nothing better than growing your own produce so why not take your vege patch to the next level and introduce some heritage and heirloom varieties? Think rainbow chard, strawberry popping corn, and kamokamo from one of our favourite heritage seed suppliers, Koanga Institute (koanga. org.nz). Another supplier is Italian Seeds Pronto who “bring old world flavour to the new world” with Italian seed varietals of chicory, artichoke, eggplant, tomato and herbs, to name a few.

16 13 Wither Hills We love the rugged beauty of Wither Hills HQ in Marlborough, not to mention their stunning range of wines. So we were excited to learn they’ll be opening a new restaurant at the winery and cellar door later in the year, with a menu drawing on produce sourced from around the region. Watch this space! witherhills.co.nz

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Allan Scott Family Winemakers When Josh, Sara and Victoria Scott were young they would help their father Allan on the family vineyard in Marlborough. Today, the three siblings are stepping up to make their own mark on Allan Scott Family Winemakers with a new premium line, aptly named Generations. Available in sauvignon blanc, riesling, dry riesling, chardonnay, and pinot noir. Prices start at $26, available from leading restaurants and fine wine retailers nationwide.

CH E E S E & KO HL RA B I P H OTOG RA P H S G E TTY I M AG E S

Visit italianseedspronto.co.nz for more information.


17 Gefu Bivita Sprouting Jar This neat miniature greenhouse provides the perfect climatic conditions to cultivate your own crispy sprouts in just a few days on your kitchen benchtop.

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kitchenwaresuperstore.co.nz

TRENDING

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Raclette.

Finally! The melting greatness we’ve been seeing all over the web has finally arrived in New Zealand. Melt, an Auckland-based gourmet grilled cheese food truck, is adopting the traditional Swiss technique of scraping grilled cheese straight off the wheel and onto an array of delicious things. Find out where Melt will be via their Facebook page, facebook.com/MELTracletteAKL or Instagram, melt_auckland

OXO Good Grips HandHeld Spiralizer This wee spiralizer washes well, fits easily in a drawer and the twist action makes short work of those newseason courgettes. Forget the bulky stand spiralizer, this will do the trick nicely.

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RRP $59.95. home-essentials.co.nz

PASTA P HOTO G RA P H S TOD D E Y RE

19 Sunbeam Food Saver VS5000 Sous-vide super-sweet with this nifty vacuum sealer. Seal meat for the water bath, or seal meat with marinades for quicker absorption. It also helps extend the life of veges. RRP$369.99 from leading appliance stores.

Make like an Italian

What better way to spend an evening than learning how to make fresh homemade pasta with like-minded folk, from an Italian chef with deep roots in this time-honoured tradition? Pasta & Cuore, a restaurant and pastificio (pasta factory) in the heart of Auckland’s Mt Eden, offer twohour workshops led by chef Stefania Ugolini, who explains the importance of selecting quality ingredients, how to mix, knead, and roll the pasta, and how to cut it into basic shapes such as tagliatelle, pappardelle and tagliatelle. She also explains how the pasta should be stored and cooked. Price is $90 per person, for more information and to book, visit pastaecuore.co.nz.

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THE SCENE

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HOT 50

Whittaker’s K Bar Block

Remember saving your pocket money and hitting the dairy for a K Bar when you were a kid? In a nod to nostalgia, Whittaker’s have launched the K Bar block range. They come in Lime, Pineapple or Raspberry flavours, featuring Whittaker’s bean-to-bar chocolate with a smooth filling that’s kinder to teeth than the original. K Bar blocks are in stores nationwide now for a limited time. whittakers.co.nz

The next big thing? Here are three new white wine grapes that producers hope will be “the next big thing”.

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Albarino My favourite of the three, this is Spain’s best white grape variety. I think it’s perfectly suited to New Zealand conditions, making a fresh and tangy wine that typically has citrus/mandarin characters and a weighty texture. Delicious! R E C O M M E N D E D Astrolabe 2015 Sleepers

Vineyard Albarino, Marlborough $24 Gently aromatic albarino with a seductively soft texture and lime, orange zest, delicately chalky/mineral and subtle apricot flavours. Very pretty wine with impressive purity and delicacy.

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Arneis From the north of Italy where arneis produces often highly aromatic wines with peach, almond, pear and sometimes hops characters. It’s well suited to cool climate growing conditions and is a logical choice for New Zealand. R E C O M M E N D E D Villa Maria 2013 Cellar Selection

Arneis, Hawkes Bay $18.49 Fresh and delicately fruity wine with ripe stone fruit and citrus flavours. Delicate and with just a hint of sweetness although the wine has a pleasantly drying finish.

Gruner Veltliner Famously grown in Austria where it is the country’s most widely planted white grape variety. If you like riesling you’ll probably like gruner veltliner which has similar crisp acidity and tangy citrus flavours although more pepper and spice. I often pick up a green tea-like character. R E C O M M E N D E D Tinpot Hut 2015 McKee Vineyard Gruner, Veltliner,

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Dumpling tour Eat Auckland Tours offer three different walking food tours around Auckland. Taking place in New Zealand’s dumpling epicentre of Dominion Road, their dumpling tour takes punters to six different restaurants and three different shops to learn about and taste the many different cuisines of China. $55 per person, visit eatauckland.co.nz

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TA S T E

TRENDING Tamarillos Tamarillos are available from April to November and are perfect for adding both acidity and sweetness to your cooking. We especially love to use it in savoury dishes and recently came across Tamco – a New Zealand company making relish and vinegar from these tangy, fleshy fruits.

Available from selected specialty stores and from tamco.co.nz

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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Charlie Brown Charles Scarceriaux bought a 40-year-old caravan in France, refurbished it himself then shipped it to New Zealand to serve authentic crêpes to the fine folk of Wanaka. Based on Brownston Street, fans of the French-style pancake can get their fill of classics like ham and cheese, or lemon and sugar. There’s also gourmet options like smoked salmon, cream cheese, sun-dried tomato and chive or the house special of banana, salted caramel sauce, walnuts and whipped cream. facebook.com/CharlieBrownCrepes

TA M A R I L LO P HOTOG RA P H G E T TY I M AG E S

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Marlborough $25.50 Light, fresh gruner veltliner with citrus, chalk/mineral and subtle green tea/wildflower flavours. Dry with a nice balance of fruity acidity. Try it with fresh oysters garnished with lime juice.


29 Harpoon Cold Brew coffee in a cask For when you’re having an epic bad day, Harpoon now make their outstanding cold brew in a 2-litre cask. The Ethiopia Yirgacheffe is brewed slightly concentrated to be enjoyed straight over ice. It pours from a one-way valve so it’s good for three months, if you feel like pacing yourself. RRP $27.99

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Taste of Auckland Explore Auckland’s best food, drink and restaurants in one place on November 17-20 at Taste of Auckland in partnership with Electrolux. Over 100 fine food producers, wine makers, distillers and craft brewers join 12 invited restaurants at the event. And, for the first time this year, enthusiastic foodies can get up close and personal with top chefs at Electrolux Chefs’ Secrets. At the Electrolux Taste Theatre guests can learn from chefs in live cooking demonstrations, and the TSB Bank Producers Market showcases New Zealand’s finest artisanal products.

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The restaurants exhibiting at Taste of Auckland submit a dish for the Best in Taste competition. Former winner Sergio Maglione of Farina restaurant shares the secret to his success: “A winning dish is always simple, tasty, made from scratch and prepared with an element of spontaneity. I never pre-plan which dish I am going to enter, I always wait until judging day and choose a dish based on what would suit the weather and environment best on that particular day. I love the atmosphere at Taste of Auckland, cooking in front of a big crowd is always exciting and as a chef, I feed off their energy. The best part is being able to make people happy with my dishes.” Buy tickets from tasteofauckland.co.nz

FA RI N A P HOTOG RA P H TODD E Y RE

Shepherd Restaurant

From the folk behind Wellington’s Ti Kouka café, Leeds Street Bakery and Golding’s Free Dive bar comes a new eatery in the heart of Hannah’s Laneway. It’s a 70-seat restaurant with a focus on presenting local produce in the most innovative ways possible in a casual but sophisticated setting. facebook.com/ ShepherdRestaurant

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The Ned Pinot Rosé 2016 vintage

When the sunshine comes out to play this spring, so does the rosé! The Ned Pinot Rosé 2016 is available now and is the perfect accompaniment to light, refreshing salads and cheese platters. RRP $17.99 from supermarkets and alcohol stores nationwide.

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Aotea Native Tonics

The Maori traditions of brewing herbal tonics to cure ailments forms the basis of the four tasty flavours made by Aotea founder Tama Toki. Ingredients like kawakawa and horopito are picked from the bush on his home turf of Great Barrier Island and combined with real herbs, leaves, roots, citrus juice and manuka honey to deliver a welcoming wellness boost. They’re available from cafes and eateries nationwide and selected specialty food stores. aoteatonics.co.nz

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HOT 50

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38 Copper Kettle Crisps Cooked in small batches to create the ultimate flavour and crunch, Copper Kettle’s new Special Reserve range are so delicious, you’ll want to indulge every night of the week! Available in premium flavour combinations of Wagyu Beef & Wasabi, Creamy Saffron & Sage and Champagne Vinaigrette & Shallot. RRP $3.99

Best Young Chef

Leslie Hottiaux, chef and co-owner of Auckland’s Apero Food and Wine on K Road is taking on the world for the title of Best Young Chef. She won the Pacific regional final in Melbourne against tough opposition with her vegetarian dish of ‘Potato Gnocchi’ Mushrooms, Pine Nuts and Truffle. Now she faces the off against the world’s 20 best young chefs (under 30 years of age) at the finals in Milan on October 13. We wish her luck! finedininglovers.com/

True Manuka Honey

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All honey is not created equal - even when it comes to the magnificent manuka variety. True Honey are a hive-to-jar producer who guarantee the high concentrations of manuka in their honey. RRP $68.90 for 250g. truehoney.co.nz

3 6

Huffman’s Crafty Sauces Huffman’s dedication to using only the finest natural ingredients is what sets their sauces apart from the rest. The vinegar they use, for example, takes the team at their distillery in Christchurch nine months to naturally ferment before being distilled and added to their brew. And their Kapiti Coast grown kaffir lime leaves are delivered within a day or two of picking before being infused into their Thai sweet chilli. Prices start at $12.99,

Premium instant-coffee mixed with Siberian chaga mushroom and lion’s mane mushroom extracts along with wild rhodiola root creates a drink that gives you the coffee high while balancing your metabolism. The Four Sigmatic brand sachets can be mixed with hot water like a regular instant coffee or blended into your favourite smoothie. international.foursigmatic.com

thegreenseed.co.nz

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39 The Green Seed Coconut Chips For something novel to sprinkle on your salads or sandwiches (or just snack on) comes these tasty vegan coconut chips from The Green Seed. Their Smokin’ BBQ flavour is made with real sun-dried tomatoes, onion and garlic and is an amazing addition to the classic avocado on toast. RRP $4.99.

available from selected supermarkets, eateries and specialty stores nationwide.

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from all leading supermarkets.

Mushroom coffee


40 Cookbooks Three local titles we’re loving right now

Celebrate the flavour of summer

• Cooking 4 Change – 101 Famous Kiwis share their favourite recipes $49.99 (Potton and Burton).

• Scrumptious by Chelsea Winter published October 3, $50, Random House (NZ).

• Little Tables: Anytime Breakfasts from Around The World by Vanessa Lewis $39.99, Beatnik Publishing.

42 41 Graham Norton & Invivo Graham Norton’s 2016 vintage sauvignon blanc for Invivo is just as cheeky as the man himself, packed with passionfruit, nectarine, feijoa and lime zest flavours. Invivo cofounder Tim Lightbourne and winemaker Rob Cameron travelled to Norton’s holiday home – Bantry House in County Cork, Ireland – along with six Marlborough sauvignon blanc pressings, for a blending session (we can only imagine Graham’s puns around that one). New for 2016 is also Graham Norton Shiraz. Graham Norton’s Own Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2016 vintage, $18.99 from New World, Pak N Save, Liquor King and other good liquor outlets nationwide

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Spice n Easy

Gubinge powder

Sometimes you want to make a curry from scratch but get put off by the long list of spices you need for that authentic taste. Enter Spice n Easy Indian Curry Recipe Kits. With not a pre-made sauce or paste in sight, you can create a homemade curry without all the cost and fuss.

Gubinge is the name the Aboriginal Nyul Nyul of Kimberley give to the kakadu plum – a potent, natural source of vitamin C. Loving Earth dehydrate the gubinge and mill it into a powder that you can add to breakfast bowls, smoothies or baking. All profits go back to the Nyul Nyul, too. Nice!

RRP $4.29, available from most supermarkets and specialty stores nationwide, or at spiceneasy.co.nz

RRP $22.90 for 50g. lovingearth.net/gubingepowder

Enjoy signature dishes from our hottest restaurants: ARTWOK ◆ DEPOT ◆ EURO ◆ FARINA ◆ FISH MISS CLAWDY ◆ PARIS BUTTER ◆ THE CULPEPER TOK TOK ◆ PLUS more to be announced soon

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

100+ Artisanal Producers 12 Live Bands 18 Chef Demonstrations New for 2016: Electrolux Chefs’ Secret Delicious selection of craft beers & boutique wine

Advance tickets from $25 at tasteofauckland.co.nz #tasteofauckland


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HOT 50

Azabu On the Ponsonby restaurant strip is a new Japanese and Nikkei (Peruvian-Japanese) restaurant from former Ebisu head chef Yukio Ozeki. There’s also a saké and cocktail bar called Roji attached. We love the South American and Japanese fusion in dishes like the tuna sashimi tostada with corn, wasabi tartar, picked daikon and chopped jalapeño. Nikkei cuisine has become a gastronomic sensation around the world, so this is your chance to see what it’s all about. azabuponsonby.co.nz

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4 4 TRENDING

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is widely revered for its healing properties and we’re seeing it pop up in all sorts of new products. True cinnamon, also known as Ceylon cinnamon, comes from the small Cinnamomum verum tree native to Sri Lanka but most of the cinnamon we see here in New Zealand is of the Cassia variety, mainly grown in Indonesia and China. We’re loving Spice n Easy’s manuka honey with Ceylon cinnamon from Pure Cinnamon. Their cinnamon is also outstanding over coffee, hot chocolate, ice cream, yoghurt or fruity cocktails. Visit cinnamonpure.com for more information

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Parrot Dog equity raise

It seems like everyone wants to ride on the craft beer bandwagon and that includes investors. When Wellington craft brewer ParrotDog launched a crowdfunding bid to expand their brewery and open a brewbar they raised $1.2 million in 12 hours. It’s all for a good cause...

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RRP $8.99 from selected supermarkets and specialty stores.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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NutriBombs They’re a superfood snack designed by an athlete and former chef. They’re paleo, vegan, gluten and diary free and tailored to certain exercise types, with labels like Yoga, Endurance Performance, and Recovery. All that and they actually taste nice – that’s quite an achievement.

Uncle Joe’s The Marlborough company produces nut and seed oils, spreads and kernels. The top restaurant in Australasia, Ben Shewry’s Attica restaurant in Melbourne, uses their products. His restaurant is No.33 on the prestigious World’s 50 Best Restaurants list, so if he likes them, you probably will too.

RRP $3.99 per pack. rebelfood.co.nz

unclejoes.co.nz

50 Tuatara Tiramisu Oatmeal Stout Have a beer for dessert with this chocolate and coffee-infused stout, aged in fortified barrels. It’s flavoured with Mojo Coffee’s La Jacoba beans, Wellington Chocolate Factory Dominican Republic cacao nibs, and Heilala vanilla. tuatarabrewing.co.nz/ beer/tiramisu/ ○

CI N N A M O N P HOTO G RA P H A LA M Y

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Pampero milk caramel spread Dulce de Leche is a traditional delicacy originating in South America. When two Brazilian’s living in New Zealand couldn’t find a suitable alternative, they set about making their own. This premium New Zealand-made milk caramel spread can be baked into pastries, ladled onto yoghurt, used as a rich filling for slices, cakes and cheesecakes, used as a sweetener for coffee, or simply eaten straight from the jar!


LIIIN0 LIN0 LIN L IN N0 N 01177 177_ 17 777_ 77 77__S SA SAV_ SAV AV_ AV A V_T TAST TAS TA AS AST AS ST TE


TASTE + COPPER KETTLE SPECIAL RESERVE

End of a busy day

Relax, unwind and catch up after a long day while snacking on Copper Kettle’s new Special Reserve flavour range. Introducing the foodies favourite – Wagyu Beef & Wasabi Cream


Photography by Vanessa Lewis. Product credits: French Country Collections, Citta Design, Freedom Furniture, Living and Giving, Farmers, Antiques of Epsom.

Prepare your palate before your evening meal with Copper Kettle Special Reserve flavour range, also including Creamy Saffron & Sage and Champagne Vinaigrette & Shallot.

GREEN BEAN DIP SERVES 4 Pair it with Copper Kettle Special Reserve Wagyu Beef and Wasabi Cream This light, zingy dip is the perfect match for the rich, meaty Wagyu beef flavour. The wasabi cream adds an interesting complexity, cutting through the richness and balancing each bite. 1 cup, peeled broad beans, can be from frozen. (160g) Âź of a red onion, finely diced 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp lemon juice 1/2 an avocado Pepper, finely ground Âź teaspoon salt 1 To peel broad beans, pinch one end of the seed pod with finger tips to rip open and press the other end of the pod until the bright green bean pops out. Peel a few extra to garnish the dip with. Place into a bowl and discard the grey casing. 2 Tip the green beans into the bowl of a blender or food processor. Blitz until finely cut, add diced onion and blitz again. Turn blender on, adding the olive oil through the top of the machine (as you would when making a mayonnaise). Add the lemon juice and blend until combined. 3 Scoop the ripe avocado pulp into the blender bowl and season well with pepper and salt. Blitz again until well combined. Tip into a small bowl, sprinkling a few beans on top, and drizzle with olive oil. Grind pepper on top to taste and serve alongside your bowl of Copper Kettle Special Reserve Wagyu Beef and Wasabi Cream.

Style notes:

Serve dip in rustic bowls in earthy tones alongside chips on top of a chopping board. We used a wooden dip bowl from Citta Design and chopping board from Farmers.


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WINE

Orange oddity Heard of natural wine? Orange wine? Wine in an egg? These new and controversial wine styles will shortly be coming to a wine store near you Bob Campbell master of wine

Back to the future

Tony Bish 2015 Golden Egg Chardonnay, Hawke’s Bay, $34.95 Tony describes the structure of this wine as being “kind of eggshaped”. I know what he means, it’s got no rough edges and is smooth as a baby’s bottom. This is definitely worth a try.

makes normally white wine go orange. Lovers of the style celebrate the flavour and character that results and accept astringency as part of the wine’s structure. It’s a ‘love it, or hate it’ option, although I’m somewhere between those two extremes.

Orange is the new white

R E C O M M E N DAT I O N

R E C O M M E N DAT I O N R E C O M M E N DAT I O N

Natural Wine Co. 2015 Pinot Gris, Gisborne, $19.95 Made with love by a Gisborne couple Geoff and Nicola Wright from their own biodynamically-grown grapes. They claim their wine is low allergen as it has only minimal sulphur added. Fresh and fruity wine with pear and honeysuckle flavours.

One egg or two? Egg-shaped concrete fermenters allow white wine to receive more contact with yeasty deposits, which adds texture and a brioche-like yeasty flavour to the wine, particularly chardonnay. Tony Bish is the first to release an egg-tank fermented wine in this country, and it’s a beaut! He let me compare his egg-fermented wine with a similar wine that had been tank fermented and I easily preferred the beautifully creamy texture of the egg wine.

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The skins of white grapes contain lots of flavour and tannins. Conventional white wine making typically involves pressing the grapes to release the juice; the juice is fermented while the skins are discarded. Winemakers can extract more flavour by letting the grape skins soak in the juice, but they run the risk of extracting excessive tannins, which can make the wine feel quite astringent. Orange wine involves leaving the skins and juice together for weeks or even months. This extra skin contact

Tongue in Groove 2015 Little Stomper, Waipara, $30 This wine qualifies for ‘natural’ as well as ‘orange’ status. With no additives, it is cloudy and orangecoloured. Made from mostly pinot gris with a little bit of gewurztraminer (both grapes have pink skins), it is quite a grippy wine but it certainly has character. It’s a good introduction to orange wines. ○ Props ▶ Olio Stoneware Jug from Everyday Needs; Menu Wine Breather from Simon James Concept Store; glassware from Father Rabbit. See Where to Buy, page 127.

P HOTOG RA P H A N G I E HU M P H RE YS

Wine must have been pretty basic when it was first invented, probably in Georgia. The world’s first winemakers would have crushed grapes in an open container and let the juice ferment for a few days before drinking it within a fairly short time period. The fermented juice would have rapidly oxidised and turned to vinegar. The ‘natural wine’ movement would like us to make wine the way it was made before agrichemicals were used in vineyards and preservatives used in wineries. “Natural wine is wine made without chemical and minimum technological intervention in growing grapes and making them into wine”, according to Wikipedia. That’s a fairly loose definition, but you get the idea. I like the idea of no additives, although that can compromise the wine’s ability to age. It’s best to drink them as soon as possible. These are not wines to cellar.


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KITCHEN TOOLS

Au naturel Give your dining table a refresh for spring with these organic and natural tableware pieces STYLING

Vanessa Nouwens

PHOTOGRAPH

Rebekah Robinson

▶ White leaf petite dishes, $9.90 each, from Flo & Frankie ▶ Washed linen napkins in hay, $54 for 4, from Nest ▶ Napkin ring, $14.90, from Indie Home Collective ▶ Montezuma dinner plate in olive, $16.95, from Freedom ▶ Charm gold cutlery, $99 for set (16 piece), from Freedom ▶ Bloomingville bubble votive, $16, from Allium ▶ Harrison & Lane side plate, $4, from The Warehouse ▶ Papaya Aria salt and pepper pots, $49, from Indie Home Collective ▶ Host serving board, $34.95, from Freedom ▶ Asta 3-piece cheese set, $55, from Shut The Front Door ▶ Viridian bowl in moss, $13.95, from Freedom ▶ Forged brass wine opener, $34.90, from Indie Home Collective ▶ Day coconut votive, $310 for set of 3, from Allium ▶ Tierra serving bowl, $49.95, from Freedom ▶ Atti salad servers, $59.90, from Country Road ▶ Spiegelau burgundy glass, $42, from Republic Home ▶ Spiegelau Champagne flute, $42, from Republic Home ▶ Robert Gordon plate, $59, from Republic Home ▶ Montezuma side plate in olive, $14.95, from Freedom ▶ Speckle bowl, $25, from Let Liv ▶ Miss Jones Apple wooden bowl, $24, from Tea Pea ▶ Wonki Ware lace side plate, $22.50, from Indie Home Collective ▶ Montezuma mini bowl in olive, $4.95, from Freedom ▶ Ivory House sugar bowl, $17, from Republic Home ▶ Tapas plate (oval), $14.50, from Country Road ▶ Tapas cereal bowl, $12.90, from Country Road (cutlery as before) ▶ Wonki Ware ramekin, $14.90, from Indie Home Collective ▶ Round board, $79, from Nest ▶ Equator side plate in celadon, $12.95, from Freedom ▶ Malawi bowl in stone, $17.90, from Flo & Frankie ▶ House Doctor plaited dish, $39.90, from Allium ▶ Sloane taupe tumblers, $8.95 each, from Freedom ▶ Hessian (backdrop) from Spotlight. See Where to Buy, page 127. ○

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FROM

HAWKER-STYLE EATS TO

PORK-BELLY FEASTS

YOU R ST Y LE. YOU R WAY. A R T I S A N C O L L E CT I O N . AVA I L A B L E N O W. Find your local retailer at maxwellandwilliams.co.nz


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E AT E R Y

Wild One Wholefoods Eatery A Mount Maunganui eatery serves fresh, innovative food that’s so satisfying you won’t notice it’s good for you STORY

T

Alana Broadhead

PHOTOGRAPHS

Rachel Dobbs

he health-conscious, modern, and tight-knit her own wholefoods cafe, and when a space came up in Mount community of Mount Maunganui seemed just Maunganui (a destination she knew to be enjoying a flourishing the place for Monique Hemmingson to realise her food scene), she was ready to make the leap. dream of opening a wholefoods eatery. It’s proved The Wild One menu is designed to work equally well for an inspired decision. Since opening Wild One Wholefoods breakfast, brunch or lunch. Case in point: the spiced smashed Eatery, in late June, the locals have been loving it. avocado served on house-made bread is a good time, any time. Wild One’s aim is to promote healthy eating by showing Sweet tooths will love the blueberry banana pecan pancakes rather than telling. Flavour comes first, but the delicious flavours drizzled with agave syrup. And for something with a spicy kick, on offer are often vegan, or free of gluten, dairy, or refined sugar the lightly fried Vietnamese rice paper rolls with tamari soy – or all of the above. dipping sauce are the go. Mention words like ‘gluten free’ and there are some that To sip, there’s an impressive smoothie menu, cold-pressed snigger. We double dare those people to eat a portobello and juices, a must-try golden milk (iced tumeric latte) and much black bean beetroot burger from Wild One and not be more. Or grab yourself a flat white and something converted; it contains all the hearty comfort of a fat from the cabinet, and walk the few steps to Pilot and juicy burger with none of the greasy regret. Bay for a beach-side bite. Maybe a chocolate and Monique came to this way of eating through cinnamon baked donut, a peanut butter black bean suffering health issues herself, and discovering brownie, or a moist mini chocolate cake. The sweet that what she ate could either heal or hurt her. treats here are so decadent, you’ll suspect they’re WILD ONE Working through our summers so she could travel lying about the refined sugar-free thing. WHOLEFOODS E AT E R Y during Northern Hemisphere summers, she had As we head into the warmer months, Wild One 7 Prince Avenue, real difficulty – at home and abroad – finding places will be extending its hours and embracing new season Mount Maunganui that catered to her needs. During a two-year stint produce with a few menu updates. But don’t worry, in London, she began getting serious about opening you can still get that burger. ○

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T H I S PAG E

Clockwise from top left: Wild One interior; chocolate courgette cake with coconut whip; the cabinet food beckons at Wild One; house made vegetable rosti; tables at Wild One; mini carrot cake. O P P O S I T E P A G E Wild One owner Monique Hemmingson; chocolate cinnamon donuts.


TA S T E + N I C E & N AT U R A L

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PROMOTION

Your new superfood snack!

DARK CHOCOLATE LUXURY With delicious chocolate, nuts, cacao and superseeds, Dark Chocolate & Cacao Protein Nut Bars provide fibre and protein. Best of all, there’s less than 4g of sugar per bar.

Looking for a satisfying snack? Nice & Natural Protein Nut Bars are bursting with fantastic ingredients Finding a nutritious and delicious on-the-go snack to help you get through a busy day can be difficult. Whether we’re buying for ourselves or the kids’ lunch boxes, many of us worry the muesli bars in supermarkets are junk food in disguise because of the amount of sugar they may contain. That’s why Nice & Natural created Protein Nut Bars with 3 Superseeds. These delicious bars are super-convenient snacks that deliver on taste. In fact, the sugar content in Protein Nut Bars with 3 Superseeds is less than 4g of sugar per bar – that’s less than one teaspoon! Not bad considering the recommended intake for a normal-weight adult is six teaspoons per day (around 25g).* What’s more, each bar contains 25% protein and is a good source of fibre. Made with a base of nuts, and the superseeds chia, pumpkin and sunflower, the bars are available in three deliciously different combinations to tempt your taste buds: Dark Chocolate & Cacao, Salted Caramel Flavour, and Cranberry, Goji Berry & Quinoa. So grab a box and solve your snack cravings. Nice & Natural Protein Nut Bars with 3 Superseeds are available in your local supermarket now. RRP $4.50.

*World Health Organization, Guideline on sugar intake for adults and children, 2015.

SWEET AND SALTY With superseeds chia, pumpkin and sunflower, Salted Caramel Flavour Protein Nut Bars combine salty satisfaction with the sweetness of caramel – and with less than 2g of sugar per bar, you’ll love it!

SUPERSEEDS AND BERRIES Delectable fruity flavours team up with superseeds and quinoa in Cranberry, Goji Berry & Quinoa Protein Nut Bars to give you a super snack with 25% protein per bar!


LET THE INGREDIENTS DO THE TALKING Nice & Natural Protein Nut Bars with 3 Superseeds are made with a focus on superfood ingredients. Nuts, superseeds, grains, cacao and berries all deliver on taste and goodness.


TASTE PROMOTION

“I love using Real Stock for its convenience and the flavour it adds” – Manu Feildel

OVEN-BAKED CHICKEN RISOTTO SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 tbs olive oil 1 medium onion, finely chopped 100g bacon, sliced 500g chicken thigh fillets, thinly sliced 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tsp lemon rind 1 tbsp fresh rosemary, finely chopped ½ tsp dried chilli flakes (optional) 2 cups Arborio rice 2 tbsp tomato paste 1 litre (4 cups) Campbell’s Real Stock – Chicken Grated Parmesan to serve

1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Heat oil in a large, flame-proof, oven-proof dish over medium heat. Cook onion and bacon for 2 minutes. Add chicken and cook for 3-4 minutes, then add garlic, lemon rind, rosemary and chilli. Cook for a further 2 minutes. 2. Add rice and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Mix tomato paste and Campbell’s Real Stock in a jug, stirring to combine. Pour over rice. Bake, covered, for 35 minutes or until rice is just tender and liquid has almost been absorbed. 3. Stir through parmesan and serve.


C E L E B R AT I N G S P R I N G

MIDWEEK MEALS

A spring menu showcasing all the new season has to offer

Fast, flavourful and exotic dishes to add to your repertoire

Eat AN AL FRESCO MENU

FOOD FOR FRIENDS

SPRING LOADED

Recipes designed for sharing and enjoying outdoors

A hearty lunchtime gathering of Italian chefs

Recipes inspired by springtime fruit and vegetables

Presidential powers W H AT ’ S A L L B L AC K S

P HOTOG RA P H TOD D E Y RE

legend Sir John Kirwan doing at a get together of exhibitors ahead of New Zealand’s largest Italian street food festival? He’s at Auckland’s Pasta & Cuore restaurant by presidential decree (plus he brought the wine). Find out more on page 68. ○

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Warm

WELCOME

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Spring lamb, seared tuna and free-range eggs are all enlivened with new-season vegetables and herbs. A decadent vanilla cheesecake is festooned with field-grown rhubarb and finished with flowery flair RECIPES AND STYLING

Fiona Hugues

PHOTOGRAPHS

Jani Shepherd • Gatherum Collectif

T H I S PAG E

Parmesan-crusted lamb rack with mint, pea & broad bean smash. See page 44 for recipe.


E AT

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SPRING FEAST

READY IN

20 MINUTES

T H I S PAG E

Tuna carpaccio with blueberries, lemon & spring micro greens. See page 43 for recipe. O P P O S I T E PAG E

The Flora Benedict breakfast sandwich. See page 44 for recipe.


“Ta-da! That’s what I say almost every time I serve this strapping breakfast sandwich” ▽

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New-season warm salad of peas, spinach & new beans R E A DY I N

45 minutes

SERVES

4-6 as a side dish

My Frenchman and our youngest child have a large vegetable garden which they tend together and spend hours in when the weather warms and cultivation begins. Over the last couple of growing seasons my little man has staggered into the kitchen delightedly wielding huge bowls of peas and beans that the two of them have produced. This salad takes care of that glut deliciously. 300g fresh beans, trimmed – I used green beans and butter (yellow) beans 300g fresh or frozen baby peas (see Cook’s Notes) 1 handful snow peas

VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

200g fresh or frozen broad beans (see Cook’s Notes) 1 Tbsp olive oil 1 Tbsp butter 1 large white onion, sliced (or use a regular onion) 2 cloves garlic, sliced Large handful baby spinach leaves ½ cup crème fraîche

Heat a medium pot of salted water until boiling. Add green and butter beans and simmer for 6-10 minutes or until just tender. Using a slotted spoon, transfer beans to a colander, refresh in cold water, drain and set aside in a bowl. 2 Repeat process with baby peas (blanch for 2 minutes) 1

and then snow peas (blanch for 1-3 minutes). 3 Now put the broad beans in the pot and simmer until tender (about 3-4 minutes if frozen, 7 minutes if fresh). Drain and refresh under cold running water, remove the skins (you’ll have to do this for fresh and frozen broad beans) and add to the bowl of beans and peas. 4 In a large pan over a medium heat, add the olive oil and butter and sauté the onion and garlic until softened but not browned. 5 Add the cooked beans, peas, snow peas and broad beans plus the spinach to the onion mixture and toss to heat evenly.

6 Add the crème fraîche and plenty of salt and pepper to taste, then gently mix. Toss again to thoroughly coat and serve warm. This dish goes well with the parmesan-crusted lamb (see recipe over the page) or any grilled meat.

COOK’S NOTES

• If using fresh peas, remove from pods, place in a colander and rinse with cold water before cooking. • If your broad beans are fresh, pod them first before cooking. Don’t thaw frozen broad beans before cooking.


READY IN

10

MINUTES

Tuna carpaccio with blueberries, lemon & spring micro greens

GARNISH

1 handful fresh rocket leaves 2 Tbsp rocket micro greens ¼ cup fresh blueberries, halved Good-quality extra virgin olive oil A sprig or two fresh marjoram or oregano Lemon cheeks

20 minutes S E R V E S 4-6 as a starter GLUTEN FREE R E A DY I N

We are so blessed here in Aotearoa to have magnificent seafood readily available. This is my preferred dish if the fishermen get lucky and especially when the tuna is very fresh. Marjoram adds a Mediterranean note, while blueberries bring an unexpected texture and sweetness. It’s a gorgeous, light meal as the weather begins to warm. Serve with a crisp sauvignon blanc. CHILLI HERB VINAIGRETTE

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice ½ small fresh red chilli, finely chopped ½ tsp roughly chopped marjoram T U N A C A R PACC I O

Olive oil, for searing 500g tuna loin

Combine vinaigrette ingredients and season with salt and pepper. Set aside for the flavours to combine. 2 Heat a little olive oil in a large pan over high heat. Season tuna with salt and pepper on all sides then sear in the hot pan for 5 seconds on each side. Remove, rest for 5 minutes then slice thinly. 3 Lay tuna slices on a serving plate and drizzle chilli herb vinaigrette liberally over the top. 4 Garnish with fresh rocket leaves, micro greens, halved blueberries, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, marjoram sprigs and lemon cheeks. Serve immediately. 1

Grilled asparagus with pecorino & sunny-side eggs R E A DY I N

10 minutes

VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

SERVES

2

Asparagus has a special place in my heart. When we were kids, we’d go under cover of darkness to the huge commercial farm next door and sneak a few brand-new spears. As a good citizen, I now purchase my asparagus and wouldn’t ever think of snaffling them overnight! This is the super-fast way I love to eat them, spurred on by the fact that my hens are usually back laying with gusto when asparagus pops into season. 10-12 spears asparagus, trimmed (thinner ones work better here) Olive oil 2 free-range eggs Shaved pecorino cheese (or parmesan) Sourdough bread, to serve (unless eating gluten free)

TA S T E

Place asparagus spears in a dish, sprinkle with a little olive oil, season with salt and pepper and rub to coat. 2 Grill asparagus on a barbecue grill or in a griddle pan over medium heat, rolling them around for even cooking, until browned in places. Set aside and keep warm while you fry the eggs. 3 Heat a frying pan over medium heat, add a little oil, crack in the eggs and fry to your liking (I usually only cook mine until the white is just set and the yolk is still very liquid). 4 Divide asparagus spears between 2 plates, sprinkle over shaved pecorino and lay a hot, cooked egg directly on top of the cheese to soften it. Season with salt and pepper and devour immediately with some crusty bread on the side. 1

For more creative spring recipes, go to

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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SPRING FEAST

“I make this vanilla cheesecake a lot – that’s why I call it my No 1. It does take a fair bit of cream cheese, but it’s well worth it” No 1 vanilla cheesecake with rhubarb & red alyssum 1 hour 15 minutes plus cooling, chilling and overnight setting S E R V E S 8-10

R E A DY I N

I make this vanilla cheesecake a lot – that’s why I call it my No 1. It’s super-easy to prepare and can be customised to work with all the different seasons. Like most good cheesecakes, it does take a fair bit of cream cheese, but it’s well worth it. For this recipe, I’ve crowned her with a glistening cap of tart rhubarb jelly and almonds. 250g packet digestive biscuits 100g butter, melted 900g cream cheese Seeds 1 vanilla pod 1½ cups caster sugar 3 free-range eggs 8 leaves gold-strength gelatine 500g rhubarb stalks, cut into 4cm lengths 750ml water 200g sugar 2 Tbsp sliced almonds Red alyssum flowers, to garnish Whipped cream, to serve (optional)

Preheat oven to 160°C fanbake and grease a 25cm springform cake tin. 2 Place biscuits and butter in a food processor and blitz until it forms a fine crumb. Press mixture evenly and firmly into base of cake tin and set aside. 3 In a stand mixer, beat together the cream cheese, vanilla seeds and sugar, taking care not to over-mix. Add the eggs one at a time, again being careful not to over-mix. 4 Pour mixture onto prepared base and bake for around 1 hour or until set (it should still have a slight wobble to 1

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it when done; if it puffs up during cooking, turn the heat down slightly). Still in the tin, cool and then chill in the refrigerator. 5 Soak gelatine leaves in cold water to soften. Place rhubarb, water and sugar in a saucepan and simmer until rhubarb is just soft (around 3-4 minutes). 6 Remove rhubarb with a slotted spoon, set aside to cool, then cover and refrigerate. 7 Measure 3 cups of the hot poaching liquid and add the leaves of softened gelatine. Stir to dissolve then pour onto the surface of the chilled cheesecake. Sprinkle with the sliced almonds and refrigerate overnight to set. 8 Remove from tin (a spatula helps lever off the base), garnish with red alyssum flowers and serve with poached rhubarb and whipped cream, if desired.

Parmesan-crusted lamb rack with mint, pea & broad bean smash R E A DY I N SERVES

50 minutes

4

I should really call this dish ‘Raymond’s rack’ as this was the name of the sheep that inspired it. He was a fine wether that I rescued and hand-raised, but he drove me to despair with his ability to clear a fence like a show jumper to get into my herb garden. This recipe comes from a furious farmer (me), fuming and dreaming of roasting naughty Raymond covered in those very herbs he was decimating. LAMB RACKS

1 cup sourdough bread pieces 6 Tbsp chopped fresh herbs (I used 3 Tbsp parsley, 2 Tbsp sage, 1 Tbsp thyme)

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

1 clove garlic, roughly chopped Zest 1 lemon ¼ cup grated fresh parmesan 2 Tbsp olive oil, plus extra for drizzling 2 x 8-bone Frenched lamb racks 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard Rocket micro greens, to garnish Extra virgin olive oil, to garnish Roast potatoes, to serve M I N T, P E A & B E A N S M A S H

300g fresh or frozen broad beans (see Cook’s Notes on previous page) 300g fresh or frozen baby peas (see Cook’s Notes on previous page) 2 Tbsp butter Squeeze lemon juice 1 Tbsp roughly chopped mint

Heat oven to 200°C fanbake. Place the torn bread, herbs, chopped garlic, lemon zest and parmesan in a processor with 1 Tbsp of olive oil and some salt and pepper. Blitz until everything is finely chopped. 3 Heat the remaining 1 Tbsp olive oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat. Season the lamb with salt and pepper and brown on all sides. 4 Transfer the racks to a lined oven tray so that they are fatside up. Smear Dijon mustard over the lamb (be generous as this acts as a ‘glue’ for the crust) then pack the herby bread crust on top. 5 Drizzle with a little oil and roast for 25 minutes until the crust is crisp and golden. Remove from the oven and place the lamb on a board to rest for at least 10 minutes. 6 While the lamb is cooking, bring a medium saucepan of lightly salted water to the boil. Add the broad beans and simmer until tender (about 3-4 minutes if beans are frozen, 1

2

7 minutes if fresh). Drain and refresh under cold running water then remove the skins (you will have to do this for fresh and frozen broad beans). Set aside while you prepare the peas. 7 In the same saucepan, simmer peas and cook until tender (about 2-3 minutes). Drain and add the butter and a squeeze of lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. 8 Smash peas with a potato masher or fork or briefly buzz with a stick blender until at least half the peas are smashed and creamy. Stir through the drained broad beans and roughly chopped mint then season to taste. 9 Sprinkle lamb with rocket micro greens and drizzle with a little extra virgin olive oil then serve with the warm smash and roast potatoes.

The Flora Benedict breakfast sandwich 1 hour 10 minutes 1 sandwich

R E A DY I N MAKES

Ta-da! That’s what I say almost every time I serve this strapping lady of a breakfast sandwich. It’s not eggs Florentine, nor eggs Benedict, but a swoonworthy combination of them both. This is an excellent breakfast to pack up and enjoy on the run. R OA S T E D T O M AT O E S

4-5 small vine tomatoes Olive oil Raw sugar HOLLANDAISE

2 free-range egg yolks 2 Tbsp lemon juice 1 heaped tsp Dijon mustard 110g butter, melted 1-2 tsp white wine vinegar (optional)


TO ASSEMBLE

2 x 1.5cm-thick slices of good sourdough bread Vegetable oil, for frying 1 clove garlic, finely sliced Butter, for frying Large handful fresh baby spinach leaves 3 rashers free-range manukasmoked, dry-cured bacon 2 free-range eggs 1 Preheat oven to 150°C fanbake. Lay tomatoes on a lined baking tray. Drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt and a little raw sugar. 2 Bake tomatoes for around 1 hour until they smell caramelised and the skin looks wrinkled. If the tomato skins split in the first stages of cooking, don’t worry; just turn the heat down a bit. (If you don’t eat them all, the roasted tomatoes will keep covered in the fridge for 2-3 days.) 3 To make the hollandaise, whisk the yolks, lemon juice and mustard together in a bowl set over a pot of simmering water. Add the melted butter a little at a time, whisking continuously until all the butter is combined and the mixture has thickened. Add a little vinegar to loosen it if required. Season hollandaise to taste with salt if required and set aside until ready to use. 4 Lightly oil bread slices and fry on one side in a frying pan over a medium heat until browned. Remove one slice and cut two holes in it with a round cookie cutter. Fry the other slice of bread on the other side. Place both slices in a low oven or warming drawer to keep warm. 5 Add garlic and 1 Tbsp butter to the frying pan over medium heat and sauté garlic for a few seconds, taking care not to

burn it. Add the spinach and toss to wilt and cover the leaves in the garlicky butter. Season, spoon into a bowl and place in a low oven or warming drawer to keep warm. 6 Wipe out the frying pan and fry the bacon in a little butter until golden and crispy. Remove and set aside. 7 Place the holey bread slice

uncooked-side down in the bacon fat and crack an egg into each hole. Fry until eggs are cooked to your liking (adding a lid will speed things up). 8 While the eggs are cooking, assemble the rest of your sandwich. Smear some hollandaise on the toasted bread and top with the spinach. Add the bacon and a couple

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of slow-roasted tomatoes, squishing them slightly to flatten. Dollop on some more hollandaise and season with a little cracked pepper. 9 With a spatula, carefully lift the eggs-in-bread out of the pan and place on top of the tomatoes. Eat immediately with extra roasted tomatoes on the side. ○

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Veal schnitzels with burnt caper butter. See page 51 for recipe. O P P O S I T E PAG E

Drunken chicken with Shandong ramen noodles. See page 51 for recipe.

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30 READY IN

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CHANGE YOUR TUNE Update your repertoire with this collection of fast, flavoursome international dishes

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O P P O S I T E PAG E

Fried haloumi with lemon, coriander & pine nuts. See over the page for recipe.

Clockwise from top left: Cauliflower cheese; Brussels sprout salad with bacon, apple & buttermilk dressing; spaghettini with calamari, rosemary & lemon; crisp fish with sambal & snake beans. See page 52 for recipes.

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“You can cut all the flowers, but you cannot keep spring from coming” Chilean poet Pablo Neruda

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½ cup olive oil

Quinoa salad with pomegranate, pumpkin & ashed goat’s cheese R E A DY I N SERVES

4

30 minutes VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

300g butternut pumpkin, peeled and diced 1 red onion, cut into wedges 1 Tbsp olive oil 200g quinoa 1 cup coarsely chopped coriander 1 cup coarsely chopped mint 2 Tbsp sunflower seeds Seeds ½ pomegranate Juice 1 lemon 60ml extra virgin olive oil 100g ashed goat’s cheese (or use regular goat’s cheese) 1 Preheat oven to 220°C. Scatter pumpkin and onion on a roasting tray, drizzle with oil, season to taste and roast until caramelised (20 minutes). 2 Cook the quinoa in a saucepan of salted boiling water until tender (10-15 minutes). Drain and set aside in a sieve to drain completely. 3 Combine remaining ingredients except cheese in a bowl, add quinoa and roasted pumpkin and onion and toss to combine. Season to taste and serve scattered with crumbled goat’s cheese.

Veal schnitzels with burnt caper butter R E A DY I N SERVES

30 minutes

4

Preheat oven to 120°C. Place flour, eggs and breadcrumbs in separate bowls and season the breadcrumbs well. 2 Dip schnitzels into flour, shaking off excess, dip into eggwash followed by breadcrumbs, patting them gently onto the veal. 3 Heat 2 Tbsp oil and 20g butter in a large frying pan over medium-high heat and cook schnitzels in batches, turning occasionally, until golden and just cooked through (4-6 minutes). Wipe pan clean and add more oil and butter after each batch. 4 Transfer cooked schnitzels to an oven tray lined with paper towels and keep warm in oven. 5 Wipe pan clean, add remaining butter and cook until foamy and nut-brown (2-4 minutes). Add capers and herbs and swirl pan (1 minute) until capers are just crisp. 6 Serve schnitzels hot with burnt caper butter spooned over, and with vegetables and lemon wedges on the side.

Drunken chicken with Shandong ramen noodles 30 minutes 4-6

R E A DY I N

1 litre chicken stock 250ml Shaoxing wine 2 spring onions, green ends coarsely chopped, white ends thinly sliced 6 thin slices ginger

460g haloumi, thickly sliced Juice 1 lemon 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Ciabatta, or other crusty bread, to serve (unless eating gluten free)

SPRING ONION & GINGER OIL

2 spring onions, thinly sliced 20g peeled fresh ginger, julienned 2 Tbsp grapeseed oil

1

SERVES

75g plain flour 3 eggs, whisked 6 soft white bread slices, processed to fine breadcrumbs 8 veal leg schnitzels (around 700g in total)

1 free-range chicken, jointed 400g thin Shandong ramen noodles (see Cook’s Note) Freshly sliced small red chillies, to taste Soy sauce, to taste

200g butter ¼ cup salted capers, rinsed 2 Tbsp fresh rosemary leaves 2 Tbsp fresh oregano leaves Steamed or boiled baby potatoes or baby beans, and lemon wedges, to serve

Combine stock, Shaoxing wine, white of onions, ginger and chicken in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until chicken is cooked through (20 minutes). 2 For spring onion and ginger oil, combine ingredients in a bowl and set aside. 3 Meanwhile, cook noodles in boiling water until tender (4-8 minutes). Drain and transfer to bowls. 4 Strain stock and pour over noodles. Add cooked chicken, season to taste with fresh chilli and soy sauce, sprinkle with green ends of onion and serve with spring onion and ginger oil on the side. 1

Fried haloumi with lemon, coriander & pine nuts R E A DY I N SERVES

4

25 minutes VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

2 Tbsp pine nuts 2 lemons, peeled and segmented ½ small red onion, very thinly sliced Rind ½ preserved lemon, rinsed and cut into julienne 1 cup (loosely packed) coriander 4 small red chillies, thinly sliced 1 tsp olive oil

1 Toast pine nuts in a dry frying pan, tossing over medium-high heat until golden (3-5 minutes). 2 Combine lemon, onion, preserved lemon, coriander, chillies and toasted pine nuts in a bowl and set aside. 3 Heat olive oil in a large frying pan or chargrill pan. Add cheese and cook, turning once, until golden (3-4 minutes). Transfer to a warm plate. 4 Dress herb and lemon mixture with lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil, toss to combine and scatter mixture over the haloumi. Serve with crusty bread.

COOK’S NOTE

Shandong noodles are available from Asian supermarkets.


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1 clove garlic, coarsely chopped 50g dark palm sugar

German pancake with lemon & sugar R E A DY I N

25 minutes

SERVES

TO SERVE

3 eggs 160ml milk 100g flour Scraped seeds 1 vanilla bean 20g butter Icing sugar, for dusting Blueberries and Greek yoghurt, to serve Lemon halves, to serve

Preheat oven to 220°C. Place a 28cm-deep frying pan in the oven to heat. 2 In a jug, whisk eggs, milk, flour, vanilla seeds and a pinch of salt with a hand-held blender until smooth. 3 Remove pan from oven, add butter and swirl to coat surface. Pour in batter, return to oven and bake until puffed and golden (15-20 minutes). 4 Serve hot, dusted with sugar, with berries, yoghurt and lemon halves to the side. 1

Crisp fish with sambal & snake beans SERVES

30 minutes

4

Steamed rice (optional) Lime wedges Cucumber chunks Coriander sprigs

4

This oven-style pancake is equally delicious as a dessert or for breakfast. Serving it whole in the centre of the table adds a bit of drama.

R E A DY I N

GLUTEN FREE

600g coconut oil Cornflour, for dusting 750g firm white fish fillets (eg snapper, hake or ling), skin on 2 bunches snake beans (get from Asian food stores or use green beans), cut into 6cm lengths

Spaghettini with calamari, rosemary & lemon R E A DY I N SERVES

R E A DY I N SERVES

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Cauliflower cheese R E A DY I N SERVES

TOASTED CRUMBS

1 cup coarse fresh sourdough crumbs ¼ cup olive oil 1 clove garlic, crushed

GLUTEN FREE

4

25 minutes VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

This simple version of cauliflower cheese is cooked in cream instead of béchamel and it makes a great midweek meal with crusty bread.

4

1 onion, finely diced 500g cleaned calamari, cut into 2cm dice 1 Tbsp chopped rosemary leaves 3 cloves garlic, very thinly sliced 2 long red chillies, thinly sliced Finely grated zest and juice 1 lemon 400g dried spaghettini (or 300g fresh) Lemon wedges, to serve

30 minutes

2 tsp olive oil 4 rashers bacon (about 280g), rind removed 12 large Brussels sprouts 3 shallots, thinly sliced 2 Granny Smith apples, cored and cut into matchsticks

25 minutes

calamari, rosemary, garlic and chilli and toss occasionally until calamari is just cooked (1-2 minutes). Remove from heat, add lemon zest and juice and season to taste. 3 Meanwhile, for toasted crumbs, combine ingredients in a frying pan over mediumhigh heat and stir until crisp (5-10 minutes). Set aside. 4 Cook spaghettini in a large saucepan of boiling salted water until al dente (8-10 minutes). 5 Drain spaghettini, reserving a little cooking water. Toss with calamari and reserved water, mixing until pasta is well coated. Serve hot, sprinkled with toasted breadcrumbs, with lemon wedges on the side.

1 cauliflower, broken into florets 60ml cream 50g each coarsely grated emmental and gruyère

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

Brussels sprout salad with bacon, apple & buttermilk dressing

SAMBAL

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Heat oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add bacon and cook, turning occasionally, until golden and crisp (6-8 minutes). 2 Shave Brussels sprouts with a mandoline (or slice thinly with a sharp knife) into a bowl. Add a good pinch of salt, the shallots, apple and half the lemon juice. Toss to combine and set aside. 3 Whisk together mayonnaise, buttermilk and remaining lemon juice, drizzle over the salad, toss well and transfer salad to a plate. 4 Chop bacon and scatter over salad along with chives and parmesan. Season and serve. 1

Heat coconut oil in a deep wok or frying pan over medium-high heat until starting to smoke. 2 Place a handful of cornflour in a bowl and season to taste. Score skin of fish well and dust in flour, shaking off excess. 3 Gently slide fish into oil (be careful as hot oil will bubble up; if necessary, turn heat off briefly until bubbles subside). Cook until golden and crisp on the outside (15 minutes). Drain fish on paper towels and keep warm. Reserve oil. 4 For the sambal, process all ingredients except palm sugar in a small food processor until smooth. 5 Transfer to a small pan with 100ml of reserved oil and stir occasionally over medium-high heat until toasted and fragrant (5-7 minutes). Add palm sugar and stir until caramelised (3-5 minutes). Set aside. 6 Heat 1 Tbsp reserved oil in a frying pan, add beans and stir occasionally over high heat until tender and golden (3-5 minutes). 7 Place fish on a platter, spoon sambal over and scatter with beans. Serve hot with rice (if wished), lime wedges, cucumber and coriander on the side. 1

20g shrimp paste – from Asian food stores 50g freshly grated coconut 7 long red chillies, coarsely chopped 1 tsp roasted chilli flakes 3 small shallots, roughly chopped 7g ginger, coarsely chopped

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Juice 1 lemon ¼ cup mayonnaise* ¼ cup buttermilk ½ bunch chives, finely chopped, to serve Shaved parmesan, to garnish

Heat a saucepan over medium heat, add olive oil and onion and stir occasionally until onion starts to caramelise (10-15 minutes). 2 Increase heat to high, add

Preheat oven to 200°C. Place cauliflower in a baking dish, season to taste and pour cream over, ensuring all the cauliflower is completely coated. 2 Scatter with cheeses, bake until golden and bubbly (15-20 minutes) and serve. ○ 1

* Check label if eating gluten free

1

For more international dinner ideas go to


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Apple spritz. See page 58 for recipe.


Al fresco

IMPULSE Enjoy the spring weather in the company of family and friends with this menu dedicated to easy outdoor eating


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Rocky road 1 hour 10 minutes 10 pieces

R E A DY I N MAKES

250g milk chocolate, broken into pieces 100g dark chocolate, broken into pieces 20g butter 11/2 cups marshmallows 150g shortbread biscuits, broken into pieces 1/2 cup dried cranberries

Line a 10cm x 20cm loaf tin with baking paper. 2 Place chocolate and butter in a bowl and microwave on medium for 1 minute. Remove from microwave, stir and heat again for 1 minute. Stir well. Repeat if necessary until chocolate is melted but not hot. 3 Halve marshmallows with scissors and drop into bowl with biscuit pieces and cranberries. Stir well to combine. 4 Spoon into lined tin and refrigerate for at least 1 hour to set. Remove from tin and cut into 2cm-thick slices with a sharp knife. 1


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Lobster rolls; pistachiocrusted salted caramel apples; smoked chicken, watercress, barley & grape salad. See over the page for recipes.

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SPRING FEAST

APPLE SPRITZ

Throw 1 handful ice cubes in a glass, add 2 Tbsp apple schnapps, a big dash cloudy apple juice, a dribble of elderflower cordial, and top up with sparkling wine. Garnish with apple slices. T I P : To make a child-friendly version, leave out the schnapps and wine, and use half apple juice and half sparkling mineral water.

1 hour 10 minutes plus cooling time S E R V E S 12

R E A DY I N

165g butter, plus extra for greasing bundt tin 2 cups plain flour, plus extra for flouring bundt tin 1 Tbsp baking powder 1/2 cup raw caster sugar 1/3 cup honey, plus extra for drizzling 1/3 cup pure maple syrup 1 tsp vanilla extract 3 eggs 3/4 cup crème fraîche

For the icing, whisk butter, icing sugar and vanilla extract in bowl of electric mixer for 10 minutes until pale and fluffy, occasionally scraping down sides of bowl. 9 Add lemon juice and most of the zest and mix to combine. Spread icing over top of cooled cake, leaving pits and troughs to trap honey. Sprinkle top with remaining zest and drizzle with extra honey to serve. 8

Pistachio-crusted salted caramel apples

ICING

R E A DY I N

150g butter, softened 11/2 cups icing sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 Tbsp lemon juice 2 tsp lemon zest

MAKES

Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease a 23cm bundt tin with a little butter and dust lightly with a little flour. Tap tin to remove excess flour. 2 Place butter in microwavesafe bowl and melt on medium power in microwave. 3 Sieve flour and baking powder and sugar into bowl. 4 Place honey, maple syrup, melted butter, vanilla extract, eggs and crème fraîche in a second bowl. Whisk well to combine. 5 Make a well in centre of dry ingredients in first bowl. Pour in wet ingredients from second bowl. Whisk mixture until just combined. 6 Pour into prepared bundt tin and bake in centre of oven for 40-45 minutes until a sharp knife or skewer comes out clean when inserted in cake. 7 Remove cake from oven. Cool for 15 minutes in tin then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

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R E A DY I N SERVES

35 minutes

11/2 cups pearl barley 21/2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar 2 tsp caster sugar 31/2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2 large shallots, finely chopped Sea salt 500g smoked chicken breast, skin removed, sliced 1 bunch watercress, roughly chopped 300g seedless red grapes, halved if large

20 minutes

6

2 egg yolks 2 tsp Dijon mustard 3 Tbsp lemon juice ⅔ cup vegetable oil 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest 1 shallot, chopped finely 2 Tbsp chopped chervil, plus extra to garnish Sea salt LOBSTER

600g cooked lobster tail meat (800g with tail shells on) 6 fresh bread rolls 40g softened butter

Place egg yolks, mustard and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Whisk to combine then slowly add oil, a few drops at a time to begin with, building up to a thin stream, whisking continuously until oil and egg have emulsified. 2 Stir in zest, shallot, chervil and season with sea salt and pepper to taste. 3 If lobster tails are on, remove meat from tails by carefully cutting down either side of tails on underside. Pull flesh from shell, cut down centre of back to reveal waste vein and remove vein. Chop lobster into bite-sized pieces and stir through mayonnaise. 1

40 minutes 4-6

R E A DY I N

M AY O N N A I S E

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Smoked chicken, watercress, barley & grape salad

Lobster rolls

GLUTEN FREE

Saw a 72cm x 6mm dowel into 4 x 18cm lengths (angle cuts to create a point to poke into apple). Push a dowel up through base of each apple until two-thirds of way up. 2 Place sugar, golden syrup and butter in saucepan over medium-low heat. Occasionally swirl (but don’t stir) saucepan until ingredients are combined. Bring to a simmer and cook for 3 minutes. 3 Add cream and vanilla extract. Cook for 4 minutes more until caramel is thick, regularly swirling saucepan. Remove saucepan from heat and stand for 1 minute. 4 Meanwhile, measure and cut a sheet of baking paper, a little wider than a wire rack. Place

Cut rolls down centre and spread with butter. Fill with lobster mix, then sprinkle with chervil and season with sea salt and pepper.

4

SERVES

6 Royal Gala apples, washed and dried 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/4 cup golden syrup 30g butter 1/4 cup cream 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 2 Tbsp pistachio kernels, chopped 1 tsp sea salt flakes

1

58

6

a glass at each end of baking paper and balance rack on top of glasses. Poke dowels through rack so apples sit on top of rack. 5 Spoon caramel over first apple, filling from centre top, allowing it to drizzle down sides. Sprinkle with pistachios and sea salt flakes. Repeat step for remaining apples. Set aside for 10 minutes to set.

Bring a medium saucepan of salted water to the boil. Cook barley for 25 minutes until tender. Drain well. 2 Meanwhile, whisk vinegar and sugar in a large bowl until sugar has dissolved. Add oil, shallots and season with sea salt and pepper to taste. Whisk to combine. 3 While barley is still hot, add to dressing and stir to coat. Set aside to cool. 4 Add chicken, watercress and grapes to bowl. Toss well to combine and coat in dressing. Season with salt and pepper, and serve. 1

If you don’t like smoked chicken, you could use barbecued chicken instead. ○

TIP:

BAU E R SYN D I C AT I ON

Maple honey cake with lemon frosting


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Potato gnocchi with bolognese sauce. See page 66 for recipe. O P P O S I T E PAG E

Stefania Ugolini makes tortelloni – you can book in for her pasta workshops at festivalitaliano.co.nz.

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Food for

FRIENDS In the lead-up to New Zealand’s largest Italian festival, a group of chefs and artisan producers meet to compare notes Luca Villari, Stefania Ugolini, Silvana Silvestro and Jason Olmstead P H O T O G R A P H S Todd Eyre

RECIPES


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W

ith New Zealand’s largest Italian street festival on the horizon, Taste’s Italian food writer and owner of Al Volo restaurant, Luca Villari, has gathered a group of market exhibitors for a recipetasting session ahead of the big event. The test kitchen is at Pasta & Cuore in Auckland’s Mt Eden and features the food of chef and owner Stefania Ugolini, Silvana Silvestro of Silvana’s Sicilian and Pukeko Bakery’s Jason Olmstead, with drinks from Sir John Kirwan’s new Jk.14 range of Italian wines.

It’s a chance to share ideas and enjoy good Italian food and wine ahead of a busy month for Italian foodies in Auckland. The Festival Italiano runs throughout September with various dining and cultural events and reaches its apex with a street festival on September 25, 11am-4pm, in Osborne St and Kent St, Newmarket. The whole area will become pedestrian-only, hosting al fresco restaurants and eating areas, an Italian market with over 40 stalls, live music and entertainment, spot prizes and a kids’ pavilion. FESTIVALITALIANO.CO.NZ

T H I S PAG E

O P P O S I T E P A G E The kitchen at

Stefania Ugolini; Sicilian cannoli with custard cream, see over the page for recipe.

Pasta & Cuore; gnocchi alla romana and vitello tonnato, see page 66 for recipes.

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Stefania Ugolini The first time customers come into Stefania’s Pasta & Cuore restaurant to view the fresh pasta for sale at the counter, they just order the spaghetti. “The second time they come, they ask for advice,” laughs Stefania. We’re a bit apprehensive about selecting and buying fresh pasta here in New Zealand, Stefania says. It’s extremely common in her native Emilia-Romagna and it’s a concept that is steadily taking root in Auckland as Italian food fans stop by on their way home from work to grab fresh egg pasta and sauce from her restaurant. It’s heat ’n’ eat, made without compromise to Kiwi tastes or fashions. The pasta and sauces Stefania made at her previous restaurant in the hills of Bologna are the same as you get from her counter in Mt Eden: tagliatelle in a variety of sauces like the classic bolognese, tortellini stuffed with buffalo ricotta in sage butter, spaghetti with creamy gorgonzola lombardo and topped with wild walnuts, or potato gnocchi with a free-range chicken ragu. Of course, you can just grab a table at the restaurant and enjoy a glass of wine from her native Bologna, a pale yellow pignoletto, for instance. Stefania will be at the street festival selling plates of gnocchi and holding pastamaking demonstrations.


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Arancini 1 hour 30 minutes M A K E S 6 large ‘little oranges’ R E C I P E B Y Silvana Silvestro

Small bunch rocket, dressed with olive oil, to garnish

R E A DY I N

These rice balls literally translate to ‘little oranges’, but in Passopisciaro, where my family comes from, they are made in a conical shape. Maybe it’s done to represent Mt Etna, which my village sits beneath. SUGO WITH SAUSAGE

3 Tbsp olive oil 1 small onion, finely diced 1 stalk celery, finely diced 4 good-quality sausages (I used Salumeria Fontana), removed from casing and divided into bite-sized pieces ½ tsp fennel seeds 2 bayleaves Splash red wine 2 x 400g cans Italian tomatoes, puréed 1 cup frozen peas, defrosted RICE

420g medium grain rice 70g pecorino cheese, grated PA S T E L L A

200g plain flour 1 free-range egg TO ASSEMBLE

1 hard-boiled free-range egg, cut into 6 even pieces 100g mozzarella, grated 150g breadcrumbs Vegetable oil, for deep frying

Pour oil into a medium saucepan and sauté onion and celery on medium heat for a couple of minutes. Add the sausage and fry until browned. Add fennel seeds, fry for 30 seconds then add bayleaves and wine. Stir to release all food on the bottom of the pot and simmer until wine is absorbed. 2 Add tomatoes, season and bring to a boil. Turn down heat and cook for about 30 minutes, or until the sauce thickens. Add the peas, stir and season to taste. Using a slotted spoon, pull out the sausage pieces along with the peas and place in a separate bowl. 3 Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Pour in the rice and stir for about 1 minute, ensuring rice does not stick to the bottom. Cook until al dente (about 20 minutes). Once cooked, drain rice into a large sieve and, using a wooden spoon, lift the rice to help it drain for about 1 minute. Let it sit for about 3-4 minutes then tip into a large bowl. 4 While rice is still hot, pour in sauce (the sugo), reserving 2 cups for serving. Add the grated pecorino and carefully stir to evenly combine. 5 For the pastella, beat 1

Silvana Silvestro There are numerous versions of the croquette-like snack arancini found in Italy; they’re Sicilian in origin and probably arrived by way of the Arab conquests of the region. When it comes to the rice snack made by Silvana Silvestro and sold at north Auckland’s Matakana Market, she says, “I just do what I know.” That means she doesn’t use leftover arborio rice from a risotto, but makes it all fresh using short-grain rice which is then mixed with a sauce. Silvana also makes the classic Sicilian dessert cannoli. The crisp pastry tubes filled with sweet custard keep the crowds coming to the Matakana Market and are sure to be a hit at the street festival.

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together the flour, egg and enough water to make a medium-thick pancake-like consistency in a large bowl. 6 To assemble and cook, prepare an assembly line with hard-boiled egg, mozzarella, sausage pieces and the peas. Place breadcrumbs in a bowl or on a large plate. 7 When cool enough to handle, but not cold, start rolling and compressing two balls of rice 5-6cm in diameter. 8 Place the first ball of rice into the palm of your hand and flatten, create a small indentation in the middle. Place in some grated mozzarella, a slice of egg and 2 Tbsp of sausage-and-pea mix (about 5-6 pieces of sausage). 9 Pick up the second rice ball in your other hand. Flatten with your thumb and the back of your other hand to flatten. Place this rice on top of the filled rice to cover all the stuffing and seal, compressing and turning it to form the conical shape (or a ball, if you prefer). Using both hands, press all around to shape it and completely seal the filling. Place on a tray and repeat with remaining ingredients to create six arancini. 1 0 Once completed, place 1 arancino into the pastella. Coat completely and lift out with a fork, allowing excess

to drip back into bowl. Dip into breadcrumbs and turn to coat completely, using both hands to press breadcrumbs onto arancino. Repeat with remaining arancini. 1 1 Place oil in a small, deep saucepan, leaving enough space at the top so oil won’t overflow when you add an arancino. 1 2 Heat oil until hot. To check readiness, drop in a grain of rice; when it rises to the top, the oil is ready. Cook one arancino at a time until golden brown. 1 3 Remove and drain on paper towels. Once cooled, refrigerate in a sealed container. The arancini can be prepared up to 1 day in advance. To serve, heat oven to 180°C and heat them for approximately 10-15 minutes or until warm enough so that the mozzarella is nice and stretchy. Serve topped with warmed, reserved sugo and some rocket on the side.

Sicilian cannoli with custard cream 1 hour plus resting and cooling M A K E S Around 12 R E C I P E B Y Silvana Silvestro R E A DY I N

PA S T RY S H E L L

150g flour 1 egg, beaten 50g Marsala wine 1 Tbsp caster sugar

Jason Olmstead He started out making French-style breads at his Mairangi Bay bakery, but an encounter with the Prada team at the America’s Cup in Auckland led him to the rustic loaves of Italy. Supplying 10-15kg of bread a day to the team helped create a passion for ciabatta, focaccia, schiacciata and crostata. He added a Kiwi twist to create his most popular loaf at his Pukeko Bakery: the ciabatta-style kumara loaf, which uses the orange Beauregard variety. His schiacciata is the bread that first sparked the interest of the Prada team back in the days when the America’s Cup was New Zealand’s cup. You can sample it, along with many more of his stunning loaves, at the festival.


T H I S PAG E

Arancino halves with sugo and rocket; potato gnocchi with bolognese sauce, see over the page for recipe.

1 Tbsp vegetable oil, plus extra for deep frying and brushing 1 egg white, beaten Icing sugar, to dust cannoli C U S TA R D C R E A M

500ml full-fat milk Seeds ½ vanilla bean 50g caster sugar 2 free-range eggs 38g cornflour 30g plain flour 1 Tip the flour onto a clean bench. Make a hole in the centre of the flour and add the egg, Marsala, sugar and vegetable oil. Beat the egg, wine, sugar and oil mixture with a fork and slowly incorporate with the flour until a dough forms. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes. Cover the dough in plastic wrap and set aside for 20 minutes at room temperature. 2 Feed the dough through

the thickest setting of a pasta machine. Fold one end halfway up and then fold the other end over the top. Feed through the pasta machine then repeat the folding and feeding twice more. 3 Turn pasta machine to a thinner setting and feed the dough through again. Narrow the setting and repeat until you get to the thinnest setting. 4 Place the pasta on a floured bench and, working quickly, cut out 12cm circles until all the dough is used up. Gather up the dough scraps and feed through a thicker setting on the pasta machine, and then through the thinnest so you can cut out more circles. 5 Fill a medium saucepan around one-third full with vegetable oil and heat. Brush oil onto four stainless-steel cannoli forms (tubes). Wrap a pasta circle round each form,

using egg white to seal circles. 6 Once oil reaches 180°C, place two cannoli forms in the pan to cook; don’t overcrowd the pan. Fry until golden brown, remove with tongs and place on paper towels. 7 Repeat with second lot of cannoli forms, then slide cooked cannoli shells off forms. Brush more oil onto forms and repeat the whole process until all cannoli shells are cooked. Once cooled, sprinkle shells with icing sugar. Cooked shells will keep in an airtight container for up to two weeks. 8 For the custard cream, place the milk and vanilla seeds in a saucepan on medium heat. Add the sugar and stir until it dissolves to prevent it sticking to the bottom. Continue to stir occasionally and heat until it reaches boiling point. 9 While the milk is coming to

TA S T E

the boil, whisk the eggs. Sift the cornflour and plain flour onto the eggs and whisk until well combined and lump-free. 1 0 As soon as milk comes to the boil, take off the heat. Using a ladle, add one-third of the milk to the egg mixture and whisk until well incorporated. Add another third and whisk again. Pour the egg mixture back into the remaining milk and whisk until well incorporated and lump-free. 1 1 Place the saucepan back on the stovetop on a low heat. Continue whisking until you see the custard come to the boil. Once boiling, remove from heat. Pour the custard into a bowl or container and cover with plastic wrap to prevent a skin forming as it cools. Once cooled, spoon custard into a piping bag, pipe into the cannoli and serve.

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Bolognese sauce 1 hour 45 minutes 6 R E C I P E B Y Stefania

R E A DY I N SERVES

Ugolini 1 stalk celery, finely diced 1 medium carrot, finely diced 1 medium onion, finely diced 1 Tbsp butter Extra virgin olive oil 250g beef mince 250g pork mince 250ml white wine 800g chopped tinned tomatoes 1 bayleaf TO SERVE

Potato gnocchi (see recipe below) Grated parmesan 1 Cook celery, carrot and onion in a saucepan on medium-low heat in the butter and a little extra virgin olive oil, stirring regularly. 2 When onion is transparent, add beef and pork mince. Cook on medium-high heat until browned then add wine. Season with salt and pepper and cook until wine evaporates. 3 Add tomatoes, mix them in well and add the bayleaf. Lower heat and simmer for at least 1 hour with the lid on, stirring occasionally. Remove the lid and continue cooking until the sauce has reduced by half.

Potato gnocchi R E A DY I N

1 hour S E R V E S 6 Stefania Ugolini

RECIPE BY

750g white-fleshed potatoes 225g flour, plus extra for dusting 3 Tbsp beaten egg 1 Peel and roughly chop potatoes then cook in salted, boiling water until tender. Drain well in a colander. 2 Place flour on a wooden board or clean bench and mash the drained potatoes into the flour while they are still warm. Shape mixture into a cone shape and make a large shallow well in the middle. Add egg to

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the well with a good pinch of salt. Mix into potato mixture with a spatula then knead into a ball of dough. 3 Take small chunks of dough and roll into 2.5cm-thick logs. Cut log into 2cm lengths and place on a tray dusted with flour. Keep rolling and cutting until all the dough is used up. Leave gnocchi to rest for 20 minutes before cooking. 4 Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Add the gnocchi, stir gently and remove with a slotted spoon when they rise to the surface. Add gnocchi directly to the bolognese sauce, mix through and serve sprinkled with parmesan.

Vitello tonnato 1 hour 10 minutes plus cooling and chilling S E R V E S 4-6 as starter R E C I P E B Y Luca Villari R E A DY I N

GLUTEN FREE

For my take on this classic veal dish with tuna mayonnaise I’ve added some seared tuna for wow factor. Although it may seem like a lot of prep, it is well worth it as the final product will be a hit with your guests. 2 Tbsp olive oil 800g veal loin or large backstrap, tied at 3cm intervals with kitchen string 250ml dry white wine 250ml chicken stock* 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 large carrot, peeled and roughly chopped 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped 2 sprigs rosemary 4 bayleaves 6 sage leaves 1 Tbsp black peppercorns

Gnocchi alla romana 40 minutes plus cooling S E R V E S 6 R E C I P E B Y Stefania Ugolini VEGETARIAN R E A DY I N

1 litre full-fat milk 100g butter, plus extra for greasing and curling 250g semolina 100g pecorino, grated 100g parmesan, grated, plus extra for sprinkling

Place the milk and butter in a saucepan, season with salt and pepper and bring to a simmer. 2 When the milk is simmering, sprinkle in the semolina and cook for 5 minutes, stirring continuously. 3 Turn off the heat and sprinkle in the cheese, mixing well to combine. 4 Pour the mixture evenly into an oiled baking tray, to a height of 1cm. Leave to cool. 5 Preheat oven to 200°C. When semolina has cooled entirely, use a 5cm round pastry cutter to cut out medallions. Grease a ceramic baking dish with butter and place medallions in it, overlapping at a 45° angle. Add a few curls of butter in between and sprinkle with extra parmesan. 6 Bake in the oven until a golden crust has formed (about 15-20 minutes).

T U N A M AY O N N A I S E

½ cup good-quality

mayonnaise* 8 anchovy fillets 1 small tin tuna, drained (I used a 95g tin flaked tuna in springwater) 1 Tbsp drained capers 2 Tbsp lemon juice 1 Tbsp white wine vinegar 1 hard-boiled egg, quartered 8 Tbsp milk

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

TUNA LOIN

Olive oil 250g yellowfin tuna, cut into three long, 2cm-square logs CRISPY CAPERS

4 Tbsp olive oil ½ cup drained capers (squeeze out all the liquid) TO SERVE

Micro lettuce leaves Lemon halves

Heat olive oil in a non-stick frying pan until hot. Seal veal for 1-2 minutes on all sides until nicely coloured. Transfer to a heatproof casserole dish, add wine, stock, onion, carrot, celery, herbs and peppercorns. 1

Add enough water to cover meat and bring casserole to a boil on stovetop. Reduce heat to a simmer, place lid on dish and poach gently for around 30 minutes (depending on thickness of loin). Remove veal from broth and leave to cool. 3 Cover cooled loin tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 3-4 hours or overnight. Strain cooking liquid from casserole and save for another time (eg use as a stock for a risotto). 4 For the tuna mayonnaise, place mayonnaise in a small mixing bowl. Place anchovies, tuna, capers, lemon juice, vinegar, hard-boiled egg and milk in a blender and blend until smooth, adding a little of the reserved casserole liquid if required. Continue blending until you have a smooth, spreadable consistency then add to the mayonnaise and mix well. Thin out with casserole liquid or more milk if required and season to taste. 5 Place a non-stick frying pan on high heat. Brush olive oil onto tuna and quickly sear for 10 seconds or so on each side (you are just colouring the outside of the tuna). Remove from heat and leave to cool. 6 Unwrap veal, cut into 5mmthick slices against the grain. Place a few veal slices on a board, cover with baking paper or plastic wrap and flatten with a meat tenderiser or rolling pin until meat slices double in size. Repeat with remaining veal. Transfer to a tray lined with baking paper and set aside. 7 For the capers, heat olive oil in small frying pan until hot and fry capers for 30-45 seconds until crisp. Drain on paper towels and reserve oil. 8 To serve, lay flattened veal on a large serving plate and drizzle with tuna mayonnaise. Cut tuna logs into 2cm cubes and arrange on veal. Scatter with crispy capers and drizzle with a little caper oil. Add micro lettuce leaves and a squeeze of lemon juice and serve. 2

* Check label if eating gluten free


Zeppole di nonna

1 tsp vanilla extract 1 cup drained ricotta 125ml milk Vegetable oil, for deep frying

1 hour plus chilling time S E R V E S 4-6 R E C I P E B Y Luca Villari R E A DY I N

S A B AY O N

6 egg yolks 90g sugar 120ml sweet prosecco 100g mascarpone

This is an adaptation of a dish my nonna used to make for me as a Sunday treat when I was young. I’ve tweaked her version by adding the sabayon and a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

TO SERVE

Icing sugar Vanilla bean ice cream ½ cup amaretti biscuits (optional) Edible flowers (optional)

ZEPPOLE

1 cup flour 2½ tsp baking soda ¼ cup caster sugar 40g raisins 2 eggs, beaten

Combine dry ingredients for zeppole in a bowl. Add eggs, 1

vanilla, ricotta and milk then mix into a thick batter. Rest in fridge for 30-45 minutes. 2 Heat a mini deep-fryer to 180°C or heat oil in a small heavy-based saucepan to 180°C (use a food thermometer). 3 Cook zeppole in small batches of 3-4, using 1 Tbsp batter for each zeppole. Carefully drop the spoonfuls into the hot oil and fry for about 3 minutes on each side (turn with a spoon or a metal spatula). Place fried zeppole on paper towels to drain. 4 For the sabayon, place yolks, sugar and prosecco in a small

metal mixing bowl over a pot of simmering hot water and keep whisking until thick. Cover with plastic wrap (let it sit directly on the sabayon’s surface to avoid a skin forming) and cool in the fridge for 10 minutes then fold in the mascarpone. 5 To serve, spoon a generous amount of sabayon onto a plate. Dust warm zeppole with icing sugar and place in sabayon. Add a scoop of ice cream, crumble amaretti biscuits over top and garnish with edible flowers, if desired.


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Pukeko schiacciata 1 hour 15 minutes plus cooling, proving and resting time M A K E S 2 loaves R E C I P E B Y Jason Olmstead R E A DY I N

150g peeled potatoes, quartered 7g dry yeast (1 packet) 500g flour Sea salt 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus 2 Tbsp extra ½ cup water Small handful fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme or whatever you have on hand) 1 Place potatoes in a medium saucepan, cover with water and boil until fork tender. Reserve 320g of the potato water then drain potatoes. (This step can be done 1-2 days in advance.) 2 After reserved water has cooled to room temperature, pour into a large bowl and mix in yeast. Set aside for 5 minutes. 3 Add flour, boiled potato, a pinch of sea salt and the oil. With a large spoon, break up potato and mix for as long as possible until it becomes too difficult. Tip dough onto floured bench and knead until elastic and shiny (5-10 minutes). 4 Place dough ball in a welloiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave somewhere warm (like the hot water cupboard) for 1 hour. 5 Remove dough and cut in half. Using well-oiled hands, press dough out to from two oval-shaped, flat loaves. Place loaves on a baking paper-lined

tray, cover with a damp tea towel and rest for 20 minutes. 6 In a small bowl, mix extra oil with the water and fresh herbs. Crush the herbs in the oil to help release the flavour. 7 Preheat oven to 240°C. After dough has rested for 20 minutes, stick your fingers into the water and oil mixture and aggressively dimple the surface of the loaves, putting generous amounts of oil and water mixture on top. 8 Sprinkle loaves with remaining oil mixture including herbs. Sprinkle sea salt liberally over the loaves. 9 Place tray in oven and turn it down to 200°C. Bake until loaves are a deep golden brown (20-25 minutes).

(reserve tips to garnish)

½ red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 3 Tbsp lemon juice Sea salt

Fish fingers R E A DY I N

4-6

30 minutes S E R V E S Luca Villari

CELERIAC REMOULADE

1 small celeriac (about 400500g), peeled and grated 6 Tbsp good-quality mayonnaise Juice 1 lemon 3 Tbsp Dijon mustard 2 Tbsp chopped chives 1 Tbsp horseradish paste Sea salt

RECIPE BY

This is a quirky take on fish fingers, with the fish being salmon crudo (raw fish) and the fingers being the Italian flat bread schiacciata. It’s a dinner party-worthy snack: simple, fresh and tasty.

SALSA

2 medium vine tomatoes, quartered, deseeded and finely diced 40g pitted green olives, roughly chopped 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve Sea salt

S C H I AC C I ATA

½ loaf schiacciata, cut into 4cm x 8cm fingers (see recipe above) Olive oil SALMON CRUDO

300g salmon fillet, pin boned, skinned, cut into 5mm dice 2 small shallots, finely diced 1 Tbsp finely chopped dill

1

Preheat oven to 200°C. Heat

a griddle pan or chargrill or non-stick frying pan until hot. Brush bread fingers with olive oil and toast for 1 minute or so on each side or until well coloured. Transfer to oven and cook for 2-3 minutes. Set aside. 2 Place all salmon crudo ingredients in a bowl, mix well and season to taste with sea salt and cracked black pepper. 3 Place all the remoulade ingredients in a small mixing bowl, mix well and season to taste with sea salt and cracked black pepper. 4 Place all salsa ingredients in a mixing bowl, mix well and season to taste with sea salt and cracked black pepper. 5 To serve, lay the bread fingers on a chopping board, gently arrange remoulade on top, followed by the salmon crudo. Scatter with salsa and garnish with dill tips. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve.

John Kirwan He might be an All Blacks legend but Sir John Kirwan is definitely an enthusiast for the Italian way of life. He is the president of the Dante Alighieri Italian Society of Auckland after all. Through living in the northern town of Treviso in the Veneto region, on and off for the better part of 30 years, he’s fallen under the spell of their exceptional wines. He’s just started importing wines from Italy under his own label, Jk.14. Some of the grape varieties will be familiar to Kiwi palates and others will be something new and interesting. His three red wines and two still whites come from Casa Roma winery, while his two proseccos, in sweet and dry styles, come from the Ciodet winery. They’re all named for friends, family and places that are special to the former All Blacks wing (No 14) and the labels explain a bit about the wine style in an engaging and informal way. As well as appearing at the street festival with his wines, JK will be putting on a wine-matched dinner with Luca Villari at Luca’s newly renovated Al Volo restaurant in Mt Eden during September. ○

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FROM THE GARDEN


SPRING

Loaded

Signs of spring are all around, especially when it comes to vibrant new-season fruit and vegetables RECIPES & PHOTOGRAPHS

Emma Galloway

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FROM THE GARDEN

▶ While it is now possible to buy beetroot all year round, they really are at their best in spring. The natural earthiness of the beetroot ties in with the earthy, nutty characteristics of buckwheat to create this beautiful, nourishing faux risotto. Beetroot & buckwheat ‘risotto’ with watercress pistou. See page 76 for recipe.


Growing up, spring was always my favourite season The warmer weather and beautiful fresh spring produce are always welcome after our long, wet New Zealand winters. Having just moved back after a long time overseas, this is the first spring in five years that we’ve been able to grow our own vegetables. I’m super-excited to have over 100 cloves of garlic coming along nicely in the corner of our large raised garden bed. Some I will pick early as spring garlic, while the rest will be harvested in summer and stored for the coming year. Our broad beans are plumping up, along with the kale and celery that we’ve been

picking all winter long. Snow and sugar-snap peas are nearly ready for picking and there are so many leeks, I don’t know what to do with them all! Fennel bulbs, heirloom carrots and chioggia beetroot (the stripy red and white variety) are fattening up, and our rhubarb patch is waking up after its long winter rest. There are so many possibilities when it comes to spring produce and the following five recipes will provide a perfect starting point.

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FROM THE GARDEN

READY IN

5

MINUTES

Avocado, matcha & lime shake R E A DY I N

5 minutes

2

GLUTEN FREE

SERVES

This is the perfect morning pick-me-up, filled with good fats (from the creamy addition of avocado), antioxidants and a gentle caffeine boost from the matcha, plus a little zip of lime to keep things fresh. Add a few ice cubes to the blender if you like things extra cold and frosty. You can find goodquality matcha tea powder at most health food or specialty food stores. Start this recipe the night before if you don’t already have ripe bananas in your freezer. Flesh 1 perfectly ripe avocado 500ml unsweetened almond milk 2 frozen bananas, roughly chopped Juice 1 lime 1-2 tsp matcha powder 1-2 tsp pure maple syrup or brown rice syrup, optional 1 Place ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Serve immediately.

Fennel, white bean & pickled radish salad 10 minutes 4 as a starter or side

R E A DY I N SERVES

VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

Fennel is one of my favourite salad ingredients, especially when shaved finely on a mandoline and doused with fresh lemon juice. Creamy white beans add a protein boost; I’ve used tinned for

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convenience, but you can soak dried beans and cook them the following day if you have time. The toasted sunflower seeds can be prepared well in advance; just cool and store them in an airtight glass jar (they will keep for up to a week). 1 medium fennel bulb Zest and juice 1 lemon 390g tin cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 1 handful mint leaves, finely chopped 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Pickled radishes (see recipe opposite) TOASTED SUNFLOWER SEEDS

1/2 cup sunflower seeds 1/2 tsp olive oil 1/4 tsp ground coriander Fine sea salt

Using either a mandoline or a sharp knife, finely slice the fennel bulb and place in a bowl. Add zest to the bowl, along with half the lemon juice. 2 Place cannellini beans in a small bowl, add the remaining lemon juice, mint and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. 3 Heat a small, dry frying pan over medium-high heat and toast sunflower seeds, stirring often, for 1-2 minutes or until golden. Add olive oil, ground coriander and a good pinch of salt and stir well to evenly coat. Remove from heat and set aside. 4 To serve, arrange a little fennel and cannellini bean mixture on four plates, divide the pickled radishes evenly between the plates, then sprinkle with sunflower seeds. 1

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016


READY IN

10

MINUTES

QUICK PICKLED RADISHES

Lightly pickling radishes not only tames their somewhat hot nature, but also gives them the most beautiful hot-pink tone, which looks great in salads. To make quick pickled radishes, finely slice 1 bunch radishes (7-8 radishes) using either a mandoline or a sharp knife. Transfer to a glass or ceramic bowl and add 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar, 2 tsp unrefined raw sugar or honey and 1/4 tsp fine sea salt. Give it all a good mix and set aside for 20-30 minutes to lightly pickle, stirring occasionally.


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FROM THE GARDEN

Roasted baby carrot, leek & quinoa salad

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 270g raw hulled buckwheat 1 large beetroot, peeled and grated 1 litre vegetable stock* Sea salt 1-2 tsp white (shiro) miso paste, or to taste* Micro greens, to serve (optional)

45 minutes plus soaking time S E R V E S 4

R E A DY I N VEGETARIAN

GLUTEN FREE

The leeks are gorgeous in our garden at the moment and I’m finding myself wanting to add them to everything I make. Here, they are sautéed in olive oil until golden and tender before being folded through protein-dense herbflecked quinoa and topped with beautiful roasted baby carrots. I usually try to soak quinoa in cold water the night before using, to improve digestibility, but if you forget, don’t worry. If you have any leftovers, they keep well in the fridge for two or three days. 1 cup quinoa, if possible soaked overnight in cold water then drained 11/2 cups cold water 1 bunch baby carrots 3 Tbsp olive oil Sea salt 2 medium leeks, finely sliced 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped DRESSING

1/2 tsp Dijon mustard* 1 tsp honey or brown rice syrup Juice 1 lemon 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Handful flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped 1 Preheat oven to 200°C. Bring cold water (use only 1 cup water if you’ve soaked the quinoa overnight) to the boil in a saucepan. 2 Add quinoa, cover with a lid and reduce to a gentle simmer. Cook for 10-12 minutes until all the water has been absorbed and quinoa is tender. Remove from heat, leave the lid on and set aside to steam for 5 minutes before fluffing up with a fork. Transfer to a large bowl. 3 While quinoa is cooking, trim all but 1cm off the tops of the baby carrots and slice in half if large. Transfer to an oven tray, drizzle with 1 Tbsp of the olive oil, season with sea salt and

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WAT E R C R E S S P I S T O U

1 clove garlic 2 cups packed watercress leaves 1/4 tsp fine sea salt 4 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2-3 tsp white (shiro) miso paste (optional)*

Heat oil in a medium saucepan, add onion and cook for 1-2 minutes, until translucent but not coloured. Add garlic and buckwheat and cook for a further 1-2 minutes, stirring continuously. 2 Mix through the grated beetroot, then add the stock and a good pinch of sea salt. Bring to the boil, then pop on a lid, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 20-25 minutes, stirring a few times during cooking, until the buckwheat is tender. 3 To make the pistou, place garlic in a small food processor (I use the mini food processor attachment on my stick blender) and finely chop. Add watercress and sea salt then blend again. Drizzle in olive oil, add miso, if using, and continue blending to form a fine paste. 4 When buckwheat is tender, add a little water if required to form a soft ‘risotto’. Remove from the heat, stir through the miso to taste and adjust seasoning if needed. 5 Serve risotto drizzled with a little pistou and scattered with micro greens, if using. 1

freshly ground black pepper and give them a good mix before popping into the oven to roast for 25-30 minutes, making sure you turn them at least once during cooking. 4 Heat remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil in a medium frying pan, add sliced leeks and garlic and cook over medium heat, stirring often for 8-10 minutes, or until the leeks are super tender and starting to caramelise. Remove from the heat and stir through the quinoa. 5 In a small bowl, whisk together the mustard and honey, add lemon juice and whisk, then drizzle in olive oil and whisk to form a smooth dressing. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, pour over the quinoa and stir through, along with the parsley. 6 To serve, either stir the carrots through the quinoa salad and serve, or divide the quinoa between plates and top with the roasted carrots.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Beetroot & buckwheat ‘risotto’ with watercress pistou R E A DY I N VEGETARIAN

30 minutes

SERVES

4

GLUTEN FREE

Despite having ‘wheat’ in its name, buckwheat is a glutenfree grain from the same family as rhubarb and sorrel. It’s a great source of vegetarian protein, iron, zinc, selenium and B vitamins. You can find it at health food and specialty food stores. If you need to eat gluten-free, make sure you check the label on your white (shiro) miso paste to ensure it doesn’t contain wheat. If you eat dairy, a little grated parmesan can be used in place of the white miso paste in both the ‘risotto’ and the pistou if preferred. Rocket can be used in place of the watercress if unavailable. 2 Tbsp olive oil 1/2 onion, finely diced

* Check label if eating gluten free

For more stunning spring vegetarian dishes, go to


Flourless rhubarb & rosemary cake 1 hour 20 minutes plus cooling time S E R V E S 10-12

R E A DY I N

GLUTEN FREE

I love adding fresh herbs and fruit to cakes and it’s around this time of the year when my rhubarb patch comes back to life after its long winter sleep, and the herbs in the garden are abundant. I use unrefined raw sugar (such as Billington’s, which is available from most supermarkets) in all my baking. Often it’s fine to use just as it is, but in cakes such as this, when you want the sugar to dissolve in the butter, I find it a little too gritty so I blend it first. To do this, simply place the sugar in a blender and pulse until white and powdery like icing sugar. 250g rhubarb 275g ground almonds 1 Tbsp finely chopped rosemary Finely grated zest 1 lemon 150g butter, softened 150g unrefined raw sugar, ground in a blender until powdery 1 tsp vanilla extract 4 large free-range eggs, at room temperature Icing sugar, to serve (optional)

Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease and line a 23cm cake tin with baking paper. 2 Finely slice rhubarb and place in a large bowl, add ground almonds, rosemary and zest, and mix. 3 Cream softened butter, sugar and vanilla using either an electric mixer or a bowl and wooden spoon. 4 Add eggs one at a time, making sure you beat well after each addition. Add the rhubarb and almond mixture and stir to just combine. 5 Transfer to cake tin and bake for 60-65 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean when inserted into the centre. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool in the tin. 6 Dust with icing sugar to serve, if desired. Will store airtight for two or three days or more in the fridge. ○ 1

For more of Emma’s recipes visit mydarlinglemonthyme.com, or find Emma on Instagram @mydarlinglemonthyme


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PROMOTION

It’s an excuse to be wicked...

Devoney Scarfe SugarMama Baking

When baking for Halloween, what could be more wicked than chocolate? Halloween is the perfect excuse for the kids to take the fun of mud-pie making to the next level. For a treat that’s wickedly chocolatey, Kiwi baker Devoney Scarfe of SugarMama Baking created this chocolate Spider Tart made with the delicious improved chocolate baking range, NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE.

Spider tart SERVES

4

A dangerously delicious dark chocolate tart with chocolate pastry and white chocolate spiders. CHOCOLATE PASTRY 2 Tbsp NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Cocoa 2 Tbsp icing sugar A good pinch of salt 200g plain flour 150g chilled butter 2-3 Tbsp water CHOCOLATE FILLING 300ml cream Pinch of salt 50g unsalted butter 290g NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Dark Melts SPIDERS AND WEB 150g NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE White Melts plus 10 extra NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE White Melts Print out of spider’s legs (for a printable PDF, visit NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Delicious Chocolate Classics Recipe Collection, visit foodtolove.co.nz)

CHOCOLATE PASTRY This can be made up to two days in advance and stored in the freezer. 1 Place the dry ingredients into a food processor – this is a good job for the kids; mine love measuring, though it can get a little messy! 2 Grate the butter into the mix. Press the pulse button 1-2 times, until it resembles breadcrumbs (this is another fun job for the kids, but don’t let them do it too many

Made for baking, the NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE range has chocolate for melting, grating, adding in, pouring over, sifting, decorating and more – making it easy to choose the right chocolate for your favourite treat.

times, as it’s important not to over work the dough). 3 Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of water. Pulse one more time. The mixture is ready when you can press it between your fingers and it clumps together. Only use the third tablespoon of water if it is necessary. 4 Tip it out onto the bench and work it until it comes together as dough. Knead for 30 seconds. Another fun kids’ job! Make into a round flat disk, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for 20 minutes. 5 Take out of the fridge and let the dough come up to room temperature. Roll out on a lightly floured surface Lay it gently over a 28cm tart tin with removable base and press into the corners. 6 Trim 5mm above the edge of the tin – this helps with the shrinkage that happens whilst cooking. Freeze for one hour (this will also help with the shrinkage.) At this stage you can freeze the pastry for up to 2 days, if you have prepared it in advance. 7 Preheat oven 200°. Line the pastry with non-stick cooking paper. Then weigh down with pastry weights. If you don’t have weights, no problem, you can use dried beans (I used lentils) or even uncooked rice. 8 Bake blind for 15 minutes. Remove the beans/rice/weights and paper and continue cooking for a further 5-10 minutes. 9 While the pastry is cooling, prepare the chocolate filling. CHOCOLATE FILLING Place the cream and salt in a pan, heat until just before the boil. 1

NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Melts set hard and glossy without refrigeration!

2 Take off the heat, and add the butter and NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Dark Melts, stir until smooth. Pour into the tart shell, reserving a little to make the spiders’ eyes. 3 Place in the fridge to cool. Now it’s time for the fun part, the spiders and web!

THE WEB 1 Melt the NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE White Melts in microwave on high for 1 minute. Take out and stir. Repeat at 30 second intervals until melted. 2 To pipe the web, the filling must still be warm. Spoon into piping bag. Start in the centre of the tart and with a #4 piping nozzle, pipe a spiral over the chocolate filling. 3 Get the kids to grab a toothpick and, from the centre, draw a line out to the edge of the tart. Repeat this process until you have your web. Place in the fridge to cool. THE SPIDERS 1 Place greaseproof paper over the print-out of the spiders’ legs. 2 Using the same piping bag as you used for the web, pipe 4 thin lines to create spiders’ legs. Get the kids to place a NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE White Melt on the top to create the spider’s body. Repeat to create 2-3 more spiders. 3 Dip a toothpick into the reserved dark chocolate filling mix and dot onto the spider to make the eyes. 4 Wait until they are set before placing on the tart. Some can go on the tart and the rest can go onto the plates when serving.


NESTLÉ BAKERS’

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sourced cocoa across the full range. To learn more, visit nestlecocoaplan.com. The range is available in leading supermarkets.

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Our guide to stir-frying

Spicy frittata

Learn TIPS & TRICKS

SUPER GREENS

W H AT ’ S

DRYING HERBS

SPRING LAMB

For sautéing and steaming

Watercress and asparagus

FOR LUNCH?

By air or by microwave!

Herby lamb & potato tray bake

3 little winners

Spring special Spring lunch idea Make a low-carb spicy sausage frittata with spring greens, which can be eaten hot from the pan or cold in the lunchbox. Beat 4 eggs with ¼ cup ricotta, 2 Tbsp milk, salt and pepper. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in a sturdy frying pan. Add 1 bunch chopped spring onions and cook until golden. Wash, trim and slice 1 large bunch spinach or 4-5 cups mixed spring greens, or blanch 1 bunch trimmed, chopped asparagus for 3 minutes. Add to pan with 2 cloves crushed garlic and 1 finely chopped dried chorizo sausage. Cook gently until greens (if using) are wilted. Pour in egg mixture. Cover and cook gently for 8-10 minutes, or until eggs are set. Preheat grill and sprinkle frittata with 1 Tbsp grated parmesan and 1 pinch ground nutmeg. Place pan in top third of the oven, so it is not too close to the grill, and cook until bubbled and golden (3-5 minutes).

It’s time to shake off winter’s sedentary state. In these pages, Sophie Gray makes the most of fresher, lighter foods and all the tender greens coming into season T E X T A N D R E C I P E S Sophie Gray

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MASTERCLASS

Dry the vegetables. If they aren’t dry they will steam and stew in the pan and lose their crisp texture. Pat thoroughly with paper towels or use a salad spinner for greens if you have one.

Food in a flash Stir-frying is a fantastic way to quickly cook a variety of greens. Simply grab your frying pan or wok and follow our no-fail guide Stir-frying

STIR-FRYING BASICS

A quick stir-fry is one of the fastest, easiest, tastiest ways to make a last-minute vegetable side dish to suit any meal. To serve four, you will need around 10 cups of leafy greens such as bok choy, Chinese cabbage or spinach. For firm vegetables such as broccoli or asparagus, 4 cups is sufficient (plus an increased cooking time). Once the oil is in the pan or wok, it needs your full attention for 2-3 minutes so don’t expect to check your emails or attend a crying baby once the pan reaches full velocity.

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Don’t crowd the pan. Stick to no more than 4 cups of evenly chopped firm vegetables or 8-12 cups of evenly chopped leafy greens. Choose your oil well. Not all cooking oil is suitable for cooking at a very high heat: sesame, avocado and rice bran oils are good choices as they

have a high smoke point and low viscosity so a little goes a long way and the food doesn’t have a greasy mouthfeel. Heat the wok or pan on high before you begin and give it time to heat up properly. Flick a few drops of water into the pan; the wok is hot enough when a bead of water evaporates within 1-2 seconds.

Remove pan from the heat before adding the oil (about 1 Tbsp). Swirl the pan to coat the bottom and sides. It shouldn’t be smoking hot – if it is, leave pan to cool a little, discard the scorched oil, wipe out the pan and start again.


Sautéing

Cook seasonings such as garlic, ginger and chilli first, for around 10 seconds until fragrant, then push them up the sides of the wok or pan and add the chopped vegetables. Season with salt and pepper if desired and stirfry for 1 minute or until the vegetables begin to wilt.

Prepare sauces or dressings before you cook and arrange them within easy reach of the stove, along with a small dish of water.

SPRING MAKEOVER

▼ Pour sauce or dressing around and down the sides of the pan instead of directly into the centre, then stir-fry or toss to coat the vegetables with the dressing.

Frozen stir-fry blends can add a burst of colour and flavour when you are hanging out for not-yet-in-season ingredients such as capsicum and corn, but they will add moisture to the pan, changing the cooking environment. Not wrong, just different.

Stock up on lighter staples: rice and ricepaper wraps, couscous, and sauces for dipping, drizzling and marinating. In the winter the flavours tend to be cooked into the dish in stews, soups and gravies. Lighter dishes tend to cook more quickly so flavours are often added at the end. Ensure you have access to fresh herbs or herb pastes, citrus, sesame oil, fish sauce and other flavour boosters.

This is a less fierce alternative to stir-frying and can be done in any frying pan. Sautéing cooks large or small pieces of food in a wide, shallow pan in a small amount of hot fat over a mediumhigh heat; turning may be frequent or just once. The fat may be a combination of butter and oil or clarified butter and is usually of a higher viscosity than fat used for stir-frying. The fat forms a protective barrier between the food and the pan, preventing the food from sticking and allowing it to brown or crispen. Sautéing is a great option for quick weeknight meals: fresh fish, crumbed schnitzel, fritters or rissoles and all manner of other foods that benefit from a little browning. The technique uses less oil than pan-frying or shallow-frying while allowing you to quickly and evenly cook larger pieces of food than if you were stir-frying.

Steaming Steaming is fast, economical and a great way to keep the nutrient content of your spring vegetables at an optimum level. You only need a couple of centimetres of boiling water in a saucepan to make steam. If you don’t have a stainless-steel steaming basket, bamboo steamers are cheap and readily available from Asian grocery stores. Or if you need a steamer (and you need it now!) a metal colander or sieve placed over, but not touching, the simmering water works just fine. You’ll need to trap that steam, so a tight-fitting lid is vital. If no lid is available, cover the top snugly with foil (just take care removing it). Infuse flavour while steaming by adding garlic, ginger root or lemon slices to the water, or try steaming miso, fish stock or tea instead of water. Fresh herbs, garlic, ginger or chilli work well in the steamer basket with the food too. The options are endless.

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SPRING GREENS

Young tender leaves make a zingy watercress pesto, which is perfect tossed through pasta for a quick supper. Blend 2 cups watercress leaves with 1 clove garlic, 1 Tbsp grated parmesan, 2 Tbsp pine nuts toasted in a dry pan till golden, a small pinch dried chilli flakes, zest 1 lemon, 2-3 Tbsp oil and a pinch salt. Cook enough pasta for two people then mix the pesto with a slosh of starchy pasta water and a squeeze lemon juice and stir through drained pasta.

Asparagus There are so many ways to enjoy this springtime treat. Add chopped, blanched asparagus to an omelette or scrambled eggs; sauté spears in a dash of extra virgin olive oil and minced garlic then season with black pepper and freshly grated parmesan, or add chopped cooked asparagus to a salad or wrap. Another option is to place spears on a large piece of foil, drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice, wrap it up and bake for 20 minutes at 200°C. Or simply smother it under a blanket of rich, velvety hollandaise.

Spring’s super-greens Here are some delicious ways to enjoy peppery, nutrient-rich watercress and that star of the spring line-up, asparagus Watercress Make a smoked salmon and watercress omelette and get your omega-3s and a superfood boost in one easy meal. Chop ½ cup watercress, 1 Tbsp spring onion greens and 1-2 Tbsp smoked salmon and set aside. Whisk 2 eggs, 1 eggshell full of water and 1 Tbsp sour cream or crème fraîche with salt and pepper. Heat an omelette pan until drops of water form beads in seconds, then drop in a knob butter, swirl it around with the spring onion greens then pour in the egg mixture. As the egg sets, use a spatula to push the set edges into the middle then tilt the pan to allow the runny part to fill the space. Sprinkle on the salmon and cress. Fold in half and allow to heat through, then flip onto a plate and serve.

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Egg and cress is a classic sandwich combination. Mash together 2 hardboiled eggs, ¼ cup chopped watercress leaves, 1 Tbsp mayonnaise, salt and pepper and spread onto bread. Enjoy either as open-face sandwiches or classic sandwiches. This amount makes enough for two generous sandwiches. If you fancy an extra kick, add 1 tsp curry powder. Young asparagus stems can be eaten whole. However, thicker asparagus becomes tough and woody as it ages. In this case, bend the stems and they will naturally snap at the point where the stem becomes tough; discard that part and eat the tender tips. Always rinse tips thoroughly to remove grit from the delicate spears.


What’s for lunch? Spring greens need next to no cooking, which makes them perfect for these tasty, speedily assembled dishes Rustle up this fast, easy carbonara with lemon and spring greens. Boil 150g dried spaghetti or fettuccine in boiling salted water. While the pasta is cooking, measure 3 cups greens (spinach, chard, cress or a combination) and grate the zest 1 lemon. Whisk together 1 egg with ¼ cup crème fraîche. Prepare ¼ cup grated parmesan. Reserve ¼ cup starchy pasta water and drain the pasta. Return it to the pan with the reserved water. Add the greens and zest, cover and shake over the heat for 30 seconds until wilted. Add the egg mixture and stir well over a gentle heat until mixed, then add the parmesan. Cover and cook gently for 1-2 minutes until the sauce clings to the pasta, season and serve. Makes enough for 2 generous servings.

Spring greens are the perfect addition to a homemade pot noodle as they don’t require cooking, just heating through. Ramen is a good starting point. Assemble ahead of time and store in the fridge. Into a small mason or springform jar place 1 Tbsp soy sauce, ½ tsp dashi granules, 1 Tbsp white miso paste and ½ tsp chicken stock powder. Add ½ cup pre-cooked noodles (udon or ramen), ½-1 cup spring greens (spring onion, spinach, chard, coriander, snow peas) and ¼ cup dried shiitake mushrooms. Secure the lid and leave in the fridge till needed. At lunchtime, fill with boiling water, allow the flavours to infuse and enjoy.

Make fragrant, delicious lemongrass chicken rice-paper rolls from last night’s leftover chicken. Finely chop 2 stalks lemongrass with 2 cloves garlic and 1 Tbsp each chopped mint and coriander. Mix in 1 Tbsp kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), 1 tsp sugar and a squeeze lemon or lime juice. Toss through 1 cup cooked shredded chicken until well mixed. Dip a rice-paper wrap in a shallow bowl of just-boiled water for a few seconds to soften then add some of the saucy chicken and other fillings (eg grated carrot, fresh greens) and roll or fold into a tight little bundle. Serve with soy sauce for dunking if desired. This makes 8-10 rolls or 2 adult lunchbox serves.


LEARN

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HOW TO DRY HERBS

Drying herbs concentrates the flavours, so you don’t need to use as much in recipes – 1 tsp dried herbs equates to 1 Tbsp fresh herbs.

Spring lamb Ready in just over an hour, this herbed lamb and potato bake with a crunchy, minty salad is sure to brighten your week ‘Spring lamb’ traditionally refers to an animal born in late winter or early spring and slaughtered at about 4-5 months old. These lambs ate the new grass as soon as they’d finished their mothers’ milk, resulting in sweet, tender meat. All New Zealand lamb is naturally reared on green open pastures, and if you are really lucky that pasture was salty coastal land, which further enhances the flavour. Spring lamb lends itself to light seasoning, which doesn’t drown out its delicate flavour.

Capitalise on rampant spring growth by drying your herbs for use all year round P I C K H E R B S on a warm day after the dew has evaporated and before any flowers have developed. Herbs can be dried in a variety of ways depending on the herb and how you intend to use it. Once dried, they are safe from bacteria and mould and will remain potent for 6-12 months.

tie sprigs or branches into small bunches (small bunches allow air to circulate, preventing mould from forming). Hang bunches up to dry with the leaves pointing downwards, place a towel underneath to catch falling leaves. Allow 7-10 days to dry – the time will vary depending on the size of the branches and the level of humidity. When the leaves

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crumble between your fingers, they’re dried. Sage, thyme, lavender, summer savory, bayleaves, oregano, rosemary and marjoram are sturdy, low-moisture herbs best suited to this method. T O M I C R O W A V E , lay tender herbs in a single layer on a sheet of absorbent paper towel, place on a microwave-safe plate and cover with another sheet of paper towel. Microwave for 1 minute then continue in 20-30 second bursts until the herb crumbles between your fingers. This method suits basil, tarragon, lemon balm, fennel, dill and mint as they have a high moisture content and will go mouldy if not dried quickly.

For a salad of asparagus, greens and mint, rinse and trim 2 bunches asparagus and pod or prepare 500g peas, broad beans or new-season green beans. Cook asparagus in boiling water for 4-6 minutes, depending on thickness. Remove with tongs and plunge into a bowl of iced water to retain the bright green colour. Add peas or beans to pot and cook for 3-5 minutes, drain and add to iced water. Mix together 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar, 6 Tbsp oil, ½ tsp Dijon mustard, a pinch sugar and 2 Tbsp chopped fresh mint. Drain vegetables and serve warm or cold, tossed with the dressing and topped with additional fresh mint. If reheating, place in a shallow frying pan, add the dressing and toss until heated through. ○

P HOTOG RA P H S A LA M Y, BAU E R SY N D I CAT I ON , G E T TY I M AG E S

Harvest your herbs

A spring lamb herb and potato tray bake is easy enough for a weeknight. Preheat oven to 210°C. Rinse 600-700g waxy new or gourmet potatoes, cut into chunks and toss lightly in ½ Tbsp oil. Arrange in a roasting pan and place in the preheated oven. Make a paste from 1 Tbsp chopped parsley, ½ tsp each finely chopped rosemary and thyme. Mix with 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 Tbsp runny honey and 1 Tbsp olive oil. Spread paste over 8-12 lamb loin chops (allow 2-3 per person depending on size). Reduce oven to 200°C and place chops on top of and around potatoes in oven. Season lightly with salt and pepper and set timer for 25 minutes. Turn chops and potatoes over when timer goes off then re-set for another 25 minutes. Serve from the pan with seasonal veges such as this salad:


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Sauté with confidence using the Tefal Reserve Collection Sauté Pan! This tasty meal is best with in-season vegetables such as asparagus, carrots, broccoli and snap peas.

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Add onion and garlic. The term sauté is from the French word ‘jump’ – shake the pan to make the vegetables ‘jump’.

3 Cook harder vegetables first, such as carrots and broccoli, and softer vegetables, like snap peas, last.

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4 Sauté with the glass lid on to retain moisture and to lock in the flavour of the vegetables.

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TA M A R I L LO S

Local

Enjoy the exotic ‘tree tomato’ before the season ends with some great recipes

Signature dish serve cuisine inspired by nature, created with fine dining technique at Pasture, their new Parnell restaurant. Ed presents one of their signature dishes of smoked egg yolk, barley, kawakawa, and chamomile to illustrate their new concept.

ED AND LAURA VERNER

ROOTS

IN SEASON

Chef Giulio Sturla visits his favourite produce supplier for recipe inspiration

Quick and easy ideas for using seasonal parsnips, yams and lemons

Smoked egg yolk “A free-range egg yolk is cooked sous vide for 3 hours to create a chewy, toffee-like texture that won’t break and leach into the sauce. The yolk is placed in a bath of our own manuka-smoked butter until service to impart a smoky flavour into the yolk.”

P HOTOG RA P H M I KE R OOK E

Puffed quinoa “We boil the quinoa until cooked, dry it out in a 50°C oven then deep-fry it in

and mixture of canola and sunflower oil. It is added into the barley porridge for texture and mild, nutty flavour.” Camomile oil “Camomile leaves are picked fresh in summer, dried and infused in canola oil. It creates a vibrant yellow oil, which adds herbal, aromatic notes to the dish.” Kawakawa leaves “Picked tender young leaves of kawakawa are pickled for 1 year in house-made lovage

vinegar. The leaves are bitter and almost inedible when picked, but the bitterness leaches out over time and they take on a flavour a bit like a green peppercorn. We wrap the smoked egg yolk in the kawakawa leaves before serving.” Barley porridge “We pressure cook organic barley in water then cook it with our house-made butter. We also mix in the buttermilk that is left behind after churning butter out of the cream; the buttermilk adds great acidity to the dish.” Drink match “At Pasture we’ve designed both alcoholic and non-alcoholic drink matches for our set menu. A juice of freshly squeezed celeriac and sorrel is mixed with a lovage-infused vinegar. We pick the lovage from the garden on our rural property. We want to show that non-alcoholic drinks can have complexity and depth. The wine match is Millton Libiamo Gewurztraminer 2015 from Gisborne. It’s an aromatic and textural orange wine that lifts the spiciness of the kawakawa.” ○

PA S T U R E

235 Parnell Rd, Parnell, Auckland

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Tasty tamarillos

Sometimes known as the ‘tree tomato’ in New Zealand, this South American native has found a home in the hearts and kitchens of countless Kiwis STORY

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Tracey Sunderland

PHOTOGRAPHS

Vanessa Lewis


T H I S PAG E

Tamarillo tarte tatin. See page 93 for recipe.


LOCAL

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Fruity yoghurt icy pops 10 minutes plus freezing time M A K E S 8 small ice blocks GLUTEN FREE

R E A DY I N

These icy treats make a great afternoon tea or dessert for kids and adults alike. This recipe is very simple and the tangy raw tamarillos offset the sweetness of the yoghurt. 4 large tamarillos, halved 3-4 Tbsp brown or raw sugar 500g sweetened yoghurt (I used passionfruit yoghurt)

Use an ice block tray with 8-10 moulds. Allow half a tamarillo for each ice block. 2 Cut a small cross into the flesh of each tamarillo half. Scoop out flesh into a small bowl. Sprinkle with sugar and stir. 3 Dollop half the yoghurt on top of the fruit. Don’t mix at all, as the colours will blend naturally when you spoon it into the moulds. 4 Using a dessertspoon, fill base of moulds with some of the yoghurt and tamarillo. Add a spoonful of remaining yoghurt to each mould then top up with remaining tamarillo and yoghurt mixture. 5 Add the individual mould lids and a stick to the middle and freeze for a minimum of 3 hours. 6 To unmould, fill a large basin with hot water and immerse block tray until water is near the top. Leave for a couple of minutes then pinch the end of each ice block and pull on the stick to remove. Serve immediately. 1

B

oris Slobalot escorts us through the five hectares of potted plants and trees of Tharfield Nursery in Katikati. He sounds a bit like a James Bond villain, but is in fact the drooling pet Boxer of owners Fiona and Andrew Boylan. Far from devising fiendishly clever ways to interrupt our tour through the nursery, Boris happily pads along through fields of Kiwi favourites like blueberries, raspberries, boysenberries, passionfruit, feijoa, and of course, tamarillo. Tharfield Nursery dates back to 1967, but when Fiona and Andrew bought the property in 1997 they decided to specialise in growing edible trees and plants and set about converting it to that purpose. They launched their brand, Incredible Edibles, in 2000 and now supply most leading garden centres nationwide. The nursery includes two hectares of mature gardens that are used for plant trials and crop research, and they also grow less common fruit varieties such as banana trees, sugarcane and coffee for gardeners with more eclectic tastes. When we visited the nursery to get some outdoor shots, we took along my daughter Eliza and photographer Vanessa’s daughter Nina to lend a hand. The red tamarillos they are holding were developed from South American seeds by an Auckland nurseryman in the 1920s. When tamarillos were originally introduced to New Zealand from Asia in the late 1800s, only yellow and purple fruit were available. The tamarillo season starts in May and runs until the end of October, so you’ve still got time this year to enjoy these delicious red jewels.

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TIP

Try a delicious adult version by swapping the sweet yoghurt for coconut yoghurt mixed with pieces of dark chocolate.


TIP

A tamarillo is ready to eat when the stalk is black and the flesh slightly soft. If the stalk is green and the fruit is very firm then it’s best to leave it in the fruit bowl for a few days to ripen

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Tamarillo compote 10 minutes plus marinating time S E R V E S 6-8

R E A DY I N

GLUTEN FREE

Tamarillos are delicious scooped directly onto cereal or hot buttered toast, with a sprinkle of sugar, for a quick breakfast. This simple compote is a delight to have on standby in the fridge for a special breakfast treat or a sneaky dessert, served with a touch of yoghurt, cream or ice cream. 8 large tamarillos, halved 2 Tbsp manuka honey, warmed Juice 1/2 large orange or tangelo 1 cinnamon stick

Scoop the tamarillo flesh into a glass bowl or large glass jar. 2 Combine the warmed honey with orange juice and stir until well mixed. Drizzle over the tamarillos. 3 Add a broken cinnamon stick to the fruit and stir once or twice. Cover and leave to marinate for at least 2 hours or overnight in the fridge before eating. The compote will last well for a few days in the fridge. 1

TIP

The flavour of dark red tamarillos can be quite tart. If you see some golden tamarillos, try them – the flavour is a little more mellow and mild. They are often available later in the season and are orange in colour.

Tamarillo confit with pinot noir 1 hour 20 minutes About 4 x 250g jars

R E A DY I N MAKES

GLUTEN FREE

This recipe came from my mother, who grew tamarillos for 10 years in Katikati with my father. Mum experimented with the excess fruit and made all sorts of recipes – tamarillo vinegar was a favourite, and so was this confit. She used to paint on little labels and sell jars


at the gate. Serve the confit as a steak sauce or condiment for cheese and cold meats.

¼ cup olive oil 3 medium red onions, halved and finely sliced 300ml red wine (pinot noir or shiraz works well) 900g-1kg peeled and sliced tamarillos 240g raw sugar 1 In a frying pan over medium heat add the olive oil and sliced onions. Cook for 20 minutes until softened. 2 Add wine and simmer for 20 minutes until the wine has evaporated. 3 Add fruit and cook until tender (around 20 minutes). 4 Add sugar and cook over medium heat until the sugar has dissolved and the sauce becomes glossy. 5 Meanwhile, preheat oven to 100°C, then place jars in the oven to sterilise for 15 minutes. Bring a kettle to the boil, place the lids in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. 6 Carefully ladle the hot confit into the hot jars and, using tongs, place the lids on top. When the jars have cooled a little you can tighten the lids and leave to seal. Wipe or wash jars to clean off any spillages. TIP

This confit is a great addition to cheeseboards and goes well with a lovely brie or creamy blue cheese. Alternatively, it delivers a wonderful hit of umami to a simple cold meat and salad sandwich.

Tamarillo tarte tatin 1 hour 15 minutes 10-12

R E A DY I N SERVES

I’ve always found this classic French upside-down tart to be a very satisfying dessert for very little effort. I recommend making this simple, sweet pastry as it will knock the socks off any bought pastry. You can

make it in a food processor or easily by hand in a bowl. If you need to save time and buy readymade, I suggest trying Paneton Sweet Pastry. This recipe makes a big tart but you could easily halve the quantities if you wish. SW E E T PA S T RY

½ cup caster sugar 2½ cups plain flour 200g butter, at room temperature, diced 1 egg, whisked with a large pinch salt 1 tsp lemon zest Juice ½ lemon TOPPING

10-12 large tamarillos, cut a small cross in the base of each fruit 2 heaped Tbsp butter ¼ cup sugar (raw or brown sugar) mixed with ½ tsp mixed spice

Preheat oven to 200°C fanbake. Choose a heavy-based, ovenproof, cast-iron frying pan (or deep ceramic quiche dish) – mine was 27cm in diameter, but it doesn’t matter if yours is smaller or larger. 2 To make the pastry, place the sugar, flour and butter in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a few times until the mixture resembles fine crumbs. 3 Drizzle the egg around the bowl, add the lemon zest and juice and pulse again a few times until the mixture forms a mass of big pieces. 4 Tip dough onto a lightly floured surface and press together. Work quickly and flatten into a neat, flat square. Cover in plastic wrap and chill for a minimum of 15 minutes in the fridge. (This recipe makes about 690g pastry.) 5 Place tamarillos in a large bowl and cover in boiling water. Leave to blanch for 2-3 minutes then drain and place in a bowl of cold water for a few minutes. 6 Drain tamarillos, peel away the skins with a small, sharp knife and remove the stalks. 1

Place the chilled pastry on a floured surface. Pull apart and then press together into a thick, flat circle. Sprinkle more flour on top then roll into a circle about 3cm in diameter bigger than the rim of your frying pan or dish. 8 Spread a thick layer of butter in the base of frying pan and sprinkle over half the sugar and spice mixture. Place tamarillos evenly around the inside edge of the pan and finish with two tamarillos in the middle. 9 Sprinkle remaining sugar mixture on top and cover with pastry, tucking the edges in around the fruit. Bake in the 7

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oven until the pastry is golden (20-25 minutes). 1 0 Remove from the oven and allow to rest for a couple of minutes. Run a knife around the pan edge to ensure the pastry does not stick. Place a large plate on top of the pastry and, using a large, thick tea towel, turn the pan over quickly so the pastry is on the bottom. Serve immediately, with a little thickened cream or ice cream. ○

For more seasonal fruit recipes, go to

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F I N I S H E D I N AGED WHISKY BARRELS. RICHER. DEEPER. SMOOTHER.

the finish is just the beginning

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BOB CAMPBELL MW*

POINTS

Enjoy Jacob’s Creek Responsibly *VINTAGE 1


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On the hunt Wintry nights mean hunkering down with warming, hearty food and bold, savoury wines. For Taste’s second Seasonal Supper, chef Dariush Lolaiy created a game-centric menu for a one-off night at Cazador RECIPES

Dariush Lolaiy

PHOTOGRAPHY

Todd Eyre

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t’s as if we’re sitting in a little tavern in the Spanish countryside, tempranillo in one hand and wafer-thin slices of aged jamón in the other. Except we’re not. We’re at the far end of Mt Eden, way down Dominion Rd, beyond the fluorescent lights and noodle houses. Though there’s still plenty of wine – courtesy of Jacob’s Creek – and cured meat. There are also stuffed animals, most notably a rather surprisedlooking stag on the back wall of the restaurant, a kitschy nod to coowner and chef Dariush Lolaiy’s background as a huntsman. In the bar, beside a shelf of sherry, hangs a photo collage of hunting triumphs – Lolaiy, family members and friends holding bloody stag heads and fish as big as toddlers. Intricately patterned rugs and pillows warm the space. Most are from Iran, where Lolaiy’s mum and dad – Cazador’s previous owners – once lived, their Middle Eastern ties celebrated both here and in the food. We’re here for the second of Metro’s Seasonal Supper series, The Hunt, a specially curated gamecentric menu matched with Jacob’s Creek Double Barrel wines.

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Canapes of velvety pheasant liver parfait with onion marmalade, and pheasant heart tartare on little radish discs, circulate the room. Both are delicate and moreish. It is very difficult to say no to another, and another, and one more for good measure. The waiter laughs at us. With glasses of shiraz in hand, we spill into the dining area, claiming spots on the velvet banquettes and pulling up chairs at five long tables with orchids, roses and tangly foliage tumbling along their centres. It feels pretty special. The hunt continues with a devilishly simple menu of wild game and a few seasonal vegetables. The paired wines, Jacob’s Creek Double Barrel shiraz and cabernet sauvignon, are bold and complex. They’re wintry and rich and great with meat. There’s a crisp riesling and a Burgundy-style chardonnay, too. The wine flows, food is shared and it’s rustic and easy. At Cazador there is no sous-vide. Most of the meat is trimmed to order and cooked on the bone over gas, or on the spit out the back in the

restaurant’s garden. It’s actually a very gentle way to cook – sensible too. The kitchen buys in whole beasts from trusted suppliers with the intention of using the entire animal. Since the restaurant’s conception, a commitment to reducing waste by finding a purpose for the “less-loved cuts”, as Lolaiy calls them, has been central to its ethos. The Frenchwoman (or man) who invented the terrine should be revered, for it is a dish of sublime pleasure. Boar hock is braised in the oven for three hours under a tinfoil hat, the meat picked from the bones. Capers redolent of sea water, sour cornichons, sweet shallots and parsley are tossed with the meat along with a glug of cooking liquor. The mixture goes into a mould, and then the fridge to set. The result? A gelatinous wedge of ham and herbs. On the side, a tomato and onion relish, at once sweet and tangy. “People are realising it was a mistake,” Lolaiy says, “to ever think fat was bad.” Now, as our guests gorge on slices of his hock terrine, it would seem they are inclined to agree. A low hum of satisfaction fills the room. There is duck sausage, lightly spiced and unctuous in the way that only good sausage is. Cooled with a swipe through a moat of labneh, it is fatty and tasty. The butchers boards on each table, piled high with sausage, terrine and pickles, are completed by rounds of venison salami, with freshly baked focaccia and sourdough bread an ideal accompaniment to the charcuterie. Next come the poussin hearts. Small and plump, they pop in the mouth to release their juices, slightly sweet after being seared in a splash of Double Barrel shiraz. Lardons of boar-belly bacon scattered over the plate are just crisp enough, while fresh parsley offers the dish a grassy lift. The boards are picked bare. And then there is rabbit – “the centrepiece for many royal tables”, as Lolaiy tells us. Though butchery by nature is esoteric, Cazador’s kitchen makes it look very simple indeed, taking only about a minute to trim each saddle of hare. It’s ruthless. Separate the ribs from the loin

Alone, Lolaiy’s version is a fine thing indeed. With a glass of Jacob’s Creek Double Barrel shiraz, it’s near-perfect.


with scissors, cleaver the end where the neck was. One fell swoop. Trim the glossy sinew from the meat. Done. It comes blue from the kitchen, to preserve the meat’s integrity. Purple flesh is seasoned with salt, pepper and thyme from the restaurant’s garden. It’s complete like this, sure, but when eaten with an earthy truffle mash – that really tastes of truffle – and astringent winter greens, it feels whole. There’s half a shiitake mushroom poached in its own juice, reduced to a luscious sauce, and a little salad – with nuts! All of this and a large glass of Jacob’s Creek Double Barrel cabernet sauvignon, and god it’s good. So good that when we’re finished, the sound of forks scraping plates echoes around the dining room. We, like Lolaiy, want to make sure there’s no waste. There’s dessert, of course. A silky panna cotta, perfumed with dabs of orange blossom and sweet vanilla. One of life’s greatest pleasures when set but still wobbly, as this one is. It’s just starting to weep on the top; a thin, translucent layer has formed. Stalks of baked rhubarb offset the panna cotta’s sweetness, and there is a scattering of crushed sugared almonds to finish. Someone suggests they taste a bit like Frosties. “I was just thinking that,” Lolaiy laughs.

Rare saddle of hare w/ olive oil mash & spring onion SERVES

4

2 hare saddles 1 sprig rosemary 2 sprigs thyme 2 cloves garlic, unpeeled and crushed with the side of a knife 3 large Agria potatoes, peeled 100 ml extra-virgin olive oil 10 spring onions, washed P O TAT O M A S H 1 Add the potatoes to a pot of cold salted water. Bring to the boil, then reduce to a gentle simmer and cook until tender. Drain the potatoes in a colander and leave them to steam for a few minutes. Mash them while they’re still hot, then pass the mash through a fine sieve. 2 To a pan over a low heat, add the mash and gradually beat in the extra-virgin olive oil with a rubber spatula. Stop when the mash is light and fruity. Season with salt and add a little cold unsalted butter to smooth out the texture if necessary.

Rare saddle of hare

FOR THE HARE

TO SERVE

Prep the day before 2 Trim the silver skin from the hare saddles, then season with salt, half the rosemary and a sprig of thyme. Cover and refrigerate overnight. 3 Preheat the oven to 220ºC. 4 Warm a heavy-based ovenproof pan large enough to hold both saddles over a medium heat. Add some cooking fat or butter, and sear the saddles loin side down for about 1 minute to caramelise the meat. Add the garlic, remaining rosemary and thyme, and another knob of butter. Turn the meat in the pan, and use a spoon to baste the meat with the butter and herbs for a further 1 minute. 5 Transfer the pan to the oven for 2 minutes. Remove from the oven and rest in a warm spot, loosely covered in tin foil for 5 minutes. Reserve the pan juices to spoon over the meat once carved.

To remove the loins from the saddle, run your knife along the backbone of each saddle and cut down to the ribs. Follow the ribs with your knife to remove the loin. Turn the saddle and remove the fillets in the same manner. Slice the meat against the grain, on a bias, into 3 cm segments. Serve with olive oil mash, spring onion puree and charred spring onions. Add a few fresh spring leaves to finish.

1

FOR THE SPRING ONION

Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Use 5 spring onions to make a puree by separating the green tips from the white stems. Slice the stems into small rounds, reserve the tips. In a pan on a low heat, soften the white rounds in a little olive oil for about three minutes. Blanch the green tips in the boiling, salted water for 20 seconds, then refresh in iced water. Use a stick blender to blend the white stems with the green tips, add a little cooking water and olive oil too achieve a puree consistency, check seasoning and add salt if necessary. 2 Halve the remaining spring onions as above, and coat them in a splash of olive oil and salt. Over a hot grill pan, char the spring onions for about two minutes, turning frequently. 1

Jacob’s Creek wines

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s one of Australia’s oldest vineyards, it makes sense that Jacob’s Creek would employ innovative techniques for ageing their wine. Their most recent range of double barrel aged reds have been generously oaked in French and American barrels before a second sitting in whisky casks. It’s a process which has taken two years to refine, and has produced two full, ripe wines – a Barossa Valley shiraz, aged in Scotch whisky barrels, and a cabernet sauvignon, which has been aged in an Irish drum. There’s heat in the fruit of these wines, with the shiraz offering dark-chocolate notes with vanilla and liquorice on the nose, and the cabernet showing bold tannins, olives, caramel and mint. In the context of a game-focused restaurant like Cazador (or dinner on a wintry night at home), these wines fit. They’re powerful expressions of South Australia’s unique terroir, with long hot days and clay soils evident.

For more recipes from the night go to:

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ROOTS

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Logan Kerr of Spring Fed Organics. The kitchen crew at Roots: Quinn Kueppers (doing work experience), Robert Fairs, Giulio Sturla, Christopher Walker, Floyd Lyttle and Lucas Sampan.

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Citrus tart with lemon curd, chocolate mousse & aerated chocolate. See page 104 for recipe. Roots serves seasonal degustation menus crafted from highquality ingredients, sourced from local and biodynamic farms, small producers and their own extensive gardens.

Everything in the garden is rosy We accompany Giulio Sturla, the chef-owner of Roots restaurant, to market gardeners Spring Fed Organics then settle in at his Lyttelton dining room to sample his award-winning cuisine TEXT

Nick Russell

PHOTOGRAPHS

Johanna Macdonald

“ I C A N ’ T B E L I E V E they can grow food up there,” Roots restaurant chef Giulio Sturla says of his fruit and vegetable supplier, Spring Fed Organics. The windblasted hills above the house-line in the Christchurch suburb of Huntsbury are a hard place to be a market gardener, but Logan Kerr and Dominique Schacherer ▶


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ROOTS

T H I S PAG E

Clockwise from top left: London Street in Lyttelton; chef Giulio Sturla; the dining room at Roots; O P P O S I T E PAG E

Fresh New Zealand wasabi; in the Roots garden; Giulio Sturla with Logan Kerr of Spring Fed Organics at Logan’s Huntsbury market garden; nori-wrapped fish with broth, citrus gel & radish (see over the page for recipe).


are happily supplying some of the best restaurants in Christchurch, selling at the Christchurch Farmers’ Market and packing up organic fruit and vegetable boxes for locals to order. Giulio has been using their produce in his award-winning Lyttelton restaurant since he and his wife, Christy, opened in 2012, but the Chilean chef first came across them while working for chef Jonny Schwass six years ago. At that time Giulio had just arrived in New Zealand after a year working at worldleading Spanish restaurant Mugaritz. It’s Logan and Dominique’s battle with adversity that really impresses Giulio – as well as their outstanding heritage and certified-organic produce. Their 1.5-acre property is very open to the elements and plagued by rabbits; they have to cover their crops every night or they’ll be nibbled to bits the next day. “We’re not able to shoot the rabbits up there and that’s the best way to get rid of them,” says Logan. He describes seeing groups of 30-40 rabbits roaming the hills looking for a free lunch. You have to wonder why they bother, but there is method to their madness. The quality of the soil is outstanding, says Logan, and when they had it tested, they found it had exceptionally high mineral content, which makes for healthier produce. The other benefit is there are fewer frosts than on the plains and the temperature is a bit warmer over winter, making it the ideal spot to grow cold-weather crops. The couple exit the hills over summer as they become bone dry and require too much water to be viable. After the winter and early spring harvest they move down to a plot of land in Tai Tapu. September and October are a bit of a waiting game for the bounty of spring. During ‘the hungry gap’ there are only the likes of salad greens, radishes, spinach and the first baby turnips. Come November, it’s all on. Logan says peas are the fastest thing to appear but he’s expecting a range of berries including strawberries and Cape gooseberries. Giulio is such a big fan of Cape gooseberries that he routinely buys their entire crop. He says the fruit are excellent with fish when they are young and quite acidic. Once they’ve ripened and lost a lot of their sourness, they are fantastic in desserts. Behind his Lyttelton restaurant, Giulio has his own kitchen garden with nine raised beds, where he grows root crops such as potatoes, garlic, Jerusalem artichokes and kumara as well as herbs, lettuce and strawberries. “We couldn’t grow tomatoes as there’s not much sun,” Giulio explains. The kitchen crew make their own compost from restaurant scraps and use foraged seaweed for fertiliser. As well as a working garden for the restaurant, it helps them to understand what is growing and keep in tune with the seasons. It has helped cement their reputation as perhaps the best restaurant in the South Island and certainly one of New Zealand’s finest.

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Citrus tarts with lemon curd, chocolate mousse & aerated chocolate R E A DY I N

1 hour plus chilling and infusing time

CURD

2 large eggs 50g white sugar Zest and juice 1½ lemons 80g organic cream MOUSSE

50g egg yolks 40g white sugar 25g egg whites 115g dark chocolate, plus extra for shaving 165g organic cream A E R AT E D C H O C O L AT E (OPTIONAL)

200g Valrhona Caramelia chocolate 50g cocoa butter TO SERVE

2 ripe mandarins, split into

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4

segments and pith removed Wood sorrel or lemon thyme

TA R T

30g butter 76g ‘00’ flour 17ml water 20g white rice flour 13g citrus-infused oil (we make our own, but Lot Eight Yuzu olive oil would work well)

MAKES

Cut butter into ‘00’ flour thoroughly until it is all one consistency. Mix water with rice flour and oil then add to butter mixture. Work lightly to form a nice dough, cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour. 2 Preheat oven to 160°C. Roll dough out and cut circles to fit four greased tart moulds (ours are 8cm in diameter). Press the dough lightly into moulds, line pastry with baking paper and add ceramic weights or dried beans or raw rice. 3 Blind bake in oven for 4 minutes. Remove tart tin from oven and remove baking paper and weights. If desired, slice pastry shells in half in the moulds (we serve half tarts at the restaurant, but you may prefer to serve the whole tart). Return to oven and bake for 1

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4-5 minutes until cooked. Remove and set aside to cool. 4 For the curd, beat eggs and sugar, then add lemon zest and juice and cream. Mix to combine, cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 4 hours to infuse. 5 Place mixture in a saucepan and cook on low heat until it coats the back of a spoon well. Pass through a sieve into a piping bag and refrigerate. 6 For mousse, whisk egg yolks while slowly adding the sugar until creamy and pale. Beat the egg whites to soft peaks and fold into egg mixture. 7 Melt the chocolate in a double boiler then cool to 45°C. Whip the cream to soft peaks. 8 Fold the melted chocolate slowly into the egg mixture, followed by the cream, cover and refrigerate for 2 hours. Remove and whip mousse for 30 seconds or so with electric

beaters then spoon into a piping bag. 9 For the optional aerated chocolate, place an empty stainless-steel container in the freezer. Melt chocolate and cocoa butter in a double boiler. Cool mixture to 45°C, place in a whipped cream dispenser/ siphon and charge it twice, using two cream chargers. Shake well then rest for 20-30 minutes at room temperature. 1 0 Remove container from freezer, dispense chocolate into container then immediately return to freezer for 2 hours. 1 1 To serve, pipe curd into tart cases (or halves). Shave extra chocolate over curd and place on plates. Pipe dollops of mousse around tart, cut small cubes of aerated chocolate and arrange 3-4 on each plate. Add mandarin segments and garnish with wood sorrel leaves or lemon thyme.


Nori-wrapped fish with broth, citrus gel & radish 40 minutes plus chilling and setting time S E R V E S 4 GLUTEN FREE R E A DY I N

FISH

1 large or 2 medium whitefleshed, line-caught fish fillets 1 packet nori sheets BROTH

300ml cold water 1 fish carcass Soy sauce, to taste* Mirin, to taste* GEL

100ml fresh citrus juice (we used a combination of mandarin, orange and lemon) 0.5g (a tiny pinch) powdered agar agar Olive oil Flaky sea salt TO GARNISH

3 fresh radishes Red mizuna or mustard micro greens

Cut fish into four rectangles 10cm x 3cm. Wrap tightly in nori by folding over gently and brushing with water to seal. Wrap fish as tightly as possible in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2-3 hours. 2 Add 300ml water to a saucepan. Break down the fish carcass so it is covered by the water. Bring to a light boil and simmer for 20 minutes. 3 Pass broth through a sieve into a bowl, discard fish carcass and pour broth into a clean saucepan. Return to heat and reduce slightly. Season with soy sauce and mirin and set aside. 4 Place citrus juice in a small saucepan and reduce by half. Add agar agar and boil for at least 1 minute while stirring. 5 Pass liquid through a fine sieve into a container and refrigerate until set. 6 When gel is set, place in a blender with a dash of olive oil and blend. Season with sea salt and pour into a squeeze bottle. 7 Slice radishes as thinly as possible and place into a bowl of ice water. 1

When ready to serve, heat a charcoal barbecue grill (or a griddle pan on stovetop) to medium-high. Gently warm broth in a pot on the stovetop. 9 Remove plastic wrap from fish and grill (without oiling 8

pan or grill) for 1 minute or so on each side. Remove, cut each piece into 7-8 thin slices, season and arrange on shallow dishes. 1 0 Squeeze 4-5 large dots of gel around fish along with

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5-6 slices of radish. Gently pour broth into dishes and garnish with a few micro greens. â—‹

* Check label if eating gluten free

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IN SEASON

Quick ideas Try these great little recipes for some of this season’s superstars: from a crispy parsnip galette and sticky glazed yams, to jars of your very own preserved lemons TEXT & RECIPES

1 Parsnips Parsnips are a taproot vegetable closely related to carrots – although sweeter and with a coarser texture. Parsnips are a good source of folate and roasting intensifies their natural sweetness. Parsnips partner well with apple and can be used in soups, stews and baking. Try honey-roasted parsnips & carrots. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Peel 3 parsnips and 3 carrots. Cut in half lengthwise then into long wedges. Line a roasting pan with baking paper. Toss the prepared vegetable strips with 1 Tbsp oil and 1 crushed clove garlic and place in the pan. Sprinkle with a pinch mixed herbs and 2-3 Tbsp honey. Roast for 20 minutes then turn them and roast for a further 20 minutes or until tender and golden.

Bake a lightly spiced chocolate-glazed parsnip & date cake. Preheat the oven to 190°C. Cream 175g butter and 100g sugar until pale. In a separate bowl sift together 200g self-raising flour, ½ tsp cinnamon, a pinch ground cloves, ⅓ cup cocoa and 1 tsp baking soda. Place 2 cups peeled and grated parsnip in a processor with 100g pitted dates. Pulse till finely minced. Fold parsnip mixture into the creamed mixture and add 1 tsp vanilla extract and 3 eggs. Mix well. Fold in the dry ingredients and bake in a greased and lined ring tin until springy (around 45 minutes). For the glaze, melt 200g chocolate with

Sophie Gray

PHOTOGRAPH

Rebekah Robinson

2 Tbsp butter, stir in 2 Tbsp liquid glucose and drizzle over the cake when cooled.

them to bulk out vegetable-based dishes. The pretty colours fade during cooking.

A crispy parsnip galette is the perfect base for poached eggs, bacon and roasted tomatoes, or serve as a change from spuds.

Whole roasted yams

Grate 2 large peeled parsnips and 1 large floury potato, scrubbed not peeled. Season with a pinch salt and mix. Heat 3 Tbsp oil in a large heavy frying pan. Pack half the grated mixture into the pan, flattening it into a pancake. Sprinkle on a bunch sliced spring onions, then top with the remaining grated parsnip and potato. Cook gently for 10-15 minutes then slide the galette onto a plate. Add another 3 Tbsp oil to the pan and swirl around. Place another plate over the top of the galette, invert and then slip the galette back into the pan so the cooked side is facing up. Cook gently for another 10-15 minutes until golden and crispy on the bottom. Serve in wedges, topped with poached eggs and roasted tomatoes.

2 Yams or oca These pretty little tubers are commonly called yams in New Zealand but are known as oca to the rest of the world. They are originally from the Andes and come in various colours from rich red to apricot. The crisp flesh can be eaten raw and becomes mealy when baked. The flavour is mild, almost bland, and lacks the sweet nuttiness of kumara. This neutrality makes them a good roasting vegetable or use

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Toss rinsed yams in a roasting pan with several crushed cloves garlic and 2 Tbsp oil till coated. Roast for 35-40 minutes until crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside.

Sautéed yams have a similar texture to water chestnuts so they work well in Japanese and Chinese dishes. Try these soy-glazed yams as an easy side dish. Slice 4-5 rinsed yams lengthwise then slice diagonally. In a small bowl combine 2 Tbsp soy sauce, 2 Tbsp mirin, 2 Tbsp brown sugar, 2 crushed cloves garlic, ½ tsp grated ginger. Heat ½ Tbsp sesame oil in a frying pan, toss in sliced yams. Stir-fry yams for 2-3 minutes until opaque. Add some of the soy glaze and toss through yams until evaporated. Repeat, cooking until the sauce is sticky and evaporated before adding more, until all the sauce has been added. The yams should have a good glaze but still be tender-crisp. Serve hot, topped with toasted sesame seeds.

The yam’s pretty skin and crisp texture are perfect in this salad of yam with orange & lime. Slice 3 average-sized rinsed yams lengthwise then diagonally into slices. Place in a bowl with 1 orange, peeled and cut into cubes, the zest and juice 1 lime, a good glug sweet chilli sauce, ¼ capsicum, diced, and a handful chopped coriander. Mix well. Serves 2 as a salad or more as a salsa.

In season for September /October ▶ Artichokes ▶

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Asparagus ▶ Avocado ▶ Brussels sprouts ▶ Courgettes ▶ Cucumber ▶ Grapefruit ▶ Kiwifruit ▶ Leeks ▶ Lemons Oranges ▶ Parsnips ▶ Potatoes ▶ Rhubarb ▶ Snow peas ▶ Strawberries ▶ Swedes ▶ Tangelos ▶ Watercress ▶ Witloof ▶ Yams

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3 Lemons Lemons have been grown in New Zealand since 1817 when the first trees were planted in Kerikeri. Newer varieties which are more tolerant of cool temperatures allow lemons to thrive up and down the country. Both zest and juice pack a flavour punch as well as a good hit of vitamin C. Preserved lemons have been used for centuries – pickled or fermented as well as salted or brined. Other methods of preserving include making curds and marmalades or crystallising the fruit or peel. The zest is just the coloured part of the skin; be sure to avoid the bitter white pith. Lemonophiles will appreciate a tasty chicken in lemon butter sauce as it is easy enough for everyday and good enough for guests. Preheat oven to 200°C. Slice 3 boneless chicken breasts in half horizontally, making 6 fillets. Dust them with ½ Tbsp smoked paprika. Heat 1 Tbsp butter in a frying pan and brown fillets for 2-3 minutes per side, then place in an ovenproof dish. Season with salt and pepper. Add a drop more butter to pan and cook 1 crushed clove garlic till fragrant. Stir in ½ cup chicken stock, ¼ cup crème fraîche or cream, zest and juice 1 lemon, 2 Tbsp grated parmesan and pinch dried thyme. When sauce is simmering add 2 cups washed, sliced spinach and simmer till wilted. Pour sauce over chicken and bake uncovered for 40-45 minutes until meat is cooked through. Serve with something to mop up the sauce: bread, rice, polenta, mash…

Lemon, ricotta & olive bruschetta take only minutes to make and are a perfect pre-dinner snack served tapas style in small pieces. Or leave whole as a light lunch or supper.

Homemade lemon syrup is delicious poured over pancakes or waffles or drizzled over a pudding. In a small saucepan combine 1 cup water and 2 cups sugar. Heat until sugar dissolves then simmer for around 5 minutes to reduce liquid by a third. Add juice 2-3 lemons and zest 1 lemon. Add more or less juice to your liking. Store in a jar in the fridge and use warm or cold.

Preserved lemons will take care of your surplus. Sterilise a 600-700g-capacity, wide-mouth preserving jar and lid. Have ready about ½ cup salt. Choose 6-8 heavy lemons with good clear skins, scrub them and trim a little off each end. At top, cut a deep cross almost all the way through each one. Pry open the incision and fill with salt then pack lemons into jar, sprinkling well with salt as you go. Squash down so the juice runs. Add a bayleaf or a few cloves, some coriander seeds or peppercorns if you like. Put lid on and refrigerate overnight. If not completely covered with juice the next day, top up jar with additional lemon juice, squash and seal with lid. Set aside for 4-6 weeks in a cool dark place. When lemons are soft, they are ready to use and will keep in the fridge for around 6 months. To use, remove a lemon from the brine, rinse well under cold water and pat dry. Discard the flesh, thinly slice the rind and add to casseroles, tagines and stews. ○

Preheat oven to 200°C. Place 2 large naan, 2 bruschetta, 2 medium thin pizza bases or 2 large pita breads on a baking sheet. In a small bowl mix ⅓ cup ricotta, 2 crushed cloves garlic, 2 Tbsp grated parmesan, 1 Tbsp grated lemon zest, 1 Tbsp chopped basil or pesto or basil paste. Spread mixture over bread, top with 1 cup grated cheddar and scatter on ¼ cup sliced olives. Bake for 10 minutes or until melted and slightly golden. Cut into fingers and serve hot.

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JOSH EMETT

Raise a toast Josh Emett creates a distinctly New Zealand long lunch menu at his Rata restaurant in Queenstown to celebrate Clicquot in the Snow. Here, he explains the menu and shares simple tips for preparing restaurant-quality dishes P H O T O G R A P H Y Sam Lee

The Rata bread recipe is one that I used while running Gordon Ramsay at The London in New York. The dough is rolled into little buns and baked in tins, making it easier to eat.

Swordfish & scampi ceviche, lime dressing, pickled cucumber & basil We serve kingfish a lot at Rata, and Kei, my head chef, has been experimenting with different flavours. This is a dish he suggested as it works well with Champagne and is a nice, light way of starting the lunch. Cured or raw is often the best way to serve fish, especially as we have access to such great fish in New Zealand. Certain fish, like kingfish and trevally, lend themselves well to this style of preparation. The biggest mistake people make when preparing ceviche is not adding enough acid. We use plenty of lime juice in this dish and lots of seasoning. If you get that alone right it’s amazing, but often the thickness of the fish is crucial to successful ceviche; the fish should be sliced nice and thin so it marinates well. CHAMPAGNE MATCH VEUVE CLICQUOT YELLOW LABEL NV

This is a very clean dish, so I found that the coconut dressing works well with the toasty and complex flavours of the Champagne.

relationship with. The Wakanui has excellent, consistent marbling, which adds to the tenderness and flavour of the end result. CHAMPAGNE MATCH VEUVE CLICQUOT ROSÉ VINTAGE 2004

We use a lot of spices in the braising of the beef, including star anise, coriander, cloves and cinnamon. This Champagne is quite full and textured with red berry aromas, hints of liquorice, honey and aniseed so it makes an amazing pairing.

Puhoi Valley goat’s cheese sorbet, celery, rata honey & candied walnuts It’s the slightly acidic nature of goat’s cheese and the creamy sweetness of honey, combined with a little sea salt that turns this into an amazing dish, along with freshness from the celery and texture from the walnuts. This dish is all about the balance of ingredients, which is crucial when it comes to pairing flavours. Sometimes it’s just ratios and balance that make a magical combination. This cheese course is a classic example of that; we played with it and tasted it for quite a while before we were happy. CHAMPAGNE MATCH VEUVE CLICQUOT ROSÉ NV

The Champagne has notes of brioche, dried fruit and almond, which complements the goat’s cheese and honey perfectly. ○

Manuka-smoked Stewart Island salmon with roasted chioggia beets At Rata, we cure the salmon and gently smoke it before we bake it to serve. We find this helps to retain moisture and if it is cured well it has an amazing flavour, which takes the salmon to a whole new level. Chioggia beets are a great looking vegetable with amazing sweetness and earthiness. CHAMPAGNE MATCH VEUVE CLICQUOT VINTAGE 2004

The Champagne has nice citrus notes and is very clean and fresh so pairs well with salmon that has a certain fattiness to it.

Wakanui beef short rib, Agria purée with mushroom butter, silverbeet & shiitake Long and slow is always the best way to cook a short rib. You also need to take the time to cool it down properly when braising, because it helps retain so much more moisture. We sourced this beef from Neat Meat, who we have a great

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“Pairing food and Champagne is quite a fun process. It’s all about highlighting the flavour profiles of the Champagnes and not being scared to match it to some interesting dishes.”

O P P O S I T E PAG E

Ben Lomond Track in Queenstown, Josh Emett, Swordfish & scampi ceviche, lime dressing, pickled cucumber & basil; Puhoi Valley goat’s cheese sorbet, celery, rata honey & candied walnuts; Rata restaurant; Manuka-smoked Stewart Island salmon with roasted chioggia beets.

R ATA

43 Ballarat Street Queenstown

SC E N E RY P HOTO G RA P H G E T TY I M AG E S

Rata bread, sea salt & rosemary


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FEED YOUR CURIOSITY Eta Uppercuts has tantalising new flavours! Try the heat, sweet and tang of Sriracha Chilli Corn Tapas, the salty, piquant succulence of Peking Duck Deli Cut or the deliciously dippable Quinoa & Chia Corn Tapas. Available in Countdown supermarkets.

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SAUCE PERFECTION Every little thing counts when you’re cooking, right down to the quality of the sauces you use. Try Lee Kum Kee in your next stir-fry, chow mein or marinade and enjoy the delicious, highquality, authentic and mouth-watering flavours. Available at supermarkets. Visit LKK.com.

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P HOTOG RA P H S K E N D OW N I E , M I K E R OO KE

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Wander

N Z O N A P L AT E

STYLE & SUSTENANCE

A new TV series explores and celebrates regional New Zealand cuisine

Commerce, culture, couture and cuisine combine in the city of Milan

Explore Waikato W A I K A T O A R T I S A N cheesemakers and brewers have teamed up to kick off Ferment Fest. The tasting event celebrates the two crafts, and the talented folk who produce these goods in the region. Cheesemaker Sue Arthur from Over the Moon Dairy says “we are really excited to be working together with the Waikato artisan beer industry because cheese is good with all kinds of drinks, not just wine!” Cheese and beer? We’re there! 2016 FERMENT FEST, SATURDAY OCTOBER 1ST, 11AM–5PM, SKYCITY ATRIUM, HAMILTON. FREE ENTRY. WAIKATOFOODINC.COM/

P HOTOG RA P H G E T TY I M AG E S

FERMENTFEST

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Auckland with snapper in Auckland; it’s a luxury fish,” says Darren Johnson, executive chef at Masu restaurant. It’s definitely the most plentiful fish for local anglers; head out into the placid Waitemata and drop a line, invariably you’ll reel in a beautiful pink and silver snapper.

“ W E ’ R E Q U I T E S P O I LT

CLOCKWISE FROM T O P L E F T Airborne

Honey from Canterbury is paired with ginger in a dainty loaf and served with manuka honey panna cotta and a clover honey snap; heading

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to the Marlborough mussel farms; cooking at the base of Aoraki/ Mt Cook; porae fillets prepared with a fennel and spanner crab salad and smoked kowiniwini potato at Auckland’s

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

Harbourside Ocean Bar Grill; Masu restaurant executive chef Darren Johnson in action; chef Matt Bouterey cooking by the Goulter River.

Without going out to get it yourself, one of the best places to source fresh snapper in the region is Leigh Fisheries, based in the coastal community of Leigh, just north of Auckland. “It’s an incredible place and product,” Darren says. “I take a lot of my sashimi chefs up there to see the quality. I really appreciate their passion for fresh seafood.” At Leigh Fisheries the fishermen predominantly use longlines to catch their fish, rather than nets which always carry the risk of wasteful ‘by-catch’. They also use the Japanese iki-jime method, driving a spike into the brain of the fish, killing it instantly and humanely. Rex Dryland of Leigh Fisheries says you can tell the difference when the fish has been killed with the iki-jime method, as the flesh is more transparent and tastier. The process prevents the fish from flapping itself to death, which releases sour-tasting lactic


acid into the meat. Darren uses the fillets in his recipe for Leigh long-line snapper with jalapeno & ginger dressing on page 19. Tu Fearn, head chef at Harbourside Ocean Bar Grill, likes to work with the lesser-known porae. The largest Maori-owned fisheries in New Zealand, Aotearoa Fisheries, catches them on long-lines in the Hauraki Gulf and lands them near the restaurant in the Viaduct Basin. Tu says they’re a great eating fish and a close relative of the tarakihi – you can tell them apart by their big lips. He serves the fillets with a fennel and spanner crab salad with smoked kowiniwini potato and pomegranate dressing. Porae are a fast-growing fish and make a great alternative to the more common snapper, kingfish and john dory. When buying the whole fish, Tu says to check the gills are a nice bright red, that the eyes are clear and prominent rather than cloudy and sunken, and the flesh is nice and firm.

TAKING IT GLOBAL A new TV series explores the regional cuisine of New Zealand and celebrates innovative businesses exporting their produce around the world. Taste picks a few favourites for a closer look

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Nelson Puketea Farm in Wakefield, John Levy farms some of the best grass-fed lamb in the land. It’s finished on ‘Tonic’ plantain, a mineralrich perennial grazing herb, before being processed by the farmer-owned Alliance group, which exports lamb under the Pure South banner to over 65 countries. Nelson chef and owner of Urban Oyster Bar and Eatery Matt Bouterey char-grills a Pure South lamb loin on the barbecue with a simple marinade of rosemary, lemon thyme and oil then serves it with roasted vegetables and a tzatziki dressing of yoghurt, diced onion, diced cucumber, lemon juice, lemon zest, ginger zest, oil and salt. Nelson is a big fruit-growing region due to its long sunshine hours. Maree and Glen Holland of Tasman Bay Berries on the Waimea Plains take full advantage of the plentiful sun with 38 hectares dedicated to growing strawberries, boysenberries, black and red raspberries, cherries and blueberries. You can get the kids along and hand pick when in season, order online, or pop into their farm shop where you can also pick up a real fruit ice cream or smoothie made with the freshest berries imaginable. Tasman Bay also supply Nelson frozen berry producer and exporter Sujon. The company was started by Kiwis Sue and John Gibb (Su-Jon), who have been in the berry game for over 30 years. They send their frozen berries, berry powders and fruit concentrates to Asia, Australia and the Pacific, as well as supplying the domestic market. The height of the tree matches the width of the row at Vailima Orchard, just outside Nelson. It’s a simple technique to ensure all the apples on their trees get to work on their suntan. Third-generation orchardists Richard and Susan Hoddy have three properties stretching across the Waimea Plains and have extensive programs trialling interesting new varieties. Their most popular is the Eve eating apple, a firm, white-fleshed fruit with a delicate and refreshing flavour. Matt Bouterey’s Eton mess with berries and caramelised apples (see recipe over the page) is a simple dessert to prepare and a decadent way to enjoy the fruit bowl of Nelson.

AT H I S 3 2 0 - H E C TA R E

Queenstown in the tough climatic conditions of the South Island’s high country takes hardy farmers and cattle. On Braemar Station, next to Lake Pukaki, Hamish Mackenzie runs cross-breed sheep, Angus cattle and red deer on 27,000 hectares. Their Meadowslea Angus bulls are selectively bred to thrive in the harsh hill-country environment and the beef that comes from the station is sold under the AngusPure label. Fine marbling and great flavour are the hallmarks of Angus beef, and their ultra-premium product called AngusPure Special Reserve is the cream off the top. At the luxury resort Blanket Bay, overlooking Lake Wakatipu, head chef Corey Hume is

PRODUCING QUALITY BEEF

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passionate about showcasing local ingredients to an international audience and the Reserve Angus goes into dishes like his sous-vide AngusPure Special Reserve tenderloin with braised AngusPure oxtail raviolo, Jerusalem artichoke purée and truffle Jerusalem artichoke chips. The dish is an example of adding nose-totail ingredients into a five-star dinner item and features not just the oxtail raviolo filling but also a little pan of braised beef cheek pieces in a thick jus. The tenderloin is vac-packed with some Whitestone smoked butter and cooked at 52°C to infuse the buttery flavour. Whitestone smoked butter is also used to finish garnishes of baby leek, baby turnip, kale and baby beetroot. The butter comes from Whitestone in Oamaru, over on the east coast. The city is famous for its wide streets and beautiful Victorian architecture made with Oamaru white limestone – the company’s name pays homage to the town’s history while also helping to put it on the foodie map.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

Chef Corey Hume’s AngusPure beef carpaccio is handed round for tasting; Havelock Marina; Marlborough’s mussel farms; chef Bradley Hornby inspects a green-lipped mussel; sous-vide AngusPure tenderloin at Queenstown’s Blanket Bay luxury lodge.


The deep waters and strong tidal currents of the Marlborough Sounds provide ideal, grit-free growing conditions for mussels

Marlborough at the head of Pelorus Sound, is the capital of New Zealand’s green-lipped mussel industry. The deep waters and strong tidal currents are ideal for grit-free growing conditions. The mussel is a New Zealand native and a major aquaculture species. They’re damn good eating and there is huge interest overseas. Local company Omega Seafood are a major ocean-to-table producer of mussels and export cooked, packaged green-lipped mussels, pioneering a method of cooking and vac-packing their seafood to the highest safety and hygiene standards. Owners Chris and Trish Redwood, who have been involved in the mussel farming industry for over 30 years, grow their mussels on lines suspended beneath ocean buoys; they are seeded onto ropes as baby mussels (‘spat’) and take 18-24 months to grow to full size. Whip out the beard and serve with a tasty dressing of white miso, finely chopped shallots and chives, minced ginger, a touch of soy and a squeeze of lemon and lime H AV E LO C K ,

juice emulsified in oil and finished with a pinch of curry powder. What’s good for mussels also works wonders for our salmon farming industry. Over half of New Zealand’s farmed king salmon is grown in the Marlborough Sounds and around 80 percent of the world’s king salmon comes from this country. Overseas they tend to farm Atlantic salmon but the king salmon we grow here is oilier with a soft texture and it’s creaking in healthy omega-3 fatty acids. The sheltered waterways allow major producers like Regal to farm world-class salmon. Local chef Bradley Hornby, of the prestigious restaurant Arbour in Blenheim, likes to give king salmon an aromatic, smoky flavour. He pan-fries it in oil, then creates a shallow bath with a decent-sized knob of smoked butter, some roughly chopped garlic and aromatic herbs such as oregano, rosemary and thyme. After basting it constantly in the herb butter while it cooks, it’s important, he says, to rest the cooked fillet so the meat relaxes, making it nice and soft to eat.

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C L O C K W I S E F R O M T O P L E F T Chef Paul Jobin with deer farmer Bruce Hood of Mt Hutt Station; chef Darren Wright, of Christchurch restaurant

Canterbury cuisine is undoubtedly our venison. One of the country’s first deer stations, Mt Hutt Station, started in 1978 when brothers Keith and Doug Hood bought the run-down property with a mind to swap the sheep for deer. They bought 35 deer to get started, but then decided to buy a helicopter and capture their own from the wild. Their now-domesticated herd is selectively bred to improve body size, temperament and velvet genetics. On the lower slopes of Mt Hutt the deer live on a diet of grass with a bit of grain in winter and spring. Doug and his family founded Mountain River in 1994 to combine his venison along with that of neighbouring farms into a processing and marketing partnership, in order to supply the ever-growing export market. When cooking venison, the usual rules apply: you want it dry so the meat doesn’t steam before caramelising when you are searing it. For a cut like shortloin, acclaimed chef Paul Jobin (until recently, executive chef at Annandale Lodge on Banks Peninsula) dries it in a tea towel before cooking to get a nice sear. For a plate of venison with a Kiwi-meets-South American vibe, he paints A N O T H E R S TA R O F N E W Z E A L A N D

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the meat with a mixture of oil and honey while it is grilling over charcoal. He rests and slices the venison and serves it on flatbread spread with avocado. For earthy, savoury notes he mixes sour cream and Marmite to make a sauce and tops the dish with pickled cabbage, celery leaves and a dash of Tabasco chipotle sauce. English traditions are celebrated at Peter Timbs Meats in central Christchurch. The classic blend of pig’s blood, fat, onion, seasoning and cereal that makes up the infamous blood sausage has been growing in popularity in New Zealand for years and has moved beyond the big breakfast into restaurant menus. Peter Timbs’ version involves lean lamb, pork cheeks, diced bacon ends, bread crumbs, barley, a secret herb and spice blend, fresh eggs, caramelised onions and, of course, pig’s blood. If you’re looking for a way to incorporate more blood into your diet, says Christchurch chef Darren Wright, the sausage pairs particularly well with pork belly and apple purée. Or you could make a blood-sausage crumb to use as a garnish: fry off some slices and bake at 60°C for 11/2 hours then crumble it up. Serve the lot with a julienne of apple mixed with a touch of horseradish.

P HOTOG RA P H S S U P P LI E D

Chillingworth Road, prepares appetisers, and later visits a Canterbury free-range pig farm; Paul Jobin’s luscious yoghurt panna cotta.


Leigh long-line snapper with jalapeno & ginger dressing SERVES 6 RECIPE BY Darren Johnson GLUTEN FREE

1 green chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 150ml teriyaki sauce* 40ml lemon juice, plus extra for finishing 6 x 180-190g snapper fillets DRESSING

200g pickled jalapenos 50g peeled and sliced ginger 1 Tbsp lemon juice 1 Tbsp soy sauce* 120ml rice wine vinegar* 150ml peanut oil SALAD

100g carrot 100g daikon 50g snow peas 100g celery 1 Tbsp Olivado Extra Virgin Peanut Oil 1 Tbsp lemon juice 1 bunch coriander

Place chilli and garlic in a bowl and add the teriyaki sauce and lemon juice. Place fillets in this marinade and leave for 30 minutes before cooking. 2 Drain jalapenos and put them into a blender with the sliced ginger. Add the lemon juice, soy sauce and the rice wine vinegar. 3 Blend on high speed until you have a smooth consistency then slowly drizzle in the peanut oil until you have an emulsified dressing. 4 Peel all the vegetables and cut them into thin julienne about the width of a matchstick, but twice as long. 5 Using an old jar, shake together the peanut oil and lemon juice with a pinch of salt to form a simple salad dressing. 6 Mix all the vegetables together in a bowl but don’t dress until you are about to serve. Pick and wash the coriander and also add to the salad at the last minute.

If you have them, use long metal skewers to skewer fish and cook over a charcoal barbecue, or pan fry or oven bake until cooked through. Test the fish is cooked by inserting a skewer into the thickest part; if it slides in with no resistance then it is ready to serve. 8 Stir jalapeno dressing and spoon some into serving bowls. Dress the salad, mix in the coriander and arrange on one side of the bowls. Squeeze a splash of lemon juice over the fish then, using the skewers, balance the fish over the bowls and serve. Or place fish on a plate, spoon over the jalapeno dressing and pile salad on top. 7

WINE MATCH VILLA MARIA VERDELHO

Eton mess with berries & caramelised apples S E R V E S 2-3 R E C I P E B Y Matt Bouterey GLUTEN FREE MERINGUES

4 large organic egg whites, at room temperature 115g caster sugar 115g icing sugar Zest 1 lemon 1 Tbsp Sujon Blackcurrant Powder (optional)

S N A P P E R P H OTO G RA P H BA B I CH E M A RT E N S F R OM M ASU

1

* Check label if eating gluten free

CARAMELISED APPLES

150g sugar 100ml water 3 Heartland Eve apples, peeled, cored and quartered TO ASSEMBLE

1 cup cream (or use ½ cup plain Greek yoghurt and ½ cup cream) 1½ cups Sujon Frozen Boysenberries, thawed

Preheat the oven to 100°C fanbake. Line two baking sheets with baking paper. 2 Tip egg whites into a large, clean, metal or ceramic mixing bowl. Beat on medium with hand-held beaters until whites stand up in stiff peaks when the blades are lifted. 3 Turn up speed and start to add sugar 1 dessertspoonful at a time. Continue beating for 3-4 seconds between each 1

addition (it’s important to add the sugar slowly at this stage as it helps prevent the meringue from weeping later). When ready, the mixture should be thick and glossy. 4 Sift one-third of icing sugar over mixture, then gently fold in with a big spoon or spatula. Continue to sift and fold in remaining icing sugar one-third at a time (don’t over-mix). Add in lemon zest and blackcurrant powder, if using, with the last third of icing sugar. 5 Place dessertspoon-sized dollops of meringue on baking trays and bake for 1½ hours until the meringues sound crisp when tapped underneath. 6 Turn oven off and leave meringues in oven to cool for at least 1 hour but preferably overnight. They will keep in an airtight container for up to two weeks, or for a month if frozen. 7 For roasted apples, preheat oven to 180°C. Combine sugar and water in a medium

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saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally until sugar dissolves. Continue to simmer, swirling the pan but not stirring, until mixture thickens and turns a dark golden colour. 8 Line a baking tray with baking paper and add apples to it. Pour over caramel, mix to coat apples and roast in oven until apples are cooked through with a glossy, dark coating. Give apples a stir while cooking to re-coat in the caramel. 9 To assemble Eton mess, whip cream until the ‘soft ribbon’ stage. Roughly crumble in four meringues (you’ll need chunks for texture). 1 0 Chop up a few caramelised apple pieces and add to the cream along with the berries and a drizzle of caramel from the baking tray. Fold mixture together gently and serve. WINE MATCH ARONUI 2014 RIESLING

New Zealand on a Plate screens on TV One, Saturday 1pm, until October 1. ○

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MILAN

STYLE & SUSTENANCE Commerce, culture, couture and cuisine combine in the city of Milan, discovers Nick Russell – although he’s happy to just concentrate on the last one


T H I S PAG E

Spaghetti alla chitarra con cipolle di Tropea at Rovello 18. OPPOSITE PAG E

The golden Madonnina, symbol of Milan, sits at the very top of the city’s Gothic cathedral.

T

he golden Madonnina statue commands the heights of Milan. Shimmering in gilded copper, the figure of the Virgin Mary was erected at the apex of the city’s spectacular Gothic cathedral, Duomo di Milano, in 1762 and is one of the iconic images of Italy’s industrial and commercial hub. Climb to the roof of the cathedral and there are two things you’ll probably notice about the Madonnina (‘Little Madonna’): she looks ridiculously well styled and expensive as heck. Definitely make some room on your credit card for a visit to this engine room of Italy situated in the northern region of

Lombardy: Milan is an amazing blend of commerce, culture, couture and cuisine. It’s got a remarkable number of Michelinstarred trattorias and cutting-edge restaurants as well as fantastic night life and bars. It’s the home of fashion houses Armani, Versace, Prada and Dolce & Gabbana and has Italy’s best shopping, so maybe leave your jandals and fanny pack in your bag until you hit the ‘ghost towns’ of the Italian countryside. Start at the stunning cathedral to make navigation easier and you should find everything within walking distance or an easy tram ride. The awe-inspiring cathedral is one of the largest churches in Christendom and is covered in gargoyles, stunning

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spires and statues. Before you scale the steps to take in the view from the rooftop terraces, gather sustenance in the form of the delicious oven-baked or deep-fried dough pockets called panzerotti from the amazing Luini. It’s just behind the cathedral and you’ll see the crowds lining up to order a mozzarella and tomato, or ricotta and chocolate, pastry. A short walk away from the cathedral is the Santa Maria delle Grazie church where you can view the mural of The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci, then stop off for a morning coffee and brioche at the nearby Pasticceria Marchesi, one of Milan’s most iconic cafes, which was founded almost 200 years ago in the same location in which it continues to operate today. Tour the huge medieval fortress Castello Sforzesco (Sforza Castle) and the surrounding Sempione Park. Take in ‘the temple of opera’, Teatro alla Scala, one of the most famous theatres in the world, or visit Pinacoteca di Brera (Brera Art Gallery) where you can view masterpieces such as Mantegna’s The Dead Christ, Raphael’s Marriage of the Virgin, Caravaggio’s Supper at Emmaus and The Kiss by Hayez. It’s exhausting stuff, all this culture, and we haven’t even got to the couture. Take a load off your loafers and sample some local dishes like veal chop Milanese at Rovello 18, just a stone’s throw from Castello Sforzesco. They make an outstanding risotto al salto, too; it’s fried then flipped over when they serve it to you, so you break through the crunchy top and you’ve got the soft risotto underneath. If you can’t get in there, Antica Trattoria della Pesa is just slightly further away and they have a similar menu of traditional dishes such as ossobuco and risotto Milanese. If you’re eager to begin your retail assault, maybe just pop into Milanese institution Princi, a counter-service bakery and pizzeria, for pizza al taglio (pizza by the slice) to munch on the go. Shopping is what many of Milan’s visitors come to the city for and the designer goods on offer in the ‘golden quadrilateral’ are world class. Start on Via Montenapoleone, one of the most expensive shopping streets in the world, then everything else will look like a bargain.

Delay your dinner So now you’ve filled in a day, it’s time for a relaxing aperitivo. It’s essentially pre-dinner drinks with a few antipasto dishes and there is a huge tradition of aperitivo in Milan. It’s a ritual to awaken the palate before dinner and it’s probably what supports the Mediterranean habit of late dining (they’re snacking when we’re eating dinner). Often you’ll pay a set price to cover the drink and the snacks. Take a walk to Cantine Isola wine bar on Via Paolo Sarpi (the Milanese Chinatown). It’s an intimate environment with walls lined with bottlefilled shelves and everything is opened on request.

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On average, there are 70 bottles open on rotation to try by the glass. It doesn’t really have a menu, but there will be some small antipasto plates on the bar. There’s outdoor seating, and the crowd often spills down the street during aperitivo time, leaning against the buildings and drinking good wine out of glasses without being chased back indoors by jackbooted bouncers. There’s also N’Ombra de Vin, which is set in a one-time Augustine refectory. Wine bottles line the walls from floor to ceiling and it has a fashionable clientele and a bohemian vibe. You can order a glass of wine and small snacks or larger meals of charcuterie, steak tartare, swordfish carpaccio or risotto. Head to the trendy Navigli canal district of Milan for an aperitivo at Rebelot del Pont and take in a bit of history while you’re at it. The Porta Ticinese, one of two medieval gates to the city that are still in existence, is on the way if you’re walking from the cathedral. The system of five canals in Milan began in the 12th century with the Naviglio Grande, which connects the city with Lake Maggiore and helped

T H I S PAG E

Cracco’s menu of traditional dishes reinterpreted with a modern twist has earned it two Michelin stars.


make the city into an economic powerhouse. Today, the canals are largely used for irrigation and the banks of the Naviglio Grande host an outstanding selection of bars and restaurants. You can take organised boat tours along the Naviglio Grande and Naviglio Pavese. Navigli is where the young and the hip of Milan come to party, so for heaven’s sake don’t wear your Crocs. Rebelot is on the Naviglio Grande and there you can sample an exclusive selection of cocktails created by Oscar Quagliarini. He’s one of Europe’s top mixologists and he adds his own signature perfumes and syrups to many of the drinks. Brazilian-born chef Mauricio Zillo puts innovative twists on local ingredients like his dish of Cinta Senese (Tuscan black pork) with broad beans, guacamole and a cheese and pepper sauce. In Milan, aperitivo usually means a negroni, or spritz cocktail, or perhaps a glass of red wine from Valtellina, a valley in the far north of the Lombardy region, or a fresh, flinty white from Lugana or a sparkling Franciacorta from the province of Brescia. The spritz is a wine-based cocktail made with

T H I S PAG E

From top: Cracco’s marinated yolk with spinach, pine kernels and raisins; Santa Maria delle Grazie; Cantine Isola; N’Ombra de Vin; spinach and ricottafilled ravioli at Antica Trattoria della Pesa; staff lounge outside a restaurant after the lunch shift.

prosecco and a dash of bitter liqueur such as Aperol or Campari. The negroni is a mix of gin, vermouth and Campari. There’s also the option of a negroni sbagliato (‘the wrong negroni’), which is a Milanese invention made famous by local institution Bar Basso over in the university district. Legend has it that whilst making a classic negroni, owner Mirko Stocchetto accidentally selected a bottle of prosecco instead of a bottle of gin and the negroni sbagliato was born.

Michelin and more Like most great cities, Milan runs the whole gamut of eating options. Cracco is arguably the most famous high-end restaurant. With two Michelin stars and a menu of traditional dishes reinterpreted with a modern twist, it’s the base of executive chef Carlo Cracco, a key figure in contemporary Italian cuisine. You can book a ‘table d’hôte’, which is a small table for a maximum of four diners, which offers views of the chefs at work. Il Luogo di Aimo e Nadia is another two-star institution in Milan, where modern, regionally inspired Italian dishes are served in a dining room

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MILAN

Clockwise from top left: Security staff at Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, one of the world’s oldest shopping arcades; Rebelot del Pont; Bar Basso; panettone.

WINTER WONDER

lined with contemporary art. It’s fine dining but there are some simple-seeming dishes, like a durum-wheat spaghetti with tomatoes and olives, that are stunning in their execution. For one of the best dining outlooks in Milan, Giacomo Arengario is an art deco-styled bistro overlooking Milan’s central piazza and facing the cathedral. It’s located on the third floor of the Museo del Novecento, a museum of 20th-century art, so you can admire artworks by the Italian Futurists then feast on classic Italian dishes and lunch options. Do a spot of celebrity watching at Da Giacomo, a Milanese institution since chef Giacomo Bulleri opened his doors in 1958. Fresh seafood is the house specialty, perhaps paired with porcini mushrooms or white truffles. There’s always plenty of new openings, of course; Milan thrives on the new just as it treasures the old. Get experimental tapas-style dim sum with an Italian twist at Ghe Sem, or sample modern international-meets-Italian cuisine at Potafiori. Combining a florist’s, cocktail bar and restaurant and run by redheaded ‘singing florist’ Rosalba Piccinni, Potafiori is one of the coolest new restaurants in the city. It wouldn’t be a trip to Italy without happening upon a few relics from Roman times. Although Milan has been variously sacked, bombed and burnt in its long history there are still surviving bits and pieces like the imperial palace of Mediolanum (former name of Milan). It was the seat of power for the Western Roman Empire from AD 286-402,

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To taste a true speciality of Milanese cuisine, try visiting at Christmas to sample the panettone. Historic Milanese pastry shop Pasticceria Marchesi is one of the best places to taste the sweet, dome-shaped bread studded with candied fruit and raisins. Italian fashion house Prada acquired Pasticceria Marchesi last year and gave it a stylish makeover with rich wood and glass furnishings, marble floors and chartreuse velvet upholstery.

so it’s an interesting diversion on your way to La Brisa restaurant next door. At La Brisa you can enjoy their pleasant garden courtyard and a menu of typical dishes from the Lombardy region, particularly their outstanding crispy suckling pig. For a bar with an illustrious history, head to Jamaica. It may look like one of myriad bars in the bohemian Brera district, but it’s served a number of key figures in modern Italian history. Legend has it that a young Benito Mussolini skipped out on his tab at the bar. His drink-and-dash antics finally came to an end when he was strung up in the nearby Piazzale Loreto in 1945. Jamaica was also a hangout for artists like Lucio Fontana and Piero Manzoni, poet Giuseppe Ungaretti and Nobel Prize winners Salvatore Quasimodo and Dario Fo. It’s a good place to stop in for a glass of the locally made herbal liqueur Fernet Branca. For something a bit different, take the number 14 tram about 30 minutes out of the city centre to Mangiari di Strada. It’s an Italian streetfood eatery with an organic, nose-to-tail focus. Chef-owner Giuseppe Zen was ahead of the curve with his lunch-only eatery and it’s a popular spot for locals, being outside the main tourist areas. Sample their specialty, the panino col lampredotto, which is essentially tripe served in a sandwich. If that’s a bit on the nose (or tail), grab a pastrami sandwich or plate of polenta with whipped salt cod and capers, or their excellent fried taleggio cheese bites and artichokes. ○

P HOTOG RA P H S A LA M Y, BAU E R SY N D I CAT I ON , G E T TY I M AG E S


A Taste of Hamilton

Dough Bros

Casual dining in the heart of Hamilton; Dough Bros is a local favourite, serving up tasty wood-fired pizzas & a selection of seasonal share-plates. 250 Victoria Street, Hamilton Ph: 07 834 2363 www.doughbros.co.nz

Gothenburg Restaurant

Overlook the mighty Waikato River while dining on a delicious selection of tapas, local and international craft beer and wine. A popular choice for locals and visitors to our vibrant city. 21 Grantham Street, Hamilton Ph: 07 834 3562 www.gothenburg.co.nz info@gothenburg.co.nz

Two Birds Eatery

Hamilton’s eatery with a difference, serving food that nourishes you from the inside out. Specialising in real, un processed, nourishing food, raw treats, superfood smoothies and much more.

Craft

Our highly knowledgeable and passionate team bring you the best craft beer and cider. With 15 beer taps and delicious food, Craft is a popular choice for beer connoisseurs and diners.

Food of the Americas and our relaxed bar atmosphere makes Ember the perfect place to enjoy a few drinks or settle in for the long haul.

15 Hood Street, Hamilton Ph: 07 839 4531 info@crafthamilton.nz

60 Church Road, Hamilton Ph: 07 850 9339 www.ember.net.nz

The Narrows Landing For more information contact Kim Chapman, ph: 07 578 3646, fax: 07 578 3647, mob: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

Ember Bar & Grill

Scotts Epicurean

Two Birds Eatery can also be booked for private functions on Friday and Saturday nights, and also offers a range of catering options to suit your personal food requirements.

Shop 12 Clyde Street Shopping Centre, Clyde St Hamilton East, Hamilton Ph: 07 856 8508 www.twobirdseatery.co.nz

The River Kitchen

The Narrows Landing, a destination to EAT-REST-WORK-PLAY located in Tamahere, Hamilton. The Narrows Landing feeds mind, body and soul with unparalleled service, exceptional fine dining and outstanding wines combining to relax and focus your energies on exploring the amazing features of this truly unique venue. Cafe, accommodation, function, conference and wedding venue.

Scotts Epicurean is an award-winning cafe delivering an eclectic menu and excellent espresso made by Hamilton’s best baristas. Our historic building and sheltered courtyard is the ideal setting to enjoy an enticing choice of dishes, freshly prepared each day. Try our famous and addictive Aglio Olio spaghetti with chilli, garlic, parsley, olive oil and Italian parmesan – once is never enough! Open 7 days.

Well-known for it's fresh white tongue n' groove interior and friendly staff, The River Kitchen is a welcoming place to meet for coffee, cake, breakfast or lunch. We source only the best local produce, including free-range pork, chicken and eggs, organic milk, whole grains, herbs and greens. Catering options are also available, including a gourmet selection of salads, bakes, meats and sweets.

431 Airport Rd, Tamahere, Hamilton Ph: 07 858 4001 www.thenarrowslanding.co.nz

181 Victoria Street, Hamilton Ph: 07 839 6680 www.scottsepicurean.co.nz

237 Victoria Street, Hamilton Ph: 07 839 2906 www.theriverkitchen.co.nz


Marketplace – General Directory

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wine

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Baywick’s premium California redwood racking for your wine cellar

Wine Guardian cellar coolers Phone: 027 454 5823 • Email: baywicks@winestorage.co.nz

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For more information contact Kim Chapman, ph: 07 578 3646, fax: 07 578 3647, mob: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

275 Ahuroa Road, Puhoi, Auckland Ph 09 422 0670 www.puhoivalley.co.nz


Recipe index

Measurements 60

76 FISH & SEAFOOD

Crisp fish with sambal & snake beans * GF 52 68 Fish fingers 58 Lobster rolls * Nori-wrapped fish with broth, citrus gel 105 & radish GF 84 Smoked salmon & watercress omelette * Spaghettini with calamari, rosemary 52 & lemon * Tuna carpaccio with blueberries, lemon 43 & spring micros * GF M E AT

Arancini Bolognese sauce Parmesan-crusted lamb rack with mint, pea & broad bean smash Spring lamb Spicy sausage frittata * Veal schnitzels with burnt caper butter * Vitello tonnato GF

64 66 44 86 81 51 66

P O U LT R Y

Chicken in lemon butter sauce GF Drunken chicken with Shandong ramen noodles * Lemongrass chicken rice paper rolls * Smoked chicken, watercress, barley & grape salad

107 51 85 58

P HOTOG RA P H TOD D E Y RE , E M M A G A LLOWAY

SALADS & SOUPS

Asparagus, greens & mint salad V 86 Brussels sprout salad with bacon, apple 52 & buttermilk dressing * GF Fennel, white bean & pickled radish 74 salad * V GF Fried haloumi with lemon, coriander 51 & pine nuts * V New season warm salad of peas, spinach 42 & new beans * V GF Quinoa salad with pomegranate, pumpkin 51 & ashed goat’s cheese * V GF Roasted baby carrot, leek & quinoa 76 salad V GF 106 Yams with orange & lime * V 104

52 77 92 10 58 44 130 58 56 64 106 94 95 68

V E G E TA B L E S & L E G U M E S

Beetroot buckwheat ‘risotto’ with watercress pistou V GF Cauliflower cheese * V GF Classic egg & cress sandwich * V Crispy parsnip galette * V Grilled asparagus with pecorino & sunny-side eggs * V GF Gnocchi alla romana V Easy carbonara with lemon & spring greens * V Honey-roasted parsnips & carrots V Potato gnocchi V Quick pickled radishes V Watercress pesto * V Whole roasted yams V

76 52 84 106

A B B R E V I AT I O N S

metric 15g 30g 60g 125g 155g 185g 220g 250g 280g 315g 345g 375g 410g 440g 470g 500g 750g 1kg

tsp Tbsp g ml kg °C

imperial ½oz 1oz 2oz 4oz (¼lb) 5oz 6oz 7oz 8oz (½lb) 9oz 10oz 11oz 12oz (¾lb) 13oz 14oz 15oz 16oz (1lb) 24oz (1½lb) 32oz (2lb)

CONVERSIONS

¼ tsp ½ tsp 1 tsp 1 Tbsp 1 cup 1 cup flour 1 cup sugar 1 cup rice 1 tsp butter 1 tsp sugar 1 Tbsp butter Size 6 egg

85 106 66 75 84 106

74 51 85 107 106 106 68 94 44

V Vegetarian

GF Gluten free (always check labels when buying

ingredients for gluten-free cooking)

1.25ml 2.5ml 5ml 15ml 250ml 125g 225g 200g 5g 5g 15g 50g

LIQUID MEASURES

metric imperial 1 fluid oz 30ml 2 fluid oz 60ml 3 fluid oz 100ml 4 fluid oz 125ml 5 fluid oz 150ml 6 fluid oz 190ml 8 fluid oz 250ml (1 cup) 10 fluid oz 300ml 16 fluid oz 500ml 20 fluid oz 600ml 1¾ pints 1000ml (1 litre) 4 cups 1 litre

CAKE TIN SIZES

metric 15cm 18cm 20cm 23cm 25cm 28cm

imperial 6 inches 7 inches 8 inches 9 inches 10 inches 1 inches

FA N B A K E TO R E G U L A R

Fanbake is approximately 20 degrees hotter than regular baking, but this varies with every oven. As a general rule, 180°C fanbake is equivalent to 200°C regular.

BEFORE & AFTER MEASURES

cup uncooked rice cup uncooked pasta 200g potatoes 4 toast slices bread 100g cheese

1 cup cooked 1 cup cooked 1 cup mashed 1 cup fresh crumbs 1 cup grated

1/ 3

Avocado, matcha & lime shake * V GF Fried haloumi with lemon, coriander & pine nuts * V Homemade pot noodle jar * Lemon, ricotta & olive bruschetta * V Lemon syrup * GF Preserved lemons * GF Pukeko schiacciata Tamarillo confit with pinot noir GF The Flora Benedict breakfast sandwich

teaspoon tablespoon gram millilitre kilogram degrees Celsius

43 66

MISCELLANEOUS

* Ready in 30 minutes or less

S W E E T T R E AT S

Citrus tarts with lemon curd

German pancake with lemon & sugar * Flourless rhubarb & rosemary cake GF Fruity yoghurt icy pops Lemon polenta cake Maple honey cake with lemon frosting No.1 vanilla cheesecake with rhubarb & red alyssum Orange & cranberry loaf Pistachio-crusted salted caramel apples Rocky road Sicilian cannoli with custard cream Spiced chocolate-glazed parsnip & date cake Tamarillo compote GF Tamarillo tarte tatin Zeppole di nonna

DRY MEASURES

1/ 3

OV E N T E M P E R AT U R E

Very slow Slow Moderate Hot Very hot

°C 120 150 180 210 230

°F 250 300 350 415 450

gas mark ½ 2 4 6-7 8-9

Where to Buy

Allium, alliuminteriors.co.nz ▶ Country Road, countryroad.com.au ▶ Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com ▶ Father Rabbit, fatherrabbit.com ▶ Flo & Frankie, floandfrankie.com ▶ Freedom, freedomfurniture.co.nz ▶ Indie Home Collective, indiehomecollective.com ▶ Let Liv, letliv.co.nz ▶ Nest, nest-direct. com ▶ Republic Home, republichome.com ▶ Shut The Front Door, shutthefrontdoor.co.nz ▶ Simon James Concept Store, store.simonjamesdesign.com ▶ Spotlight, spotlightstores.com/nz ▶ Tea Pea teapea.co.nz ▶ The Warehouse, thewarehouse.co.nz.

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B AC K PAG E

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BAKING

Bake the Back Page Tart cranberries and sweet citrus form a winning combination in this easy-to-make afternoon tea treat RECIPE

Karla Goodwin

PHOTOGRAPH

Melanie Jenkins

Orange & cranberry loaf 50 minutes 8-10

R E A DY I N SERVES

300g plain flour 2¼ tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 300g unsalted butter, at room temperature 300g caster sugar Zest 2 oranges 6 eggs ½ cup sour cream 1½ cups frozen or dried cranberries SYRUP

Juice 2 oranges and an equal quantity of caster sugar

Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease and line a large loaf tin with baking paper. 2 Sift flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl and set aside. 3 Cream the butter and sugar with a handheld electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add the orange zest and mix through. 4 Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition (if the mixture curdles at this point, don’t be alarmed; it will come together once the flour is added). 5 Add half of the dry ingredients and mix until just combined, then add half of the sour cream and stir through. Repeat with the remaining dry ingredients and sour cream. Fold through the 1

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cranberries, scraping down the sides of the bowl so everything is well combined. 6 Pour mixture into the prepared loaf tin and smooth the top so it’s level. Bake in the middle of the oven for 30-35 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean and the top springs back when lightly touched. 7 While the loaf is baking, prepare the syrup. Measure the orange juice out by tablespoon and combine with an equal quantity of sugar in a small saucepan. Cook over a low heat until the sugar has dissolved. 8 When the loaf has cooked, remove from the oven and pierce several holes in the top with a wooden skewer or toothpick. Brush the syrup over the top of the loaf. 9 Leave the loaf to cool in the tin for 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire cooling rack to cool completely.

For a delicious jaffa-flavoured version, just add 1 cup NESTLÉ BAKERS’ CHOICE Dark CHOC BITS along with the cranberries. For more great baking ideas, visit the Delicious Chocolate Classics recipe collection at foodtolove.co.nz ○


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HOOKMVNR0816TNZ PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHER DAVID THOMPSON

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Taste (New Zealand) 9/10 2016