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ISSUE 212 SPRING 2016 AUS $10.50 INC GST


U L T I M A T E B O A R D F E E L S T E F A N J A N O S K I , S E A N M A LT O A N D K A R S T E N K L E P PA N IN AUSTIN TEXAS. VIEW CAN’T TURN IT OFF AT NIKESB.COM


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INTRODUCTION

WORDS BY TRENT FAHEY PHOTO BY SAM COADY

I

n all my years shooting with Slam, I would always look forward to the phone call saying, ‘Hey, it’s Photo Annual time’,” said Steve Gourlay, one of Slam’s most revered former senior photographers, when I got him on the line for an interview in this issue. “I’d always think about the ideas I had written down and who I could call up to recruit. Most of my Photo Annual shots were always pre-planned and thought out. I always loved those phone calls.” Steve started shooting back in the late ’80s, not long after the birth of this very magazine. These days, having shifted the focus of his lens to commercial photography, Steve rarely shoots skateboarding out in the field, but it’s still inspiring to hear someone of his calibre and vast experience speak so fondly of our photography editions. During our conversation, Steve explained how he’s always enjoyed taking a bird’s eye view when composing some of his favourite photos. “I’ve always loved the aspect of looking at skateboarding a bit like a bird,” he told me with an air of excitement. “To be on top of what’s going on. When you’re skateboarding you’re kind of flying up in the air and down again. I wanted to relay that in my photography.” Steve is a pioneer of Australian skate photography, and his work has inspired many of the prominent photographers featured in the pages of this mag. One thing is for sure, he never took it for granted. “It’s such an exciting thing to be a skate photographer,” he said. “You’ve got to understand that if you are one, you’re bloody lucky.” You can read more of the legendary lensman’s reflections on page 20; then thumb through the array of outstanding images on the pages that follow. Behind each shot is a story, and this issue is dedicated not only to the photos themselves, but to the craft, effort and occasional drama that goes into each and every capture.

Sam Coady composes a bird’s eyeful of Trent Evans’ scenic no comply in Sydney.

8 | INTRODUCTION


CONTENTS

SPRING EDITION 2016 INTRODUCTION STEVE GOURLAY REFLECTS PHOTOGRAPHING IN ETHIOPIA SPECIFICS SUBSCRIBE JASON MOREY JAKE DARWEN BRYCE GOLDER J-HON POELLNITZ RIELY WALKER EDDY HAMRA ANDREW PETERS

008 020 022 024 026 029 039 042 043 044 049 050

054 060 062 064 068 078 088 100 104 106 108 111

CAMERON MARKIN BRENDAN FROST MIKE O’MEALLY ISAAC MATZ WADE MCLAUGHLIN ANDREW MAPSTONE SAM COADY NEW GEN FOCUS PRODUCT INTOXICA FINALE

With not enough run-up to jump down the gap, Michael Lawry grinds up with a crooks, popping onto the platform in Brisbane. Photo: McLaughlin

COVER: PHILLIP MARSHALL, OLLIE UP TO ROCK RIDE, PERTH. PHOTO AND CAPTION BY LUKE THOMPSON This sculpture is known as a kugel ball. It’s a solid granite sphere that is suspended on a thin film of water pumped up from below. The large ball weighs several tonnes and it can be pushed and spun around with minimal effort. It’s not an obstacle that anyone would usually skate. On this particular Sunday the fountain was switched off, so Phil used his huge pop to ollie up and ride over the rock.

10 | CONTENTS


FRONTSIDE SHOVE IT | PHOTO: SAM MCGUIRE

BUILT BY SKATEBOARDING WILLOW MARANA VULC

etnies.com

|

@etniesskateboarding


E R I K

E L L I N G T O N

/ S W I T C H

F R O N T S I D E

IN WELL WORN KSLIM 5-POCKET TWILL

F L I P


F R O N T TA L E S

STEVE GOURLAY REFLECTS

ONE OF OUR MOST TALENTED FORMER SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS LOOKS BACK ON SOME OF THE STANDOUT MOMENTS OF HIS CAREER SPANNING WELL OVER TWO DECADES LONG.

Steve’s groundbreaking angle for the cover shot of Slam issue 165. Shane O’Neill overcrooks. Photo: Gourlay

AS TOLD TO TRENT FAHEY

20 | FRONT TALES

F

IRST ROLL OF FILM From a photographer’s nerdy perspective, one of my first memorable moments was processing my first roll of film. That was in 1989. I think it was a roll that had some shots of an Adelaide street skater, Mark Nathan, on it. He was brilliant. There were also some shots of Simon ‘Sac’ Reynolds and Paul Brabenec. To be able to print those was just mind-blowing. At a time when it was really difficult to see what was happening interstate, that’s when I realised it was possible to show other people what was going on around Australia. For this, Slam Magazine was the perfect medium.

THE PINNACLE In 1990 I travelled to Europe and America, and I ended up in Bourges, France, with Gary Valentine, Lance Mountain, Ray Underhill and a couple of others. We were at a skate camp for two weeks, and I had the time of my life skating and shooting photos of those guys. Initially, I was asked to go on the trip as a skateboarder and not a photographer, but I tore the Achilles tendon in my ankle on that trip and couldn’t skate. So I carried my camera wherever I went – I’d just sit there with my leg in plaster and shoot photos of all the crew. I think that was a pinnacle point for me as a photographer. When I got back

home to Adelaide, I thought, Shit, I’m OK at skateboarding, but photography is probably my passion. And it has been ever since.

Hasselblad. I couldn’t believe that he did. He said, “Mate, I’ll send it to you.” So Dave sent me his medium format camera in the post.

FIRST SLAM COVER You may have to look back through the archives, but I think my first Slam cover was issue 41. That cover was of a young kid called Nugget [Luke Taylor] – obviously not our current day Nugget [Shane O’Neill] – but it was a Lien melon over the hip at Fulham. I’m pretty sure Mike O’Meally was the editor at the time. When he gave me the cover, it lit a fire under me. All states, particularly New South Wales and Queensland, were full of amazing skateboarders. I just wanted to try and show everyone what else was happening around Australia.

I started shooting skate photos on that camera with a standard 75-millimetre lens. When I got my first roll of film back I couldn’t believe the clarity and focus, the depth of field, the brilliance of the colours, contrast, everything. So I sent it back up to Dave, went and bought myself one, and got right into it. I think that was around ’99 or 2000. Back then, as a photographer, it became the best hook to get me out to go and shoot a photo: to get the negs back and just claw over them to see how beautiful they were. It was just incredible.

THE POTHOLE I’ve shot a lot of photos, but one trip that really sticks in my head emotionally was getting the crew together to go and shoot the Pothole. I think that was 2001-02. Jake [Frost, ex-Slam editor] gave me the cover and a big spread that flowed on to Transworld and other mags. I named Matt Chamberlain ‘Potty’ because he actually got the crew together. That’s where he gets it from: the Pothole. Crew came from Perth, Queensland, New South Wales, Adelaide and Victoria. There were about 40 people on this amazing adventure of four days’ camping, skating every day, and shooting in the most photogenic situation I could ever imagine. Look at that [cover] photo of Cuz [Andrew Currie] way up at 10 o’clock. I look at all the people in that photo and they just mean so much to me, every one of them. They’re pretty much just skateboarders and friends; a couple of them aren’t with us anymore. It couldn’t have been a better time in my life, really. I could talk about the Pothole for days. MEDIUM FORMAT My introduction to shooting medium format photography was mind-blowing. Dave Adair had a lot to do with it. I talked to him in the late ’90s about it, and he told me that he had an old

GOING DIGITAL In 2002 I got my first digital camera, which was just as mind-blowing as getting the medium format. Obviously I had a good grasp on film, but it probably took me a year or two to understand digital photography. I was working for Globe as an inhouse photographer, skate photographer and team manager, and initially, I didn’t want to go with digital. I just thought it looked terrible. But deep down I knew I needed to keep up, otherwise it would have been the end of what I wanted to do as a creative photographer. I got into the post processing side of digital photography. Back then, not many of us skate photographers were doing our own processing. There was no contrast sharpening or any of the stuff that everyone does now. So I really started getting involved in that, and I think that began a whole new interest in the digital dark room. I used to speak to Andrew Mapstone all the time about it, because we’d always tell each other our little photography tricks. Eventually, after a couple of years of fumbling, everyone’s images became really bloody good. And now, when you look at what the young guys are doing, it’s fucking phenomenal. I just love the whole evolution of photography. It’s never scared me. I’ve just always wanted to get involved.


F R O N T TA L E S

BUILDING FUTURES: ETHIOPIA’S FIRST SKATEPARK

BRISBANE PHOTOGRAPHER TESSA FOX ON HER TIME SHOOTING A SLICE OF ETHIOPIAN SKATE HISTORY.

WORDS AND PHOTO BY TESSA FOX

T

here’s no shortage of things to shoot in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa. Crowded, rusting minibuses; half finished construction sites; corrugated iron fences painted bright green and yellow (the national colours) and, of course, the friendly locals. The whole place is teeming with life. As much as I enjoyed shooting those things, they were merely wonderful distractions from the task at hand: to document the building of Ethiopia’s first skatepark (a joint venture between Make Life Skate Life and the local Ethiopia Skate crew). Addis is a playground for cultural types. It’s the birthplace of coffee, world-renowned jazz, delicious food and, the reason I was there, a burgeoning skate scene. Ten years ago, there were only around three skateboarders in the city of Addis, now there are upwards of 150. A PHOTOGRAPHER’S DREAM I always find it easier to take photos when I’m outside of Australia. I have more motivation, I’m more inspired and I’m more inquisitive. Ethiopia was no exception. I spent a lot of time being distracted by the characters around the skatepark build site. The local restaurant owner, Debeli Teshome Tato, who served us food every single day, was particularly photogenic. During the days, my time was divided between helping with the build of the park and shooting it. I wanted to try and get some street skating photos, but our daily schedule just didn’t allow it, and I would’ve felt bad if I bailed on the rest of the team (in total, there were around 50 people from 20 different countries pitching in). We always spoke of

22 | FRONT TALES

night skating missions, but they got sidelined as the build picked up pace and began rolling into the nights. When the locals are out night skating, they are known to try and give money to security guards so they can skate a good spot for a little longer. These mini bribes will often be just enough money for the guards to buy a tea or coffee. If only a flat white would get security off your back in Australia… SHARING’S CARING The park builders all lived together in one big house. Each room slept around 10 people, and everyone was sprawled all over the floor. Going in with so much expensive camera gear (I shoot on a Canon 5D MK II) and being around so many new people, I had to learn to trust everyone from day one. And as it would turn out, it wasn’t the people I was living with that I needed to be worried about. Most of the volunteers took donations of boards, trucks, wheels and clothes to Addis with them. In spite of that, we had more boards, mobile phones and cameras stolen during the build (and on opening day) than we could count. When the first camera went missing at the build site, I freaked. I decided to start spending more time shooting and paying closer attention to my gear. Local skateboarder Nathan Eyasu said there was no point telling the police about stolen items, as they won’t do anything unless you know who the culprit is. “The thief will sell the board to a skater and then go and buy drugs,” he told me. “If you go and tell the cops it shows you are scared. If you fight them they won’t do it again.” Our friend Henry – who was in Ethiopia with Ben Hermans and Adam Anderson of

The Community Collective, a social enterprise dedicated to building spots and parks in disadvantaged communities – had his camera stolen and needed a police report for insurance. After finally working out where the police station was, he visited multiple times to hassle them for a report until eventually giving up. Despite their promises, Henry realised they were never going to write one. WORKING HARD OR HARDLY WORKING? Shooting photos of people working feels weird. I couldn’t help but feel lazy when I swapped my trowel or pickaxe for my camera. It was tricky to divide my time between shooting, filming, recording interviews, writing, editing, building, skating and, of course, partying. There were so many things going on to distract me. Everything got done in the end, though. I guess because every single aspect – from the shooting to the building and even the partying – was important to me. The photo being run with this article shows a group of locals putting in the work. When we first turned up, most of them were shy and didn’t expect the project to be so big. They thought we were just going to build a little mini ramp to replace their rotten wooden one. As it progressed, they became so hyped on how big and creative the park was. They were super keen to learn how to build and work with concrete, too – they would’ve learned so many skills to take forward with them. “We don’t know much about construction,” 18-year-old skater Micky Asfw told me, “but we can help carry stuff. We can help concreting the bricks or making the stairs. We can help like that.” The park is a dream come true for the skateboarders of Addis. Those words were repeated over and over again by every one of the local skaters. Here’s hoping the next time I visit Addis, there’ll be an even bigger skate scene there to welcome me.


goliathskate.com • info@goliathskate.com • 03 9380 1799


SPECIFICS

344 PHOTO COMPETITION 344: if you can’t crack the code, that’s three dudes, for The 4 Skateboard Company. Nike SB Australia and 4 brought their boys Casey Foley, Mike Martin and Harry Clark together for a trifecta video part, and, as expected, the results oozed with style, skill and top trick selection. On the night of the premiere, the trio were bumped up to professional status with their own boards to a room of loud cheers and clinking beers. Now, thanks to 4 and Nike SB, you can score a package of 344 goodness to commemorate the occasion. For your chance to take home a box of all three boards from the Camera Series, three long-sleeve photo print tees, three sets of wheels and a pair of Janoski Hyperfeels, we want to see a photo submission surrounding the number three. It can be three separate photos to form a mini-series, or one photo with three subjects included, or something completely abstract – as long as you shot the photo or photos, and it has something to do with the magic number three.

SEND YOUR “Slam 344 Competition” entries to: comps@slamskateboarding.com with your name, street address and contact number. Entries close mid December.

Keep the file size below 5MB.

PREMIER PICTURES We check in with two of our distinguished senior photographers (who are currently shooting in The States) to flash back in time and talk about their first published photos in Slam.

JAKE DARWEN My first photo ever in Slam was a crooks transfer of my friend Sean Bone in the Exposure section. Dustin Dollin’s kickflip frontside 50-50 was on the cover [issue 170, 2010]. I remember being at Vic Park in New Zealand and seeing an issue of Slam. That mag had a section in the back where you could submit your photos and hopefully have it run alongside other upcoming photographers. That night, I went on the website and found the contact email. I sent through a bunch of photos, hoping that one of them would make the cut. Although, at that point I thought it would be impossible to get a photo in an Australian magazine; I gave it a shot anyway. When I saw that it was published it made me want to send more and more to Slam. Eventually, things snowballed and I became a staff photographer three years later.

24 | SPECIFICS

ANDREW PETERS The first photo I ever had published in Slam was a portrait for Chima Ferguson’s interview in 2005. I started taking pictures and immediately got in touch with the Slam editor at the time. I let Jake Frost know that I was an “up-and-coming photographer in Sydney”. I would send sleeves full of slides and negative film in hope to get something over the line. Chima has been one of my best mates since we were about nine years old. His level of skating was leaps and bounds ahead of my photography back in our young years. However, I was at Martin Place to shoot a portrait of him at the spot that would play a huge role in his career and host some of his most memorable tricks. I’d had one other photo published previously, in the now-deceased ASM, which was another portrait of Chima to accompany his interview in that magazine. I remember the feeling of mixed emotions; I was excited, proud and inspired that I’d achieved this massive goal, but all I really wanted was to shoot a skate photo good enough to grace the pages. Although, in retrospect, I couldn’t be happier that my first published photos were of my lifelong friend and colleague, skating or not.


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26 | SUBSCRIBE


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P H O T O T H E

28 | PHOTO FEATURE

S T O R I E S

F E A T U R E B E H I N D

T H E

S H O T S


W A L L I E

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

C O R E Y

L E S O

If you look closely at this photo you’ll notice that there’s a bench missing on the left of the tables. We perched the seat long ways up against the building for me to get high enough for this angle. I awkwardly perched from the makeshift vantage point to get the photo. In theory, I thought I’d find myself comfortably sitting up there like a tennis umpire or lifeguard at a beach. In reality, I balanced on one foot while holding myself up under an entry sign on the building. Thankfully, Corey made this wallie quite fast and I was able to shimmy down and stretch out my leg cramps. Well worth it.

JASON MOREY

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This picture was taken on our second visit to shoot Ben’s boardy. On the first attempt, we were greeted by a grumpy security guard who appeared after about five tries – including two sackings. The secko was sharp and he plonked his arse on the rail to create the ultimate skate-stopper. We politely asked if we could have a few more tries, but to no avail. Ben continued begging like a little boy, whinging, “Pleeeeease can I have one more go and we’ll leave! Pleeeeease.” I’d never seen someone whinge so politely. It was hilarious and admirable at the same time. The following week we were back for round two. And round two of Ben’s balls greeting the rail. Funnily enough, each sacking seemed to be a part of his strategy to feel out the rail. As you can see, the rail bends around the corner, so you have to rock around and throw your body weight. Alternatively, you can throw your nuts at the rail just as Ben did. The security approached us again, but it was too late for them this time – we were already saying our goodbyes as I walked away with this photo.

30 | JASON MOREY


L A W R I E

B O A R D S L I D E

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

B E N

JASON MOREY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

M A T

K I N S M A N

B L U N T S L I D E

The day this photo was taken was my first time skating with Kinsy in about six months. Like every other time in the past, it was all good vibes and a pleasure to watch him skate. We ended up at this out ledge, which used to have an ugly length of coping attached to it. The bricky ledge had since been waxed to buggery and some new tricks had already gone down. Kinsy said he’d wanted to get a bluntslide on a Hubba or out ledge for ages, and this was looking perfect. The only problem was a parked car in the landing. He said, “Oh well, fuck it. Hopefully I get it quick and I don’t hit the car.” As you can see, there was a white Corolla parked right in the 32 | JASON MOREY

landing. The car was lined up with the ledge, so to roll away he’d have to ollie out in the opposite direction. You could cut the tension in the air with a knife as his board shot out many times into the little white threedoor. Thankfully, they weren’t horrible hits and it wasn’t long before he popped out and rolled away right beside the little obstruction. Vibes were high again and everyone cheered in amazement. The footage will be in Geoff Campbell’s next production. While I can’t say the parked car came out completely unscathed, I can assure you that we left with an amazing piece of footage and this here photograph. The things you’ll do to get a trick. (Insert awkward face emoji.)


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

S A M

G I L E S

S W I T C H

I don’t often see Sam skate switch. He seems more of a ‘jump off a building’ type of guy. Every time he visits from Wollongong he always leaves me with a photo or two, or five. This was the final day of one of his many weekend missions to Melbourne and he was eager to get one last trick before he bailed. I’ve wanted someone to skate this up bar for so long, but nobody has been interested after Silas Baxter-Neal nosegrinded the shit out of it. There isn’t too much worth mentioning from

5 0 - 5 0

this session besides the classic Sam Giles mentality of ‘just jump on it and commit’ – one of the smarter, yet sometimes self-destructive approaches to skateboarding. Just like committing to jumping off a building, Sam committed 100 per cent to grinding switch up the circle bar. After tripping over the rail a few times, he eventually stuck it in fine form and jumped on the next plane back home to the ’Gong.

JASON MOREY

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K R I S T J A N

R O W E L L

F O O T P L A N T

34 | JASON MOREY


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

I’ve been to this spot so many times and never been kicked out by security, until this day. As the uni’s security escorted us out of the basketball court, Kristjan mentioned he had a trick he’d like to try as the seckos left. He said he’d just learned footplants on the chicken wire fences around the court and they were feeling good. He seemed confident, and before we knew it he was jumping down the gap like he’d been doing them forever. Not long after the initial attempts, Kristjan was rolling away with a brand new trick, and with it some new hot pockets. He immediately left to go home and ice his ankles, while being the happiest I’d seen somebody be after destroying their legs.

JASON MOREY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

N I C K

36 | JASON MOREY

B O S E R I O O L L I E


Brass is always a pleasure to shoot photos with. He can do any trick with a stern mix of power with style. This was taken on a Nike SB trip to New Zealand, in a town called New Plymouth. We had about four people watching for cars at the bottom of the hill as Brass would bomb down to this garage gap. It was a nail-biter to watch, as he was skating directly towards a stop sign and a main road with constant traffic. Each attempt was either a kick-out, or hang up into a downhill commando roll. Falling and taking it to the shoulders and hips in the most controlled manner, like the professional skateboarder he is. When he finally cleared the canyon and landed into the bank he picked up more speed. He bombed the hill almost into an oncoming car before sliding out on his arse and tearing a hole in his favourite pants.

JASON MOREY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JASON MOREY

J A S O N

R A I N B I R D

F R O N T S I D E

N O S E G R I N D

This rail is at the train station of Rainbird’s hometown in Dandenong. It’s regulated by sketchy crackheads and drug dealers, so it’s not the ideal place to be with expensive video and camera gear. Sometimes it’s a good situation to be at a spot in a sketchy area – the skater will usually feel a little more pressure and be keen to get the hell out of there. Fortunately on this day we didn’t actually have any problems at the Dandy station. I was actually disappointed with the lack of stories we left with. The people around floated by our session like zombies, as if we weren’t even there. Regardless of any potential crackhead pressure, Rainy committed to every try and rolled away before we knew it. Classic Rainbird.

38 | JASON MOREY


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JAKE DARWEN

M A X

C O U L I N G

N O L L I E

H E E L F L I P

Max doesn’t sleep. He’s always on the search to create Melbourne’s next hot spot. If it looks pleasing to him, best believe it’s going to be skateable within the next 24 hours. This gap is a prime example – he found it the night before we shot this photo. As the sun set the next day he sawed off the metal bars that made the gap unskateable. Once that was done he handled his business by nollie heeling the gap with finesse.

JAKE DARWEN

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K A Y L E L A W S O N 3 6 0

F L I P

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY JAKE DARWEN

This was seriously one of the sketchiest spots to shoot at. As I jumped down into this dungeon, the only thing blocking me from falling into Batman’s Lair was a pile of leaves and some spiders that I swear haven’t even been discovered. I felt something crawling on me with every attempt. I put pressure on Kayle so that I could get out as soon as possible. Luckily for me, Kayle didn’t want to see me suffer any longer and handled this 360 flip.

40 | JAKE DARWEN


JAKE DARWEN

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY BRYCE GOLDER

G R E G

N O

S T E W A R T

C O M P L Y

F L I P

Greg is the most entertaining person you could ever meet. If he’s not humming nuts or drinking sauvignon blanc, he’s losing his mind on a skateboard. If you spent a night on the piss with Gregsie you would get to know The Vibe first hand. I feel like this old rundown spot in Clifton Hill is a little like Greg’s mind, with the graf painting a picture of his thoughts. They’re colourful and all over the place; they pop up late at night; and they’re always changing. Somehow, with his mind drowning in sauv, he keeps it together long enough to no comply flip his board over this gap.

42 | BRYCE GOLDER


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY J-HON POELLNITZ

J A C K

N E W E S T

K I R K D E A L

For some reason we always end up at this spot whenever I’m in Santa Barbara. But, this time it was different … I’d never had Kirksy with me before. I saw a twinkle of excitement in his eye as soon as we got out of the van on our way back from a two-week Slave tour to North California. He already had a trick in mind, so I set up to shoot. As he was close to locking in his trick, a couple of locals were getting hyped playing 50 Cent, super loud, on their boom box with beach cruisers in tow. We had already drawn more than enough attention to ourselves by lighting up the spot, so we asked them to kill the beats as Kirksy was getting close to landing his trick. After a couple of tries, he popped out perfectly from the no handed nosepick, and somehow made that rough brick runway appear like a silky smooth marble surface.

J-HON POELLNITZ

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C O R E Y PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY RIELY WALKER

N O

44 | RIELY WALKER

Y O U N G

C O M P L Y

I’ll never understand how people pop high no-complies, no matter how many times I see them done. For Corey, though, it’s a piece of cake. By the time I arrived in the city he’d already filmed this trick and was coming up with ideas to add it to a line. He asked me to shoot it and I, of course, obliged. I wasn’t totally psyched on the photo the first time I shot it. I kind of blew it. Thankfully, Corey is always keen to go again. Nestled among some bushes across the street, I found myself a new angle. Corey promptly landed it, again, and this time I got the photo. I was stoked to shoot a trick that I would consider to be one of the most difficult imaginable to take over this bench.


RIELY WALKER

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46 | RIELY WALKER

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY RIELY WALKER

I’ve never seen anyone work harder for a trick than Jack did for this heelflip. He battled this spot for a couple of hours on four separate occasions, and must have thrown down at least 100 attempts. He was battered, bruised and beaten after every time. When we arrived on the fourth visit, we noticed a couple of police cars pulling up at an abandoned building down the street. Jack hustled like never before. He promptly landed the heelflip and we got the hell out of there. I guess the heat from the police was the extra motivation Jack needed.


J A C K

P A T E R S O N

H E E L F L I P

RIELY WALKER

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY RIELY WALKER

S T E V E

S W I T C H

A D A M

F R O N T S I D E

H E E L F L I P

This was my second encounter with the mythical Steve Adam. He’s a humble creature who stalks the suburbs of Wollongong, occasionally unleashing savage attacks on the area’s skateboard spots. I originally drove out to this particular spot with another skater, but we soon realised it was a lot gnarlier than we envisioned. The roof is super high and the run-up has a sketchy surface. There’s a reason hardly anyone has skated this thing; just climbing onto the roof is a scary thought. We were packing up to leave when Steve pulled up to the spot, completely out of the blue. He hopped the fence, climbed up onto the roof and started throwing down tricks without even batting an eyelid. Within a matter of minutes he was rolling away from this switch front heel. And just as quickly as he appeared, he was gone. We barely had time to give him props before he was driving off into the sunset.

48 | RIELY WALKER


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY EDDY HAMRA

C A I L E A N

F R O N T S I D E

H O L L A N D F I V E - O

Cailean is one of those skateboarders who is always keen to go out and shoot a photo, no matter what. He’ll skate a board that someone else has skated for months like it’s a brand new deck. He could be a carton deep the night before, and skate the next day like he’s never had a beer in his life. On rainy days he sits at home on Google Street View looking for spots. He’ll take a screenshot of anything worthy and send it to me. I guess that’s how we came to shoot at this spot. He somehow spotted the tip of a Hubba leading to an underground carpark. This Hubba is as rough as guts and has a cheese grater rollaway, but a sketchy spot like this is a dreamland to Cailean. With a fire in his belly, the very next day we headed to the Hubba and managed to come up with something pretty cool.

EDDY HAMRA

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW PETERS

J O S H

P A L L

F R O N T S I D E

50 | ANDREW PETERS

F L I P


Jetlag is a son of a bitch that you don’t want to let take a hold of your first day in America, or any country. When you get into LA at the crack of dawn, and whether or not you got a wink of sleep on the plane, you should try to push through to the evening before going to sleep. If you don’t, your whole week will be screwed. I picked up Juan [Onekawa] and Josh from the airport; we got the usual errands out of the way, like sim cards, breakfast supplies, and it was finally time to go skating. The first spot saw Josh get shit-whipped trying to ollie it, so we weren’t off to a great start, but at the second spot we had a little more luck. Josh was set up great for his victory snooze into a regular sleeping pattern.

ANDREW PETERS

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW PETERS

J U A N

O N E K A W A

F R O N T S I D E

52 | ANDREW PETERS

O L L I E


We were in San Pedro and we ended up at a curved ledge/anchor spot, but Juan eyed off these banks in the distance. He asked the local of the crew if he would get kicked out, and the general consensus was, yes. We dicked around at the ledges for a while and nothing was really happening. I said to Juan, Let’s go for it and see how much time we get. We got in and the tops of the banks were capped and there were officials walking around in the distance. We presumed we had a minute or so. Ten minutes later, Juan was boosting higher and higher on these frontside ollies, and I was running around trying to figure out how to frame him up with the big US Army ship in the background.

ANDREW PETERS

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C H A R L E S R O B E R T S O N F R O N T S I D E

5 0 - 5 0

This 21-stair hell-ride did not come easy. The first session was cut short a half an hour into Charles feeling out the behemoth. We inspected a deep slash through his hand – a result of sliding across the chipped old stairs in a bail gone wrong. Being the good friends we are, everyone in the crew assured him it wasn’t stitch worthy and I dropped him home. Twenty-four hours later he’s back at it, with three stitches and a vengeance. Fuelled by a fear of not wanting to put his hands down again, he went to work and cruised through the 50-50, as we always knew he would.

54 | CAMERON MARKIN


CAMERON MARKIN

| 55

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY CAMERON MARKIN


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY CAMERON MARKIN

Sam and I were en route to another spot when we decided to check out this rail that we happened to be driving by. Despite the uneven, awkwardly angled run-up, Sammy was into it. Back 50-50s were soon followed by back Smiths as the boys cheered on. The vibes are always high when a spontaneous spot works out. The pressure skaters can put on themselves on the way to a planned spot is replaced by a little cheeky curiosity.

56 | CAMERON MARKIN

S A M

B A C K S I D E

A T K I N S S M I T H

G R I N D


CAMERON MARKIN

| 57


I can’t remember the exact moment when Ryder discovered the stoke of inverts, but from that point he’s been filling my memory cards with them. With a single focus in life to have one run in print, he decided to go ham and throw down what you see before you – bashing his tail on the windowsill at Portside DIY.

58 | CAMERON MARKIN


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY CAMERON MARKIN

R Y D E R

L A W S O N

I N V E R T

CAMERON MARKIN

| 59


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY BRENDAN FROST

S A M F A I R W E A T H E R F R O N T S I D E

60 | BRENDAN FROST

T A I L S L I D E


After watching Dean Parsons take a 50-50 down this thing, pretty much any other trick seemed unfathomable. Although, I remember thinking to myself, A tailslide would be doable if someone could pop out of it. I showed a couple of people the photo of Deano’s 50-50 and copped responses like, “That thing looks gnarly,” or, “Fuck that.” It wasn’t worth the trip for most. The Hubba is in Cessnock, which is around a 40-minute drive inland from Newcastle. So it is about a two-hour ride for Sam from his home in Gosford. The spot is ancient concrete; rougher than your grandma’s cracked heels. It’s a one-push run-up to the 12-stair Hubba with a kink on the end, so you have to pop out to the side or you’re stomping on stairs. I watched Sam slip, jump, stomp into 50, and graze himself over and over. That was the first trip. Unsuccessful and unsatisfied with the outcome, a few days later there was talk of another expedition out to The Nock. Sure enough, within a couple of weeks we were back. He threw himself down it again and again before rolling out fakie into the wall and then out forward. The rest is history.

BRENDAN FROST

| 61


62 | MIKE O’MEALLY

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY MIKE O’MEALLY


J A C K

F A R D E L L

F R O N T S I D E

T A I L G R A B

This pool is in the Hollywood neighbourhood, and it was spotted by a big time celebrity pro skater legend. That’s all very interesting, but the fact is it’s a crack house where pimps run game on ladies of the industry. The cost to skate there is one pack of Marlboro Reds, paid to a shirtless brother with waist-long dreads. The pool has perfect wide open transitions, so it’s top secret. It is actually a bit naughty to be running this photo. Jack definitely couldn’t care less about all of that flapping when he was flying through the magnolia tree like it was a skatepark. Say nothing on the locaysh … it’s in Chatswood, yeah?

MIKE O’MEALLY

| 63


64 | ISAAC MATZ

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ISAAC MATZ

After I moved from Auckland to Melbourne earlier this year, I somehow managed to stumble across Dean and his crew within my first few days of lurking around the CBD. When first encountering Dean and his infamous beanie, I didn’t know that this man-child was an absolute powerhouse. Dean doesn’t hesitate to throw down on whatever is in front of him. He’s the ultimate package with his unique trick selection, the talent to keep a skateboard glued to his feet and his heartthrob-like smile. I was lucky enough to shoot my first photo of him in Melbourne, nailing this wallride backside 180 over a bench at Docklands. While we were shooting, some of the crew used the nearby barbecues and rustled up enough grub for 15 people. Knowing his chance to snag some food would fade the longer he took, Dean landed the wallride 180 with ease and he got what he originally went to Docklands for: a free BBQ.


D E A N

W A L L R I D E

J O H N S T O N B A C K S I D E

1 8 0

O U T

ISAAC MATZ

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ISAAC MATZ

H O O T I E S W I T C H

B A C K S I D E

A N D R E W E S N O S E G R I N D

R E V E R T

Hootie has done it all. He has run every gimmick running, and done every ‘cool trick’ out – only he probably did them on a mini ramp when he was 12, tucked away in Arrowtown, New Zealand. Arrowtown is smaller than Docklands, where this photo was shot, while filming for his controversial part in the Onti video. I was watching his video parts before I even knew what switch was, so I’m beyond stoked to be shooting with Hootiefrog now.

66 | ISAAC MATZ


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ISAAC MATZ

T U L L Y

W E S T

W A L L R I D E

Tully finds time for almost anything. Whether he’s delivering food for Uber on his time-machine pushbike (while drinking a six-pack), going on hot dates or filming Melbourne’s best skateboarders, he still manages to be one of the best humans and skaters in the game. If he says a spot isn’t good, it’s not. And if it is, he’s probably already shut it down. He also has an incredible wallride up his sleeve, as you can see here.

ISAAC MATZ

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68 | WADE MCLAUGHLIN

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN


M I T C H E L L F R O N T S I D E

H O W S E

B L U N T

I love the Northern Rivers of New South Wales and its DIY culture. Many of the people that call the area home understand that real wealth is knowledge. They work together to peel away from the system and live sustainably off a piece of land. Although being completely logged and burnt at the start of the past century, the area has since been reclaimed by the Indigenous, hippies and farmers alike, who continue to fight to preserve the area’s perfect subtropic ecosystem from mining and harmful farming practices. The land is now thriving with native wildlife, forests and constant, clean running water. She’s fuckin’ gorgeous, mate. Dylan McNamara’s place is a perfect example. It is fittingly known as Creekside because the bowl lays next to a pristine creek on his family’s farm. I can guarantee you that every person who ever skated Creekside has definitely said the phrase, “This is fucked” while trying to navigate the bumps and lumps. Mashy included, who found the biggest, gnarliest section that he could front blunt.

WADE MCLAUGHLIN

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN

E D G A R

S H I F T Y

K I I S A

F L I P

Hailing from the northern European country of Estonia, Edgar has lived in Australia for just over a year now. For the majority of that time I have been out with a cooked knee, so I haven’t had much of a chance to skate with this seemingly cheeky character. But what I have realised when watching this larrikin skate is just how versatile skateboarding can be from one country to another, and the different perspective that can be taken on our spots due to diverse influences. This is the first and only photo we’ve shot together so far, and what a treat it was. Even with the short, uphill run-up, and minimal bump, Eddy put the stamp on this unconventional shifty flip in just a few tries.

70 | WADE MCLAUGHLIN


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN

L O U I S

B E A N

R I L E Y

P L A N T

You could say that Lou-grom is the Justin Bieber of skateboarding. I imagine his Tinder account makes young girls scurry out the door, eye on the prize, as if they’re chasing a rare Pokemon. But Louie had another bean to plant on this day; he had just been introduced to the Hoon family. Cuzza [Andrew Currie] was in town showing the young guns how it’s done and checking in on his new recruit. Not wanting to disappoint, handling the slippery sideways run-up to back Cuz up on his ollie, Louie went in with this gnarly bean plant a few hairy attempts later. Hoonz!

WADE MCLAUGHLIN

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72 | WADE MCLAUGHLIN


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN

S A M M Y F U L L W O O D B O A R D S L I D E

P O P

Having previously shot a wallie with Sammy from the kicker over the barrier a couple of years back, I felt pretty sure that no one would risk their life trying to one-up that any time soon. After skating with him for many years growing up on the Sunny Coast, I’m completely confident in Sammy and his abilities on the board. He makes the hardest tricks look like they require little to no effort. But when he hit me up to shoot a boardslide pop over on the said spot, I have to admit, I was a bit worried. Shit was pretty tense for everyone around, but unfazed, Sammy boardslides out and over potential death to pop over to the busy motorway. I’m glad that session ended without casualty, but no doubt I will be shitting bricks at this spot again some day.

O V E R

WADE MCLAUGHLIN

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74 | WADE MCLAUGHLIN

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN


J O E L W I L S H E R E K I C K F L I P

When Joel told me he wanted to shoot this kickflip, I already knew the spot and exactly how I wanted to take the picture. What I didn’t anticipate was a huge truck parking right in front of my perceived shot. Luckily, Joel has that kind of flick that looks amazing any way you shoot it, and he is bloody amazing to work with – when he doesn’t have a rolled ankle. Hence the nickname ‘Limpy’. He doesn’t mind a huck. Giving me a few moments to reposition, I gave Joel the green light. He immediately started throwing himself over the block and into this slanted narrow tunnel of a landing. Even though the angle doesn’t do the spot much justice, we probably ended up with a nicer looking picture than what I first envisaged. Or, it could be that any time you capture Joel skateboarding it’s always absolutely stunning.

WADE MCLAUGHLIN

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M I T C H S L A P P Y

76 | WADE MCLAUGHLIN

O W E N S

B A C K S I D E

T A I L S L I D E


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY WADE MCLAUGHLIN

Being a fellow Sunny Coaster, I’ve had the pleasure of watching Mitch evolve from a very quiet but fast skating Alex Heads grom, into one of the most creative, quick-footed and quickwitted city larkers that the Brissy metropolis has ever seen. Since making the move down a few years ago, you will regularly find ‘Reddog’ (as he is fondly known) skating the shit out of spots that no other skater would even look twice at. On this occasion (and most of late, as I’m still recovering from knee surgery) I was reduced to walking around the city to get to spots – a major pain in the arse. Mitch, however, being the good bloke that he is, opted to walk with me rather than wheelie board to this spot. I remember him saying, “Man, this is weird, I feel like a citizen.” A board-width run-up, and a two-storey drop with traffic below, Reddog slappy back tails on a guardrail that keeps the citizens at bay.

WADE MCLAUGHLIN

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE 78 | ANDREW MAPSTONE

J A C K S O N B O A R D S L I D E

Y A N K

P I L Z O V E R


When you’re as good as Jackson Pilz, anything is possible. A short while ago, in Tassie, we were on our way to a skatepark when Jackson made us stop to check out this rail. Right by the door of the building was a metal awning that could easily decapitate an unknowing skater, in an instant. Initially we wrote the thing off and continued towards the park, but Jackson couldn’t let it go. To me, the rail looked super gnarly, the run-up sucked, the awning was deadly and bloody long to boot. Jackson didn’t see any of that as an issue, so we returned with tools and managed to take the awning down. Jackson almost boardslid the whole thing straight out of the gate. But with a limited run-up and nowhere to roll away, it turned into a battle. I’m sure any mere mortal would’ve given up, but we’re talking about Jackson Pilz – and he’s no mere mortal. He’s always determined to roll away, and when you’re as good as Jackson, you can get yourself out of any situation. All it took was some quick thinking and an even quicker yank out, and the battle was won.

ANDREW MAPSTONE

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE

B E N

B A C K S I D E

W E I R

T A I L S L I D E

Ben first came to Melbourne for a short visit, and during that trip he got a taste of the good life: the fine weather, smooth ledges and famous Melbourne sunsets. He loved it so much, that a few weeks later he made the move from Perth. Unfortunately, since then, Ben’s been smashed by Melbourne’s bad weather and early, cold mornings on his worksite (he’s a chippy). Luckily for us, Ben doesn’t give a shit about the cold. Since landing in Melbourne, he’s made quite the impression; netting himself a tonne of new friends and a photo in the pages of Australia’s first legit skateboarding magazine. Here he is, back-tailing something that shouldn’t slide.

80 | ANDREW MAPSTONE


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE

J E S S E

N O O N A N

D R O P

I N

When Red comes to town, the whole of Melbourne will know about it. Jesse has this ability to draw a crowd, and when the people of Williamstown saw this large, fiery human climb to the top of a bus stop, they couldn’t help but stop and observe. We threw Red his board and he proceeded to drop in on the glass; it was like a truck driving straight into a wall. Those that could bear to watch, did, and those who couldn’t looked away. There was no choice for me but to get under the action and egg him on.

ANDREW MAPSTONE

| 81


J A M E S B A C K S I D E

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE NE E

All it takes are whispers of a skateable pool to send skaters into a frenzy, no matter how good (or how crappy) it is to skate. For photographers, it’s easy to make any pool look good. But for the skaters, getting to grips with a new pool is something else. This one in particular was dead hard to skate. Luckily, James has the ability to get up, into and out of any situation. Match that with his fashion sense and you have a photographer’s wet dream.

82 | ANDREW MAPSTONE

H A L L

S M I T H

G R I N D


ANDREW MAPSTONE

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84 | ANDREW MAPSTONE

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE

If you’ve ever been up and down the New South Wales surf coast as a skater, you’d have visited Pambula Park. It’s a veritable surf coast destination. I only managed to get there myself a few years ago, and even having seen loads of footage of locals rip the vert wall, I was surprised by how gnarly it was in the flesh. Reece Warren just so happens to be the king of Pambula Park (closely followed by Zac and Johnny Mac). There’s nothing better than going to a park and having the locals put on a show for you. With the help of Johnny, I talked Reece into doing this back noseblunt. If you look closely, you can see how thin the area is that he had to ride up and lock on to. So much could’ve gone wrong. I’m stoked with this photo.


R E E C E

B A C K S I D E

W A R R E N

N O S E B L U N T

ANDREW MAPSTONE

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S C O T T

Whenever an outof-towner comes to Melbourne, they ask to skate Melton Drains. I always do what I can to talk them out of it. It’s not that I hate the drains, they’re just a mission to get to. If you’re hitting Melton, that’s your day done. But sometimes, every now and then, the mission is worth it. Even though Scotty lives in Melbourne, you could still classify him as an out-of-towner. He’s been on fire lately, so when he asked to go to Melton, I couldn’t refuse. And he didn’t disappoint. I haven’t seen anyone else hit this switch, and it’s not just the switch back tail that’s gnarly, it’s the roll away as well. You don’t only have to worry about the speed of that thing; there are thousands of chalkies waiting to take you out, too. You can take the boy out of Ballina, but you can’t take Ballina out of the boy.

86 | ANDREW MAPSTONE

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY ANDREW MAPSTONE

S W I T C H

S T A N D L E Y

B A C K S I D E

T A I L S L I D E


ANDREW MAPSTONE

| 87


I’ll begin with an interesting fact about Cody: he is the most intense driver I’ve ever been in the car with. If you ask anyone that’s seen him behind the wheel they will surely tell you just how angry the little man gets. Another interesting fact is that Cody happens to be one of the most talented dudes skating in Sydney right now. It’s rare for the weekend to go by and Cody not to have logged at least four or five tricks on George’s [Kousoulis] trusty VX. This trip was no different. With promises of new and exciting spots that the CBR has to offer, we decided to check them out. First on the agenda was this lengthy ledge in Woden. Cody was confused on what trick to do, so a front blunt was suggested. After a couple of tries, he managed to stay off Snapchat long enough to put it down bolts.

88 | SAM COADY


F R O N T S I D E

PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY

C O D Y

R I L E Y

B L U N T S L I D E

SAM COADY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY 90 | SAM COADY

B U G S

F A R D E L L

B A C K S I D E

T A I L S L I D E


The Hoon fellas came down south to film for their new video, enjoy some good times and some good old heckling sessions. Bugs was joined by Andrew Currie and Mashy [Mitchell Howse], and they were in search of some dangerous terrain. I suggested that we check out the most dangerous spot I knew – this one in Merrylands. Many have claimed, but only a few have conquered. This bank looks like a beauty, but it has so many shithouse factors: cheese-grater ground; large cracks at the bottom of the bank; scattered chalkies and tight tranny. You get the idea. Anyway, the session was on and Bugs was looking good. A back tail here is no easy feat. He made it look so damn good, while Mashy screamed out shit the whole time.

SAM COADY

| 91


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY

N I K

S T I P A N O V I C

F R O N T S I D E

S M I T H

G R I N D

The gremlin finally left the comfort of his beloved Cronulla skatepark and ventured out on a mission to one of the deepest, darkest corners of Western Sydney, Blacktown. This was one trick from a heated session that was going down that day. Some were landed and some were left for another day. Stipo took the cake with this long Smith down and through the kink, followed by some quick thinking to avoid a brick wall directly in the roll away. A thank-you must go to my lighting assistant, Billy Lukins. He had to move my flashes out of the way, every time, while I was no doubt inconveniencing his cigarette time.

92 | SAM COADY


PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY

B A C K S I D E

J A E 1 8 0

O V E R T O N

R E V E R S E

N O S E G R I N D

O U T

F O R W A R D S

Ovo is an odd character. Actually, he’s probably one of the weirdest people I know. He has that look about him. He’s a part-time comedian, full-time drug delivery guy at the hospital, and has two bunny rabbits that he talks about far too much. Luckily he can skate, because I honestly don’t know what he would get up to if he couldn’t. He’s a ‘tech guy’, so when he told me about an old ledge that had been given a facelift, I knew exactly what to ask of him. With the Randwick Uni security typically onto you within the first 15 minutes, this time luck was on our side as he executed this beauty before there was anyone in sight. SAM COADY

| 93


J A K E

PHOTO: JASO

B A C K S I D E

A Y E S

S M I T H

G R I N D

Jake’s making a heavy mark on American soil, and it’s very easy to see why. Back home, he kickflipped a massive garden gap at Cannonball moments before he back Smithed this ledge at full speed – a ledge so narrow that people struggle to even sit on it. A two trick line executed three times, because, well, I don’t know – you’ll have to ask Jake. Seriously though, mate, the first line was fine.

94 | SAM COADY


PHOTOS AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY

J O S H

H E F F E R N A N

S L A P P Y

C R O O K S

This spot is down the road from my house in Glebe. It’s high, chunky and next to a busy main road. It doesn’t really tick many boxes. One night, Josh rolled away from a next-level slappy crooks, but I missed it as I was getting gear from my car. A couple of weeks later I asked him if he would do it again; he gladly obliged. This picture ended up being my favourite photo that I have submitted for this issue. An interesting fact about Josh is that he also shoots photos and has a rad eye for a nice shot.

SAM COADY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY

L O U

G A P

96 | SAM COADY

F R O M

E L L I O T T

T H E

S T E P

T O

5 0 - 5 0


Lil’ Lou came in hot to Sydney from The States, and the good times began to roll as soon as he stepped off the plane. With his quest to do anything and everything Australian, he also left his mark on a fair few of our spots. The mayor of Sydney skateboarding, Cameron Sparkes, was his tour guide, and a session was on just across from this spot when Lou spotted some potential. After locking in some 50-50s, a security guard approached us and stood in front of the handrail. Screams of “One more try” were hurled. The security guard looked away for a split second and Lou ducked under his arm, under the kinks of the rails, rolled along the step to 5050 the back of the bench. It was a beautiful moment as he rolled away to one of the sweetest victory hill bombs I’ve ever seen.

SAM COADY

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PHOTO AND COMMENTARY BY SAM COADY 98 | SAM COADY

L E V I

P O L E

J A M

J A R V I S

B A C K S I D E

S M I T H

G R I N D

Levi is the new kid on the block and he is eager to do anything on a skateboard. And I mean anything. There have definitely been moments when I’ve feared for his safety; but he’s pulled through every time. He shreds pretty much every secondhand board that Jake Hayes and Cody Riley dish out, and learns a few new tricks every day. Someone else’s misfortune of driving into this pole at Sydney Uni became our win. I really wanted to shoot a pole jam back Smith, and suggested the idea to Levi, which he proceeded to do perfectly five times in a row. Keep your eyes peeled for more from Levi.


SAM COADY

| 99


NEW GEN

SIMON FRAZZETTO NEW GEN

PHOTOS BY ISAAC MATZ

100 | NEW GEN

T

20 YEARS OLD // LIVES IN FITZROY NORTH, MELBOURNE

he past winter has been one of the coldest and wettest that Melbourne’s had in a while. Have you been able to skate much? Ah, man. It’s been pretty dark. It definitely feels like it’s been the worst one in a while. People still want to skate, regardless. Most of us here in Melbourne work throughout the week, and we usually still find a way to skate, even if we’re tired from work, if it’s dark out, or cold and raining. How long have you been working at Fast Times, and how did you get the job? I’d say I’ve been there for almost a year now. There’s a good bunch of people who work

there. I got the job through Jimmy Roche. He slid into my DM’s asking if I’d be keen to fill an open position they had (laughs). The Fast Times city store has its fair share of visits from tweakers and crazy characters. What weirdos have you encountered so far? Shit, I don’t even know where to start. There’s older people who want to chat for yonks about their old-school Powell Peralta boards they used to have; there’s junkies trying to rack shit; or even the bogans who come in from the ’burbs asking why we don’t have the Metal Mulisha etnies in stock. It’s all good, though. It usually brings some laughter to our day.

What’s the story behind the video on your Insta of old mate with a sheep inside the shop? That was pretty funny. That guy just decided to come into the shop with his sheep and talk some shit to us for a while. Everyone who was in the shop, including customers being served, all stopped and started staring and filming them as he was trying to get a smooch from it. The back-story is that the guy saved it from being killed out in the country and now they’re homeless, living in the Fitzroy Gardens. Oh yeah, and he also decided to call it ‘Jackie Chan the Ram’ (laughs).


Cab over the block and down at the RMIT b-ball courts.

RIDES FOR ADIDAS, HODDLE SKATEBOARDS, SPORTS CLASS APPAREL AND FAST TIMES SKATEBOARDING Classic. Do you do anything else to pay the bills, or does your job at Fast Times cover it? Nah, I just work at the shop. I’m still living at home at the moment, so it’s relatively chill. I help out with the bills and give my mum cash whenever she needs it. Without trying to make it sound like I had it super hard growing up, I didn’t come from a well-off family. Mum hasn’t been able to work for years, so I like being able to help her out with what I can. Good man. In the past month, roughly

how many New Zealand skateboarders would you estimate have moved to Melbourne? Honestly, I can’t say that I’ve come across any that have moved over in the last month. Although, if I was asked this question towards the start of the year, my answer would be quite different. Back when the plaza (Lincoln Square) was still the everyday spot, quite a few of them came over here to make the most of the last summer sessions. What do you think of the influx of the Kiwis?

Man, I back the new younger gen of migrants from NZ, hard. Hootie Andrewes, Elijah Robertson, Kerry Wharekawa and Jarrad Carlin are my fucking guys; as well as Isaac Matz, whose photography skills are going to be blowing people’s minds. I also find it funny, because some people who are from here in Melbourne don’t like that they’re coming over. I reckon that’s just because they haven’t spent much time skating and socialising with them. Some of my best mates are Kiwis who have moved here over the years, and as

long as they contribute positively to the Melbourne skateboarding scene, I don’t see why anyone should care. People migrate into skateboarding communities all over the world, so why should anyone be sour if it’s happening here, too? Well said. Where in Melbourne did you grow up, and how did you discover skateboarding? I grew up in the inner city suburb of Fitzroy North, and that’s where I still live. It’s pretty funny telling people that, because most people assume it’s all nice, expensive houses, but I grew up NEW GEN

| 101


NEW GEN

Heelflipping in Dandenong.

in the commission housing part. It isn’t the same as living in the commission high-rise flats, but there were definitely still some sketchy characters hanging around. I discovered skating when I was pretty young, just by hanging around the local kids and partaking in the stuff they did. Although, I don’t think I was all that into it until the end of primary school. It’s safe to say that your skateboarding has a ’90s influence. Who were your main inspirations growing up? Hmm, well I don’t really think my inspirations from when I was younger affect the way I like to skate now, because back then I always used to watch the ‘Poon’ crew, like Jeremy 102 | NEW GEN

Corea, Bryce Golder and Jack Kirk. They used to smash City Park hard and then sit up on the back quarter looking down at everyone else (laughs). They’re my mates now, but I feel that the reason I skate the way I do now has a lot to do with Tom Snape, Casey Foley and Geoff Campbell. Over the past few years I’ve definitely learnt a lot about trick selection and style just from observing those guys. Was it a shock to see yourself on the cover of our last issue? Yeah, 100 per cent. That shit was crazy. I remember being at the State Library skating with my mates Kerry, Isaac and Jarrad, and we left to go and skate

another spot around the corner. On the way there I just happened to check my phone and it started going nuts, with heaps of text messages from the boys and all these notifications from social media. I started tripping out. We instantly went back to the library to smash a couple of boxes of beer. It was also the first cover that Bryce Golder has shot. Did you celebrate with him when you found out? I was equally as stoked on the fact that he got his first cover. Seeing as a lot of people forget about the fact that it’s much more than the skateboarder or the trick. It’s about the way that the photographer decides to shoot the

photo, and how much effort they put in to getting it right. We ended up getting pretty buck at a bar after meeting the boys at the library. I want to once again thank Bryce for killing it on the shot, and you guys at Slam for putting me on there, as it’s not a classic cover-style photo. No, thank you. You’re on the Hoddle Skateboards program. Tell us about the brand. Hoddle was originally just a zine that Dale Van Iersel and Keegan Walker started, with T-shirts and stickers. Back then it was labelled as Hoddle Grid. For those who don’t know, the Hoddle Grid is the way Melbourne city was set out in the 1800s by a guy named Robert Hoddle.


Threading the needle for a backside nosegrind revert, Melbourne CBD.

I suppose they thought it was just a fitting name for an inner city Melbourne company. Although Dale played a large part in getting it to where it’s at now, it’s currently just Keegan running it solo, with Caeylen Norris and myself as the team riders at the moment. Being a part of a small local company is sweet. At first I was a bit unsure, but then I thought about it and realised that I’d rather help my friends start something that’s from right here in Melbourne. Why did Dale bail? Well, I’ve only spoken to him about it briefly, but from what I’ve gathered he’s doing a bunch of things at the moment and he doesn’t want to be running a

skateboard company if he’s not putting all that he can towards it. It sucks not having him fully a part of it anymore, but at the end of the day it’s his call to make. You also ride for apparel brand Sports Class. How did the company evolve? Yep, I’ve been riding for Connal Lo’s brand Sports Class for a little while now. Basically, from what I know, he had a vision to make a small run of tees, and he initially hit up Snape and Pete Solvyns to be a part of it. Snape asked me if I wanted some tees, and then Toby Locke hit up Connal because Snapey was on the team, and he was down to have us both be a part of it. Toby is basically the TM now (laughs). We’ve got a short video

that Geoff Campbell has made coming out soon, too. What are your thoughts on the heavy lark scene? Are you into the Magenta or Domingo vibe? Shit, I’m not calling anyone out, but some of that stuff is too much for me. People can skate however they like, but I’m not down to watch some dude doing one-footed powerslides with camera lights waving around all shaky and shit. It’s definitely not for me. Let’s finish up by talking about ‘The Month of Simo’. What went down? (Laughs) I don’t know if I should be explaining this as I don’t want to sound like I’m wording myself up or anything;

however, it was just over two years ago, and within a few weeks I happened to get a couple of tricks. A switch back 180 down the Cheese 20 12-stair, and a back bigspin down the Black 11. It was kind of unusual for me, as even now I think hucking your carcass down huge sets isn’t the most impressive way of skating. Actually, as Max Couling says, “Any old Butts-burg Bobby could huck down that” (laughs). Anyway, I won’t go into detail, but I also lost my virginity within that time period, so everyone got super hyped for me and started calling that month ‘The Month of Simo’ (laughs).

NEW GEN

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FOCUS Back Smith, Ryde. Photo: Walker

SAM SUTTON AGE: 15 LIVES: CENTRAL COAST, NEW SOUTH WALES RIDES FOR: ÉLAN SKATEBOARDS, GLOBE (FLOW), SLAM FACTORY

104 | FOCUS

“Sam looks and skates well beyond his years. It’s always funny to hear people offer beers for him to make a trick and then be shocked to find out that he’s only 15.” – Andy Walker

“I’m looking forward to one day spending the recess breaks of my child custody trial by rolling on down to my local skate shop, in the same skate shoes I wore to my year 10 formal, and telling the groms that I used to know Sam Sutton.” – Jae Overton


COREY GLICK RIDES FOR ESWIC

GOLIATHSKATE.COM • INFO@GOLIATHSKATE.COM • 03 9380 1799 ESWIC.COM | INSTAGRAM/TWITTER:@ESWIC | FACEBOOK.COM/ESWICCLOTHING | INFO@ESWIC.COM


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GLOBE Mark Appleyard – Mahalo SG From $119.95 globebrand.com @globebrand

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DC Evan Smith S From $99.95 dcshoes.com.au @dcshoes

106 | PRODUCT


QUASI

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PRODUCT

| 107


INTOXICA

344 PREMIERE, JUANITA PEACHES, MELBOURNE

Photos: Jason Morey

From left to right: 1) Nike SB and The 4 Skateboard Company threw a premiere party for new pros Casey Foley, Mike Martin and Harry Clark. The boys and their boards after the 344 screening 2) Harry with Chris Middlebrook and Geoff Campbell. 3) Remember Raph Rashid from Blank clothing? He’s now the owner of Juanita Peaches, and they put on a damn good spread. 4) Yeah, Geoff! Flanked by Jessica and Amy. 5) Kaloe Kaaikala, TF, Corey Leso, Max Couling and Derek Hume. 6) Tassie pride: Chris Smith and James James. 7) Leigh Bolton and Luke Gallant. 8) Harry inspects Nick Anderson. 9) Kelsey, Eugenia and Sandy. 10) Simon Frazzetto and Riley Stafford. 11) Bryce Golder with Rimi. 12) Tyke and the grom-squad drank all the soft drinks.

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS Editor and Publisher Trent Fahey trent@slamskateboarding.com Deputy Editor and Online Editor Steve Rodgie steve@slamskateboarding.com Art Director Dave Read dave@slamskateboarding.com Senior Photographers Andrew Peters Jake Darwen Andrew Mapstone Jason Morey

SILVER LINING MEDIA

Photographic Contributors Luke Thompson, Sam Coady, Wade McLaughlin, Steve Gourlay, Tessa Fox, Bryce Golder, J-hon Poellnitz, Riely Walker, Eddy Hamra, Cameron Markin, Brendan Frost, Mike O’Meally, Isaac Matz Editorial Contributors Tessa Fox, Jason Morey, Jake Darwen, Bryce Golder, J-hon Poellnitz, Riely Walker, Eddy Hamra, Andrew Peters, Cameron Markin, Brendan Frost, Mike O’Meally, Isaac Matz, Wade McLaughlin, Andrew Mapstone, Sam Coady, Luke Thompson Illustrations Andy Murphy, Pigeonboy Slam Stockists 335 Skate Supply, Beyond Skate, Boarders, Darkside, Extreme Skates, Fast Times, Grundy’s, Hemley Skateboarding, Kick E Mart, Lodown, OCD, Popsgood, Precinct, Sk8er, Skatebiz, Street Machine, The Park, UPS

Advertising Production Co-ordinator John Harland Accounts Krystal Fahey Circulation Adam Brown Digital Imaging and Photography Dave Read Digital Development Co-ordinator Sam Heavyside IT Josh Croft Sub-editing Assistance Oliver Pelling Proofreader Rachel Morgenbesser Send contributions to trent@slamskateboarding.com or post to PO Box 823, Burleigh Heads, Qld 4220. We will not hold ourselves responsible for unsolicited contributions. Slam will retain reprint rights, contributors retain all other rights for resale and republication.

Subscriptions Subscription & Merchandise Co-ordinator Kim Woodward subs@slamskateboarding.com Freecall from Australia 1800 069 918 OR go to page 26 of this issue OR visit www.slamskateboarding.com/shop Advertising Trent Fahey trent@slamskateboarding.com

Slam is published four times a year by Silver Lining Media – post: PO Box 110, Miami, Qld 4220. Views expressed by authors are not necessarily those of the publisher. Copyright is reserved, which means you can’t scan our pages and put them up on your website or anywhere else. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited. Email addresses are published for professional communications only. Australia and New Zealand distributor: Gordon & Gotch: GGA Publisher code 13653. Overseas distributor: eightpointdistribution.com.au

108 | INTOXICA


PHOTO: LUKE BROWNE

BACKSIDE NOSEBLUNT POP IN – SYDNEY

RICO SC

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J U L I U S M AY / / D V S S H O E S . C O M . AU / / @ D V S S H O E S OZ S & S DISTRIBUTORS: 0499 885 101


FINALE

Phillip Marshall, pole jam, Perth.

PHIL’S PHOTO FINISH WORDS AND PHOTO BY LUKE THOMPSON

Skating bike racks is sketchy. There’s a multitude of different ways for your board to become hooked up or your leg trapped. Initially, this setup looked as sketchy as could be. However, that was until I saw Phil have a few attempts, and then it made sense – the dude had it. He possesses some kind of extra gravitational ability to float in the air for a split second longer than what you would presume is possible. Ever since I met Phil he’s been surprising me on a skateboard. Both of the tricks he has in this issue are perfect examples of this. I’ve never doubted his skill when I hear of the tricks he has planned, but it’s sometimes hard to imagine how he’s going to pull it until you actually see him do it. It’s an honour to open and close this Photo Edition with photos of Phil.

FINALE

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MARK APPLEYARD | THE MAHALO SG

Introducing Mark Appleyard’s new signature shoe the Mahalo SG. Globe’s Shogun cupsole adds greater support and flexibility with a deep cushioning footbed for impact control.

@globebrand | GLOBEBRAND.COM | est. Australia 1994


NAME

F A K I E F L I P / P H O T O : O ’ M E A L LY

INSPIRE

INTRODUCING THE SALFORD ANCHOR EDITION A HIGH PERFORMANCE VULCANIZED SHOE F E AT U R I N G T H E L U X- L I T E CUSHIONING SYSTEM SEE ALL COLORS AT L A K A I . C O M I N S TA : @ L A K A I LT D

Slam skateboarding june july 2016  
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