Page 1

AN ITP T EC H N O LO GY P U B L I CAT I O N

AUGUST 2013

VOLUME 19 ISSUE 8

THE GREAT CABLE DEBATE: IS 40G JUST FOR DATA CENTRES? //41 CASE STUDY

EIBFS connects with IP-PBX deployment //20

//16 HEAD TO HEAD Safenet and help AG discuss hacktivism and DDoS attacks //22 COLUMN Brand-Rex talks greening your enterprise network

GREENING THE EMIRATES ETISALAT REVEALS ITS EMIRATES ENERGY STAR PROGRAMME //24

THE GREEN ISSUE

REGIONAL EXPERTS IN GREEN IT LOOK AT REGIONAL DEPLOYMENTS USING GREEN TECHNOLOGY AS WELL AS COOL NEW GREEN IT INNOVATIONS


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// CONTENTS / AUGUST 2013

Volume 19 Issue 8

August 2013

Etisalat has implemented its Emirates Energy Star Green IT programme in 79 buildings across the Emirates.

24

For us, the biggest challenge was to retrofit existing buildings in a way that allows us to retain most of the original installed systems.”

Abdulla Hashim, SVP, ICT, Etisalat

18//Interview> FIBRE IS THE FUTURE In the long term, full-scale fibre optic (FO) networks can only provide the necessary data throughput and the required transmission speed for all subscribers in a network, says R&M.

33//Green IT> INNOVATIONS IN GREEN IT Regional Green IT vendors, including Brocade and Dell discuss their latest product innovations in both hardware and software, such as Fresh Air infrastructure and SDN in the green IT sphere with Piers Ford.

36//Green IT> GOING GREEN High regional commercial energy costs and a developing ‘green’ conscience is driving a slow, but steady uptake of green IT initiatives in the Middle East.

41//Cabling> WHAT CABLING WILL SUPPORT 40GBE? Global experts discussed what cable types are most suited to 40GbE and whether this technology is data-centre centric.

// WWW.ITP.NET /

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 1


// CONTENTS / AUGUST 2013

28

Welcome

Green is great Gre

07

41 //Regulars> 04// INFOGRAPHIC

20// CASE STUDY

Why are enterprises choosing desktop virtualisation?

Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies rolls out Panasonic IP-PBX to enhance its communications.

07// REGIONAL UPDATE The third world may win the mobility race, shrink your data centre white space, plus more exciting network news.

28// BUILD GREEN How to build a green data centre in the region and how it benefits the enterprise.

14// SECURITY WATCH Data loss is an insider threat says Natalya Kaspersky, security and compliance in the cloud and more fresh security news.

44// GE STANDARDS Asef Baddar of Leviton discusses uptake of 40 & 100 GE

45// PRODUCTS 16// HEAD TO HEAD

AccessData SSL Locksmith.

help AG and SafeNet go head to head on hacktivism and the severity of DDoS attacks.

46// TRAINING NEWS An in-depth look at the MCITP: EA Training course.

17// COMMENT Fortinet, R&M, du and BrandRex discuss network trends. // 2 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Green IT, or more precisely the reduction in energy costs in the enterprise data centre is a growing regional trend due to very high commercial electricity prices, particularly in the UAE. However, green IT is not just about reducing your energy costs and it has been exciting delving into the innovations in green IT and the green supply chain for this issue. Dell displayed some innovative problem solving after Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when one of its customers found that all of its servers were full of water. Instead of advising the customer to throw the servers away and start again, technicians’ descended on the servers bearing sacks of rice. The servers were taken apart and filled with rice for a few days, the rice was then removed and the servers started up as normal. An innovative, green and organic way of fixing waterlogged servers. Many IT companies are beginning to implement the green ethos all the way down their supply chain, particularly in global companies with a local presence.

Some company top-management have to now stay in hotels with green ratings on business trips and companies such as R&M, headquartered in Switzerland is using geothermal energy to power its headquarters, named the Cube. The same geothermal principal was recently used in a regional speed camera installation, where the speed cameras are powered by both geothermal energy and solar power. It is great to see how green practices in IT are beginning to gain a foothold in the UAE. This country has one of the highest carbon footprints per capita in the world, it is high time enterprises began looking at a way to reduce this. Georgina Enzer Editor georgina.enzer @itp.com

48// LAST WORD Samer Ismair from Brocade. // WWW.ITP.NET /


// INFOGRAPHIC / DESKTOP VIRTUALISATION

Virtualise your desktops Why are customers choosing desktop virtualisation?

R

ecent trends toward consolidation, including server and storage virtualisation, are often driven by operational and financial considerations to return to fewer servers with higher utilisation, simplified disaster recovery operations, and common platforms, according to application acceleration specialist Riverbed. The next logical step in the cycle might be a return to true thin clients, embodied presently as a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI). This continues the effort to reduce the dependence on heavy, distributed physical components, in favour of the light-weight portability of virtual desktop services in branch offices. Desktop virtualisation customers are seeking to reduce support and maintenance costs, simplify management, replace traditional PC hardware, and increase security and resilience. The benefits of desktop virtualisation may be elusive if end user productivity suffers from the performance limitations of the new architecture, particularly the capability of the WAN to deliver the entire desktop platform, user profiles, applications, and data to clients. WAN optimisation addresses the root causes of performance problems. One of the top concerns when considering VDI solutions is the impact it will have on the end users and their productivity. The desire is that employees will be able to seamlessly adjust to virtual desktops and enjoy applications that respond quickly, allowing them to do their jobs without delay. However if the WAN has too little bandwidth or too high latency to smoothly deliver virtual services, branch office users might suffer and even protest. If customers want true desktop virtualisation success, they would be well advised to evaluate WAN optimisation solutions as a way to conquer many of the challenges and constraints of their network infrastructure. // 4 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Some organisations devote more than 24 hours per device to annual ongoing management WAN OPTIMISATION IMPROVES:

• • • • • •

Application response time and performance Reduced network operating expense requirements Data protection and disaster recovery Simplified OS and software deployments and upgrades Improved security and compliance Enable offline desktop operations

DESKTOP VIRTUALISATION AS BENEFITS TO CUSTOMERS:

• • • •

Simplified and standardised desktop support Greater consistency and control Better security and compliance Reduced support costs

LIMITATIONS OF BANDWIDTH AND NETWORK LATENCY ARE DOUBLY CHALLENGED BY

1

The increased distance between users and servers

2

The increased dependence on the remote virtualisation technology servers

REMOTE OFFICE SIMPLIFICATION

OBJECTIVES

CHALLENGES

REDUCE REDUNDANCY, CONSERVE ENERGY AND REAL ESTATE

CERTAIN FUNCTIONS EG. PRINT SERVER NEEDS TO REMAIN AT THE BRANCHES

REMOVE BRANCH INFRASTRUCTURE COMPLEXITY CENTRALISE APPLICATION SERVERS

CERTAIN APPS DON’T WORK WELL OVER WAN VDI IS SLOW OVER WAN // WWW.ITP.NET /


// INFOGRAPHIC / DESKTOP VIRTUALISATION

HOW WOULD YOU RANK THE FOLLOWING POTENTIAL HURDLES TO VDI ADOPTIONS? Source: Freeform Dynamic mics mic

Cost of acquiring/implementing solutions More pressing priorities for use of IT resource/budget Storage infrastructure stress/upgrade cost Lack of need/business case User resistance to losing local desktop Server infrastructure stress/upgrade cost Concerns about user experience Network infrastructure stress/upgrade cost Maturity of solutions Concerns about managemnt tools/process related issues Skills and experience related issues

32%

4

3

2

OF IT ORGANISATIONS SPEND OVER 12 HOURS PER CLIENT DEVICE PER YEAR DOING MAINTENANCE TASKS

1 (no issue)

0%

20%

40%

41%

OF PLANNED VDI ADOPTERS HAVE CONCERNS WITH ‘INCREASED NETWORK BANDWIDTH REQUIREMENTS’

Source Sou rce:: Citr C itrix

1 2

Higher security for data

3

Improved/less complex user experience

4

Increased uniform performance

5

Increased mobility from/thru many devices

// WWW.ITP.NET /

100%

38%

HAVE WORRIES ABOUT ‘POOR PERFORMANCE [APPLICATION RESPONSE TIME]’ HOLDING THEM BACK

Source Sou rce:: C itr i ix

Lower cost of ownership over current desktop management

Easier regulatory compliance

80%

VIRTUALISATION PROJECT FURTHEST ALONG

RANKED REQUIREMENT IMPORTANCE FOR ADOPTION OF VDI

6

60%

15% 6%

56%

23% Server

Application

Desktop

Other

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 5

Source c e : Rive R rbee d Tech nology l og gy, C itr g it ix, Freeform Dy Dynam namics ics..

5 (major blocker)


COMMSMEA AWARDS 2013

Wednesday 4th December 2013, Dubai

MOST

THE CELEBRATED

EVENT FOR THE MIDDLE EAST

TELECOMS INDUSTRY Nomination Deadline : Thursday 3rd October The 8th annual Comms MEA Awards will celebrate the telecoms industry professionals and operators that have shown outstanding performance and results across key market segments in the past 12 months. To nominate your company’s achievements, please visit www.commsmea.com/awards or contact one of our team for more information

For sponsorship enquiries please contact: Philip Sims Sales Manager T: +971 4 444 3233 M: +971 55 308 6066 E: philip.sims@itp.com

George Hojeige Sales Director T: +971 4 444 3203 M: +971 50 502 5532 E: george.hojeige@itp.com

For nomination enquiries please contact:

For table booking and other information please contact:

Roger Field Editor T: +971 4 444 3419 E: roger.field@itp.com

Daniel Fewtrell Head of Marketing T: +971 4 444 3684 E: daniel.fewtrell@itp.com Category Sponsor

w w w.c o m m s m e a .c o m / a w a r d s


// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

INSIDE… 08 High density data centres are best 09 Cloud and your intellectual property rights 10 The use of flash memory and cloud storage is growing 12 A Day in the Life of Thierry Chamayou from Schneider Electric 12 Plan carefully for disasters 13 How to deploy your software defined network

For all the latest network news from the Middle East and Africa, visit www.itp.net/news-and-features/networks

//Regional_Update The mobile world race

Developing economies will gain an edge over the legacy burdened first world The mobile centric IT model will define the whole client computing world for the next 10 to 20 years, with the developing countries gaining an edge over the legacy network burdened developed world, according to David Clearly, VP & Gartner Fellow at Gartner Research. “We are going to see a first world/ third world split, but it is not that the third world can’t access the mobile ecosystem. Some of the very high bandwidth applications may be more difficult to access in the third world, but the shift to the mobile centric world is happening faster in developing countries,” said Clearly. According to Ericsson, in the first quarter of 2013, eight million net mobile subscriptions were added in the Middle East, and this figure is only set to exponentially increase. “Seven-hundred million mobile subscriptions are to be added in the Middle East and Africa by the end of 2018. This major transformation in the ICT industry is being accompanied by a demand for high volumes of data transfer. End-users are now expecting HD on their smartphones,” said Anders Lindblad, president Ericsson Middle East Region. However, there will be the issue of raw bandwidth in very heavy consumption applications such as video, big data and personal cloud applications, so there will be some mobility areas where the // WWW.ITP.NET /

developed world will have better infrastructure and advanced capabilities “First world countries are dealing with a lot of legacy issues and the third world will come up with innovative low cost options to deliver this. The need for companies to deliver both of these worlds will drive mobility innovations,” said Clearly. The mobile application model is also shifting and applications five years from now will look nothing like applications do today, according to Gartner. More simple, targeted, focused applications in the mobile world will start to be the standard model.

Anders Lindblad from Ericsson says by 2018 700m mobile subscribers will be added to the MEA region.

TOTAL AFRICAN MOBILE CONNECTIONS 1000m

Source: The Royce Funds 100%

Connections (Millions) Penetration (%)

800m

80%

600m

+3

0%

GR CA

60%

400m

40%

200m

20%

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 7


// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

High density data centres are best

Ciaran Forde says that the capacity of a data centre is based on the size of the computer room space.

Building a modular data centre, or a high density data centre are the best approaches to reduce the spiraling enterprise energy costs and maintain power usage effectiveness (PUE), according to Ciarán Forde, vice president, Enterprise Sales, Middle East and Africa at data centre specialist CommScope. According to CommScope, enterprise IT managers and facilities management are often challenged to fit more computing equipment into less space in the data centre. The current popular design strategy is to balance lower capital and operation cost with high availability and efficiency within the data centre. “In the enterprise, through virtualisation technology and effective design we are seeing some data centres being able to better use the available white space by as much as 75%, by adopting a // 8 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

high density server usage approach versus low to medium density,” said Forde. The capacity of a data centre is based on the size of the computer room space (floor space available for IT and telecommunications equipment), and the capacity of the IT, power and cooling systems per unit of computer room floor space. High-density data centres have a higher capacity of power and or cooling per unit of computer room floor space. This allows for a higher density of server, switching and storage in the data centre space. A balance between space and capacity needs to be determined at the outset when designing a new data centre and when modifying an existing data centre space, according to CommScope. This space vs capacity balance will depend on the type of IT and telecommunications systems the data centre is going to support and the number or combination of those systems which are to be placed within each cabinet or rack within the data centre. “Building new data centre objectives have to majorly contribute to improving revenues in the enterprise, and reduce expenses for the business, for example building co-location data centres will have different drivers than building in house data centre for the enterprises,” said Forde. Previous reports from IT research company Forrester illustrates the upward trend in server consolidation achieved through virtualisation. It also illustrates that there are three main reasons for consolidating servers, these are; cutting hardware costs, improving business continuity and disaster recovery strategies and capabilities and significantly reclaiming the data centre floor space there by increasing both the data centre density and efficiency.

According to Angel Porras, if any government wants to access corporate data, they can and they will.

QUOTED

“Encrypting data — whether it’s in the data centre, a private cloud, or a public cloud — is a proven way to keep data safe even when the perimeter is breached.” Dave Hansen, CEO, SafeNet // WWW.ITP.NET /


// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

UAE IP rules protect cloud data One of the top worries for regional CIOs is what happens to their data when it is in the public cloud, who can gain access to that data and what happens if that data is moved between public cloud providers, according to Angel Porras EMEA vice president Cloud Networking at Citrix. “Generally speaking imparting data to a cloud provider is all about intellectual property [IP], whether it is sitting on premise or sitting on the cloud. As far as laws are concerned, the same intellectual property laws that apply to a corporate apply to the cloud as well. Given that both the telcos in the UAE are regulated by the TRA, I think the legal framework exists, it is just the fact we need to build

30°C

that confidence in businesses and consumers to trust those IP laws,” said Porras. Over the last 12 to 14 years the UAE has led in intellectual property laws in the region, and public cloud security companies are protecting IP whether it is in the cloud space, corporate data, or a bit of both, according to Citrix. “I think the concerns around security or laws around cloud business providers is more around building trust and changing the behaviour and expectations of the end-users and I don’t think it is a big challenge in most of the region,” Porras said. According to Porras, if any government wants to access corporate data, they can and they will.

The temperature that new data centre equipment can operate at, thereby reducing data centre energy costs to the enterprise. Read more on page 30

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Fits within any standard LC adapter opening or LC SFP module

Only design with a rotating latch that simplifies polarity changes.

“For greater operational efficiency, firms should look at DDoS solutions that offer advanced virtualisation and geolocation features.”

“Have we crossed the chasm with repect to virtualisation adoption? Yes, but there are still some laggards who need to catch up.”

Bashar Bashaireh, regional director, Fortinet

George DeBono, general manager Middle East, Turkey & Africa, Red Hat

// WWW.ITP.NET /

The push-pull design enables easy access and removal via the boot in tight-fitting areas

W W W

.

S I E M O N

.

C O M

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 9


// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

DATASTREAM

1 bn

Smartphones are predicted to be sold globally in 2013, a 32.7% growth on global smartphone sales in 2012 Source: Lenovo

14,000

New Android malware applications detected by McAfee Q1 2013, malicious spyware prominently on the rise Source: McAfee

62%

The current percentage of smartphone penetration in the UAE Source: Lenovo

65%

Of IT experts in the GCC region believe that the region is now a prime target for cyber criminals Source: GBM

The flash flood

Tim Stammers, senior analyst at Ovum says that flash memory will significantly change the storage industry The two biggest trends in storage at present are the use of flash memory in the data centre and public cloud storage, according to Tim Stammers, senior analyst at Ovum. Public cloud storage will take a long time to be adopted, but it will significantly change the face of the storage industry; flash memory will also significantly change the face of the storage industry at a very detailed level. Storage is very much a technical plumbing subject and flash is going to change the way storage systems are put together, said Stammers. “Flash is a blessing for IT, because it is solving the growing challenges created by the performance limitations of disk storage. A common misconception is that flash storage is expensive, and only suits exotic, high performance applications. The reality is that flash is already boosting performance and reducing costs in a range of other settings, including but not limited to mainstream database and frontoffice applications, Microsoft Exchange, and server and desktop virtualisation,” he said. According to Ovum, one of the most important parameters for flash is dollars-pergigabyte capacity, and there it is much more expensive than disk, but in dollars-per-datathroughput-speed (IOPS) flash is about 40 times cheaper than disk in terms of dollars per IOPS, meaning that companies are likely to start investing more into flash storage.

According to Ovum, flash storage is cheaper than traditional storage in dollars-per-data-throughput-speed (IOPS).

KEY MESSAGES OF FLASH • Flash usage will grow rapidly • Flash technology is very different to disk, and is still developing • Deployment choices demand new thinking from IT • Buyers are spoilt for choice in deployment options • Treat benchmark performance claims with even more care than usual • Flash life can be long, but is complex

NEWS IN BRIEF Cloud adoption low Gartner estimates that there are currently about 50 million enterprise users of cloud office systems, only 8% of overall office system users. Gartner predicts a shift toward cloud office systems by 2015.

Nicky Sheridan, SVP – Middle East, Africa & Turkey, Software AG.

// 10 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Software AG to acquire Apama Software AG has executed an agreement with Progress Software to acquire Apama, the market leading platform for Complex Event Processing and CEPpowered solutions.

Dell introduces PowerEdge VRTX PowerEdge VRTX is a converged IT solution designed specifically for remote and small office environments, with enterprise-class capabilities in a deskside, space-saving coverged design.

Correction In the July issue of NME, in the company profile for Gartner, we referred to Simon Field as area vice president. Mr Field is actually the executive partner. NME would like to apologise for any confusion.

// WWW.ITP.NET /


Cloud Concerns Security holding back local cloud computing adoption www.commsmea.com

Building and delivering IT solutions for the Middle East

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Project Managers Rising demand for IT project professionals

Plus

52

CIO EXCLUSIVE: GLOBAL CIO TALKS DELL ON DELL

Rashid Abdulla, Batelco

p18

40

PLUS

Hosting Growth VoiceTrust looks to hosting for local ops

Arab Technology Awards recognise leaders in regional IT sector

Governing Progress Performance solutions for government manage strategic initiatives

24

OFFICE SOLUTIONS IONS W ER EVOLVING POWER VIT Y OF PRODUCTIVITY

E WINNERS WIN WI THE Find out who o ea earned arne ed recognition recog gnittio on at the CommsMEA Awards

58

An ITP P Tech Technology h nology Pu Publication u blication

January 2013 | Volume 26 Issue 1

Vol. 11 Issue. 01

P36

INTEL CEO TO RESIGN

FROM ATM TO IP/ ETHERNET:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want a data centre facility immediately; they want to be able to move quickly.â&#x20AC;?

COMMENT

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P10

DATA CCENTRE ENTR TRENDS FOR DS FO OR 2013

Acer is on on a m mission iss to ramp up its businnesss in tthe h MEA region (24) business

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The latest telecom deal trends ds in the MEA region p20

CTO INTERVIEW

We see telecom operators approaching M&A with a greater degree of caution and at a slower pace today.â&#x20AC;?

Qtel Groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CTO talks LTE, upgrades and tech challenges p38

Plus

Federico Membrillera, Delta Partners

p20

GROWTH OW T FACTOR TOR OR

FEBRUARY 2013 VOLUME 19 ISSUE 2

ANALYSIS OPINION RESEARCH PRODUCTS CLINIC

New investment looks okss sset ett to prop propel pel Renna Mobile beyond nd Oman Oma an

Building Bu ui and delivering IT solutions for the Middle East

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END OF LIFE IFE

What to do with old, obsolete bssole ete o orr br broken rok ken ddle e Ea ast reg gio on IT equipment in the Middle East region

CLOUD PROVISIONING AND MONITORING: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW P28

CHANNEL MIDDLE EAST

AN ITP T E C H N O LO G Y P U B L I C AT I O N

MARCH 2013 VOLUME 19 ISSUE 3

LENOVO CEO VOWS TO KEEP COMPANY ON TOP BROCADE RESHUFFLES CHANNEL TEAM MITSUMI SIGNS AS WD DISTIE ALFALAK TO DISTRIBUTE IXIA EMPA, SUPERMICRO PARTNER

12

COMMENT: PERFORMANCE HUNGRY APPLICATIONS THAT SLOW YOUR NETWORK DOWN

MARKET RK KET M MOVERS Honouring women executives xeccuttivess drivingg ma marketing arkkett strategies in the IT channel (26)

INTEGRATED PRINTING SYSTEMS CREATING PARTNER OPPORTUNITIES 34

45

PLUS PC Market Remains Flat IDC says Q4 shipments highlight challenges P41

Apple Working On Sub-Prime iPhone Troubled iMaker focuses on smaller, cheaper handsets

Oracle Chief Warns ME Mark Hurd cautions business leaders not to ignore social media explosion P17

Networking players reveal hhow ow the they ey are he SMB SMB B space (4 40) helping resellers to win in th the (40)

Bu Building uilding g and delivering IT solutions for the Middle East

P24

NAJMUL HUSSAIN P20

COMBATING THE DATA FLOOD: COMPANIES MUST START TREATING THEIR DATA AS AN ASSET

P14

THINKK SMART RT

P40

Dubai World Central and Smartworld artw world have ave inst iinstalled alle ed om mv en ndor network k the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first multi telecom vendor

BUILDING AND DELIVERING IT SOLUTIONS FOR THE MIDDLE EAST

COMMENT: DEALING WITH TARGETED ATTACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TIME TO LOOK INSIDE THE NETWORK

CHRIS MOORE JOINS BLUE COAT WESTCONME WINS JABRA AWARD VORMETRIC APPOINTS STARLINK OPTIMUS EXPANDS DATA CENTRE ARRAY SOPHO SIGNS COMPUTERLINKS

We would like to give every business and every resident the ability to choose the telecom provider he wants. â&#x20AC;?

30

End user

VIDEO ON D DEMAND EMAND D RESELLERS RSS BRACE BRACEE FOR CHALLENGES LLENGES 28

TALKING TACTICS Trigon LLC outlines its game plan for the Middle East (34)

An IITP TP Technology Tee chnologg y Publication

Project Round Up New deals and ICT project deliveries from around the Middle East Mobile data Deploying advanced usage models to enable data mobility and BYOD

The T he eA Ankabut n network delivers co onnectiv nectiviity and and advanced technology to connectivity drive tthe he e UAEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s UA knowledge economy

March 2013 | Volume 26 Issue 3

46

MARCH 2013

Windows 8 Does Microsoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new OS create security risks? Critical analysis for telecommunications executives exe ecu utivess

Aligning Alignin ng bu business usiine e and IT strategies in the Middle East for 28 years

CRM EVOLVES NEW CAPABILITIES IN CUSTOMER MANAGEMENT

Security lorrmipa ip pa all Adding physical msiip solutions loremsip

38

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PLUS

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INDUSTRY REVIEW: VIIEW W: GGLOBAL LOBALL ITT LEADERS LE MAKING THE HEADLINES

Data centre virtualisation creates platform for growth for Hellmann 40

p4//EXPANSION Etisalat seeks loan for Maroc Telecom bid p11//OPERATIONS Review clears MTN of corruption charge p14//FINANCE Airtel Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s losses rise in last quarter

52

Siddiqui Altaf, IT manager, Middle Eastern Region for Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, on data centre virtualisation

End user

STORAGE SURGE

Fahem Al Nuaimi, CEO of Ankabut, discusses connecting the UAEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic sector and creating collaboration culture.

58

PLUS

Project Round Up New deals and ICT project deliveries from around the region Cyber Attacks Hacking tactics adapting more quickly says Sophos Project Round Up New deals and ICT project deliveries from around the region

FUTURE ROADMAP IT ANALYSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2013 PREDICTIONS

FOCUS WHY THE TIME IS RIGHT FOR LTE DEPLOYMENTS CLINIC TELCOS LOOK TO THE CLOUD FOR NEW REVENUE STREAMS

BLACKBERRYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUMPY ROAD BACK BlackBerry needs to wrest control of the market from Apple and Google.P17

KS Parag, MD, FVC

NEWS. VIEWS. INSIGHTS.

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COUNTRY FOCUS

Saudi Arabia retains much potential, but challenges persist //p30 Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a quiet behind the scenes kind of company. A lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know us as weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re often branded as other things but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne with us.â&#x20AC;? ANDREW SUKAWATY, INMARSAT//p35

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DATA PROTECTION ENCRYPTION IS KEY TO KEEPING DATA SAFE

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PC MARKETS SLUMP IN Q3

Aligning A liggnin ng businesss aand nd d IT T strategies sttr in the Middle East for 28 years

Security Managing integrated solutions

GOING VIRTUAL Guiding customers through a maze of choices with VDI

PARTNER UP Channel experts on developing comprehensive partner programmes

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A LOOK AT EVENTS THAT SHAPED PEED THE MARKET IN 2012 (36)

WINNING ING WITH S SMB MBS

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Amin Mortazavi, VP, Acer MEA

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COMPANIES TO WATCH

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the most basic of terms, air cooling works by pumping air through the facility and over the IT equipment.â&#x20AC;?

SMB STORAGE SOLUTIONS OFFERING SOLID MARGINS (42)

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CRM EVOLVES NEW CAPABILITIES IN CUSTOMER MANAGEMENT

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Windows 8 Does Microsoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new OS create security risks?

Aligningg bus business sin nesss and IT strategies in the Middle East for 28 years

A NECESSITY, NOT A LUXURY

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Dr Jassim Haji, director of information technology for Gulf Air, talks about the beneďŹ ts of the airlineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private cloud

Vol. 10 Issue. 12

IDC expects less growth in 2012 P41

Outsourcing Managing service providers

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xeecuttives dri ivingg m a Honouring womenn eexecutives driving marketing strategies in the IT channel (26)

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MARKET RKETT MOVERS

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// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

Plan carefully for disasters The most appropriate disaster recovery and business continuity plan depends on the business’s cost-versus-benefit strategy, according to Yasser Zeineldin, CEO eHosting DataFort. “Hot sites are more expensive than cold sites, since much of the equipment the company needs has already been purchased and thus the operational costs are higher. However, if the same organisation loses a substantial amount of revenue for each day they are inactive, then it might be worth the cost,” he said. A hot site is a duplicate of the original site of the organisation, with full computer systems as well as near-complete backups of user data.

A day in the life of…

Thierry Chamayou Business Development director, IT BU Schneider Electric MEA

Yasser Zeineldin from e-Hosting DataFort says that hot sites can be used for operations prior to a disaster.

“Another advantage of a hot site is that it can be used for operations prior to a disaster happening. Perceptions of the acceptability of disruption might be mod-

ified by the cost of establishing and maintaining appropriate business or technical recovery solutions,” said Zeineldin. There is a consensus across the industry that the best solution is one which avoids the ‘single point of failure element’, identified by Hussein Moghnieh, channel manager at IT management software specialist CA Technologies MENA, as a key consideration. “The main aspect to take into consideration when looking for a DR/BC plan is to understand the needs and objectives that have to be met by it, and putting it down with clear bullet points and flowcharts before looking for a solution to meet those objectives,” he said.

MORNING

AFTERNOON

EVENING

7.00AM Wake up and start the day with some light warm-up exercise and a swim at home.

1.00PM The two hour French lunch break is a myth for me! However, I ensure my lunch break lasts for 30 - 45 minutes. Despite my best efforts to steer clear of business, we end up talking about how we can do more.

6.00PM Wrapping up my work at the office, I head straight to an awards ceremony in the evening where we were nominated for our seventh win for this year!

8.30AM I hit the office and go into a catch up meeting with the regional team. I look through my mails to follow up on the initial scan on my handheld during breakfast. 10.00AM Followed another catch up session with my regional team to review updates and progress on issues. Spend rest of morning preparing for afternoon meetings.

// 12 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

2.00PM We had a regional call during which each country presented business highlights, potential opportunities and growth avenues. 3.00PM We conducted business review calls with African country units.

10.00PM The banquet over, I left the venue to pick up a bouquet of fresh flowers for my lovely wife who is an integral part of my career and success. The flowers were to make up for staying away from home in the evening. My wife is a true ‘Cordon Bleu’, I would never miss dinner with her.

SCHNEIDER LAUNCHES APC NETSHELTER SV Schneider Electric has introduced APC NetShelter SV, designed to be an affordable rack solution offered in multiple heights, widths and depths to meet the challenges businesses face in IT environments. The NetShelter SV is optimised for basic enclosure applications such as small and medium business IT needs and for co-location cage environments.

// WWW.ITP.NET /


// UPDATE / AUGUST 2013

How to deploy your SDN effectively

DATASTREAM

413m

a switch-based model is common, said Joe Skorupa, VP and distinguished analyst at Gartner, although the biggest limitation to this approach is that it currently does not leverage existing L2/3 network equipment. When rapid deployment over an existing IP network, or when responsibility for the SDN environment is assigned to the server virtualisation team, a tunnel-based overlay approach may be appropriate. With this approach the SDN endpoints are virtual devices that are part of the hypervisor environment. “The greatest limitations of this approach are that it does not address the overhead of managing the underlying infrastructure, debugging problems in an overlay can be complex and it does not support bare metal hosts,” said Skorupa. The third approach combines the first two into a hybrid deployment. This allows a nondisruptive migration with a path toward an eventual switch-based design. Gateways link devices that do not natively support overlay tunnels, such as bare metal servers.

Gartner says that hybrid software defined networking deployments allow for non-disruptive migration.

Organisations need to carefully consider which deployment model to adopt when rolling out software defined networks, according to Gartner. Currently three deployment models for SDN are available; switched-based, overlay and hybrid. For greenfield deployments, particularly when the cost of physical infrastructure and multi-vendor options are important,

The total forecast number of internet users in the Middle East and Africa regions by 2017 Source: Cisco

30%

The percentage increase of social networking activity in the Middle East region during the holy month of Ramadan Source: The Online Project

2018

The year that 40G uplink speeds are forecast to be a requirement for server interfaces Source: CommSco

VOX POP IF 1 EQ UALS “ IT K EEPS M E AWAK E AT N IG HT” AN D 10 EQ UALS “ DO N ’T CAR E”...

Is green IT important for your company? “It is very important to reduce the carbon footprint and improve Data Centre efficiency.” Ganesh Bhat eHDF

““DSO is committed to reduce its carbon footprint with innovation & best practice.” Ghanim Al Falasi Dubai Silicon Oasis // WWW.ITP.NET /

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“Committed to environmental stewardship, we help customers operate safely and efficiently.” Maurizio Rovaglio, Invensys

“We make energy intensive data centres energy efficient.” Olivier Delepine VP, Gulf, IT Business, Schneider Electric // AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 13


// UPDATE / SECURITY

NEWS JUST IN… AccessData has released its forensic toolkit, FTK 5, which is designed to bring speed, analytics and enterprise-class scalability to investigations.

Blue Coat Systems has unveiled its Business Assurance Technology vision, a new security approach to securely empower businesses.

Fortinet says a multi-layer strategy is crucial in DDoS protection and involves dedicated on-premise solutions designed to defend and mitigate threats.

Sourcefire has announced enhancements to its Firepower security platform, including its 7000 and 8000 series appliances, NGIPS and NGFW.

For further info on the above stories, plus all the latest security news, visit www.itp.net/news-and-features/security

//Security_Report DATASTREAM

$19.2bn Worldwide security software revenue in 2012, a 7.9% increase from 2011 revenue Source: Gartner

36%

Of companies express serious concern about the growing number of mobile clients and uncontrolled devices Source: Kaspersky

45%

Of respondents to a GBM survey from GCC companies had a security incident in the past year Source: GBM

25%

Of respondents said their organisations have not been conducting regular proactive securityscreenings Source: GBM

How to easily steal company data Natalya Kaspersky says theft is easiest from the inside If an outsider wants to break into an enterprise to steal data, they very often use insiders because it is much easier and quicker then having to develop a hacking program, according to Natalya Kaspersky CEO of data loss prevention expert InfoWatch. “If you know whom you can connect to and ask for the data then it is unfortunately very difficult to prevent,” she said. According to InfoWatch, data loss prevention software is a good start for companies to use to prevent some degree of insider theft of data. However, Kaspersky said that if someone really wants the data there is not really any way of stopping it, for example an insider can take a photo of the computer screen with their mobile phone and there is no way to stop that kind of leakage. “Data loss prevention software is better than nothing at all, but it does not give a guarantee. But, what we can do is analyse people’s behaviour and how they use information. For example if a bookkeeper who mostly writes financial applications and connects to the finance department, suddenly starts to contact the research and development team a lot, exchanging huge amounts of documents, then they can be flagged and the people involved can be monitored,” said Kaspersky. “It is much easier to address 1% of the company rather than the whole company.”

// 14 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

TOP TEN...

Tips to prevent data loss 1. Audit data access 2. Inventory permissions and group memberships 3. Prioritise at risk data 4. Remove global access groups and revoke broad access rights 5. Identify data owners 6. Perform entitlement reviews 7. Align security groups with your data 8. Audit permissions and group membership changes 9. Lock down, delete or archive stale data 10. Clean up stale groups and access control lists Source: Varonis Systems

// WWW.ITP.NET /


// UPDATE / SECURITY

Dave Hansen from SafeNet says that compliance requirements in the cloud cannot be ignored

Enterprises face an overwhelming and growing array of compliance mandates that regulate the management and protection of sensitive data. With numerous laws, GLOBAL BOTNET WATCH

Source: Trend Micro

1500

Command and Control servers active from 14th July to 28th July

// WWW.ITP.NET /

10%

SPAM ZOMBIES 60%

40%

20%

MALICIOUS CODE SOURCES

750

30%

375 07/16

07/18

07/20

07/22

07/24

07/26

20%

10%

450k

Egypt KSA Pakistan UAE Iran Jordan Qatar Kuwait Oman Yemen

Botnet connections active from 14th July to 28th July

20%

1125

600k

5.8m

30%

300k 150k 07/16

07/18

07/20

07/22

07/24

07/26

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 15

Source: Symantec

2299

PHISHING HOSTS

Iran UAE KSA Pakistan Egypt Kuwait Palestine Lebanon Jordan Bahrain

regulations, and industry-specific requirements from diverse sources, becoming compliant can be a costly burden for organisations according to Dave Hansen, CEO, of security expert SafeNet. “Though restrictive, regulatory requirements cannot be ignored, as the ramifications of inaction can have sweeping effects to a company’s finances, and to their reputation. Organisations must consider all of the damage that can be done to their business if sensitive data is compromised — loss of sales and customer confidence, negative publicity, stock devaluation, and civil and criminal penalties,” said Hansen. “The challenge is to translate a myriad of high-level requirements into actionable and measurable controls without deploying disparate, multi-vendor point solutions, which create limited ‘islands’ of security that result in increased cost and complexity of data security.”

Middle East threat sources

KSA Iran Pakistan UAE Kuwait Egypt Palestine Lebanon Iraq Afghanistan

The headache of cloud compliance

TOP TEN…


// HEAD TO HEAD / DDOS AND HACKTIVISM

//Head_to_head IT experts Safenet and help AG go head-to-head on DDoS and regional hacktivism

Miguel Braojos

Nicolai Solling

Vice president of sales Southern EMEA, Safenet

Director of Technology Services, help AG

Are DDoS attacks just an embarrassment for entities, or do you think they do real damage to a business? Besides the obvious embarrassment of the enterprise that has suffered a DDoS attack, the damage to the business can be long-term, especially when it comes to the reputation of the company. It is not always easy to regain the trust of the clients or stakeholders, as the company would appear vulnerable and easy prey.

Although damage to reputation is the motivation behind most of the attacks in the region, the impact of a successful DDoS attack extends beyond this. Disruption of service, damage to reputation, regulatory and compliance issues, and potential damage to equipment are all potential implications of DDoS.

What motivates DDoS attackers? One of the main reasons in the good old days of vintage hacking was the reputation of the hacker, who typically targeted high-proďŹ le entities. Things arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that simple anymore. Hacking is big business and attacks can be complex and well-planned with a commercial objective or reward.

Recent attacks have been executed to draw attention to political or ideological causes. This is the prime motivation behind DDoS attacks, a fact that is corroborated by a report from Arbor Networks. The report found two-thirds of DDoS attacks globally were motivated by politics, ideology, nihilism or vandalism.

What is your opinion of hacktivism? Hacktivism is controversial and the lines are blurred, as it can be used for supporting valid causes such as protests against a company that employs child labour, as well as for illegal, unethical attacks. It is not an activity that is usually tolerated or encouraged as there are far more acceptable ways to generate awareness.

Because of the political turmoil in the region, hacktivism is rampant. With hactivism being the motivation behind DDoS attacks, predicting which organisation will next fall victim is now quite a daunting challenge. It is no longer what a company does that makes it a target for attackers.

Next month: The importance of securing your wireless access points If you want to take part in the discussion, please e-mail: georgina.enzer@itp.com // 16 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

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// COMMENT / BASHAR BASHAIREH

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Bashar Bashaireh

Staying clear of DDoS Starting out as simple denial of service assaults launched from a single computer, DDoS attacks have evolved — with the proliferation of botnets — into one of the biggest threats on the security landscape. Verizon in its 2012 Data Breach Investigations Report called these attacks ‘more frightening than other threats, whether real or imagined’.

In addition to lost revenue due to downtime, firms have to endure costs related to IT analysis and recovery, loss of worker output, financial penalties from broken service level agreements, and reputation damage to the brand.” Bashar Bashaireh, regional director, Fortinet Middle East

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Research firm Stratecast in a recent study also found that DDoS attacks are increasing by 20% to 45% annually, with applicationbased DDoS attacks in particular growing by triple digits. Stratecast added that attacking via DDoS is one of the most prominent tools used by the hacker community, often as part of a multitechnique attack strategy. Most recently, researchers have found that DDoS attacks are growing not just in terms of frequency, but in terms of bandwidth and duration as well. A decade ago, for instance, 50Gbps attacks were seen a couple of times a year perhaps. Now, such attacks can happen nearly every week. Attacks are also getting smarter because they are now more controlled. Rather than launching a scripted flood of data, attackers start

an operation and then can adapt the type of attack or adapt the target depending on the desired result. DDos attacks will continue to proliferate as more enterprises allow mobile devices onto their network. Fortinet’s own threat research group FortiGuard Labs has also found that mobile botnets like Zitmo have many of the same features and functionality of traditional PC botnets. FortiGuard Labs is actually predicting that in 2013, new forms of denial of service attacks, that will leverage both PC and mobile devices simultaneously, will surface, and they come at tremendous cost. In addition to lost revenue due to downtime, firms have to endure costs related to IT analysis and recovery, loss of worker output, financial penalties from broken service level

agreements, and reputation damage to the brand. The evolution of DDoS attacks highlights the urgency with which enterprises must adopt a security strategy to defend themselves. There are proactive steps organisations can take to bolster defences and reduce the risk of attack. Instead of aiming for the complete removal of all DDoS traffic, an enterprise DDoS strategy should attempt to maintain services, especially critical services, with minimum disruption to the business. To that end, businesses can start by assessing the network environment and devising a response plan. Among other things, the plan should include backup and recovery efforts, additional surveillance, and ways to restore service as quickly and efficiently as possible. For proactive protection, the three key steps to follow are; the implementation of a multi-layer defence strategy, protection of DNS servers and other critical enterprise infrastructure, and maintenance of visibility and control of the enterprise IT infrastructure.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 17


// COMMENT / SHIBU VAHID

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Shibu Vahid

Fibre is the future Service providers in the Middle East are currently reaping the rewards of their investment for triple play services; telephone, internet and TV via one xDSL or cable connection from a single network provider. Referred to as convergence, this approach represents the coming together of IT, internet and media and has resulted in an integral communication package that has been widely welcome by customers.

Global data traffic via the internet is growing by 32% every year. Consequently, the demand for bandwidth in the fixed network is currently doubling around every 18 to 20 months.” Shibu Vahid, head of Technical Operations, R&M Middle East & Africa

// 18 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

If service providers are to learn from the experiences of the west, they should be preparing themselves for the inevitable growth in customer demands. Hardware and software, from smartphones to data centres, are becoming ever more efficient. They offer users new functions every day. The mega trend of convergence appears to be bringing the region closer and closer to unlimited communication in real time. Fixed and cellular networks, clouds and apps are creating amazing symbioses and new kinds of business opportunities and models. With every new application, there is an increase in the volume of data to be transported, the need for an omnipresent internet connection that can be used on the road, and the desire for loss-free, immediate transmission. Storage spe-

cialist EMC estimates that 2.8 zettabytes of digital data were generated and stored worldwide in 2012. By 2020, that figure could reach 40 zettabytes. Global data traffic via the internet is growing by 32% every year. Consequently, the demand for bandwidth in the fixed network is doubling around every 18 to 20 months. Video transmission in particular is causing networks to be used virtually to capacity. In order to meet the needs of the imminent data explosion there are still obstacles to overcome. The infrastructure needed to be online everywhere at all times is often lacking, or it is too slow. If data volume and the trend toward the digitisation of our everyday routines continue, standard copper and coaxial cable networks, and even cellular networks,

will increasingly reach their performance maximums due to physical limitations. This then raises the question, which technology can best meet the challenges of the future? The answer is clear: In the long term, full-scale fibre optic (FO) networks can only provide the necessary data throughput and the required transmission speed for all subscribers in a network together with other technologies. Something needs to be done if network operators hope to meet the requirements in terms of availability, bandwidth and speed. They should further extend FO infrastructures, bringing them ever closer to the customer. But for this to happen, there needs to be wide public support. Some countries in northern and eastern Europe, in the Middle East and Asia are doing pioneer work and resolutely treading the path toward the fibre society. In many locations, it is the competitors of the established telecommunications providers who are taking over the role of pacemaker and investing in new fibre optic networks.

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// COMMENT / HATEM BAMATRAF

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Hatem Bamatraf

SaaS gains traction Software-as-a-service (SaaS) is continuing to gain traction as a deployment method for IT service management solutions. Four years ago only a handful of tools vendors offered SaaS-based solutions for IT infrastructure management, but today, all of the major systems management providers, specialist software houses and service providers such as du offer some form of cloud-deployed ICT infrastructure management.

By using virtual resources as an adjunct to existing in-house operations, enterprises can eliminate facilities costs, reduce overheads, access new service agent talent, and reduce agent churn.” Hatem Bamatraf, executive vice president, Enterprise, du

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SaaS is both a delivery model and a business model. The delivery model plays a substantial role in reducing two major components of IT, hardware costs and software infrastructure costs. The rest, such as custom development and requirements management costs, are independent of the delivery model and depend on the organisation’s complexity and the nature of the software service. SaaS as a business model impacts a third parameter, licensing costs, through subscription services and the pay-asyou-go approach. Adoption of SaaS is gaining in pace in the infrastructure management space, primarily due to the fact that the services have matured, and there is an increased demand for IT to speed application deploy-

ments, lower cost ownership of assets and applications, and better secure an increasingly distributed and mobile workforce. Infrastructure management solutions typically need to operate in tandem with a large number of systems management tools and utilities, from database and network management systems; the moves, adds and change procedures needed for up-to-date desktop assets; to the power and cooling controls of data centre servers. SaaS is seen as a viable alternative to some of the on-premise systems management tools. A recommended starting point for many organisations will be use of a SaaS-based cloud service management solution to help lower support costs. Cloud-based systems do offer some compel-

ling strategic benefits. For example, cloud technology allows service centres to change their staffing model, as it is easier to provide technology to distributed service agents. By using virtual resources as an adjunct to existing in-house operations, enterprises can eliminate facilities costs, reduce overheads, access new service agent talent, and reduce agent churn. The continuity benefits of the cloud are also important. Many hosting providers are able to support uptime of between 99.99% and 99.999%, providing a level of performance guarantee which easily meets enterprise requirements. Cloud-based service management solutions increasingly offer functionality to remotely support mobile devices with the same ease as supporting client PCs. New cloud-based solutions allow technicians to support remote end-user systems through firewalls from their computer or mobile device. Both the technician and the remote client are able to establish remote desktop control using outbound connections.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 19


// CASE STUDY / EIBFS

Case study

IP PBX revolution Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies implements a new IP-based PBX system that reduces travel, shrinks costs and improves communication he Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies (EIBFS) has implemented a new IP-PBX system by Panasonic, that is designed to reduce carbon emissions due to travel between branches, improve branch to branch communication using fewer resources and enhance the government entities’ productivity. The IP-PBX is designed to transform enterprises by giving them the power of Local and WAN-based communications and the functionality of larger-scale systems.

T

THE END-USER Established in 1983, Emirates Institute For Banking and Financial Studies (EIBFS) is delivering world class education, training and allied services in the area of Banking and Finance at its three campuses located at Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai. EIBFS has been contributing to the Emiratisation initiative by paving the career path of UAE nationals in the Banking and Financial sector. EIBFS has been integrated with various global leading institutes and universities of the world to offer the

best programs and courses to UAE in the domain of banking and finance. The Institute has witnessed growth on various dimensions including but not limited to students, training programs, campuses, faculty and staff members, alumni

and various other dimensions and variables. The institute has developed three state of the art campuses at Abu Dhabi and Dubai after its inception with the Sharjah campus. The institute currently has 80 employees across the Emirates of Sharjah, Abu

Dhabi and Dubai and was looking to increase productivity and reduce call and travel costs across these branches by implementing an up-to-date telephony system that utilised IP and was also looking for a system capable of adopting new technologies in IP such as unified communication applications and SIP trunks. THE SOLUTION The Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies chose to implement Panasonic PBX solutions across its three offices, the solutions included Panasonic pure IP based PBX TDE 100 in Abu Dhabi and Dubai and the Panasonic Pure IP-based PBX TDE 200 in Sharjah. Royal Way IT is the Value Added Reseller for PBX products for Panasonic UAE and was the implementation partner on the project. Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies

The choice of Panasonic ensured investment protection, the existing handsets were reused with new technologies, so that was the main attraction for EIBFS and saved it costs.” Philip Varghese from Panasonic says that the concept of the PBX is green as it reduces the number of lines you need from the telecoms provider.

// 20 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Najeeb KA, general manager at Royal Way IT

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// CASE STUDY / EIBFS

decided to choose Panasonic hardware because Panasonic is a well known company and because EIBFS had been working with the vendor for around ten years. “We started in Sharjah in around 1983, then in 1990 we started in Abu Dhabi, so we needed a new integrated system to connect our branches. For that we choose Panasonic,” said Amjad Hussam, IT support technician, EIBFS. Through the careful selection of the correct equipment, Royal Way and EIBFS were able to utilise the legacy Panasonic handsets to connect to the new PBX system. This ensured that costs were controlled and staff training was completely reduced. “When we migrated to the new IP system, we did not have to do a lot of training to the employees as they are using the same phone system, which is an advantage,” said Najeeb KA, general manager at Royal Way IT. “The choice of Panasonic ensured investment protection, the existing handsets were reused with new technologies, so that was the main attraction for Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies, and saved costs. We provided the Panasonic range of PBX for EIBFS and we implemented a stand-alone PBX at two of their branches. With the new IP solutions we were able to fulfill requirements like interconnectivity between their four offices, so that their chairman can intercommunicate between different offices in Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Sharjah. All these three PBX are connected to the IP.”

// WWW.ITP.NET /

We started in Sharjah in around 1983, then in 1990 we started in Abu Dhabi, so we needed a new integrated system to connect our branches. For that we choose Panasonic.” Amjad Hussam, IT support technician, EIBFS

BUSINESS BENEFITS The main business benefit seen by Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies since the implementation of the PBX system is a reduction in call costs. “Calls made from one branch to another branch in different emirates on a standard landline cost money, by connecting the system to the IP it is free of cost as the call goes through the private network,” said Najeeb. Another benefit is that employees are always connected, for example, the chairman is often travelling between branches and using the new system, he is available through his number in any of the Emirates. This eases a lot of administration costs. “With the new system you can have a soft phone in the laptop or PC, so for people that are always moving

around, they can use the soft phone connected to the PBX which acts as a virtual extension. If employees are outside the UAE. They can save a lot of money on calls,” said Renil Nalawangsa, business manager for Panasonic’s UAE distributor Al-Futtaim Panatech. “I can also see if there is any maintenance needed at Emirates Institute for Banking and Financial Studies and any technical settings that need to be changed. It can be done from anywhere, even my office as it is all in a dashboard,” said Najeeb. IP telephony is being enabled worldwide, the trend is that people are moving away from the legacy landline systems, according to Panasonic. “Key benefits are reducing travel and therefore reducing emissions, it enables connectivity anywhere, anytime and there is less downtime. Panasonic has been a leader in telephony for a long time. Customers find it easy and cost effective to adapt and move to IP telephony as it enables legacy handsets without having to replace the whole network. We feel it is easy to achieve,” said Philip Varghese, assistant manager, Telecom Sales & Marketing Department Panasonic Marketing Middle East and Africa. The implementation time was also kept down to a week as Panasonic has immediate availability on all of its ranges. Another green benefit of this particular implementation was that EIBFS was able to utilise the legacy equipment efficiently, meaning no waste for landfills. Typically the PBX concept is pretty

green, although green IT is a relatively new concept and the PBX came out several years before green IT, according to Panasonic. “The fact that you are able to reduce the number of lines you need for the service provider and that it is easy to reach a colleague across the table or even in another country, reduces travel costs and hence emissions, so we are saving costs on a daily basis,” stated Varghese. IN PRACTICE HOW WAS PANASONIC ABLE TO RESOLVE THE CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS? By providing an IP solution, Panasonic was able to interconnect all EIBFS’s branch offices, so the customer is able to make free phone calls between different branches The unified communication applications help the user to improve productivity. EIBFS is now able to grasp the new technology without much difficulty as Panasonic is very user friendly Since Panasonic has backward compatibility on terminals the customer was able to retain their exisiting handsets which helped them in saving the cost of new handsets

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 21


// INTERVIEW / BRAND REX

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Interview

Greening your network According to Ian Wilkie, supply chain director at Brand-Rex, getting to grips with ‘green’ is not only desirable, it’s essential because it makes really good business sense.

A structured cabling network can use 50 kilometres of copper/ polymer based cables. The smaller diameter Cat 6A Zone cable we developed reduces the carbon footprint by 25% and enables 50% more cable per lorry.” Kennedy Miller, development manager, Brand-Rex

// 22 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

“The subject is one that many companies have ignored, others have just tried to use ‘publicity’ to appear green. These companies are totally missing the point,” he said. There are massive cost savings for every business to make simply from analysing where in its operations energy and carbon are utilised and emitted; and then starting to reduce the really heavy-duty ones, according to Brand-Rex. “Our experience over the last ten years in ‘greening’ Brand-Rex operations has led to us becoming the lean, fit organisation that we now are. And this in turn has enabled us to grow significantly whilst most other datacoms infrastructure manufacturers have been shrinking. Now that IT has become the ‘lifeblood’ of so many companies and public services, its contribution to energy consumption and carbon footprint is increasingly significant. Data centres

are massive culprits here and IT professionals are starting to think seriously about energy reduction, but these things take time. And getting started is the most important thing,” according to Wilkie. “No-one is expecting every company to be perfectly carbon neutral next week! But if every company makes a few relatively easy adjustments, globally this adds up to a massive impact,” said Stuart Lemmon, head of Advisory Services at Carbon Clear, one of the world’s leading providers of carbon advisory services and carbon offsets agrees. In many factories the production line is up and running when the morning shift starts, not because someone started it all up but because for ten or more hours every night all the motors, heaters, coolers etc have been running, wasting energy and money. Network Level So against this background,

how does this affect or impact on IT and network managers in their daily jobs. “Green IT is about efficiencies and cost reduction really. At the data centre level there are massive cost savings to be made by stopping things using energy when they do not need to,” according to Lemmon. Virtualisation According to Brand-Rex, in data centres, the tendency has been to deploy ‘serverper-application’, but in reality this leads to a lot of servers drawing power 24x7 but not doing much for most of the time, putting them at their lowest energy efficiency levels. Kennedy Miller, development manager at Brand-Rex said that that techniques like server virtualisation are beginning to enable data centre operators to reduce the total number of servers and significantly increase the operating efficiency of the remaining servers and storage devices. “The ancillary energy needs for cooling, lighting and switch ports are also reduced. This can double the

// WWW.ITP.NET /


//INTERVIEW / BRAND-REX

Techniques like server virtualisation are beginning to enable data centre operators to reduce the total number of servers and significantly increase the operating efficiency of the remaining servers and storage devices.

power and carbon reduction,” he said. Infrastructure At the network infrastructure level too the choice of products can add to the carbon footprint reduction. “Even though the carbon footprint of a cabling network is relatively small compared to the megawatt energy consumption of data centres, it makes sense to apply carbon footprint reduction principles. A structured cabling network can use 50 kilometres of copper or polymer based cables. The smaller diameter Cat 6A Zone cable we developed reduces the carbon footprint by 25% and enables 50% more cable per lorry,” said Miller. Higher density products tend to have a lower materials and production energy usage as well as using less real-estate.

// WWW.ITP.NET /

Tips for manufacturers What sort of things should manufacturers be doing to improve their carbon footprint? Manufacturers must have analysed their company’s entire energy usage and carbon footprint and then have worked on and been able to demonstrate significant reductions in various areas. “There is always ‘low hanging fruit’ in terms of easy to implement energy and carbon footprint reductions,” said Andrew Prosser, consultant at Verco, a market leading advisor on energy and emission reduction. “Once a company has identified its high energy consumers then quick energy reductions are often really very easy. Identifying machinery and IT equipment which is left running when not in use can frequently lead to an instant energy reduction.

“In one company we helped them reduced their energy use by 37% by addressing people’s behaviour. Which company wouldn’t want to reduce their energy spend by over a third just by teaching people what to switch off, when and how?” said Lemmon.

Miller, the man in charge of carbon footprint reduction at Brand-Rex explained that, by measuring and understanding where the energy is used, his company has made significant carbon reductions and energy cost reductions by: changing from fuel oil to gas, introducing natural light into the factory and installing automatic lighting control. Utilising the right packaging is also a big element in reducing the carbon footprint of a company. “We have switched from using bleached white cardboard to unbleached for our packaging, which takes out a production process and its energy and chemicals usage, plus it makes the packaging far easier to recycle efficiently,” Miller said. “We’ve worked really hard to squeeze carbon out of every element of all our operations andall our products globally.”

TOP FIVE...

Questions to ask for a greener company • Has the company accounted for all of its locations globally? • Has it included all energy/emission types? • Has it accounted for all staff travel including air travel? • Has the company reduced its carbon footprint by outsourcing things like lorry fleet and data centre, but then ‘forgeting’ to report secondary emissions from these activities? • If the company is claiming to be ‘carbon neutral’ has it done so against the new PAS 2060 standard?

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 23


// CASE STUDY / ETISALAT

SUMMARY

Objective

The Emirates Energy Star programme by Etisalat and Pacific Controls aims to reduce energy consumption by 20% and carbon footprint by 20% for Etisalat customers by 2015.

Solution

EES aims to reduce energy consumption by retrofitting existing buildings with machineto-machine systems to increase energy efficiency through Managed Energy Monitoring Services. Currently, over 79 buildings have been connected to EES, covering low and high rise buildings in both residential and commercial sectors, plus hospitals, shopping malls, mixed use complexes, hotels, academic institutions and business centres. These buildings represent the public, government and education sectors, followed by construction and industry. Banking and finance sector forms the third largest segment.

Results

Etisalat says EES has saved 11,860 tonnes of CO2 until May 2013. This is equivalent to planting 2,546 trees and has resulted in cash savings of $2.15m for the UAE.

Case study

Greening the Emirates Etisalat implements energy efficiency, carbon footprint reduction scheme across 79 companies and government entities in the UAE mirates Energy Star is a nationwide program to champion the cause for improving energy efficiency and reducing the carbon footprint of the UAE. The program, set

E

// 24 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

up by Etisalat and Pacific Controls, aims to reduce the energy consumption and carbon footprints of its participating customers by 2015. Etisalat’s ICT strategy includes high investment in Machine-to-Machine (M2M)

industry, where energy management is one of the vertical solutions under M2M. All these solutions, including EES, use the Etisalat network and infrastructure. “Through the EES program, Etisalat also seeks to

// WWW.ITP.NET /


// CASE STUDY / ETISALAT

sations signed up for their first buildings into the EES programme. Having seen the results for several months, they are now signing up the entire portfolio of their assets into the programme. This is enabling a faster uptake and a rapid reduction of the carbon footprint of the UAE. Collectively, these buildings are all participating together to accelerate the UAE’s journey to becoming one of the smartest nations in the world, contributing to the UAE’s Green Economy Programme and the UAE’s Vision 2021, where environmental performance is a key performance indicator,” said Sougata Nandi, CEO of Pacific Controls.

A total of 79 participants from across public and private sectors have implemented EES programs so far, registering 18% energy savings.

fulfil its corporate social responsibility by directly lowering the carbon footprint of the UAE. Achieving the lowest per capita carbon emission for UAE will eventually result in our becoming one of the smartest countries in the world by 2021,” said Abdulla Hashim, senior vice president, ICT, Etisalat. According to Etisalat, EES has saved 11,860 tonnes of CO2 till May 2013. This is equivalent to planting 2,546 trees and has resulted in cash savings of $2.15m for UAE. “In 2012 several organi-

// WWW.ITP.NET /

THE UAE’S CARBON FOOTPRINT The UAE has taken significant steps to address global concerns of climate change due to rising carbon dioxide emissions. EES was set up by Etisalat to aid the government in this cause. According to Etisalat, a report by the World Wildlife Fund in 2010, rated the UAE number one in the world for having the biggest ecological footprint. The ecological footprint measures a country’s sustainability by comparing the use of natural resources per person per capita. Following the announcement, a panel of scientists and experts studied the methods of energy consumption in the UAE in detail to determine how they can be improved. This drove the UAE to become the third country in the world to develop the ‘Ecological Footprint Initiative’. In the UAE, a num-

ber of regulations were made in 2013 to improve the standard of lighting equipment used in homes, which account for over three-quarters of the UAE’s carbon footprint. In another study of carbon footprint by Jones Lang LaSalle, a global real estate services firm specialising in commercial property management, electricity and cooling were found to be responsible for around 40% of the total operating costs for office buildings in the UAE. EES aims to address these concerns by retrofitting existing buildings with M2M systems to increase energy efficiency through Managed Energy Monitoring Services. “Currently, over 79 buildings have been connected to the Emirates Energy Star programme, covering the whole gamut of low rise to high rise buildings. These comprise an entire spectrum of buildings like high-rise residential and commercial towers, hospital, shopping mall, mixed use complex, hotel, academic institutions and business centres. While the majority of these buildings are commercial, residential buildings form the next big category. These buildings largely represent the public, government and education sectors, followed by construction and industry. Banking and finance sector forms the third largest segment participating in this program,” said Hashim. The participating organisations which have implemented EES programs so far, have registered 18% average energy savings. Members of the scheme include Abu Dha-

IN PRACTICE THE BENEFITS By May 2013, EES has achieved an 18% energy reduction across all 79 participating facilities with an RoI of seven months. “This brought us very close to achieving our target of 20% energy savings across all buildings under our purview by 2015,” said Hashim. “On average, the EES program reduces electricity consumption of the participating buildings by a minimum of 15%, and in some cases by as much as 25%. This is being achieved purely through active 24/7 management of the HVAC equipment in these facilities.” The project is of significant value for the country, according to Etisalat, besides the obvious cost savings for the end user in the form of lower energy utility bills, the EES program helps decrease pollution, water consumption and resultant waste. Building owners are able to recover their investment towards the program from the savings that they make. The payback period for the building owner would be in the range of 18-24 months depending upon the STAR rating.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 25


// CASE STUDY / ETISALAT

bi Commercial Bank, the Ministry of Social Affairs, Dubai Municipality Al Twar Centre, Al Rostamani 21st Century Tower, First Gulf Bank Dubai, and the Deyar Al Barsha headquarters. IMPLEMENTATION Most buildings constructed 20 years ago do not have the infrastructure to address the concerns of carbon emissions as they consume a lot of energy, according to Etisalat. Over the years, automation systems have been built to be in compliance with industry standard open protocols. “For us, the biggest challenge was to retrofit existing buildings in a way that allows us to retain most of the original installed systems. This reduced the requirement for removals of systems. The hardware and software solutions we developed allowed us to integrate into the automation systems of buildings installed over 20 years ago,” commented Hashim. The EES program makes use of vendor neutral protocol agnostic software and hardware. Etisalat retrofitted existing buildings with M2M systems to increase energy efficiency through Managed Energy Monitoring Services. The solution was delivered using multivendor industry standard hardware to connect the sensor inputs and outputs which are used to control the systems using most energy. THE TOOLS EES focuses on significant energy savings that can be accumulated very quickly. The program utilises Etisalat’s ICT

Through Etisalat SIM cards, and 3G network the centre assesses electricity consumption of chillers and electronic devices being used at the client site. The sensors conduct intelligent reading of the data received and implement measures to reduce energy consumption and carbon emission.” Abdulla Hashim, senior vice president, ICT, Etisalat Abdullah Hashim from Etisalat says that the focus of Emirates Energy Star is on reduction of energy consumption in air-conditioning systems of buildings.

based M2M technology and the Pacific Controls Galaxy Enterprise City Management Platform, which is scaled to manage tens of thousands of buildings. The hardware and software, necessary algorithms and applications all help in the analytics and storage of historical data. According to Etisalat, Galaxy is one of the world’s first enterprise platforms delivering city centric services for management of its ecosystem. The Galaxy platform offers modularity in application components. The framework is flexible, scalable and elastic

// 26 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

to add or trim down the functionality based on business process and key performance indicators around the ecosystem. The application layer of Galaxy is designed to deal with a range of services and acts as a single point framework to deliver a proposition of services in a managed service delivery model. The Galaxy platform is designed to enable third-party applications to be developed and integrated to be part of the managed services ecosystem and also enables an asset owner ato subscribe to the managed services in a cost effective manner.

“On a 24/7 basis, the PCG is fed with information from the sensors based on which it conducts energy analysis, measurement and verification and carbon footprint analysis for monitoring and controlling buildings. Through Etisalat SIM cards, and its 3G mobile network the centre assesses electricity consumption of chillers and electronic devices being used at the client site. The sensors conduct intelligent reading of the data received and implement measures to reduce energy consumption and carbon emission,” said Hashim. // WWW.ITP.NET /


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// GREEN IT / DATA CENTRE

BUILD GREEN

BUILDING A COMPLETELY GREEN DATA CENTRE IS A FANTASTIC WAY FOR COMPANIES TO DRAMATICALLY SHRINK THEIR ENERGY COSTS AND IMPROVE THEIR GREEN CREDENTIALS

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esigning and building a green data centre is not just about what you put inside the building, but also about how, and where you construct the actual data centre. With the very high corporate power costs in the region, many companies are looking to shrink their data centre energy costs through the utilisation of more energy efficient equipment, better data centre design, and cooling methods that do not have to rely entirely on air conditioning. Enterprises also need to be aware of developments in both data centre software and hardware that can reduce their energy costs and improve efficiency.

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CONSTRUCTING YOUR DATA CENTRE Designing a green data centre is partly about the building and partly about the infrastructure inside the building. “Here in the Middle East we have the challenge of very little natural shade and consistently high temperatures. The most common approach is to create artificial shade where possible. This is often done by using solar panels on the roof which helps to absorb the sun before it can reach the outer fabric of the building. Another option that is often talked about is building the data centre underground. This is not as simple as it sounds. If the data centre is part of a larger building, the area that is above ground acts as a giant radiator in the summer bringing heat to the data centre, rather than taking it away,” explains James Coughlan, business development manager, Middle East at data centre solutions expert Cannon Technologies. In the region, outside air cooling is just not viable for most of the year, this means that companies need to develop more creative solutions to cool their data centre efficiently without using huge amounts of power. “In areas where outside cooling is not available, then water-side economisers and close-coupled cooling may make more sense,” states Carrie Higbie, global director of data centre solutions and services at data centre solutions expert, The Siemon Company.

Insufficient airflow or cooling caused by higher density IT equipment creates hot spots that result in premature equipment failure, system crashes, random reboots and poor system performance.” Olivier Delepine, vice-president, Gulf Countries, IT Business, Schneider Electric

Regardless of cooling methodology, however, one must first determine the capacity needs of the space in terms of power to carefully plan the solution, according to Siemon. Whatever is chosen it should be scalable in both directions to accommodate the fluctuations in technology. Wasted capacity will undermine any attempt to be green and not enough capacity will limit the technology that can be deployed. “Once the means is determined then it is important to determine the needs across the white space. In many data centres there is a need for extra capacity within the space, creating higher density zones rather than engineering the entire space for high density,” says Higbie. Inside the data centre, the goal is to drive lower power consumption and meet green targets through innovative cooling, aisle containment and power efficient equipment and understanding the need to address specific sustainability and availability metrics before construction begins, is essential to ensure that performance requirements and operational benefits are weighed equally in the design of a green data centre. According to Cisco, the inclusion of the latest sustainable technologies to support the facility’s infrastructure is an important first step in the design process. “Through the use of photovoltaic technology and natural

FIVE CRITERIA TO HELP ENSURE…

The ‘Green’ traits that make a data centre ‘Green’ 1. Meters should be designed in to the blueprint to break down energy usage to the level of components, such as different size servers, switches, the SAN, and a UPS, and which business units are charged for the power being used by those components.

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2. Energy usage should be continuously monitored to determine peak and low energy demands. Ideally the capability to measure energy capacities on a total data centre level, right down to the circuits to make all are within acceptable limits.

3. An energy savings plan should be documented and rewarded. This will drive behaviour to measure and use energy sparingly. 4. CPU throttling should be switched on for the servers, and the range of power consumed under

a variety of loads should be focussed on by the IT department. 5. Thermal profiling units should be used in the data centre to identify hot spots and ensure the optimal cooling practise. Source: Cisco

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Through the use of photovoltaic technology and natural day lighting for the entire facility, the green data centre can maximise the use of renewable energy without seriously impacting the facility’s ROI.” Scott Manson EMEA account director, Cisco

day lighting for the entire facility, the green data centre can maximise the use of renewable energy without seriously impacting the facility’s RoI. In addition, through the installation of efficient fixtures and implementing an environmentally friendly natural drainage system, we can make big steps to protect and conserve water,” says Scott Manson EMEA account director at network specialist Cisco. Companies across the globe are announcing ways to save energy and reduce costs through what they put inside the data centres, buying new hardware and services, according to Cisco. “In the past, electricity has been treated as a pure overhead, but with rising power costs and issues regarding reliability, supply, and capacity, electricity requires its own specific focus and that should start with green principles,” states Manson. Some of the key energy consumption principles are driving such things as the inclusion into greenfield green data centre designs as; hourly sub-metering capabilities for circuits, building meters that communicate energy consumption data to a data management system, and metre data management systems that store data and create user reports showing calculated hourly, daily, monthly, and annual energy consumption for each meter, according to Cisco. INTERIOR LAY OUT The three most critical challenges facing data centre managers today are without doubt, power, cooling and space. The facility should be designed with a host of energy-saving attributes, including day lighting features, reduced building footprint and rooftop solar arrays. The interior layout of a green data centre plays a significant role in saving energy, according to UAEbased cloud service and storage provider eHosting DataFort. “Technical rooms should be on either side of the white space in separate rooms leaving 3.5 metres of area in front of Cooling Control Units. The front aisle of CCUs should be the hot aisle and place of racks longitudinal. To ensure a good flow of air there should be floor void supply air and ceiling void return air and power tray under the raised floor and overhead data trays,” says Ganesh Bhat, data centre manager, eHDF. According to Cannon Technologies, the first step in any new data centre is to install an aisle containment solution. This // 30 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

makes it easier to cool equipment and reduces the risk of thermal runaway should there be any breakdown or disruption to the cold air. “As part of the aisle containment, it is important that the internal rack and equipment layout is as stable as possible. This makes it easy to properly seal the aisle and reduce the risk of hot and cold air mixing. To reduce the cost of cooling the cold air, there has been a gradual increase in input temperatures to the hardware. Where 10 years ago most data centres cooled air to 16C to 18C, today that air can be up to 27C,” says Coughlan. Enterprises need to do a careful risk-to-cost assessment for every area of the data centre. With hardware failover, every server doesn’t necessarily need dual network connections and dual power supplies, according to Siemon. Creating areas inside the space that will accommodate different power requirements and cooling zones can be beneficial, allowing capacity to be placed where capacity is needed; nearly eliminating the waste of over-engineering. HARDWARE CHOICES When building a green data centre, the IT foundations and modular blocks inside the walls of the facility become a fundamental element in the building’s success. Cannon Technologies recommends deploying large sensor grids, which have been a significant step forward in help make data centres greener. Sensor arrays mean that operators can see where power is being consumed, not just at the rack level but right down at the individual piece of hardware. Sensors also enable granular monitoring of heat and humidity. If there is a breach in the containment, sensors will show that hot and cold air are beginning to mix, temperatures are climbing and there is a risk of condensation where hot and cold air meet, according to Cannon. “Another benefit from using sensors is that they also show where the load on some hardware is leading to excessive heat spots which can be difficult to eliminate. Historically, this would have triggered a sudden increase in cold air across a large part of the facility, much of which would have been wasted. Today, operators can use this information to build automated solutions that help balance the workload across the DATA CENTRE COOLING SOLUTIONS • Room Cooling: Flexible cooling solutions perfect for lower density racked and non-racked IT loads • Rack Cooling: Dedicated cooling and air distribution for single racks or hot spots • Row Cooling: Energy efficient solutions for low to high density racks and zones • Cooling Distribution: Centralised distribution and piping for rapid deployment of row cooling • Heat Rejection: Matched outdoor heat removal for operation of room, row, and rack cooling Source: Schneider Electric

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James Coughlan from Cannon says creating artificial shade is a good way to lower data centre temperatures.

Olivier Delepine from Schneider Electric says enterprises need to keep up with growing heat densities.

data centre, eliminating its hot spots and improving its cooling efficiencies,” says Cannon Technologies’ Coughlan. In terms of the racks and enclosures, Schneider Electric says that it is crucial to have an enclosure that is designed to meet current IT market trends and applications. The racks and enclosures should incorporate cooling, power distribution, cable management and environmental monitoring. “Insufficient airflow or cooling caused by higher density IT equipment creates hot spots that result in premature equipment failure, system crashes, random reboots and poor system performance,” states Olivier Delepine, vice-president, Gulf Countries, IT Business, Schneider Electric. SOFTWARE CHOICES Automation is the key to managing a large, complex, data centre. Most modern management tools enable operations teams to build rules sets to respond quickly to certain conditions, for example a sudden increase in workload that creates a hot spot. “If that increase is due to multiple virtual machines running on the same server, then it is possible to move some workloads to other servers and reduce the heat,” states Coughlan. Workload capacity management tools allow operations teams to build profiles of different workloads over time. This makes it possible to model the data centre and predict when and where the workloads will increase. As a result, it is possible to identify future risks to power and cooling demand and take pre-emptive action to reduce and even eliminate risk. Predictive tools are also able to identify when maintenance is required and to help facility management teams build highly efficient preventative maintenance programmes. Those same techniques are able to spot when drives are failing or fans in servers are in danger of failure and move workloads before there is any risk of system failure, according to Cannon. Man// WWW.ITP.NET /

Carrie Higbie from The Siemon Company says that wasted capacity will undermine any attempt to be green.

THE THREE STAGES OF…

Data centre management cycle 1. GREEN DESIGN • Consider server virtualisation • Develop data life cycle management framework • Adopt data centre design to separate hot and cold air • Use structured cabling system • Install meters to measure energy usage 2. GREEN PROCUREMENT • Include energy performance requirements and power management features • Specify IT equipment that can operate in wider ranges of operating temperatures and humidity • Specify minimum Coefficient of Performance • Deploy computer room air-conditioners with variable speed fans 3. GREEN OPERATIONS • Measure carbon footprint, power usage efficiencies, utilisation of servers and storage • Switch off idle IT equipment or unmanned monitors • Enable power management features on IT equipment • Manage air-flow to separate hot and cold air • Shut down unnecessary cooling equipment • Move cooling closer to IT load • Reduce cooling by increasing the ambient room temperature

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son says that data centres, or IT centres, are essentially an organisation’s repository for data. Creating a green data centre involves the consideration of a number of facets; computer equipment, mechanical and electrical systems, and building construction as they all contribute to the design and output of maximum energy efficiency and minimum environmental impact. “Just to elaborate further on the software element of green data centre management and operations, with respect to innovation: monitoring has become one of the most important features related to data centre efficiency and a major player in the quest for a Green technology. If you can’t monitor what you have, then you also can’t determine how to make it efficient,” states Manson. Lifecycle plays a role in the classification of a data centres green credentials. The important aspect for any customer is to balance green and efficiency with hard dollar returns, which will dictate the sustainability of any green data centre project. INNOVATIVE IDEAS The use of solar panels to harvest energy and create artificial shade is the most common innovation seen in the region. However, it is not the only way that energy can be harvested or energy costs lowered. “There are several sites where wind is being used to generate power, often twice daily. This is done by taking advantage

To ensure a good flow of air there should be floor void supply air and ceiling void return air and power tray under the raised floor and overhead data trays.” Ganesh Bhat, data centre manager, eHosting DataFort

of the onshore/offshore pressure changes that occur early in the morning and late in the evening,” explains Coughlan. According to Cannon Technologies, sites that use a lot of water for cooling are beginning to implement better technologies to reduce water loss. Fully contained systems help reduce the usage of desalinated water which, while heavily subsidised, is still a cost that the data centre can reduce. “Governments could do more to encourage green initiatives. The reduction of subsidies for energy and water would force facilities to improve usage. Another way would be to follow the EU where strict energy standards are being applied to data centres and owners have to buy carbon credits. This would create an immediate fiscal incentive for data centre owners to improve green policies,” says Coughlan.

The use of solar panels to harvest energy and create artificial shade is the most common innovation seen in the region, according to Cannon Technologies.

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INNOVATIONS IN GREEN IT REGIONAL GREEN IT VENDORS DISCUSS THEIR LATEST PRODUCT INNOVATIONS IN THE GREEN IT SPHERE, WRITES PIERS FORD

IBM:

Shifting focus to IT utilisation Shifting the focus from wasted power to maximising utilisation rates so that energy is not squandered in the first place, IBM is one of the vendors leading the charge to combine IT and business innovation. Much of the innovation centres on achieving the optimum Power Utilisation Efficiency (PUE) score of its servers. But generally, the industry giant also makes a strong case for using analytics software to increase the utili-

Companies struggling with inefficient IT have a significant advantage in our systems, which are designed out of necessity for industry-leading IT utilisation and power efficiency as design goals.” Bashar Kilani, territory executive, Gulf &Levant, IBM // WWW.ITP.NET /

sation of IT infrastructure by helping companies forecast capacity, power and cooling requirements with precision, using input such as expected application growth and IT strategy. “Companies struggling with inefficient IT have a significant advantage in our systems, which are designed out of necessity for industry-leading IT utilisation and power efficiency as design goals,” says Bashar Kilani, territory executive, Gulf and Levant, at IBM. “For example, our high-performance System z and POWER servers are much more efficient than competitive systems, running at CPU utilisation rates nearing 75%, while competitive systems often run at well less than 50%. IBM was among the first IT companies to identify the trend of rising power costs due to under-utilised data centres, largely from the unmitigated spread in the last decade of inefficient distributed systems based on X86 architecture.” In the future, IBM foresees the emergence of a new era of computing, the era of cognitive systems, designed to be much more powerful and energy efficient than today’s computers that power corporate data centres, according to Kilani. // AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 33


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Joe Fagan from Seagate says that their Constellation CS drives are extremely energyefficient, through the use of a range of different design and operating features.

Sufian Dweik regional director of Brocade MEMA, says that the company has focused its green IT efforts on developing Software Defined Networking and industry standards.

SEAGATE:

BROCADE:

Solid state innovation

Efficiency by design

Seagate has a similar history of innovations, according to senior director of cloud initiatives, Joe Fagan, and uses many techniques to reduce power consumption of storage solutions. “Looking at hard drives as one example, this can involve features like spinning drives slower, offering advanced powermanagement features to switch off motors and electronics in idle periods, promoting the use of smaller form-factor drives, and promoting SSD and hybrid SSD in the correct environments,” he says. “Our Constellation CS drives, for instance, are extremely energy-efficient at under 8w, which averages 29% less than competing hard drives. This also means designing devices that operate in the most aggressive environments – as seen in warm climates like the Middle East — where drives must be able to work reliably in higher temperatures, and where cooling can be a very expensive luxury.”

No vendor worth its salt will miss the opportunity to hail the consistency of its own efforts in pursuing an innovative green development strategy. And for most leading players, the ideal of a comprehensive, end-to-end green product portfolio has long since become a reality. Sufian Dweik, regional director, MEMA, at Brocade Communications, said that there is no single solution for optimising ICT efficiency. “Green networking is part of our DNA and philosophy, and an integral part of all our products and solutions,” he states. “Brocade provides products that increase productivity and reduce energy consumption. We work hard to encompass all elements of efficiency, including energy, planning, processes, manageability, scalability and more.” Brocade has focused its efforts on Software Defined Networking, the powerful new network paradigm designed to address the issues of ever-increasing demand for speed, scalability and resilience. It is also working with the Storage Network Industry Association to solve specific energy issues, including the carbon impact of the complex of servers, switches, directors, storage arrays and tape subsystems that form data centre storage networks. “Brocade designs energy efficiency into each of its products,” says Dweik. “For example, in blade server environments, our blade SAN switches and Access Gateway solutions enable integrated SAN connectivity without requiring a separate switch chassis, power supplies and cooling fans. Sharing the power and cooling resources of the blade switch chassis reduces overall energy costs and heat dissipation requirements.”

Our Constellation CS drives, for instance, are extremely energy-efficient at under 8w, which averages 29% less than competing hard drives.” Joe Fagan, senior director, Cloud Initiatives EMEA, Seagate Technology // 34 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

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Pan En from Huawei says that ICT applications are playing an active role in driving the evolution of the power industry across the Middle East.

Basil Ayass from Dell says that the company has developed Fresh Air products that can run at higher temperatures in the data centre.

HUAWEI:

DELL:

Green influence benefits Fresh air cooling ICT applications are playing an active role in driving the evolution of the power industry across the Middle East, according to Pan En, regional vice president of Huawei. More widely, innovation is striking at the heart of the data centre as enterprises get creative in their efforts to build endto-end networks that integrate services, network resources and IT resources. “In later 2012, for example, we announced our Universal Distributed Storage system,” said Pan En. “This product underscores the concept of infinite storage and definitive security, adopting an innovative storage architecture to present customers with a highly reliable, scalable and cost-efficient mass storage solution. The rapid growth of resources like wider network bandwidth, smart terminals and 4G LTE telecom services have created a synergy accelerating worldwide ‘informatisation’. As information-bearing platforms, Internet Data Centres are major energy consumers on the network.”

Modern power industry ICT solutions cover all segment of this market, including power generation, transmission and transformation, consumption and dispatching.” Pan En, regional vice president, Huawei // WWW.ITP.NET /

Dell has developed hardware for data centres called Fresh Air, which was driven by companies like eBay and Bing. “They told us that their data centres cost them millions of dollars to run at 18 degrees Celsius, extremely cold to make sure that the servers continue running, but it costs a tonne of money, especially in the UAE where temperatures reach up to 50C in the summer outside. If you run your air conditioning at 18C for one month then the next month put it at 25C, you save a huge amount of money,” says Basil Ayass, marketing director at Dell Middle East. Fresh Air certified servers can be run at 35C, according to Dell, this will save regional enterprises huge amounts of money on cooling. “We sell these Fresh Air servers in the UAE and telling our customers that they no longer need to cool their data centres to such a low level, that they can raise it by a few degrees saves them a lot. With Fresh Air we have a provision to go for 10% of the time to 40C and 1% of the time up to 45C,” says Ayass. Dell has also introduced Fresh Air certified storage, Fresh Air certified network switches, and Fresh Air certified PDUS. “Today a customer that is building a data centre, specifically, if it is a new build, they can build a Fresh Air data centre, We have all the required components, storage, server, network power distribution and the rack, all is Fresh Air certified so you can build a data centre that can run at 25C up to 35C, which reduces energy costs,” explains Ayass. According to Dell, for around 50 servers the savings would be around $300,000 to $350,000 a year in cooling costs. As a percentage, that is 25% to 35% power savings from cooling. // AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 35


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GOING GREEN

HIGH REGIONAL COMMERCIAL ENERGY COSTS AND A DEVELOPING ‘GREEN’ CONSCIENCE IS DRIVING A SLOW, BUT STEADY UPTAKE OF GREEN IT INITIATIVES IN THE MIDDLE EAST hile green IT is an important consideration for companies in the US and Europe, the concept is still in its infancy in the UAE and Middle East region, with the only real green IT champions being the telecoms companies and enterprises with their head offices in the US or Europe, such as Dell and R&M. “Sustainability and green technologies are increasingly high priority topics for CIOs worldwide,” explains Mathias Militzer, general manager at printer specialist Lexmark International, MEA. “In the Middle East, there is an increased drive towards sustainability and responsible consumption, especially with the governments emphasising the need for harnessing more green technologies in the drive towards development. This will impact the market for sustainable products favourably over the next few years.” In the Middle East, the GCC is the most focused region in its approach to promoting sustainable and green practices, according to Gulf Business Machines. “Many countries in the GCC are trying to establish themselves as international centres; which is one of the reason they are focusing on renewable energy and sustainability. Solar energy, for example, is set to emerge as one of the region’s main energy sources in the next few years as large investments are being made in this sector. Governments and manufactures in the region have matured in the past few years while regional companies have started to comply and add green products and solutions requirements to their evaluation criteria,” states Hani Nofal, director of Intelligent Network Solutions at GBM. With the cost of commercial power causing regional businesses severe headaches, the energy saving side of green IT

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should be coming into sharp focus for most medium to large size regional enterprises. Nader Baghdadi, Middle East regional director at Ruckus Wireless, says he expects green IT and sustainability to rank in the CIO’s top five concerns within the next two years. “Generally speaking, applying a green approach to technology will cut costs,” he says. “But the Middle East still doesn’t top the list compared with the US and other parts of the world, and this is primarily because of the lack of awareness programs in the region.” If the Middle East lags behind the West in adapting to a greener IT model, it is catching up fast, driven in part by broader technology trends such as virtualisation and cloud computing, which encourage a leaner approach to IT infrastructure. “With a new set of technologies setting their foot in the region, many Government-backed agencies and initiatives are in place to promote sustainability, energy efficiency and green IT

A few local customers that are green savvy have moved the cost of power to each of the different departments. Marketing pays their power, IT pays their power. Now that IT are paying the cost of electricity, they have realised how large it is and they are looking at saving power.” Basil Ayass, marketing director Dell Middle East // WWW.ITP.NET /


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DEFINING…

Dell’s green initiatives Dell’s green initiatives extend beyond just the hardware products themselves, into areas such as green packaging and extending product lifetime, even in the event of a disaster. “All our packaging is made with recycled material, but more recently we have been using organic material and have started using mushrooms for packaging. There is a specific species of mushroom that we have worked with and started getting from a supplier that doesn’t go bad, smell bad or look like a mushroom, but it is organic material and we use it for padding and providing shock absorption for the gear we send out. A lot of the boxes we

shift our gear in whether it is servers or PCs, are actually filled with mushrooms to protect the gear from shocks,” explains Ayass. Another example of Dell’s green approach is its approach to waterlogged servers resulting from Hurricane Sandy in the USA. “We had a customers whose server went under water in Hurricane Sandy and it was no longer working, so we told him to use rice. The rice soaks up all the liquid and you spend a couple of days with your server covered in rice, remove the rice and turn it back on and the server is running — that is a green way of bringing it back to life,” says Ayass.

Dell’s engineers filled waterlogged servers with rice after Hurricane Sandy, this approach saved the servers and was both green and organic.

Dell has utilised a type of material made out of mushrooms to protect its hardware in transit.

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Hani Nofal from GBM says that recycling needs to be more of a focus for regional companies.

in both public and private enterprises in the region,” says Salil Dighe, managing director at Dubai-based data management specialist Meta Byte Technologies. POWER AWARE Some local businesses have developed a unique way to make the IT department accountable for the power they use. Traditionally the company’s facilities department paid the power bill, now some large enterprises are asking each individual department to pay their own power bills to force them to think more about power consumption and how to reduce energy costs, according to Dell. “A few local customers that are green savvy have moved the cost of power to each of the different departments. Marketing pays their power, IT pays their power. Now that IT are paying the cost of electricity, they have realised how large it is and they are looking at saving power. A lot of customers that are paying the electricity bill have started using the lower power CPUs, sacrificing slightly on the performance of the CPU and making it up in other areas, such as adding a bit to the memory and upgrading the network. By doing this you will get similar performance that is not so power hungry,” explains Basil Ayass, marketing director Dell Middle East. With the shift to IT paying their own electricity, Dell has seen IT start to ask, as part of their procurement process, for with power consumption estimates of the IT hardware they // WWW.ITP.NET /


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are purchasing before they buy because they know their power budget and what they can spend on electricity. “For the UAE and the region as a whole, being environmentally friendly is considered as a new trend, which is picking up pace as greater awareness of the benefits and ease of realising a greener and more sustainable environment becomes commonplace,” said Dan Smith, head of integrated marketing for the Middle East and Africa at printer and copier vendor Xerox.

Many countries in the GCC are trying to establish themselves as international centres; which is one of the reason they are focusing on renewable energy and sustainability.” Hani Nofal, director of Intelligent Network Solutions, GBM

GREEN INITIATIVES There are multiple motivations for being environmentally sensitive, according to GBM, however, the main driver for companies to embrace green IT is the possible savings on their bottom-line. The channel has a crucial role to play in promoting these green IT benefits and using them as sales levers, although a product or solution’s green credentials are most effectively pitched as integral elements of the best technology. “Return on Investment plays a significant role in getting capital expenses approved,” says NR Rajesh, sales manager for IT infrastructure at data centre management specialist Rittal. “If the CAPEX of a data centre is linked to the OPEX with green technology, the decision makers can see a better RoI or payback period that will build up a strong case in favour of the sustainable option. This is what every channel partner should pursue to build up a strong business case.” There are many examples of green IT implementations

across the Middle East region. The implementation of virtualisation and cloud initiatives across the Middle East have fantastic sustainability and energy saving benefits for enterprises, according to Gulf Business Machine’s Hani Nofal. “In the last three years GBM has delivered more than 200 virtualisation projects across the region and is now assisting companies to migrate to private clouds and eventually hybrid and public clouds,” he explains. Al-Futtaim Technologies has also been part of the green IT movement, designing and implementing command and control centres with functions such as resource metering and monitoring, designed to reduce costs and allow companies to monitor their electricity spending. “The resource metering and monitoring were important to

DU’S GREEN COMMITMENT du’s Green initiatives include efforts to improve the energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy at its mobile transceiver stations, to simple, ‘doing-your-bit’ gestures of switching off unnecessary lights, printing double sided, recycling, changing coffee machines to use ‘Own Cup Option’ to setting up a performance improvement system. DU GREEN INITIATIVES • du’s first solar power project was at Sir Bu Nair Island in 2011, since then the company has put in place two more sites running on 100% solar energy // WWW.ITP.NET /

in 2012. Resulting in zero percent diesel consumption further equating to zero percent carbon emission from use of diesel fuels. • In line with du’s objective to reduce the diesel consumption and CO2 emission by 50%, du decided to convert off-grid sites to smart hybrid sites. The project was initiated in December 2011, and 137 out of a total of 350 sites running on generator have been converted to hybrid operation, having reduction of 11% on annual diesel consumption and CO2 emissions in 2012 (one million litres of diesel

and 2,500 Tons of CO2 emissions). • In 2013, 60 sites are planned to be changed. The annual reduction is expected to increase to more than 20% in 2013 and by the end of 2014 we expect a total reduction in diesel consumption of six million litres and 15,000 Tons of CO2 emissions • du have put in place two more sites in the UAE running on 100% solar energy in 2012, following the success of the Sir Bu Nair Island project in 2011. • This green technology eliminates the need for diesel generators resulting in 0% diesel

consumption used which further equates to 0% carbon emission from the burning of diesel fuels. We plan to continue implementing such green technology in our remote, inaccessible areas. WASTE MANAGEMENT du’s short term focus is to understand and improve its current waste and recycling practices, against a long term aim of reducing waste in its broader business activities. Part of du’s long term aim is to increase recycling of its electronic wastes. In 2012 it developed its hazardous waste policy to promote this.

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Green IT is a high priority topics for CIOs says Mathias Militzer from Lexmark.

the sustainability programmes of command and control centre to monitor the data centre, IT and telecom performance and energy consumption. This system is a good tool to reduce energy consumption of IT equipment and other systems,” says Venkat Raghavan, general manager, Al-Futtaim Technologies. SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY Some companies here in the Middle East region have the wrong impression of green IT, according to Dell’s Ayass. Instead of actually saving energy and reducing their carbon footprint, they shift the energy and carbon burdens down or up the supply chain. For example, according to Dell, a company’s management might think that to be green they should not drive their car because it uses gasoline, so they sell their car and use a taxi every day of their life. ‘The taxi will use the gasoline, but not me, I am green’, is the prevailing belief according to Ayass. Another example is the use of Google servers, and hosted servers instead of on site. Those servers are still there and using electricity, but the company is paying its supplier to provide the cloud services and storage. “That is what some companies are doing, offsetting their electricity usage by moving it upstream or downstream on the supply chain. That is a misguided approach to green computing, so it is very important to not only reduce your own expenditures, but also look at your suppliers and customers and make sure that your suppliers are abiding by your rules and // 40 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Salil Dighe from Meta Byte Technologies says governments are promoting green IT.

this around green computing and your customers. A lot of the companies aim for zero emissions and state they are, but their supply chain and their customers are the ones using the energy. You must ensure your suppliers are providing and utilising green technologies,” states Ayass. However, it is not all doom and gloom, there has been a lot of evidence of progress by regional companies when it comes to green IT product selection, implementation, management and optimisation. “In the short term, greener products are usually more efficient, of a higher standard and do not cost more than less green products,” said Roch Muraine, director of strategic solutions for Middle East & Africa at Alcatel-Lucent, Enterprise, which specialises in eco-sustainable information and communications technology networks, applications and devices. According to Gulf Business Machines, companies need to focus more on recycling as it is one of the sectors less developed in the region. “The return on investment is clearer when buying a product consuming less power or implementing a solution that will reduce space requirements or reduce the data centre’s utility bill. The incentive for companies to dispose their old IT equipment without any harmful impacts on the environment is less evident to management. Corporate social responsibility plays a key role in this instance and governments, suppliers, retailers and enterprises need to work more closely to improve this process,” explains Nofal. // WWW.ITP.NET /


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BIOGRAPHY

PANELIST ALAN FLATMAN Neutral observer/ commentator Flatman has advised on network technology and strategy since 1980. He represents the UK at both International & EU cabling standards committees and is an active contributor to IEEE 802.3. For 20 years, he has been the liason officer between cabling and network technology groups.

Cable Debate

What cabling will support 40GbE? Global experts discussed what cable types are most suited to 40GbE and whether this technology is datacentre centric or if it can be used in buildings

T

he Network Middle East Cable Debate topic two looked at what type of cabling is best suited to support 40GbE in the data centre environment. Since 40GbE is not yet available, this debate looked at what the global cable standards bodies are considering to support 40GbE in the future and what type of cabling is likely to make the most sense.

Richard Mei: There are only two 4G solutions available in the data centre, one is fibre optics the other is coaxl cable based. The IEEE // WWW.ITP.NET /

Call for Interest slides clearly state that 40GBase-T is geared toward data centre application. I believe 40GBase-T will be very data centre centric and may not be applicable to desktop arena unless the building architecture changes to a degree that would accommodate 30m 2-connector channels instead of the conventional 100m 4-connector channels. At this moment consultants and engineers design for 100m horizontal coverage from the telecommunications room or IDF in a building so it is difficult to provision for 40GBase-T in buildings. The lack of bandwidth-demanding

desktop applications is another barrier for 40GBase-T deployment. However, the latest wireless access point technology such as 802.11ac really requires a highspeed backhaul connection. A single 1000Base-T link is insufficient to support the traffic between 11ac and switch port. It requires multiple 1000Base-T links through link aggregation to satisfy the need of bandwidth. With the growth of wireless devices and processing power, this application is a potential candidate to utilise high-speed Ethernet protocols such as 10GBase-T now or 40GBase-T in the future.

PANELIST VALERIE MAGUIRE director of standards and technology, Siemon Maguire is vice chair of the TIA TR-42 Telecommunications Cabling Systems Engineering Committee, vice chair of the TIA TR-42.7 Copper Cabling Subcommittee, TIA TR-42 appointed liaison to IEEE 802.3, treasurer of the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet Working Group, and much more.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 41


P R E S E N T E D BY

// REPORT / CABLE DEBATE

BIOGRAPHY

PANELIST RICHARD MEI R&D director, transmission solutions, Enterprise Division, CommScope Mei has designed various custom test systems with computer-based hardware and software that were used to characterise the transmission property of premises cabling systems. Mei holds numerous engineering degrees from top universities.

PANELIST STEFAN RIES Head of Global Key Account Management at R&M Ries has 25 years in the data communication industry. For 15 years, Stefan has been a member of the Swiss technical committee for structured cabling & telecommunication and for the past five years an expert in the global standardisation workgroup ISO/IEC JTC SC 25 WG3.

Valerie Maguire: What I would like to do is agree with Richard 100%. Nothing Richard said was incorrect. Stefan Ries: While I agree with Richard and Valerie that this is a data centric technology, but the market reacts differently. I would like to remind you of the 10 gig technology, this has been set as a data centre technology, nothing else, but in the market there is deployment of Cat 6A cables which are for 10 gig , not for 1 gig. For one gig Cat 5 would be sufficient. So, yes, 40GbE is a data centre technology, but I wouldn’t wonder if the market would say ‘I would like to have the cabling that is Cat 6A, but for 30 metres it needs to be capable of 40 Gig as well’. Martin Rossbac: In three years we will have a new twisted pair standard. The IEEE have decided to go with 30 metre because of the complexity and the learnings they have made from the 10GBaseT project. A lot of complexity went into 10GBase-T and the active components, but all the intelligence was put into transceiver technique and it caused a six year delay on 10GBase-T to the market. People want to avoid making the same mistake. Many of the data centres today only need 30 metre, therefore the length restriction is perfectly OK for data centres and an enterprise is not in focus. This does not mean that if the technology evolves and new chip generations come that can deal with the signal at higher frequency, maybe a new generation will come that can deal with the higher frequency, then we will have another project

// 42 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Technologies will change in support of user demand said Eddie Whelan from Citihub.

Enterprise use of 40GbE is really down the road, it will happen, but not at the moment.” Martin Rossbac, director of product marketing and new market development at Nexans

40GBase-T for longer lengths. Maybe 40GBase-T will come for longer lengths if the market wants it, but it is definitely a different project then what we are discussing today, this is just for data centres. Enterprise use of 40GbE is really down the road, it will happen, but not at the moment. How do you see the data centre in regards to 40g? Alan Flatman: We are definitely in the data centre. We will start to see 40GbE servers flowing into the market sooner than we realise, so we are going to have to start support-

ing them with something, so what people will do is start to reach out and start deploying optical fibre where we have to connect servers to switches at end of row – end of row as everyone said you need 30 metres. Fibre is the only real solution for that break down. It is expensive and it also donesn’t support auto-negotiation; the ability to automatically adjust speeds to the lowest speed running between a switch and an attachment, in this case that is the server. Base-T does that. Twisted pair technologies are actually the cheapest available, they are cheaper than Twinax, they have a longer reach then Twinax, are less expensive and have slightly less reach then fibre, so it fits nicely in the middle. It also supports auto-negotiation, all of the speeds from 10 gig upwards, so what a network managers dream to be able to do that. There are basically two fundamental options for 40G-Base-T. It has got to be screened going forward, so it must be a F-UTP (four twisted pairs with a foil over the top), what the TIA is now formally calling Cat 8, IEC is calling it // WWW.ITP.NET /


P R E S E N T E D BY

Cat 8.1. Or it is going to be the fully screened cabling or the PIMF, individually shielded pairs which IEC calls class 2 or Cat 8.2, slightly different naming involved. I think the chairman of the 10GBase-T group put it very well two weeks ago at the last meeting of the group in Canada, he showed a picture of a Ferrari and a very congested set of roads and then he showed a picture of a small eco car and a super 10 lane highway and said ‘what we don’t want to do, which is what they did in 10GBaseT is choose the Ferrari as the transceiver’, which they got very wrong. What we do need to do is choose the eco car, because that means the chips are simple, low power and low latency, they sell, everyone buys them and we use the best infrastructure that we can possibly access. Choose the best cabling on offer that was his appeal to the working group. We will see the way forward over the next six to 12 months. I think we will do our best to go for the best cabling on offer, which is Class

// REPORT / CABLE DEBATE

There are only two 4G solutions available in the data centre, one is fibre optics the other is coaxl cable based.” Richard Mei, R&D director, transmission solutions, Enterprise Division, CommScope

2 PIMF individually screened cable. It means we don’t have ay internal cross talk to deal with. We have heavily suppressed alien crosstalk which we have to budget for in the leak design, so we simply budget for a little bit of that. If I had to put my money on a horse, it would be for the Class two approach. SUMMARY Edward Whelan: The way we communicate at a social level, the information we share, the business we do and the way we do business is changing;

Richard Mei from CommScope says it is difficult to provision for 40GBase-T in buildings.

// WWW.ITP.NET /

and fast. A recent study by Cisco estimates that ‘Annual global IP traffic will surpass the zettabyte [that’s 21 zeros] threshold [1.4 zettabytes] by the end of 2017’. Note also that the Middle East was seen as one of the world’s major growth centres over this same period. The information that we retain and the way we store and access it is changing. Whilst writing this article, I had a quick look around my house and I found over seven Terabytes [12 zeros] of storage devices and estimate another two Terabytes on the ‘cloud’. When we want to access information, systems, applications, we want it now! We live in an instant society that doesn’t expect to wait. Behind the scenes supporting ICT infrastructures are changing, new technologies are being developed and rolled out almost on a daily basis to keep up with demand and expectation. The development of 40GBase-T is a reflection of this and the studies into the advancement of both copper and fibre technologies a reaction to the anticipated uptake. 40GBaseT (Category 8.1 and 8.2 cables) will have a place in the data centre cabling architecture, as will fibre and the economics of provision will play a major role in the speed of uptake and volume of 40GBase-T deployment. User habits and demand will continue to grow and technologies will change in support, this will always affect and drive the cabling market. 40GBase-T is a snapshot in time of this development, as was 1Mbps, 10Mbps, 1Gbps and 10Gbps. Who knows what the future may hold.

BIOGRAPHY

PANELIST MARTIN ROSSBAC director of product marketing and new market development at Nexans Rossbac has 20 years in the IT & telecoms industry and is a member of the ISO/IEC standards committee JTC1 SC25 WG3, CENELEC TC215 WG1 and chairman of NBN - Belgian Mirror Committee for JTC1/ SC25.

MODERATOR EDDIE WHELAN senior consultant & head of MEA infrastructure practice, Citihub Wheelan has over 20 years of experience in the telecommunications and the construction industries. The majority of his experience has been gained working with government, Blue Chip companies and financial institutions in the City of London.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 43


// COMMENT / ASEF BADDAR

Got something to say? If you have any comments to make on this issue, please e-mail: georgina.enzer@itp.com

Asef Baddar

40- and 100-Gigabit Ethernet Today there is a lot of talk about 10 Gigabit Ethernet, 40GE, and even 100GE to support high speed networks. This is of course fuelled by data centre need for speed and supported by the IEEE standards publication.

To some degree 40G and 100G are being used today, as equipment manufacturers, such as Cisco, Brocade, and Extreme, have made them available.” Asef Baddar, senior technical manager — Middle East & Africa, Leviton

// 44 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

The new IEEE standard 802.3ba was ratified in 2010 and addresses requirements for 40/100G using parallel optics. To some degree 40G and 100G are being used today, as equipment manufacturers such as Cisco, Brocade, and Extreme have made it available. The majority of application is for 10G network speeds connecting the EDA to HDA and 40G or 100G from the HDA to the MDA core/aggregation. The move to 40G or 100G in the infrastructure is easy, causing almost no downtime. The key for that to happen is proper data centre design from day one. Full utilisation of fibre solution must be done to enable smooth migration to 40G or 100G in the future. This makes it easy for data centre owners to make the right decision when going to active and have a purely electronics decision. The 40G SR4 technology uses a total of 8 fibres per channel. 100G SR10

technology uses a total of 20 fibres. This fact alone may be a significant barrier for 100G implementation between layer 2 and aggregation/ core switches. The cost for the infrastructure would nearly double from a cable perspective. However, from a migration aspect, there is currently in working session within IEEE the emerging standard of ‘4X25’. This new standard is proposing the use of 8 strands for 100G capability (25Gig lanes). However, latest ‘news’ shows that distance will be reduced to below 70 metres for OM3 and 100 metres for OM4. I believe that this is why the new TIA 942-A standard has solidified its position of OM3 as a minimum and OM4 as the recommended medium for DC applications. Looking ahead, IEEE should have the 4x25 standard emerging over the next two years or so which will enable this same client to upgrade or refresh the active switches which will then be capable of

implementing the new 4x25 technology for 100G I/O. Keep in mind that by that time I believe that a much higher percentage of servers will be utilising 10G I/O or will be virtualised, both will require higher bandwidth from the aggregation point out. The client will be able to utilise the existing infrastructure for connectivity transmission. An important point is that the existing channel count that the client has designed for the 40G SR4 system will maintain the same channel count when implementing the 4x25 technology, hence providing cost effective migration for today’s 10G to 40G to 100G requirements.

Leviton says that IEEE should have the 4x25 standard emerging over the next two years or so.

// WWW.ITP.NET /


// PRODUCT WATCH / SECURITY

//Product_Watch

Want to showcase your latest product here? If you have any new innovative products, please e-mail: georgina.enzer@itp.com

2

1

4 3

Hot product

SSL Locksmith, what is it?

AccessData develops product that exposes the contents of SSL-encrypted network communications helping to close a network security hole

01//What is the product?

02//What does it do?

03//What is new about it?

04//Why is it better?

SSL Locksmith exposes the contents of SSL-encrypted network communications, therefore eliminating a critical cyber-security blind spot. Without visibility into the SSL-encrypted network, your employees can steal data and avoid detection.

Unmonitored, encrypted traffic violates mandated compliance regulations. AccessData’s SSL Locksmith eliminates this problem. Since about 25% of traffic on the network is encrypted, SSL Locksmith improves the ability to defend your data.

SSL Locksmith solution was designed with fail to wire bypass functionality to prevent disruption in service should the hardware fail. White list and black list filters control which sites/connections are decrypted for privacy and enterprise compliance.

SSL Locksmith is a standalone product which can be used with various technologies. It works with any packet analysis or capture solution, such as IDS, IPS, DLP, network forensics and web content monitoring solutions, to reveal content.

Where can you buy it and how much does it cost? The AccessData SSL Locksmith can be bought from ARM (Advanced Risk Mitigation), AccessData’s distribution partner in the Middle East region. The price is available on request from ARM.

// WWW.ITP.NET /

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 45


// TRAINING / MICROSOFT CERTIFIED IT PROFESSIONAL COURSE

Training

Become a certified administrator The Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) course is essential for those who want a career in IT infrastructure management says Aditya Girish, centre manager, Dubai Operations, Koenig Solutions

MICROSOFT CERTIFIED IT PROFESSIONAL (ENTERPRISE ADMINISTRATOR) FAST TRACK COURSE DATES: • 10th August to 4th September 2013 • 12th October to 6th November 2013 • 9th November to 4th December 2013 • 14th December to 8th January 2014 COSTS • With 4 star hotel: $10,400 plus $1,000 registration fee • With Koenig Deluxe Apartment: $9,320 plus $1,000 registration fee • Without Hotel: $7,160 plus $1,000 registration fee Along with the MCITP Enterprise Administrator certification, students can attend the following courses: • CEH • CCNA

What does the Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) course involve? The Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) is a certification that covers the full spectrum of Microsoft’s operating system and server related network configurations. This certification course has a focus on real world situations giving students the tools to correctly manage large projects in an enterprise environment. This course provides students with the skills needed to run a highly efficient and modern data centre, with expertise in identity management, systems management, virtualisation, storage, and networking. It also provides skills in Windows infrastructure design and helps students to excel in working with Windows Server 2008 (R2). What benefits does the course give the student in the Middle East employment market? Enterprise administrators are recognised among their peers and managers as lead-

// 46 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

Aditya Girish from Koenig says the MCITP (EA) course is essential for IT professionals.

This course provides students with the skills needed to run a highly efficient and modern data centre, with expertise in identity management, systems management, virtualisation, storage, and networking.”

ers in Windows infrastructure design. The Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) certification, distinguishes students as IT professionals committed to excellence in working with Windows Server 2008 (R2). Although students may have the experience behind them, it is still very important to keep qualifications up to date in a rapidly expanding and transforming industry. The Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) certification will expand students knowledge base and skills, making them an important asset to future employers.

// WWW.ITP.NET /


// TRAINING / MICROSOFT CERTIFIED IT PROFESSIONAL COURSE

Although students may have the experience behind them, it is still very important to keep qualifications up to date in a rapidly expanding and transforming industry. ”

Target Audience • System administrators • Technical support assistants • System analyst • System consultant • Web server administrators You can take a Knowledge Level Test from Koenig Solutions to evaluate your aptitude for this Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) program by getting in touch with us: http://www.koenigsolutions.com/knowledgelevel-test.aspx

Is it an essential qualification for IT professionals? This course is essential for anybody who wants to have a career in IT Infrastructure Management Services. This course is the base for the other advanced courses in ITIMS be it related to client and server management and monitoring (System Centre Configuration Manager, System Centre Operations Manager, Exchange, etc) or be it related to Security Management and Monitoring (Certified Ethical Hacking). Enterprise administrators are responsible for deploying mission-critical systems in a production environment. It is their job to ensure all solutions are installed correctly with minimal impact to business.

What kind of knowledge base do students need to have already before attending the courses? Before enrolling for the Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator) training program, it is strongly recommended that you have knowledge of Basic Networking, PC Hardware Skills, and Basic OS Skills.

Who should attend the MCITP (EA) course? The Microsoft Certified Enterprise Administration qualification is best for those who want to work within a medium to large sized company as an IT professional.

// WWW.ITP.NET /

How many places are there on each course? Our batch size does not exceed seven participants. In addition, we also run one-onone training for our MCITP (Enterprise Administrator) courses at an additional cost.

CAREER PATH

The course teacher’s perspective YOGENDER SINGH, MICROSOFT TRAINER, EXPLAINS THE MCITP (EA) COURSE How does the specified course improve or enhance a student’s career? It is a top tier qualification and proves to employers and clients that you have undergone a very high level of training and testing in this field. This course is a must-do for any IT professional and is the foundation for further specialisation. What are the most challenging parts of the course? The most challenging part of this course is understanding the best practices to be followed, and the considerations to be kept in mind while implementing an Enterprise Wide IT Infrastructure.

What is the demand for the course like in the region? This course is a foundation for any IT Infrastructure Management Services Job. So, it is a must do course for people looking for a career in this field. Do IT professionals in the region generally have the necessary up-to-date qualifications? As this is one of the most popular IT course, many people have this qualification. The demand for this course is very high as this course is the foundation for IT Infrastructure Management Services as well as many other advanced information technology courses.

COURSE INFORMATION What other courses that you offer are good for IT professionals to attend to move their career forward? Participants can opt for advance level technologies such as System Centre configuration Manager 2012; Sharepoint 2010, 2013; Microsoft Exchange 2010, 2103; Microsoft Lync Server 2010 & 2013.

How much does the whole track cost? A regular track course extends for 43 days (including days booked for examination) and costs $10, 580. We also provide fast track for the same course which extends for 26 days and costs $7,160.

What dates are the next training courses and where are they held? The next batches for regular track training starts on 27th July and 24th August and for Fast track the batch starts on 10th August, 2013.

// AUGUST 2013 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / 47


// FIVE MINUTES / SAMER ISMAIR

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: +971 4 444 3000 Fax: +971 4 444 3030 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai and London

Five minutes with…

ITP TECHNOLOGY PUBLISHING CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Managing Director Karam Awad Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell General Manager Peter Conmy Editorial Director David Ingham

Samer Ismair

EDITORIAL Editor Georgina Enzer Tel: +971 4 444 3316 email: georgina.enzer@itp.com Senior Group Editor Mark Sutton Tel: +971 4 444 3225 email: mark.sutton@itp.com Contributors Piers Ford

MEMA NETWORK CONSULTANT AT BROCADE COMMUNICATIONS

What is your current role in the ICT industry in the Middle East and what are your responsibilities? I work for Brocade Middle East, as a networking consultant specialised in the data centre solutions that Brocade offers. Some of my daily responsibilities include customer meetings for technology/product updates and to discuss network projects, building proper network designs that fit customer requirements, and maintaining relationships with Brocade channel partners.

mobile phones, smart devices) are leading to fresh, world-class and innovative ideas that combat local and regional challenges. The Middle East no longer lags far behind the developed countries in the adoption of the latest technologies. We get a sense that CIOs and IT managers in the region are doing all they can to equip themselves to making better technology decisions by attending conferences, workshops, exhibitions and other forums. Vendors play a big role in this developing education process.

What do you love about your job? My job involves a lot of travel and I thoroughly enjoy visiting many countries, interacting with a variety of people and experiencing so many different cultures.

TOP 5 What is your favourite film? Braveheart iOS, BlackBerry or Android? BlackBerry business,iPad while traveling or at home What is your favourite gadget? iPad Who is your favourite band/musician? Michael Flatley’s Lord of the Dance music and Riverdance

How innovative do you think the network industry in the Middle East is? In emerging growth markets like the Middle East, new access to existing technologies (eg, higher-speed broadband,

// 48 / NETWORK MIDDLE EAST / AUGUST 2013 /

What are the upcoming trends or products in your sector? We are still seeing market adoption and a growing trend in the areas of virtualisation and data centre convergence. Mobility and cloud are really the areas to watch out for this year. Does Brocade have green initiatives? Brocade has invested heavily in R&D to ensure that its products’ energy credentials are market-leading. What BYOD do you use? I use the company given blackberry to connect to my email and certain company files. I have my personal iPad to connect as well to my corporate emails and have limited access to company’s resources. And from my company’s laptop, I can access all the companies resourses anytime. What are your ‘out of office’ hobbies? Playing basketball, swimming, travelling, watching movies, spending time with my family and playing with my daughters.

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Network Middle East is audited by BPA Worldwide Average Qualified Circulation: 5,174 (6 month audit July to Dec 2012)

Published by and © 2013 ITP Technology Publishing, a division of the ITP Publishing Group Ltd. Registered in the B.V.I. under Company Number 1402846.

// WWW.ITP.NET /


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Š Copyright 2013 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.


Network - August 2013  

Network Middle East Magazine, Vol 19 - Issue 8 - August 2013 by ITP publishing, Dubai [52pages]

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