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DECEMBER 2016

MARIECLAIRE.CO.UK

NEW GEN

party looks slinky metallics & sexy shoes

Let it snow!

Gorgeous gifts & fun ways to get festive

Family affairs

‘Born black but my parents told me I was white’

THE NEW

Ruth

Wilson

The enigmatic British beauty

Glamour Report

‘The music industry’s dirty little secret’





 


The Spirit of Travel


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PHOTOGRAPH BY DREW WHEELER. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY ADELE SANDERSON. TRISH WEARS SHIRT, ROBERTO CAVALLI AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

Editor’s letter

19

Right now, members of the Marie Claire team are filling recycling bags with old copies of magazines, dusty press releases and the random things (yes, even loo rolls) that get sent into the office on a far too regular basis. No, it’s not tidy Friday, but the preparation for a big change to the way we work. Hot-desking, remote working, meetings via Skype: we are embracing an exciting and brave new work culture that will rely more than ever on teamwork and communication. So it’s apt (and honestly a coincidence) that we have a feature this month on the power of great teams (page 133) and how they can enhance not just your work life, but your personal skill set, too. Talking of skill, I’m delighted we have not one, but two of my favourite British actresses in this issue: cover star Ruth Wilson and leading lady Claire Foy. Since she played Jane Eyre straight out of drama school, I’ve been a huge fan of Wilson, and have relished watching her in a succession of versatile roles and dramas, from Luther to The Affair (collecting some pretty great leading men on the way – Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, Jake Gyllenhaal, Idris Elba…). Claire Foy, meanwhile, first caught my attention in Little Dorrit, and was a joy to watch giving the great Mark Rylance a run for his money as Anne Boleyn in last year’s Wolf Hall. She will be Queen once more, playing Elizabeth II in new Netflix drama The Crown, which I’m definitely earmarking for Christmas TV bingeing. As it’s the ‘most wonderful time of the year’, we have, as always, lots of great fashion and beauty ideas as well as a nine-page gift directory (page 155) to help make your holiday as fun and fabulous as possible. We’ve also devoted our special dossier to all things festive (page 110), exploring the psychology of why this event provokes so many emotions (good and bad). We also meet women whose jobs revolve around the 25th December, including a vegetarian turkey farmer (yes, really), and reveal where all those – peculiar when you think about them – Yuletide traditions began. Enjoy the issue and have a very merry Christmas.

TRISH HALPIN Editor in Chief @trishhalpin


TABLE OF

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01 C OVER STORIE S 57 New gen party looks

290

Slinky metallics & sexy shoes

155 Let it snow! Gorgeous gifts & fun ways to get festive

117 Family affairs ‘Born black but my parents told me I was white’

186

121 Report ‘The music industry’s dirty little secret’

175 The new glamour 186 Ruth Wilson The enigmatic British beauty

59 Trends: eveningwear, military and metallics 65 The one: Dolce & Gabbana’s neck candy 66 Shoes first: dance-floor divas 68 Style edit: winter fashion, street-style 80 Fashion details 83 Christmas decorations: cool new jewellery 86 Hot list 89 Style spotlight: Emilia Wickstead 91 Festive fashion formulas 94 #Curve 96 Marie Claire goes shopping 290 Finishing touches: punk power

FEAT URE S

68

105 Newsfeed 110 Dossier: the most wonderful time of the year 126 Interview: Claire Foy 133 Psyche: the power of teamwork 137 First person: ‘I felt guilty for surviving’ 140 Life stories: Helen Mirren 147 Reporter 273 Health: ’Tis the season to have sex 277 Deluxe 286 Travel: the girl on the snow train

155

133

FA SHION FIR ST


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FA SHION 176 All woman Festive dressing with a difference

194 Heavy metal fan Solid gold and silver jewellery take centre stage

200 Modern muse

213

Resort collection

BEAU T Y 209 Beauty news

126

194

Ellie Bamber showcases Chanel’s

210 Skin SOS: hangover skin 213 The edit: hot new scents

214 Talking points: the statement lip is back 225 Hair buzz 226 Beauty rules 229 #MCBeautyDesk 233 Men’s grooming special

176

EVERY MONTH 19 Editor’s letter 46 MC HQ 172 How to subscribe

Photograph by Drew Wheeler. Styled by Jayne Pickering. Hair by Seiji at The Wall Group using Oribe. Make-up by Talia Sparrow at Kramer + Kramer using Dior Christmas Look and Capture Totale Dreamskin. Nails by Yuko Wada at Atelier Management using Chanel Le Vernis in Ballerina & Body Excellence Hand Cream. Production by The Production Factory NY. Ruth wears: top, Dior Haute Couture. Recreate Ruth’s make-up with: Skin Illusion Natural Radiance Foundation SPF 10, £28; Instant Concealer 02, £22; Bronzing Duo Mineral Powder Compact, £30; Instant Light Brush On Perfector in Pink Beige, £25.50; Blush Prodige Illuminating Cheek Colour in Rosewood, £27; Eye Brow Liner in Soft Brown, £17.50; Ombre Matte Cream Eyeshadow in Nude Beige, £19; Mascara Supra Volume in Intense Black, £21.50; Instant Light Lip Balm Perfector in Rose, £18.50; Joli Rouge Lipstick in Tea Rose, £20; Clarins Fix’ Make Up, £24, all Clarins


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DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Lucy Abbersteen VIDEOGRAPHER Andrea Moro (12 MONTHLY ISSUES, INC P&P): UK £43.20. Priority mail: EUROPE (3-5 days) €117; NORTH AMERICA (5-7 days) $229; REST OF THE WORLD (5-7 days) £148. Direct entry USA (5-12 days) $113. Cheques payable to Time Inc. (UK) Ltd. For enquiries and orders, please email help@magazinesdirect.com. Alternatively, from the UK, call 0330 333 1113 or from overseas, call +44 330 333 1113 (lines open Monday-Friday GMT 8.30am-5.30pm, excluding bank holidays). To obtain back issues, call 01733 385170 or go to mags-uk.com/timeinc. Marie Claire is a registered trademark. Copyright © 2014 Marie Claire Album, Paris. Prices quoted in this issue are correct at time of going to press. Distribution by Marketforce (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU (020 3148 3333); printed in Great Britain by Wyndeham Roche; repro by Rhapsody Limited; cover printed at Wyndeham Roche. Sole agents: Australia and New Zealand, Gordon & Gotch (Asia) Ltd; South Africa, Central News Agency Ltd. Marie Claire (main issue 0955-0178; compact size 1743-8306) is published monthly by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, England. The 2014 US annual subscription price is $113. Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica NY 11434. US Postmaster: send address changes to Marie Claire, Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Subscription records are maintained at Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, England. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent. Marie Claire is sold subject to these conditions: that it shall not, without written consent of the Publishers first given, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise disposed of by way of Trade at more than the recommended selling price shown on the cover (selling price in Eire subject to VAT), and that it shall not be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise disposed of in a mutilated condition or in any unauthorised cover by way of Trade or annexed to or as part of any publication or advertising, literary or pictorial matter whatsoever. Marie Claire cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. We reserve the right to publish and edit any letters. This issue is on sale 3 November 2016

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Meet the team JAY N E P I C K E R I N G MARIE CLAIRE’S FA SH ION DI R E C TOR

Te l l u s w h a t y o u d o … ‘ I h e a d u p M a r i e C l a i r e ’s f a s h i o n department and shoot for t h e m a g a z i n e ’s m a i n f a s h i o n

READY, STEADY, SHOP!

section. Twice a year, I go to the shows in New York, Lond o n , M i l a n a n d Pa r i s t o d e c i d e o n t h e t r e n d s t h a t w i l l s h a p e o u r

Have you heard? We’ve launched our

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time slots. Beauty lovers, rejoice!

PSST…

Bookmark Fabled.com for exciting Black Friday offers in-store and online soon

If you were not in fashion, what would you do? ‘ I w o u l d l i k e t o b e a g a r d e n e r. ’

#INSTABEAUTY

What are you currently reading? ‘ A m e r i c a n Pa s t o r a l b y P h i l i p R o t h . ’ If you could click your fingers to be somewhere else…

Every month on Instagram

‘I’d go anywhere in India, from Rajasthan to Goa.’

Stories, we’ll be bringing

W h o ’s b e e n y o u r f a v o u r i t e p e r s o n t o s t y l e ?

you the best beauty tutorials

‘ I h a v e b e e n l u ck y e n o u g h t o s t y l e s o m e a m a z i n g women, but Beyoncé is definitely up there.’

from the team, as well as the

What couldn’t you live without?

latest product drops from

‘A b l u e s h i r t . A n d m y d e s i g n e r o f ch o i c e w o u l d b e C é l i n e . ’

Fa b l e d b y M a r ie C la ir e .

Marie Claire HQ Tap in to all our social feeds for cool videos,

PARTY PREPPED

DEAR SANTA Please bring me (or that hard-to-buy-for friend) a

’Tis the season to be dressy, so your outfits need to be on point. Head to our pick of stylish party pieces at marieclaire.co.uk/ fashion/shopping and get clicking. 

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Fashion first HOT RIGHT NOW... Precious metal Reboot your bling with our pick of must-have jewellery

Sartorial stats One power purchase + the perfect add-ons = festive season sorted

STE LLA McCARTN EY

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

Evening class Sumptuous silk slips and velvet loungewear score serious style points


Fashion first

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N eck l a ce, £ 1 , 2 0 0, D o l ce & G a b b a na

Fashion first

Collared

THE ONE

65

Secure your style status with a STANDOUT necklace.

SEDUCTIVE satin and a DECADENT buckle, obligatory

Styled by ABISOYE ODUGBESAN Photograph by DAVID ABRAHAMS


Shoes first

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#SHOESFIRST

Dance-f loor d i v a s Baroque, bejewelled and bedecked with pearls: cue the party scene-stealers

0 1 S an dal s, £ 650 , La urence D a ca de a t Bro wns 02 S ho es, £ 255 , Rus s ell & B r omley 03 B oots , £ 672, Dr ies V an Noten 04 Boots, £ 89, T o psho p 05 S ho es, £725, Ma no l o Bl a hni k 06 Shoes , £ 875 , Simone Rocha 07 Shoes , £ 580 , Alber ta Fer r etti 08 S ho es, £90 , D une 09 S a nda ls , £ 45 , ASOS 10 Shoes , £ 1,695, B alenciaga

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07


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Styled by DES LEWIS Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

classics – the latest looks for winter are street-style ready

Exaggerated silhouettes, clashing prints and twists on

Style edit


Fashion first

69

ARTISTIC FLARE Th is p a g e: b r a l et , £ 1 2 . 9 9 , Zara; top (worn underneath), £59, Phase Eight; trousers, £5 3 5 , M a r q ues ’ Al mei d a a t M a t ches fa s hi o n. co m; b o o t s , £4 0 , R i v er Is la n d ; e a r r i ng s , £ 1 0 0, A llis o n B r y a n; r i ng , £1 0 3 , M a r i a B l a ck

NATURAL ORDER O p p o s it e p a g e: j a ck et , £5 5 5 , a n d t r o u s e r s , £3 3 0 , b o t h J a cq uemus at Browns; shoes, about £4 7 9 , Ti b i ; ea r r i ng , £ 1 7 9 , M a ria Black ; r i ng , £ 1 3 4 , C o r n e l i a We b b


Fashion first

70 IN PRINT This page: shirt , £2 9 8 , Drake’s for J C r e w ; t r o user s, £ 55, U r b a n R enewal a t Urb a n Out fit t er s; ear r ings , £1 0 0 , Alliso n B r yan; ring , £ 103, Mar ia Bla ck

THE LONG GAME Opposit e page : s hirt , £ 225, Haizhen Wa n g ; t r o user s , £3 7 0 , Dr ies Van No t en a t B r o wns; boo t s , £7 1 5 , Laur ence Da ca d e


Fashion first

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FLUFFED LINES Ab o v e: j a ck e t, £2 4 9, M a r c C a i n ; dress (worn und er nea t h) , £ 49 .9 9, Zara

CHECK MATE R i g ht : s hi r t , £ 3 6, AS O S; t r o us er s , £ 2 8, and shoes, £ 6 5, both N e x t


Fashion first

74

LACED UP

PEEP SHOW B el o w : b l o us e, £ 49 5, S i m o n e R o ch a ; b r alet, £2 4 5 , P r i ng l e o f S co t l an d ; je a ns , £ 2 4 0 , A l e x a n der Wang ; ea rring , £ 2 2 0 , a n d rin g , £ 2 1 0, b o t h Al i g h i e ri

HAIR BY BJORN KRISCHKER AT FRANK AGENCY USING ORIBE AND LUXURY HAIR EXTENSION BRAND BEAUTY WORKS. MAKE-UP BY PHOEBE WALTERS USING TOM FORD BEAUTY. MODEL: BELLA BROEKMAN TILBURY AT IMG MODELS. LOCATION BY AIRSPACE LOCATIONS

R i g ht : d r es s , £ 21 9, B a u m u n d P f e r d g a r ten; sweater (worn underneath), £ 1 2 , N e x t ; b o ots, £ 8 2 5, J W And er son


Fashion first

80 63, £1,6 e n i l é C

KENZO

BALE NCIAGA

Kenzo, Maison Margiela and Balenciaga went all out on the ear-candy front this season with a host of quirky showstoppers. You heard it here first.

MAISON MARGIELA

HANG TOUGH

Luxe leather? Tick. Buckle

are standing firm at the top

Whistles has

Fashion D E TA I L S

S O N IA RYK I E L

our wish list.

DREAM TEAM

Hot ideas and chic looks for an Instaglam wardrobe

collaborated with London nightwear and loungewear brand Yolke to create some gorgeous pyjama and eye-mask sets in two exclusive prints. The limited-edition sets, £175, will be available at selected Whistles

Br Z a a top £ 6 r a ; s , £2 5. 9, h H o i r t , 99, bb s

stores. Snoozing has never looked

MSGM

so stylish.

L I N G E R I E L AY E R I N G

Crop top, £135, J Brand at N e t-a-p o rte r. co m ; s h i rt, £22 5 , Marqu e s ’ Almeida at Browns

Smalls have just hit the big time. Yep, underwear is officially the new outerwear – layer up over a shirt or dress for the perfect look.

COMPILED BY GRACE SMITHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

Céline boots

S A N DY L I A N G

heel? Tick. These

LUST ITEM

detail? Tick. Cone


Fashion first

83

Christmas decorations A power piece can upgrade your look in seconds. Cue the catwalk’s key jewellery trends…

02

CIA

GA

STATEMENT 01

LEN

earrings

04

05

E LLE RY ASH LEY WILLIAMS

C H R I S TO P H E R K A N E

BA

It was all about the earring this season, with seriously eye-catching designs taking centre stage at the major shows. Reboot your winter wardrobe with a bold, pendulous pair and go BIG. Size really does matter.

06

01 £39, Fossil 02 £215, Jennifer Fisher at Net-a-porter.com 03 £420, Annelise Michelson 04 £125, Alexis Dove 05 £1,820, Clogau 06 £59, Swarovski 07 £269, Sif Jakobs

07

03

VALE NTI N O

01 02

RING

leaders OSM AN

03

05

06

After a more subtle style update? Invest in some signature rings instead. Team MC loves to see a band on every finger, and you’ll earn bonus fashion points for piling on chunky signet numbers.

01 £490, Charlotte Chesnais 02 £279, H Samuel 03 £15, Jon Richard 04 £84.99, Gemporia.com 05 £160, Thomas Sabo at Goldsmiths 06 £250, Ernest Jones 07 £49, Trollbeads.com

04

07


Fashion first

S A LV A T O

BOLD

S O N IA RYK I E L

84 b ra ce l e ts

01

AG RE FERR

Bangles, cuffs, chunky chains: bracelets of every description stormed the runways. The biggest sartorial mistake you can make right now is to leave your wrist bare.

AMO

02 ROKSAN DA

01 £69, Skagen 02 £155, MICHAEL Michael Kors 03 £199, Amanda Wakeley 04 £150, Links of London at Harrods 05 £100, Maje at selfridges.com 06 Silver bangles, £170 each, and gold bangle (centre), £275, all Dinny Hall at Harvey Nichols 07 £79.50, Nikki Lissoni

03

04

05

06

07 03

02

05

PEARL

p owe r

CHA

Ladylike was the theme of the season and what is a lady without a pearl? For a modern take, substitute your triplestrand necklace for a pareddown pearl earring or ring. Team with a pussy-bow blouse or a classic trench for pure pearl perfection. Q

NEL

06

01 Bracelet, £160, Diamonfire. co.uk 02 Ring, £620, Anissa Kermiche 03 Earrings, £490, Delfina Delettrez 04 Ring, £215, Chloé at Net-a-porter.com 05 Earrings, £95, Folli Follie 06 Ring, £45, Pandora

COMPILED BY ROSIE SMYTHE. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

04 MARNI

CH

AN

EL

01


THOMASSABO.COM

CONTACT: +44 (0) 20 77 20 97 25 UK@THOMASSABO.COM


Fashion first

86

10

1

2

THE

9

HOT LIST

3

Our edit of the new high-street drops

6

8 7

5

1 S h i r t , £ 7 5 , Ute rqü e 2 B a g , £ 2 9, an d d e t ach ab l e st r ap, £ 12 , bo t h Accessor iz e 3 Skirt, £ 165, Topshop Unique 4 C l o t h e s p i n s , £ 1 2 (f or pack of two), Ri v e r Isl an d 5 Shoes, £ 55.99, Zar a 6 Dress, £ 60, Next 7 B ag, £ 49.99, Mango 8 Tr ou se r s, £ 1 5 0, Ware h ou se 9 Shoes, £ 59.99, H&M 10 Jacket, £ 23, Pr imar k

COMPILED BY ROSIE SMYTHE. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

4


w ww. viv iennewestwood. com


Wickstead’s mo t t o ? Think pink. ‘It ’s so r t of become my good-luck co lour. It st ar t ed as a dusky pink, but go t br ight er.’

Skir t , £2,250 , Emilia Wickstead

‘Th e co l l ect i o n included a “Jan e E y r e” c o lla r, ’ s a y s Wi ck s t e a d . ‘I lo ve w a t ch i n g old films –you c a n se e s o met hi ng a n d t hi nk , “ I ’ m g o in g t o a d d t h a t i n!” ’

T he designer in her f lag ship st ore

Al ex a C hung

‘I l ov e d ou r f ab ri c s f or th i s c ol l e c ti on an d the contrast of th e g e om e tri c s, broc ade l ac e an d sh i m m e ry stri p e s,’ s ays Wickstead. ‘I’m a b i g f an of u si n g h e avy wool s fo or d r e sse s.’’ Skirt, £1 ,7 9 0, Em i l i a Wi ck s te a d Dress, £7 6 5 , E m i l i a Wickst e a d

Phot o gr apherr Erwin Blumenfeld d was numer o u no o n her mo od d bo ar d: ‘The t r anspar ent st r ipe in o ne of his pict ur es inspir ed me.’

STYLE SPOTLIGHT

WORDS BY JESS WOOD. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS, REX FEATURES, TINA HILLIER/KIOSK (PORTRAIT OF EMILIA), © YVETTE BLUMENFELD GEORGES DEETON/ART + COMMERCE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

Emilia Wickstead Emilia’s a low-key Kiwi with a penchant for ball gowns – in the coolest possible way. Wickstead has become one of London fashion’s biggest success stories, with her ladylike aesthetic that draws on classic couture silhouettes – full, sweeping skirts and balloon sleeves with a pared-back edge, in exquisitely modern colour palettes. ‘I’m known for quite dressed-up styles, but I like adding something that’s a little more “street”,’ she says of her AW16 show venue – a grey, concrete space in King’s Cross. Despite her celeb-packed front row, her three-year-old daughter, Mercedes Amalia, managed to snaffle a seat, while her husband stood at the back to avoid taking up a spot. ‘Sometimes, I’ll have to pick her up from nursery and take her to work with me. She loves it – the clothes, the choices! We’re a pretty chilled family,’ says the designer (she also has a baby boy, Gilberto). Yet, Wickstead’s designs are giving Europe’s mega labels a run for their money on the red-carpet front – look no further than super fans Alexa Chung and the Duchess of Cambridge for evidence of her classic/cool crossover appeal. Born in Auckland and brought up in Milan, Wickstead came to London to study at Central Saint Martins before starting a made-to-measure business designing pieces for London’s discreet-chic set. Eight years later, she has a shop in Belgravia and a star spot on the LFW schedule. ‘Every day I wake up and love my job,’ she says. ‘I hope women wear my designs now, then put them in their wardrobe for their children and their grandchildren.’ Here, she talks us through her AW16 inspirations….

Fashion first

89 Top, £520 , Emilia Wickstead


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91 Fashion first Fash

Fe s t i v e f a s h i o n formulas One killer buy can see you through the season. Trust us, we’ve done ne the maths

The velvet suit 04

01

+ 03

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

+ 02

KOCHE

+

05

+

06

= Day chic

= Night glam

Te a m your v elv et e t w o- pi ece wi th h a p l ai n

Rock it with a heel, a statement clutch and

t e e and flat sho es to create an effortlesss

a cute corset if you want to opt for a dressy

lo o k for y our C hr h i s t ma s fam i l y m e al .

vibe. Cocktails outfit, sorted.

01 T-shirt, £40, Whistles 02 Shoes, £32, Next 03 Jacket, £520, and trousers, £365, both Koché at Avenue32.com 04 Corset, £39, Finery London 05 Bag, £1,480, Manolo Blahnik 06 Sandals, £69, & Other Stories

MA

The printed shirt

RN I

03

+

04

+ 05

PAUL SMITH

01 06

08

02

+

+

07

+ = Christmas Day

= G i r l s’ n i g h t

We a r lo o se ly o v e r a p a ir o f b o ld t r o u se r s

Tu ck i n t o a wrap skirt an d ad d

and f inish of f w it h some embellished

metallic accessories (and friends)!

add-ons. Christmas-Day perfection.

01 Skirt, £395, Raey at Matchesfashion.com 02 Bag, £1,425, Mark Cross at Net-a-porter.com 03 Shoes, £320, Emporio Armani 04 Shirt, £145, Topshop Unique 05 Bag, £10, Primark 06 Trousers, £265, Max Mara 07 Earrings, £12.50, Marks & Spencer 08 Shoes, £455, Robert Clergerie x Sonia Rykiel


92

01

+

= Cocktail hour 01

Work a standout skirt for festive

03

tipples by pairing it with a silk blouse, killer flatforms and b o ld ear r ings.

+

The slip dress

02

+ = Theatre date L a y e r i t ov er a met a l l i c po l o neck, add decorated shoes and earrings, and you’re date-ready.

02

E N O A IM H S OC R

05

04

+ 06

06

+

Y

+

= Romantic dinner D r e ss d o w n y o u r s l i p d ress with

= B ox i n g D a y

a b l a z e r, b a ck l e s s l o a fers and a

W ar w it h a caasual po We olo lo

long-strap bag. Ideal for a cosy

nec a nd f lat trainers for neck

C h r i s t m a s m e a l w i t h y our partner.

07

0 1 S h o e s , £ 8 9 5 , M a l o ne Souliers at Matchesfashion.com 0 2 E a r r i n g s , £ 5 5, U te rqü e 03 Swe a te r , £17 5 , Fleur B 04 Dress, £35, ASOS 05 Bag, £1,225, Edie Parker 06 Shoes, £25, River Island 07 Jacket, £29.99, Zara

a g r eat B oxing g-D ay look.

01 Blouse, £120, Warehouse 02 Sandals, from a selection, Rosie Assoulin 03 Earrings, £220, Simone Rocha at Brownsfashion.com 04 Skirt, £475, Rejina Pyo 05 Sweater, £34.95, Gap 06 Trainers, £52, Vans at Schuh Q

COMPILED BY GRACE SMITHAM. THAM. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. OYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM .COM

DKN

+

JO

SE

PH

05

The statement skirt

EN AN NOT D R IE S V

04

03

CK BRO TION LEC COL

+


‘My aest het ic t ends t o lean t o war ds a dar ker palet t e, but every now and then I lo ve a pop of co lour. Deep r uby and fier y r eds ar e al l the rage this winter, and t his go r geous r ed velvet midi [left ] will t ake yo u fr o m desk t o dance flo o r wit h z er o effor t .’ Jacket, £150, Simply Be; top, £19.99, and shoes, £27.99, both New Look; skirt, £36, Evans; bag, £50, Dune

‘ The j ump s ui t i s my n e w p arty g o-to – a s i mp l e b l a ck d es i g n i s an i d e al al te rn ati v e t o t he LB D , b ut w e ari n g on e wi th a pri n t or a b o l d s t r i p e [l i k e th e on e b e l ow] c an lo o k e q u a l l y s t u n n ing for events.’ Jacket, £150, and jumpsuit, £42, both Simply Be; earrings, £50, House of Harlow; bag, £245, Russell & Bromley

C lut ch, £14 , B oohoo. com

Ne ck l a c e, £5 . 9 9, Ne w Look C ar digan, £42 , Ev ans Bag, £65, D une Blouse, £3 3 6, Mari n a R i n al d i

S a nda l s , £ 25 , M a r k s & S penc er

‘A p re mium, d irect io na l ba g a l w a y s e a r n s y o u r ex t r a s t y l e p o i n t s , so invest wisely. ’ Bag, £50, Dune

Top, £28 , AS OS

E V R Bag, £22 , Next

This month, our resident columnist Callie Thorpe is pulling together fashionforward looks for Christmas Party season has officially arrived – cue a flurry of work events, cocktails with friends and cosy meals out. It’s the perfect excuse to live out your sartorial dreams, so don’t limit yourself to a little black dress. Chic stripes, playful textures and a rich palette will all help you to nail an on-trend festive wardrobe. Invest in premium fabrics (I’m loving leather and velvet) and focus on the key trends to keep your look modern. There’s no need to shy away from bold buys, either – I’ve got you, and your curves, covered.

Skirt, £99 , Elv i

‘Thanks t o t he catwalk, a silk pyjama suit is mor e luxe t han loungewear t his season, and it lo o ks par t yperfect with a killer heel. If matchy-matchy isn’t yo ur t hing, team a pyjama shir t wit h skinny jeans [r ight ].’ Shirt, £149, Elvi; jeans, £35, Evans; sandals, £25, Simply Be; earrings, £60, Maria Francesca Pepe; bag, £245, Russell & Bromley

STYLED BY ABISOYE ODUGBESAN. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

Tr o u s e r s , £ 22 , S i mpl y B e

#C U

Fashion first

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96

12

Fashion first

GLOBAL STAR Lo v e t h e Lo u i s Vu i t t o n ‘ Tw i s t ’ b a g ? The classic, go-to arm candy is back, but it’s been given a cool upgrade with playful

LACY NUMBERS

travel-inspired stickers. Designed to be worn a c r o s s t h e

The White Company

b o d y o r s l u n g o ve r th e s h o u l d e r, i t ’s t h e o n l y a c c e s s o ry

has lingerie all

y o u need to take

wrapped up for the

a simple s w e a t e r

festive season with

and jeans combo

simple lace sets in

into first-class style

pretty pastels. Bra,

t e rri t o ry. £2 , 4 3 0 ,

£34, and briefs, £22,

louisvuitton.co.uk

thewhitecompany.com

marie claire

GOES SHOPPING Time to treat yourself – well, it is the season of good will…

3

4

MOUTHPIECES

Jewellery designer Solange Azagury-

Partridge has added a touch of sparkle to her famous ‘Hotlips’ rings with a new glitter collection exclusively for Amazon. Hold the tinsel – we’ll be decking our Christmas-day outfit with these

5 COSY DOES IT

Wi th three decades of

TOP MARKS Alexa Chung has delved into the M&S archives for a second season to produce another amazing collection of autumn must-haves. We’re crushing on

knitwear design under its belt, Scandinavian

f a s h i o n b r a n d Pa r t Tw o i s s h o wi n g i t s s t e l l a r y a r n ex c e l l e n c e b y producing a special

all things velvet and Victoriana

A n n i v e rs a ry Kn i t

right now and we’ll be bagging

Collection. We can’t wait

this jacket, £59, and cute

t o wra p u p i n t h e g re y

blouse (right), £35, pronto.

swing cardigan (right).

Marksandspencer.com

£1 2 9 . 9 5 , p a rt t wo . c o m

COMPILED BY HANNAH MOORE

twinkly jewels. £69 each, amazon.co.uk


Promotional Feature

The main

E V E N T Matalan has party-season cool nailed. From sequinned bombers to sexy slips – every piece is a knockout

ALL THAT GLITTERS Just slip on t h e bomber when y o u leave yo ur desk a nd you’re party-rea d y Jacket , £ 28, sweat e r, £ 12, and skir t , £ 1 4, all Mat al a n


LOW-KEY LUXE Th e n e w g r u n g e i s grown-up and refined – and has just enough s p a rkl e fo r t he ho l i d a y s To p , £ 1 6 , T- s hi r t , £ 3 , skirt , £ 1 6 , a n d b o o t s , £2 5 , a l l M a t a l a n . S o ck s , m o d e l ’s o w n


Promotional Feature

SEASONAL STAPLES Two of fashion’s biggest fancies – the bomber and the pleated skirt – ar e your new par t y fr ock essent ials Jacket , £ 25, t op, £ 12, sweat er (wo r n under neat h), £ 14, and skir t , £ 18, all Mat alan


Promotional Feature DRESS CODE The babydoll dress is swinging back i n to ac ti on an d i s full of attitude D re ss, £1 6 , and f au x -f u r stol e , £8, both Mat al an

DYNAMIC DUO A b l a ck s h e e r t o p is an evening standard – wear it with a mini t o ke e p i t ed g y To p , £1 4 , a nd s k i r t , £1 6 , b o t h M a t a l a n

SMART STYLE For a fast festive fix, elevate classic black t r ouser s wit h an o ffthe-shoulder number To p, £ 14, and t r ouser s, £ 15, bot h Mat alan

WATCH THE SHOW See more of Matalan’s party wear and get expert styling advice from Marie Claire by tuning into The Show at matalan.co.uk.


feed

NEWS Ta s h i ( l e f t ) a n d Nungshi on an ex p e d i t i o n i n Queenstown, N ew Z ea l a nd

WO RLD IN P ICTUR ES

Twin peaks Meet the sisters from India breaking gender barriers by climbing the world’s seven highest summits When Colonel Virendra Singh Malik’s twin girls (now 25) were born, he recalls, ‘I was numb.’ India’s cultural preference for boys and the effect of female feticide has led to a gender ratio of 871 females per 1,000 males in Tashi and Nungshi Malik’s native Haryana, north India. But their father overcame societal pressures to encourage them to pursue their passion for sport. ‘Children in our village would say, “You can’t play cricket, you’re girls,”’ says Tashi. ‘But it’s important to be physically strong in a country where women are vulnerable. We know rape victims and we want to show girls that there’s hope.’ THE

AVERAGE

LENGTH

OF

MARRIAGE

This year, Tashi and Nungshi became the youngest climbers ever (and the world’s first twins) to complete the Explorers Grand Slam – scaling the world’s seven highest peaks, including Everest, and skiing to the North and South Poles. ‘Climbing is a metaphor for the daily struggle of gender discrimination,’ adds Nungshi. ‘It’s about sticking together. When we got to 8,000m on Everest, I was hallucinating from altitude sickness, but Tashi pulled me through.’ The Nungshi Tashi Foundation (nungshitashi.org) empowers girls in India through outdoor adventure sports and mountaineering.

A RO U N D

THE

WO R L D* :

I TA LY

18

Y E A RS


© 2016 COTY US LLC

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N E WS

Coming home for Christmas?

feed

REPORT

The number of women spending the festive period homeless has risen by 50 per cent since 2011. Tracy Ramsden reports Thousands o f ‘Within months, I had gone from working full-time as a mothers and childre n nursery nurse to being alone with my baby in a temporary find themselve s hostel that had mouldy walls and a broken toilet, which housed in tempora r y I shared with 19 other families,’ says Stacey, 26. ‘I would lie accommodat io n f or mont h s awake at night thinking, “How did I end up here?”’ Stacey isn’t an anomaly. With a 13 per cent rise in the last year alone, there are now 56,000 homeless women in the UK. who have been abused are 20 times more likely to become When we think of homelessness, rough sleepers in shop homeless than those who haven’t. Shelter has also issued a doorways spring to mind. But that’s only part of the growing warning about a rise in sordid adverts on listings sites such as problem – the part we can see. What about the young women Craigslist, which target homeless women by offering them sleeping in night shelters, spending Christmas in unsanitary accommodation in exchange for sex. In fact, 28 per cent of hostels, or drifting from sofa to sofa, relying on friends to women on the streets have reported having had unwanted provide an elusive roof over their heads? sex just to get a roof over their head. Once in the spiral, they Having split from her partner of seven years when their are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and son was small, Stacey went to live with her mum, but felt she addiction and, on average, die at just 43 years old. needed to move out after a row. She then sofa-surfed at friends’ The shocking figures have led to calls for the government houses for the next few months. But as her financial situation to deliver more genuinely affordable housing, tackle the socialworsened (she was on maternity leave and unable to afford housing shortage and build bridges between landlords and childcare), finding a place to rent grew increasingly difficult. tenants via longer tenancy agreements, and for housing benefits ‘You can only rely on friends for so long to be paid directly to landlords. before you start to feel like a burden and it For Stacey, the process of being allocated ‘This is not about individual social chips away at your dignity,’ says Stacey. housing was painful. ‘I was in a B&B people – it’s a wider issue for eight weeks, but it was damp so I didn’t The shortage of social housing is driving people into the already saturated caused by the breakdown feel [it was] safe for my son, who was born private rental sector. Fiercely competitive, three months prematurely and had had of the housing system’ unstable and often unattainable for those pneumonia,’ she says. Afterwards, Stacey was claiming benefits (57 per cent of landlords moved to a women’s hostel, which was refuse to let their properties to anyone on housing benefits) worse – she and her son spent Christmas Day there last year. means that Generation Rent is more vulnerable than ever. ‘The kitchen was filthy and our bed was broken with springs ‘There has been a dramatic increase in the number of sticking out of it,’ she says. ‘It got to the point where I wasn’t working people who find themselves homeless, and a quarter sure I wanted to wake up in the morning.’ of those confirmed as homeless by local authorities are twoThe hope for next year is that the government will commit parent families with children,’ says Kate Webb, head of policy to building affordable homes, including rentals, for people on for homelessness charity Shelter. ‘This is not about individual all incomes. ‘Local authorities also need to be given the people and the rights and wrongs of their lives – it’s a wider financial help they badly need so that families aren’t spending issue caused by the breakdown of the housing system. And Christmas in substandard accommodation,’ says Webb. it’s renters who are bearing the brunt. In a deliberately Stacey and her son, now two, finally secured social housing insecure market – tenancy agreements generally last for 6-12 in January this year. ‘Now we have the stability we craved, months – renters are spending the largest proportion of their I can go back to work and think about where I want my son to income on housing costs. Wages are stagnant and jobs go to school without the fear that I might have to move him,’ uncertain, especially for those on zero-hours contracts. So, if she says. ‘We’ll also have a nice big tree this Christmas.’ tenants are asked to leave by landlords, they’re finding it This year marks the 50th anniversary of Shelter. To support its more and more difficult to find somewhere else to live.’ emergency Christmas appeal and donate, visit shelter.org.uk. If It’s a reality that thousands of women are facing. Domestic you think you might be at risk of losing your home, call Shelter’s violence is also often a precursor to homelessness – women free advice line on 0808 800 4444.

CANADA – 14 YEARS; FRANCE – 13 YEARS; AUSTRALIA – 12 YEARS; MEXICO – 12 YEARS


‘Small Steps is a wonder ful organisation to be an ambassador for. I’ve been donating shoes for years. This year, I’m

feed

N EWS

donating my favourite red Miu Miu heels.’

Helen a Christensen

I n s h e r a h M o u s a , 3 8, tr a u ma sp e c i a l i st a t t h e C e n t e r f o r Vi c t i ms o f To r t u r e i n Jo r d a n

Inspiration ‘The people I see have survived the war in Syria or 13 years’ violence in Iraq, and fled to Jordan as refugees. One woman was raped by five soldiers at a checkpoint in one night. She hasn’t even told her husband yet. But since starting psychotherapy, she has been able to come off antidepressants and look after her children again. Stories like hers make me want to take on more clients.’

H i g h l i g ht ‘I co-founded the Jordanian Clinical Psychologists’ Association in September 2016. Finally, the shame around mental health is decreasing, and now someone who needs help can be sure their therapist has the right training so they can heal and move on with their lives.’

Goal ‘I want to empower women. Female Syrian refugees aren’t used to making decisions for their families, but they must if their husbands are in Syria or have been killed. If you change how women see themselves, their children learn by example. An empowered woman changes a society.’

‘I love my colour ful shoe co llectio n , b u t not as much as Small Step s.’

Chris Martin

‘I adore these shoe s and have had a lot o f fun in them tourin g with Jools Hollan d ! I hope they can rais e lots of cash for th i s incredible charit y. ’

Mel C

Stepping up Fancy walking in Kate Moss’s shoes? Now you can bid for them while helping children out of poverty Kate Moss, Emma Watson, Oprah Winfrey, Helena Christensen and Dita Von Teese are just a handful of the celebrities who have stepped forward to donate their most treasured pair of shoes to be auctioned off for the Small Steps Project. The charity was founded by former showbiz journalist Amy Hanson, who quit her job to launch the charity after a life-changing visit to Cambodia seven years ago. ‘I had just turned 30 and was looking for something more meaningful to contribute in life,’ says Hanson. ‘After seeing so many homeless kids scavenging barefoot on rubbish dumps filled with broken glass and sharp objects on Cambodia’s largest landfill site, I was heartbroken and an idea just came to me. I thought, perhaps I could use the experience and contacts I have through my job to make a positive change to their lives.’ And from her bedroom in north

London, the world’s biggest celebrity shoe auction was born. Today, Amy spends her time travelling between various Small Steps projects in Nicaragua, Romania and Laos to oversee how the funds are spent. What began as just giving out shoes, has developed into providing children with what they need to make the small steps out of poverty and into education, breaking the crippling cycle of scavenging for survival. ‘Thousands of Manolos could have been gathering dust in celebrity wardrobes all over the world, but instead they’ve helped fund nurseries, mother and baby units, medical, nutrition and education programmes and really transform lives,’ says Hanson. ‘And we’re just getting started.’ The Small Steps Project #Celebrity ShoeAuction starts on 1 November. To bid, visit smallstepsproject.org and hit the ‘Celebrity Shoes’. Q

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Compiled by TRACY RAMSDEN

THE MOST

wonderful time OF THE YEAR?

Frivolous spending, family feuds and age-old traditions: Christmas is as special as it is stressful. So why do we love it so much? Explore the psychology with Lizzie Pook, then meet the magic makers


Wine played ten times over in the office. ‘The value of tradition is its familiarity and dependability,’ says Batcho. ‘We count on these things because they counteract the constant change that is the essence of life. Knowing that there is a core that doesn’t change reinforces our sense of order and meaning in the world.’ According to a study by the University of Southampton, nostalgia is triggered by familiar smells and sounds that make us dwell on a memory – typically it’s a fond memory, but it can also bring on feelings of loss or regret, depending on your past experiences. It’s why the loss of a loved one can be more overwhelming at Christmas and why our heightened emotions over the festive period can feel bittersweet. Christmas is not all bells from on-high and ecstatic gingerbread baking. There are often simmering family tensions to negotiate when you pile three generations into one house and lace it with Monopoly, overindulgence and whisky. Indeed, a 2012 survey found that the average British household will have at least five rows on Christmas Day alone. ‘Christmas triggers a lot of anxiety for many of my clients,’ says psychotherapist Hilda Burke. ‘Most of us, when we retreat to our family home, are confronted with parents and siblings who treat us as they always have done. No matter what we’ve achieved, we can end up feeling childlike and disempowered. Team this with the nagging feeling that we should be having a perfect Christmas in harmony with our families, and the expectations become totally unachievable.’ And for those who didn’t enjoy Christmas as a child, finding their own traditions can be empowering. Elizabeth Leighton, 35, from London says: ‘Our family did Christmas very badly – it was just my mum and me stuck in my granny’s flat with her going on about how much she hated Christmas. But now that I have children of my own I have seized the chance to reinvent it for them – we go all-out with turkey, bread sauce, Quality Street, the works. I’m always urging my friends who have difficult, complicated families that ruin Christmas for them to take charge – we all work hard, why waste a free day off having an awful time? Life’s too short.’ Regardless of its appeal, this is simultaneously the most stressful and splendid time of the year. So go on, grab the tinsel, whack on Mariah, take a long, deep breath and have yourself a merry little Christmas, yeah?

‘There are often simmering family tensions to negotiate when you pile three generations into one house and lace it with whisky’

Like an excited five-year-old, I’ve been known to fall ill in the run-up to Christmas. It’s not the cold weather that gets me, or even the cheap adventcalendar chocolates; it’s the heady sense of anticipation that ties my stomach in knots. By November – when the Coca-Cola ad is on and a trip to John Lewis involves hearing Mariah Carey at least four times – I’m ready to bulldoze my way through the nearest Christmas market, guzzling every mug of mulled wine that crosses my path. Christmas is big business, boosted largely by commercialism. The average family spends at least £800 on the celebrations (that’s a lot of Quality Street), and in the UK alone, we buy 6 million rolls of Sellotape and more than 25 million Christmas puddings each year. So where exactly does this festive fervour come from, when almost half of us are not religious? Christmas has transcended theological Christian boundaries to become the most widely celebrated holiday in the Western world. ‘Being the only Jewish kid in my school, I remember being really jealous of everyone’s Christmas trees,’ says Anna Cowell, 30, from north London. ‘Now, I buy one every year, and decorate it while wearing a garish Xmas jumper. I celebrate Jewish holidays but I appreciate Christmas the way a tourist appreciates an amazing building in a foreign city. I think I am even more enthusiastic about the traditions because, to me, they are exotic and exciting.’ If we loved Christmas as a child, nostalgia is a crucial part of its appeal as an adult, too – from the scent of fallen pine-tree needles to the taste of warm brandy butter. ‘Christmas reminds us to pause our hectic schedules and take stock of how far we’ve come,’ says psychologist Krystine Batcho. ‘Harking back to childhood is a comforting respite from the stress of daily life. Yearning for the past reminds us that we were once loved for who we are – not for what we could do or did.’ Research has also shown that nostalgia benefits our emotional health, counteracting boredom and anxiety, and making people more generous and tolerant of strangers. ‘Nostalgia enhances our feelings of being socially connected and belonging within the family,’ says Batcho, ‘which is crucial for our emotional well-being.’ It’s no surprise, then, that every year many of us feel compelled to buy into that connection to our idealised past. We want the same pigs in blankets, the same moth-eaten 30-year-old stocking and the same version of Mistletoe And

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Making the magic Meet the women styling your festive season

LIZ SILVESTER

HEAD OF VISUAL IDENTITY AT LIBERTY ‘We start thinking about Christmas in January. In fact, I am about to take a trip to New York to start setting the scene for December 2017. For inspiration, I look at fashion, culture and what the city is doing, and then introduce unexpected elements from up-and-coming artists and designers. This year, we wanted a traditional approach and what’s more traditional than The Nutcracker? ‘In March, I pitched to Kevin O’Hare, the director of The Royal Ballet, with our vision for “Liberty presents… The Nutcracker”, and this Christmas, for the first time ever, our windows will hold no product. The idea is to give customers an immersive festive experience, not to shove products at them. Instead, we will be opening the curtains for an exclusive performance of The Nutcracker to take place in Liberty’s shop windows. In store, there will be wind-up Sugar Plum Fairies and a growing Christmas tree that pops out of one of the balconies. We’ve gone for a Scandinavian forest theme and worked with Diptyque to produce a bespoke scent for the garlands on the ground floor, so it’s a true multisensory experience. ‘I’m from up north so I get my inspiration from the Christmas markets of Yorkshire and Manchester. I also live near the V&A toy museum in London, which evokes that nostalgic excitement of childhood. At home, I’m also in charge of dressing the house for Christmas, so my neighbours can always expect something weird and wonderful hanging from my door wreath.’

Christmas traditions unwrapped What’s the story behind our much-loved rituals? With centuries-old customs still firmly in place today, we would be lost if we couldn’t find a tangerine at the bottom of our stocking or if our Christmas pudding was missing a shiny sixpence. But for something that happens every year, we know very little about our festive rituals. Author Mark Forssyth traces their roots in his new book, A Christmas C Cornu ucopia: The Hidden Stories Behin nd Our Yuletide Traditions (£9.99, Viking)

TH HE CHRISTMAS TREE Few w of us question why we pl k a dead tree in the corner plonk o ourr living room and cover it of i b ubles. The tradition dates in bau back b k to medieval Germany and northern France, where plays recounting the creation of the world were a popular midwinter tradition. In every production, performed on 24th December, there was a tree on stage decorated with apples and ribbons, which symbolised the tree of life in the Garden of Eden. It was Queen Victoria who made Christmas trees fashionable in Britain, after her German husband Prince Albert decorated his own at Windsor Castle in 1841. Many people followed suit, topping their tree with a Union Jack.

ADVENT CALENDARS The concept of advent has been around for centuries, but it was actually a Munich housewife who thought up the advent

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LISA DICKENSON

AUTHOR OF MISTLETOE ON 34TH STREET ‘I wrote my very first Christmas novel during the hottest summer that we’d had for seven years. I was sitting outside wearing shorts, attempting to summon up visions of the Regent Street lights. Now I use Pinterest to create mood boards to get me into the zone! I’ll also watch classic films or Christmas episodes of 30 Rock or Parks And Recreation and, if I’m focusing on a romantic scene, I’ll choose a song and listen to it on repeat until it becomes the soundtrack to my novel. ‘It helps that I can’t get enough of Christmas. I’m usually the only one celebrating when the decorations hit the shops in September. Ever since I was little my family and I have been to church on Christmas morning and watched It’s A Wonderful Life on Christmas Eve. When I write, it’s about capturing those sights, sounds, smells and emotions without veering into cliché. I find myself thinking, “Is there a new way to describe snow?” ‘I actually prefer the build-up to Christmas rather than the day itself. A few years ago, my now-husband and I had been travelling and New York was our final stop. He proposed on our last night there and we were desperate to get home to tell our friends and family but a huge snowstorm hit the UK. We got stuck in New York for five days with Christmas edging ever closer. Eventually, we flew out on Christmas Eve and landed on Christmas morning. Years later, I stole that storyline for my book.’

EWA KEPINSKA

ARTISAN TURKEY FARMER R FOR COPAS TURKEYS ‘When I tell people that I’m a turkey k farmer they’re often surprised, especially as I’m also a vegetarian. I studied finance, but realised it wasn’t for me – I prefer to be outdoors, doing something physically challenging. ‘Our turkey farm is so beautiful, even in the bleak winter months. I manage health and safety, which involves a lot of paperwork, and also the production schedule. We’re a small team of eight, but at Christmas we have 130 people working here and we slaughter around 35,000 birds. The birds are all dry-plucked because there’s less risk of bacteria contamination than with wet-plucking, so we know our meat is clean. Turkeys are then kept for 14 days in a cold store for maturing before evisceration to remove the offal and organise giblet bags. The turkeys are then packaged into beautiful boxes and dispatched to independent butchers or private clients. ‘I’ve been a vegetarian since high school when a friend who was training to be a doctor showed me some medical pictures that made me too squeamish to eat offal. It means that I can’t taste the products that we now sell but it has driven me to want to produce the cleanest, freshest quality meat and to help take care of our birds. It was difficult to see the slaughter process in the beginning (I can’t even kill a spider) but I’m used to it now. ‘I try to be on the farm for 6am throughout November and December and finish at 7pm. There isn’t much time to do my own Christmas shopping so I try to get that done in late October before the season starts. There’s a great atmosphere on the farm though: we have a huge tree and invite local farmers and buyers to drink mulled wine and look at our produce. By January I can slow down and take a holiday with friends to recuperate.’ Q

calendar, inventing it to forestall her son Gerhard’s endless questions about how long it was until Christmas Day. She would attach sweets to her advent calendar with string, and Gerhard would get to eat one sweet every day. Despite starting as a family tradition, Gerhard Lang went on to become the first person to mass produce advent calendars in 1908 – standardising them to start from 1st December instead of St Andrew’s Day (30th November), when Advent actually starts.

CHRISTMAS CRACKERS Much like Santa’s red outfit (he traditionally wore green until a Coca-Cola advert in 1931 changed his get-up to red), the invention of crackers was an advertising gimmick; merely a way of popularising sweet wrappers. They started in London as ‘cracker bon-bons’ in the 1840s: a novelty sweet with a strip of mild explosive in the wrapper that was triggered when you pulled the ends. It was Tom Smith who decided to replace the sweet with a love poem on a piece of paper and, later, the terrible jokes we get now. His son Walter had the idea of putting a paper crown inside, and Tom Smith Crackers still remains the largest manufacturer of Christmas crackers in the world today.

THE SILVER SIXPENCE The hiding of a silver sixpence inside a Christmas pudding is a centuries-old custom that promises the finder of the coin good luck. The tradition dates back to Tudor times when nobles would appoint a servant as the Lord of Misrule – a person who presided over Christmas games – according to who found a bean or pea in the pudding. When the sixpence was first minted in 1551, the coin replaced the bean or pea and the tradition became popular.

WORDS BY JENNY PROUDFOOT. PHOTOGRAPHS BY SLIM AARONS/GETTY IMAGES, MILLENNIUM IMAGES, GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, ISTOCK BY GETTY, TRISTRAM KENTON/ROYAL OPERA HOUSE

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Identity

117

I gr e w up BELIEVING

I WAS white

When Georgina Lawton’s beloved dad died, she finally unravelled a carefully created web of family secrets that had plagued her for years ‘Why don’t you scratch yourself white?’ said a five-year-old girl in my class as we played in the sandpit at school. This was the first time I experienced a sense of confusion about my own appearance. The way her fingernail felt as she scraped it across my beige forearm remains a vivid memory. Because even though I’ve looked black or mixed-race since birth, I grew up believing I was white. I’d been fed the same story by my parents: I wasn’t adopted, or switched at birth, or the product of an affair; I had inherited my

genes from a dark-skinned Irish relative on my mother’s side, which had ‘skipped’ a few generations. The truth, which only came to light last year after my father’s death, was that I was not his child, but the result of a brief hook-up between my mum and another man. My dear dad, with his economics degree and managerial job, never questioned Mum’s version of events. And my white brother Rory, who has Dad’s blue eyes and his long, curved feet, never queried it either. My brown skin and frizzy black hair stood

out in family photos. But it was easier for everyone to ignore my differences. Cloaked in the protective bubble of whiteness, I didn’t spend much time thinking about race. It didn’t affect me until an outsider – like a child at school – brought it up. Overall, my upbringing was a happy one: I had two very present, hands-on parents; at school, I was a high achiever with lots of friends. And yet, looking back, it’s easy to pinpoint where the nagging self-doubt crept in. At 15, I flirted with bulimia; from 17, I bleached the life out of my hair, and with every passing comment about why I didn’t look like my family, I developed another layer of prickly defensiveness. The web of lies was already moulding my character. The questions about ‘where I was really from’ and the queries into my identity were persistent, unwavering, draining. If I beat observers to the


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Clockwise from top: Georgina as a baby with her mum and dad; with her brother and dad; her nonbiological – but much loved – father

punch, I could own my narrative. But when airport security would usher me into the queue for baggage check-in with the Caribbean couple in front of me, instead of my own family, it was alienating. At 13, I was told to ‘go back to Africa’ and was once labelled a ‘Paki’, which just intensified the confusion. With each incident I went home and demanded answers from my parents, who would sit me down and repeat again that I was definitely theirs and that they loved me. Mum wanted to believe I was my father’s daughter, which by definition made me white. Dad was complicit, but whether he knew the truth deep down, I’ll never know. Everyone seemed happy to go along with the pretence and it became easier to explain my skin colour to strangers by saying, ‘I’m half-Jamaican’. Dad’s illness last year was the catalyst for change, though. As I watched the cancer brutally eviscerate my beloved, white dad from the inside out, I was devastated by the reality that he would soon be gone. I was also acutely aware it was my last chance to raise all the uncomfortable questions that plagued me. Mum told me that pursuing the subject was selfish. But one day, after I gently hinted at my desperation, he consented to giving me a DNA sample before he died, lovingly reassuring me I was biologically his. It was a whole year after his death,

consumed by grief, that I decided I had nothing to lose. In March 2016, I began the process of testing his DNA and discovered that, by blood, we were not related at all. I remember where I was when the test results came through, rather ghoulishly in an email. Nothing can prepare you for processing that kind of information at work. I felt like my blood had been sucked from my body with a syringe. Despite it being obvious, I still didn’t want to believe it. Distraught, I phoned the company to ask how reliable the results were. They were sympathetic, but I was told, ‘Almost 100 per cent. You’re not your dad’s’. When I hung up and called my mum, she said she was as shocked as I was. Her denial went on for weeks,

had met in a west-London pub in 1992. This was all she knew about him. To say things have been rocky since would be an understatement. Nine months on, I’m still so angry I can barely look at Mum. I lie awake replaying all the times I’d asked her if there was a possibility I couldn’t be Dad’s. Why couldn’t she have just told me the truth? We’d have been OK. I’ve spent my whole life vehemently fighting a race battle that my parents were blind to and carrying the weight of the lie about my mother’s affair. I know Mum loves me, and I still love her very much, but she still finds it hard to discuss the impact this has had on me, which just compounds the feelings of isolation and loneliness I’ve buried. Although these wounds are still fresh, I’m hopeful we’ll work through everything, because I do want her in my life. I also want to take time to focus on grieving for Dad, and learning about

‘Fin ally, Mum con fess ed to her one -night stand wi th a da rk m a n’ as I sobbed into my pillow each night. I’d just learned to process the fathershaped hole in my life, but there was no handbook for how to navigate this emotional minefield. I couldn’t cope. When I challenged Mum − vociferous in my questioning and utterly broken − she looked at me blankly and told me there must be some mistake. Despite existing in a dream-like trance, unable to call my father my own any more, I still didn’t suspect her of lying − it was just too distressing to start sieving through everything she’d ever told me. Finally, a full month and countless arguments later, Mum cracked. I had just suggested a re-test using DNA from Dad’s parents when she confessed to her one-night stand with a ‘dark’ man from Dublin, who she

the culture I may be connected to. Still consumed by grief, I made a clean break and moved to New York this year. I’ve been living in Brooklyn and immersing myself in a very mixed area. My next plan is to undertake a more comprehensive DNA test to determine my ethnic roots as a method of catharsis and, through my website, to encourage others suffering with identity issues to face them head-on. For me, racial identity is fluid, and determined by the people in my community, who just so happen to be white. I exist in a race-less space, with less knowledge of my heritage than ever before, but I’m determined to forge an identity on my own terms, no matter what that entails. Q girlunfurled.com


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MUSIC’S DIRTY LITTLE SECRET

From Kesha’s rape allegations and her ongoing court battle to Lady Gaga’s revelation of sexual assault by a producer when she was 19, the music industry is under scrutiny like never before. Polly Dunbar speaks to women on the frontline of pop It’s late evening in a London studio, and filming on a teenage pop singer’s first video has halted. Her manager, an executive from her record label and the director – all male – are huddled around a laptop, looking at footage of her and discussing their displeasure in tones they make no attempt to hush. The star herself sits alone and crying on the other side of the room, wearing hotpants, a bralette and sky-high stilettoes. A makeup artist and several stylists look on in awkward silence. By the time the shoot is abandoned, the singer’s crimes have been spelled out to her in the most degrading terms possible. ‘The men explained they weren’t happy with the way she was moving; she looked “lumpy” and “overweight”, although

she was tiny,’ a witness on the shoot tells Marie Claire. ‘One of them told her she’d need to lose weight and practise her sexy dancing, because she didn’t look “shaggable enough”. She was clearly devastated, but she just nodded and mumbled, “OK.”’ In 2016, it’s difficult to think of many situations in which sexism this blatant would be tolerated in Britain. Yet pop music is a £4 billion-a-year business in which men hold 67.8 per cent of the jobs, and the vast majority of positions of power. Female artists are often treated as no more than pretty cash cows, whose bodies and talents exist purely to be exploited for maximum commercial gain. Women working in other roles in the industry claim they are also viewed as subordinates or sex objects.


122 A boss will suddenly start groping [an artist] and she’s expected not to mind Kesha’s ongoing legal battle with the songwriter-producer Dr Luke (Lukasz Gottwald) has shone a stark light on the most extreme version of this exploitation. In 2014, the singer sued her former mentor, claiming he’d ‘sexually, physically, verbally and emotionally abused’ her ‘to the point where she nearly lost her life.’ The suit’s aim was to sever the contract binding Kesha to Dr Luke’s label, allowing her the freedom to work with other labels and, in her words, ‘get free from my abuser’. The producer countersued her for defamation, denying her claims strenuously. But when a court ruled Kesha had to remain in her contract with Dr Luke earlier this year, the hashtag #FreeKesha began trending on Twitter and fellow female musicians including Lady Gaga, Lily Allen, Kelly Clarkson and Lorde publicly offered her their support, only serving to underline their empathy with her. Taylor Swift donated $250,000 (£198,000) ‘to help with any of her financial needs’, while Adele dedicated her Brit Award for Best Female Solo Artist to her, acknowledging the problems faced by so many female stars by thanking her own record label ‘for embracing the fact that I’m a woman’. The overwhelming outpouring of solidarity for Kesha suggested that her allegations had struck a deep chord with women in the industry who had up until this point remained tight-lipped. This was confirmed by Lady Gaga, who revealed she had been sexually assaulted by an unnamed producer when she was 19. In Britain, countless women who work in the business testify to frequent cases of sexual misconduct and misogyny. ‘Women I know often tell me stories about sexual harassment,’ says Lara Baker, events manager at the Association of Independent Music (AIM), the organisation that looks after some of the world’s most successful independent record labels. ‘The music business involves a lot of late nights and drinking, and in those situations it’s common for people’s sense of what’s appropriate to go out the window. A woman will be in a taxi with her boss or a client after a gig and he’ll suddenly start kissing or groping her and she’s expected not to mind. It’s not easy for her to speak out when it involves a colleague or client and her reputation is at stake.’ A particularly disturbing element of Kesha’s story is her allegation that Dr Luke ‘bombarded’ her with insults about her weight, calling her a ‘fat fucking refrigerator’, which she says contributed to her developing an eating disorder. Attempts to control a young female artist’s image and make her more commercially appealing by ‘encouraging’ her to lose weight and wear sexier clothing is a common scenario that singer-songwriter Lauren Aquilina, 21, has experienced first-hand. ‘I’ve been in so many situations where my image has been commented on as public property,’ she says. ‘When I was younger, I did a shoot for a partnership with a fashion brand and I was told by a guy who was high up in the company, “These clothes are designed for small women, so

Singer-songwriter Lauren Aquilina s ays s h e was told to lose weigh t b y an older male co lleagu e

Above right: DJ Georgia LA has exper ienced discr iminat ion Abo ve: Lar a B aker want s mor e suppo r t fo r female musicians

if you want to work with us in the future you should think about losing weight, because this isn’t really working at the moment.” I was crushed. I was only a size 10, but I started wondering if he was right. ‘I’ve been told repeatedly that to be successful, boys need to fancy you and girls need to want to be you. I’ve been asked, “When are you going to start looking like a pop star?” I don’t look like a typical pop star; I’m not a size six and I don’t wear skimpy clothes. I think my fans like that because they can relate to me. But I’ve felt so much pressure to compete with other girls in the industry, and until recently it really affected me.’ Aquilina has also found that as a young female artist, she has been patronised over her songwriting, and experienced pressure to change. According to PRS for Music, only 13 per cent of their 95,000 songwriters are currently female, so it’s little surprise that songs written by women are not always taken seriously – despite the phenomenal success of female singer-songwriters like Taylor Swift and Adele. The fact is, the majority of chart-topping songs performed by female artists, from Rihanna to Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus, are still written by men. Aquilina says, ‘I’ve had a few mental-health issues and I’ve been told by men in the industry that I needed to stop being


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A y o ung w o ma n p ro t es t s following Ke s ha ’s c o u rt ca s e

band or a singer, the men in the office would either ignore me or take the piss out of my taste. It was incredibly demoralising.’ Björk recently spoke about encountering a similar lack of respect for her opinions. ‘Everything that a guy says once, you have to say five times [as a woman],’ she said. Georgia LA, the writer, producer, presenter and DJ on Apple Music’s global station Beats 1, knows how this feels. ‘When I did media training for record companies, I’d put together the press pack and present it in meetings, and because I was a young woman, I wouldn’t get taken seriously,’ she says. ‘But if a guy presented my ideas, the executives would say they were great.’ Georgia LA has also experienced gender discrimination in salary terms. ‘I was doing a music presenting job at one stage but was furious when I found out the male presenter was getting almost 40 per cent more than me for exactly the same job,’ she says. ‘My agent had a word and was told they didn’t have the budget to give me more. It was so frustrating – they should have shared the budget equally between us.’ At AIM, Baker organises regular networking and conference events for women in music, as well as working on the annual Women in Music Awards, which celebrate the achievements of women in the music industry. She cites networks such as SheSaid.So, which helps women support one another and collaborate. ‘There are so many women wanting to get into the industry, but a very small number of women at the top, so we’re trying to find ways to help them get there. The more women there are in powerful positions, the more the culture will change,’ she says. She believes the only way to create gender equality within the industry is to involve men in the conversation, like the UN Women HeForShe campaign is attempting to do. ‘We need enlightened men to be part of the fight, calling out their colleagues and friends if they see them saying something sexist or making inappropriate advances,’ she says. ‘Equality has to be something we’re all working towards together.’ Despite the bleakness of the current picture, Aquilina believes there is reason to hope change will eventually happen. She says, ‘Adele is a fantastic role model, because she’s so successful, and she doesn’t let herself be pushed around. She’s chosen not to let herself be sexualised, and that’s so refreshing. She’s proved that audiences want to see diversity in music. I just hope that labels are listening.’ Q

Abo ve and r ight : Kesha’s st or y r aised t he issue of sexual har assment and discr iminat io n against female musicians

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHARLES NEGRE, GETTY IMAGES, REUTERS, WENN. *NAME CHANGED

you should think about losing weight’

so emotional; such a girl. I’ve been told to stop moaning and write a happy, upbeat song that befits a female pop star. I know for a fact a male artist would never be asked to ditch an emotional, raw song. ‘Now, I have a female manager and A&R rep and that’s made a big difference to my confidence. I’ve learned to stick up for myself more. I’ve had to grow up at an alarming pace to handle the pressure and demands of being a 21-year-old woman in the music industry.’ It’s not just the artists who suffer as a result of sexist attitudes: they permeate the entire industry, with women who work everywhere from A&R to promotion and PR earning less than their male counterparts and struggling to rise through the ranks. The upper echelons of the business remain solidly male. Despite the music industry signing up to UK Music’s Equality and Diversity Charter in 2012, there is little sign of progress. At Midem, the international music event which took place in Cannes in June, a major panel discussion on the future of the industry consisted solely of middle-aged and older white men, one of whom said, without irony, ‘Hopefully in the next 20 years there’ll be some women on this stage.’ Emma*, 32, worked in A&R for a small label for three years, hoping to scout new artists at gigs and nurture their careers. She says, ‘I’ve never been happier than when I got my job, because I’m obsessed with music. I’ve been to thousands of gigs and I thought there couldn’t be anything better than getting paid to do it, but by the end of three years, I hated it. I was still being treated like the office junior, opening post and making cups of tea, while the guy who started at the same time as me was promoted. When I tried to give my opinion on a

He said, ‘If you want to work with us,

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DRAMA QUEEN


Claire Foy has spent years quietly cementing her reputation as a respected British actress, but her latest role is about to send her stellar. Lucy Pavia meets the new monarch of Netflix

Claire Foy was five months pregnant when she auditioned to play the Queen. She was asked to balance a large crown on her head and wear a white 40s dress, which didn’t fit her bump. She thought she looked so ridiculous she didn’t have a hope of winning the part. But watching her play Elizabeth II in Netflix’s sumptuous new £100m production The Crown – about the Queen’s first decade on the throne – makes you wonder whether any other actress could have possibly been a better fit for HRH. Physically she passes with flying colours as a young Liz, but more importantly she’s captured her elusive combination of delicacy and steeliness. And with Matt Smith playing a more sensitive (read: noncartoonish) Prince Philip, it makes for pretty addictive viewing. When we meet for the shoot in a spacious London flat, Foy’s hair has been lightened to honey blonde (‘for a film,’ she explains, ‘I can now conclusively tell you blondes do have more fun,’) and she changes from Jil Sander and Osman separates into a short silk tea dress once the photographs have been taken, hugging each member of the production crew as they leave. Foy, 32, is one of those actors who has taken a slow-and-steady approach to a career path notorious for having a short lifespan. Starting with the BBC’s period piece Little Dorrit (2008) and turning her hand to both film (Wreckers) and theatre (Macbeth) along the way, Foy’s star really began to ascend last year when she played Anne Boleyn in the BBC adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, transforming a historical figure so often portrayed as little more than a power-grabbing harpy into something deeper and far more interesting. One British queen down, she’s now taking on the longest reigning monarch of the lot. No pressure...


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THIS PAGE AND NEXT PAGE CLAIRE FOY WEARS: DRESS, JOSEPH; SHOES, PAUL ANDREW; EARRINGS, COMPLETED WORKS; RING, MARIA BLACK

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Biopics are notoriously hard to pull off, but doing a biopic of someone who is both alive and hugely famous must be even tougher? ‘It’s really tricky, [but] you just have to take it as any other normal piece [and] not be scared of making a bold choice or making people unattractive. Being really likeable all the time is just not real life, so it’s your duty to make a well-rounded character. But I’ve never really thought of it as a biopic, I suppose, because it’s not just about her, it’s about “the firm”, it’s about the crown, it’s about politics and everything that’s happening in society at the time.’ The show isn’t shy in tackling marital tensions between the Queen and Prince Phillip. ‘He’s a strong man, and [when they married] they set their life up in a very conventional 50s way. She wanted to be his wife, to follow him around and support him in his career and that’s what they thought they were going to do for 20, 30 years. But a few years later [when King George VI died] finding out that’s not what’s happening, to be told, “You can’t live where you want to live, you can’t have your own name, you can’t do what you want to do any more, you have to do this.” It’s completely suffocating.’

It’s very interesting to see a more in-depth interpretation of Prince Philip… ‘Philip’s story is the most interesting in the royal family – his background is the opposite of what you’d think. Everyone has this idea that Philip is this bumbling, deliberately posh sort of man who says the wrong thing. I think actually he has no respect for people respecting him; in a way, he just thinks it’s all nonsense – why should he be living in a palace and other people not? It’s heartbreaking where [the story] goes, because you’re watching these two people have a relationship in public, but also the decisions they make [that] affect their marriage.’ Do you think it’s easier or harder for royals now – like William and Kate – than it was back then? ‘It was easier in a sense that the rules were clearly defined. You knew where you stood. The press was respectful and likewise you gave them a certain amount of room. But the lines are so blurred now that you don’t know when you’re on and when you’re off. I also think it must be tricky to be a celebrity… I mean, when Elizabeth was a princess she was a celebrity – what she was wearing and whether or not she would marry Philip were all over the newspapers – but it wasn’t exactly her day-to-day life being splashed everywhere.’


‘I’d never had a baby before and I didn’t know what state I was going to be in…’

Whereas now royals are treated like A-list celebrities from birth? ‘It’s their job, but they don’t ever have the chance to choose. It’s easy to say, well, they’ve got all this privilege, but I think freedom is a real gift. Regardless of how much money you possess, having the freedom to choose what you want to do in your life – they’ve never had that option.’ Did you have any reservations about the role? ‘Oh god, yeah. I’d never had a baby before and I didn’t know what state I was going to be in physically [filming started when Foy’s daughter was four months old] or mentally. You know, I might have given birth and been like, “I’m never working again,” or I might have been clawing my way out of the house. But then I thought, everything happens for a reason. And they were so supportive. They said, “We’d love you to do it so take care of yourself and we’ll see you after your baby’s born,” which gave me room to not go bonkers. You’re a different person after you’ve had a baby, so you can’t pre-empt that decision. I sort of had to in a way, though I’m so glad that I did.’ How did you find it? ‘It’s very odd to be in a capacity which is not being a mum. People are asking you things and you’re like, “What, sorry?” But I’m very lucky to do a job where I could bring my baby on set a lot of the time.’ You’ve said in the past that you have no big desire to move to Hollywood. Have you changed your mind? ‘There is an idea that that’s where you should want to be, and I’m a bit like, “Well, why?” I don’t think the pinnacle of your career is just getting bigger and bigger. There are lots of actors who do really good stuff and enjoy it, and are able to do it without having to sacrifice a huge part of their [lives]. The idea of moving to America would be exciting but I’m not like, “I will go out there at all costs.”’ Do you think the UK has a better offering in terms of great female roles? ‘Not particularly. I mean The Crown is a different kettle of fish because I’m playing a real person. I do think [on-demand] telly gives you the opportunity to explore different angles because it doesn’t have to appeal to all people, which I think is sometimes a problem with terrestrial TV. You feel like 13 million people have to love it, but I just don’t think that’s going to happen and I don’t know why you’d make something hoping that was the case. There’s definitely a better variety of roles for women on TV than in movies, though. It’s brilliant because you don’t have to fit into a particular [mould] – you’re not just “the girlfriend” or “the mother”, you can be more complicated.’

Your husband [The History Boys’ star Stephen Campbell Moore] is an actor. Do you avoid talking shop at home? ‘It would be weird to avoid that, because then you’d come home seething or really happy and go, “No, we can’t talk about it.” I was incredibly boring doing [The Crown] because I’d learn so many amazing things about the royal family and go, “Did you know that in 1957...?” Have you talked to Helen Mirren about playing the Queen? ‘I’d love to talk to her about it actually, I can imagine how that conversation would go. I think it would be quite funny. We definitely have something in common.’ Q The Crown is on Netflix from 4 November

STYLED BY ABISOYE ODUGBESAN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY DREW WHEELER. MAKE-UP BY VALERIA FERREIRA AT CAREN USING SYNTHETIC DE CHANEL AND LE LIFT V-FLASH

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#Squad Goals It takes trust, intuition and selflessness to harness the new power of teamwork. But it might be your key to personal success, too Words by ALIX O’NEILL

IT’S BEEN A YEAR OF TWO halves. Within six months, we went from a nation bitterly divided, to a cautiously optimistic one – and we largely have the Rio Olympics to thank for hauling us out of our post-Brexit funk. The phenomenal success of Team GB (in particular, the kick-ass performances in the women’s hockey, rowing and cycling) served as a timely reminder of what can be achieved when we pull together. Helen Keller called it when she said, ‘Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.’ Not that Gen Y-ers need any convincing on the merits of collaboration. In a 2014 study*, nearly half of millennials surveyed said they would hire new employees based on teamwork skills if they were in charge. Our collective thirst for togetherness is the driving force behind the current sharing economy – bedding down in strangers’ homes through Airbnb, hailing shared UberPools and seeking career collaborations in co-working hubs. ‘Humans are natural collaborators’, says Richard Gerver, author of Simple Thinking: How To Remove Complexity From Life And Work. ‘We overcomplicate the primal things we do as children – kids aren’t afraid to ask for help,’ he says. ‘But as adults, we’re conditioned to think that’s not OK. This generation is not afraid to reach out because they’ve been brought up in a more connected world. It’s about

knowing what you’re good at and what you’re bad at, and plugging the gaps.’ The narrative shift from ‘me’ to ‘we’ could be down to evolution, according to psychologist Emma Kenny. ‘Primordial man was actually quite selfish,’ she says. ‘He’d look after his own, but anyone else was viewed as a threat. This made sense from a survival point of view, but now young people want to be part of something bigger. Connecting with people gives us a sense of common ground that makes us feel safer, as though we belong. It also means young people are more compassionate to other cultures.’ There is a power in that collective compassion too, as illustrated by social media movements – from #HeForShe to #EverydaySexism to Marie Claire’s #CallOutRacism – that rely on likes, shares and retweets from the masses to start a global conversation for change.

In direct contrast to society pitting women against one another, co-operation is now being heralded as stronger than competition and people are using social media to form support groups. I can vouch for that − I’ve been a member of a Facebook group for female freelance journalists for the past year and have benefited from invaluable career advice, comforting words and even the odd commission. Technically, we’re rivals – we’re all after the same jobs – but there’s an unspoken understanding that when someone does you a favour, you pay it forward.’ This begs the question: are women innately better team players than men? In a study** of collective intelligence based on a group’s performance in a range of tasks, the most successful groups were not the ones with the highest number of individually intelligent members, but the groups


with the highest proportion of females. Women scored higher on emotional intelligence and were better at reading non-verbal cues from their teammates. ‘It’s not that women are biologically more empathetic than men, it’s that we have been socialised to nurture others and value the importance of friendships, so it has become part of the female hardwire,’ says Kenny. ‘By the time we get to the workplace, women have simply developed better non-verbal communication skills.’ But as with any skill, it takes work to become a good team player, which could explain the recent trend for cool

‘Connecting with people gives us a sense of common ground that makes us feel safer ’ alternatives to corporate teambuilding days, such as The Crystal Maze and Mission: Breakout. According to sports psychologist Dr Andrea Furst, who helped Team GB’s women’s hockey team to prepare for Rio, teamwork also takes commitment. ‘You need co-operation, empathy and trust,’ she says. ‘To become more in sync with the people around you, listen to them and observe their behaviour, so that you can maximise the strength of the network. It’s also important to have a clear understanding of why you are working together and what the end goals are. Even athletes in individual sports – like Andy Murray – often credit a large part of their success to the support network around them.’ Self-awareness is integral to being a good team player, according to Dr Furst. ‘There is huge value in an individual learning about themselves, so they can communicate with more confidence their own role in the team. It helps teams to respect one another; ultimately, a team player puts the needs of the team before their own.’ Trust is key, too. ‘My job would be impossible to do without the surgeons, junior doctors, nurses, lab technicians and admin staff I work with,’ says consultant dermatological surgeon Emma Craythorne, who specialises in removing skin cancers from the face and neck. ‘Our main objective is to

ensure that the treatment we give is effective and safe. If one member of the team isn’t performing well it has a negative effect on this overall aim.’ The good news is, the more time you spend with your colleagues, friends or teammates, the more in sync you’ll be. ‘Studies show that people who work in the same environment but do not have to perform tasks together don’t learn much about each other,’ says Benjamin G. Voyer, a lecturer at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. ‘Conversely, those who spend a lot of time working in groups and pursuing common goals become more attuned to others.’ Real teamwork ultimately comes down to one thing: solidarity. ‘Women who help other women get ahead are at the heart of the current zeitgeist,’ says Kenny. ‘And it makes sense. If one person at work climbs the ladder, see it as an opportunity for you to do the same and, crucially, then pass the baton on. In the long term, everyone wins.’ Q

Better together: G B’s women’s hockey team showed their squad spirit at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games t his summer

W H AT K I N D O F T E A M P LAYE R A R E YO U ? 1. You and your team are finding it difficult to meet a deadline. What do you do? A) Debrief as a group and delegate new tasks B) Become frustrated that you’re the only one getting things done C) Estimate a new deadline and draw a graph to project results 2. A teammate has taken praise for a project you’ve invested more time and energy in. How do you react? A) This situation would never apply to someone like you B) Subtly raise it with your manager so your efforts are noted C) Collate evidence to prove you had exactly 51 per cent input 3. A new team member has joined. How do you introduce yourself? A) Let them know they can ask you if they need anything B) Shake their hand and secretly hope they’re not lazy C) Stalk their profile on Facebook

MOSTLY A: LEADER Confident and outgoing, leaders are decisive, authoritative and good team motivators. Needs to work on: Taking advice and criticism from others, and not feeling pressure to always get it right. MOSTLY B: IMPLEMENTER Implementers are great at turning ideas into realities and getting on with a project instead of just talking about it. Needs to work on: They can be impatient so implementers tend to make more mistakes than other team members. MOSTLY C: RESEARCHER Researchers are good communicators and are more methodical in their approach than other team members. Needs to work on: Maintaining a balance because they expend more energy with fewer results, and their enthusiasm can wane.

QUIZ WORDING BY JENNY PROUDFOOT AND TEAM-BUILDING EXPERT, STEPH BAKER. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JULIA NONI/TRUNK ARCHIVE, GETTY IMAGES, CAMERA PRESS. *DELOITTE’S MILLENNIAL SURVEY 2014. **BY MIT, CARNEGIE MELLON AND UNION COLLEGE. ADDITIONAL RESEARCH COURTESY OF CNRS-GATE UNIVERSITY OF LYON AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

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Mourners mark their respect for victims (ab ove); survivor Caroline Langlade (below )

‘I felt guilty for surviving’ Caroline Langlade spent three-and-a-half hours trapped in the Bataclan as terrorists stormed the theatre, killing 90 people. It remains the most deadly terrorist atrocity in France’s history. One year on, she speaks to Susan McClelland about learning to love life again When my boyfriend and I arrived at the Bataclan theatre on 13 November, 2015, for the Eagles of Death Metal concert, I was excited. But I was also exhausted. I’d been on my feet for five hours distributing food and blankets to freezing refugees on the streets. Looking back, it was those refugees who saved my life, as not long after we entered the theatre, I told my boyfriend I was too tired to stand, so we moved upstairs to sit down. Minutes later, terrorists barged through the front doors and shot everyone who was standing by the stage. If we hadn’t have moved upstairs, I’d be dead. Coming so close to death has had a significant impact on my life. Society is the same, but I’m not. Like others who were there that night, or have survived any major terrorist event, I’ve had to learn, like a child, how to live again in the shadow of what

happened that day. A year on, I still jump when I hear loud noises, like the sudden rumble of a motorbike. I still wake up with a nagging remorse that I kept my life when so many mothers and fathers were killed that night; I wonder why I was not taken instead. If you haven’t been through a terrorist atrocity first-hand, you might be afraid of crowded places during the day in case an attack happened to you. But we survivors are most afraid of the nights, when things go quiet and we replay each terrifying moment. When the terrorists began to shoot indiscriminately into the audience, the music stopped, people began screaming and a normal night was transformed into deadly chaos. Instinctively, I moved in the direction of the running, screaming people, towards what I hoped would be a way out. My boyfriend and I tumbled down the stairs into a room, no larger than 7 sq m. There were 40 of us cramped, cowering, in that tiny room – our hearts thumping,


‘We clung to each other in total panic’ sweating, all of us in a state of terror. My body trembled all over, disconnected like it didn’t belong to me, and yet my mind was rational, robotic even. I knew that if we pulled together as a group, and stayed calm, we would live. I wasn’t alone. We all knew instinctively that to survive we needed to unite. We couldn’t let fear get the better of us. ‘We’re not going to make any decisions unless everyone else approves them and we’re agreed,’ I remember someone whispering and we all nodded. We decided to turn off the lights, lock the door, and open the iron-barred window to stop us suffocating. It was me that was assigned to call the police. With trembling hands I dialled the number, forcing my mind to stay calm when I heard the busy tone. Then I called my mother and told her to ring back for me. Minutes later, a Paris police officer called my mobile. For 15 minutes he remained on the line, encouraging me to calm the others. ‘I know you are in there… you will not make it out tonight,’ came a voice from outside as I spoke. He told us he had a gun and we were all going to die. But we trembled silently, holding each other’s hands and breathing in unison – in through our noses, out through our mouths – in a steady rhythm to calm our collective panic. For three-and-a-half hours we remained in this room, listening to the shooting, the screaming, the crying around us, followed by episodes of deafening silence, which was broken only by one of the terrorists banging on the locked door to remind us we were not alone. We clung to each other in total panic. We had no idea how many people had been killed, how many terrorists were out there, or what was going on. It resulted in moments of weakness as several of us reached breaking point. There were times when several people couldn’t take the pressure any more and tried to open the door to find loved ones outside. We fought with them in hushed whispers, begging them to think of the group. It was heartbreaking, but we had to remain a unit or we risked all of us being killed. Finally, when the police arrived and announced themselves, we didn’t believe it was them. A man in the room went to the window and asked them to prove their identities. We thought he’d be shot. As we unlocked the door and were led out, I saw what had happened. There was blood and dead bodies everywhere. It was like being trapped in an apocalyptic nightmare. Outside, we were greeted by two strangers – one Syrian and one Parisian – who reached out to my boyfriend and me, and held us like babies. I stared blankly at the pavement, my body numb. I wanted to feel human again.

Ter r or tar get: the B at aclan t heat r e, Paris (left), where 90 people died

In the days afterwards the fear and terror I’d suppressed in the room started to surface. I couldn’t read a book or watch a film. My parents and sister offered support, but I craved people who had shared my experience to help me understand my feelings. I had previously loved my job as a filmmaker, but I couldn’t contemplate returning to work; I couldn’t even face public transport. Darkness convinced me I was still in the room and I’d start to panic that the terrorists were coming to get me. I stopped socialising, craving instead the company of others who had been through the same experience. I wanted to talk to them so I’d no longer feel alone. I started searching online for survivors from the room I’d been in and found support in a Facebook group, Life For Paris, set up by Maureen Roussel, who had also survived the Bataclan attack. Like me, some survivors were struggling to go back to normal life. Small tasks like getting up and having a shower were almost impossible. But strangely, I began to fall into a supportive role for others, advising them on where to go to get help with counselling and advice. It gave me a new purpose and soon I had a job with value, helping people move on with their lives, which helped me get on with my life too. I’ve struggled with survivor’s guilt and face a battle every time there’s a terrorist attack. I feel overwhelming sadness for all those killed. But I’ve made friends with a man who lost his wife that night at the Bataclan, and he has convinced me that us survivors have to defy the terrorists by living courageously instead of allowing them to destroy us along with the dead. I’ve undergone a huge transformation as a person since that night. Before, I was concerned about trivial things, like my apartment, my job, and the stuff I thought I needed to buy. I went to the cinema, I liked concerts and meals in nice restaurants. But now I know that when all is stripped back, life is only about love and solidarity. My three-and-a-half hours in that room with 40 strangers had a profound effect on how I see the world. We all had different political leanings, interests, lives and backgrounds, but when our outward trappings were lifted and we had to survive, we came together and did it. I now feel lucky to live after the Bataclan terrorist attack. Today, Life For Paris represents 700 people from all around the world who have suffered violence… and we are growing. I have a renewed empathy for others now – a new sense of humanity. I experienced terrorism for one night but there are others, like the refugees who saved my life, who live with violence every day. Q lifeforparis.org

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAMERAPRESS, GETTY IMAGES, GOFFPHOTOS

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141 Life stories

The cringeworthy interview with Michael Parkinson in 1975

Left: Mirren at home in 1969 Right: as a young girl growing up in Leigh-On-Sea

Famously outspoken, she turned down being a Bond girl for her feminist principles, but it’s her acting presence that has kept her in demand for five decades When Helen Mirren was invited to appear on Michael Parkinson’s eponymous chat show in 1975, he must have assumed she would be one of his less contentious guests. This was her first primetime appearance and he was the doyen of celebrity interviews – how could it possibly go wrong? Yet it did – for him – as seen when the footage resurfaced on social media and went viral last August. When Parkinson blithely suggested her ‘equipment’ (nodding towards her breasts) might detract from her acting, Mirren didn’t simper and giggle as he clearly expected her to. Instead, quietly ‘enraged’ as she would later reveal, the actress – then 30 – shut down his sexist questioning with masterful aplomb: ‘I’d like you to explain what you mean by “my equipment”, you mean my fingers? Come on, spit it out,’ she urged him, before dismissing his questions as ‘boring’. Now a Dame, with her latest film Collateral Beauty hitting cinemas this December, she is one of only 13 actresses ever to have achieved what’s known as the Triple Crown of Acting – winning a Tony, Emmy and Oscar. Born Illiana Lydia Petrovna Mironova on 26 July, 1945, in west London, she was one of three children. Her Russian father Vasily, a civil servant, anglicised their names when Helen was nine. Her mother, Kathleen, was the daughter of an east London butcher who supplied meat to Queen Victoria. The family relocated to Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, when Mirren was two, because her parents felt the seaside was a nicer place to raise children. Mirren is fiercely proud of her roots. ‘I am still very much an Essex girl,’ she said. ‘My poshed-over voice was all learnt.’ It was watching an amateur production of Hamlet at the Palace Theatre in nearby Westcliff-on-Sea when she was 13 that made Mirren want to act. ‘It was in all probability a very poor production – I certainly remember tights that were falling down – but the power of the story and the exoticism of the characters were overwhelming,’ she recalled in her 2008 autobiography, In The Frame: My Life In Words And Pictures. A painfully shy child, Mirren recalls, ‘I was never the kind of little girl who naturally loves to perform, or rather be looked

With her 2007 Oscar for The Queen (above left); becoming a Dame (above); winning Emmys in 1999 (left) and 2007 (below)

at. Embarrassment came easily to me and acting, even in my school days, was more to do with disappearing than “look at me.”’ But when she joined the National Youth Theatre at 18 after impressing in school productions, she gained rave reviews for playing Cleopatra and was invited to join the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1967, aged 22. The press would later brand Mirren as a ‘sex symbol’, with one newspaper calling her ‘the sex queen of Stratford’. That didn’t sit well with her feminist ideology and she would later complain, ‘The headline was to haunt me for the next 20 years or more.’ As her fame grew, Mirren rejected the role of a Bond girl because she didn’t want to be objectified. It was her mother who shaped Mirren’s feminist beliefs,


143 Life stories

She dated actor Liam Neeson for four years

In 1981 fantasy film Excalibur with Nicol Williamson

urging her to have a career (as a teacher) and not to settle down too young. Mirren has since said, ‘She was totally successful [as] I never had any inclination to marry. It seemed to me like voluntary imprisonment.’ She did have serious relationships though, her first with actor Kenneth Cranham, who recently appeared in the BBC’s War & Peace. Mirren credits him with ‘restoring my selfesteem’. She has said, ‘The hardest period in life is one’s twenties. It’s a shame because you’re your most gorgeous and you’re physically in peak condition. But it’s actually when you’re most insecure and full of self-doubt.’ At one point Mirren visited a palm reader for reassurance. His prediction? ‘You will be successful in life, but you will see your greatest success later, after the age of 45.’ By 1981, then 36, Mirren signed up to appear in Excalibur, a Camelot-inspired fantasy epic, and promptly fell for her co-star, Liam Neeson, who was seven years younger than her. After filming wrapped, Neeson moved from his native Belfast to live with Mirren in London. Their relationship lasted four years, floundering because he reportedly wanted marriage and children and Mirren didn’t. Eventually she decided to move to Hollywood to pursue bigger roles, leaving him behind. Neeson, said to be heartbroken when she left, almost never talks about her publicly but once, when pushed on the subject, he answered, ‘Ah, Helen… what a bright lady and beautiful… she was very special to me. But I can say nothing more.’ Mirren, however, didn’t stay single for long. Once in Los Angeles she auditioned for a role in White Nights, a ballet-inspired film to be directed by Taylor Hackford, whose previous credits included An Officer And A Gentleman. Hackford was married at the time, and it would be a year after he and his wife had parted before he and Mirren became a couple. ‘Helen is just a fantastic partner for me,’ Hackford said. ‘She’s very witty and can use her humour and so on, but she’s a serious artist. You get a clarity and an honesty

‘She’s very witty, but she’s a serious artist’ Mirren married Taylor Hackford in 1997 after 11 years together

from Helen, which is only more real when you live with her.’ Mirren, meanwhile, credited their bond – they are still together 30 years later – to them both being unsentimental. ‘Taylor and I aren’t remotely romantic with each other,’ she has said. ‘I would be completely horrified if he gave me a Valentine’s card! That’s not our sort of relationship at all – we would pour cold water on that sort of thing.’ The tipping point of Mirren’s fame came in 1991, when she was offered the lead in a new ITV police drama written


‘She can convey in a glance a multitude of emotions’

The role of Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect took her fame to a new level

by Lynda La Plante. Called Prime Suspect, it centred on a female DCI called Jane Tennison who was battling sexism within the force while leading a murder investigation. Mirren hadn’t been looking for a return to TV or the UK, but the role was too irresistible to turn down. ‘Helen was already a consummate actress and had the maturity to make the character totally believable,’ La Plante told Marie Claire. ‘She possesses a rare weight and stillness, able to convey in a glance a multitude of emotions and, to this day, I am and always will be grateful she agreed to portray [Jane Tennison].’ The first series was a resounding success (and six more followed, until the final episode aired in 2006), winning Mirren an Emmy and a Bafta. She became a global household name at 46 – just as her fortune teller had predicted. Away from the cameras, Mirren became equally adored for her outspokenness and refusal to kowtow to others’ expectations. She was candid about not wanting children (‘I have no maternal instinct’) and equally effusive about changing her mind on marriage when she wed Hackford in 1997 (after 11 years together) wearing a low-key jacket and skirt combo. ‘I’m a get-a-dress-at-a-thrift-shop-but-open-abottle-of-champagne kind of person,’ she said. Occasionally, her comments would get her into trouble. In 2008, she suggested date-rape victims should not expect their assailants to be prosecuted because it was a ‘tricky’ area. She was talking from experience, revealing in a GQ interview that she had been date raped ‘a couple of times’ when she was younger – on one occasion she was locked in a bedroom and forced to have sex against her will – but never reported the incidents. In the ensuing backlash, anti-rape campaigners said her comments reinforced the idea women were ‘asking for it’. In the same interview, she also admitted she used to love taking cocaine as a young actress before stopping in the early 80s. She remains outspoken, while the insecurities that plagued her twenties appear to be a distant memory. ‘As I get older, I don’t look as good – but I don’t give a damn,’ she said recently. ‘If I could give my younger self one piece of advice, it would be to use the words “fuck off ” more frequently.’

Playing the Queen in 2006 (left) and meeting the monarch in 2011(above)

After scene-stealing turns in Calendar Girls, The Madness Of King George – for which she received her first Oscar nomination in 1994 – and Gosford Park, Mirren was made a Dame in 2003, aged 58. Soon afterwards it was announced she would play Queen Elizabeth II in Stephen Frears’ The Queen (2006) and it was to be Mirren’s career opus, winning her the Oscar for Best Actress in 2007. At 71, Dame Helen has just completed filming the eighth instalment of the Fast & Furious franchise with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson and is tipped to be starring alongside Keira Knightley in Disney’s forthcoming retelling of The Nutcracker. Ryan Reynolds, her co-star in last year’s Woman In Gold, said, ‘When they roll the cameras, she becomes whomever she is playing. That’s a beautiful thing.’ Q

PHOTOGRAPHS BY FEATURE FLASH, GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, SPLASH NEWS

Life stories

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147

p

The wizarding world of Harry Potter is back this month – and

PHOTOGRAPH BY ART & COMMERCE

it’s got a brand new female heroine. Introducing Katherine Waterston

r


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149 The B abysitters

Girl of the moment Kat h e r i n e Wat e rs t o n Steve Jo bs

INTERVIEW BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES

Wa t e r s t o n s t a r s w it h Eddie Redmayne in J K Ro wling’s scr eenwr it ing debut , Fantastic B easts An d Wh er e To Find Th em

You play Porpentina Goldstein in Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them. How close is JK Rowling’s script to the original Harry Potter books?

Which spell would you like to use the most in real life?

‘The themes got more serious as the books continued, and Fantastic Beasts feels like a continuation of that. It’s more adult and there are certainly some very dark elements, but I don’t think Jo [Rowling] tried to target a particular age group. There’s still so much childlike wonder in the story.’

You’ve worked with some incredible actors. Who’s been your favourite?

Did you read all the books when you were a teenager?

‘My first introduction to Harry Potter was through my little brother, who started reading them and then we didn’t see him for days. I don’t even know if he ate. I’ve always had an aversion to bestsellers, so I tend to read really wonderful books about ten years too late! I read them while we were shooting, which actually ended up being an incredible gift as it kept me focused. I saw the films first, so I experienced it all in reverse.’

‘Reparo [to repair things] would probably be really useful, but Stupefy [the stunning spell] would be amusing!’

‘I’ll probably always hold working with Joaquin [Phoenix in Inherent Vice] very close to my heart, because that was a big break for me.’ You were recently reunited with Michael Fassbender in the sci-fi movie Alien: Covenant…

‘I can’t wait for people to see this film, because Michael plays two different

robots and he’s just incredible. I felt like I was getting this preview of what my children’s children will experience – interacting with an A.I. that looks like a person. He made my job so much easier, because I didn’t feel like I was engaging with a human being.’ Are you happy to be coming into the limelight in your thirties, rather than your teens or twenties?

‘Years ago, I thought that as I got older I’d have more clarity about life, but now I see that the questions remain. Things don’t necessarily get simpler as you age, but I think I’m probably less likely to sweat the small stuff.’ Who’s given you the best advice?

‘My grandfather said, “Fame is like smoking; it won’t hurt you if you don’t inhale”, and I think there’s something very grounding about that.’ Fant ast ic B east s And Wher e To F Ind Them is in cinemas from 18 November

I nhe re nt Vice

‘I’ll always hold working with Joaquin Phoenix in Inherent Vice very close to my heart’


FILM 01 The Light Between Oceans **** Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander became a couple for real while filming this 20s tragic romance – and no wonder. From the director of Blue Valentine, it’s a real heart-wrencher. 02 Arrival **** Amy Adams heads up this smart sci-fi as a grief-torn linguistics professor tasked

with

communicating

with

two

alien

creatures

that

land

in

Montana.

Highly

original.

03 Paterson **** Jim Jarmusch’s latest sees Girls star Adam Driver play a poetry-penning bus driver from New Jersey. Funny and gentle, if only more films were as literate and lovely as this. 04 Indignation *** Adapted from Philip Roth’s novel, Logan Lerman stars as a Jewish atheist college student in 50s America at odds with his beliefs. Well-acted, well-executed and well-intentioned.

By James Mottram 04

02 03 01

01

CHRISTMAS TV BINGO From missing F i i the h Q Queen’s ’ speech h to quoting ti Home H Alone, Al cross off ff these th entertainment i clichés li hé as they h h happen

WORDS BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON AND LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REX FEATURES, ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, BBC PICTURES

Y o u r mu m c o m m e n t s on how ‘dishy’ James Norton is during the Grantchester C h r i s t m a s sp e c i a l . A contest ant uses a choir and sm o k e m a c h i n e in The X Factor final.

Y o u r da d s a y s , ‘ Th a t ’ s a b i t r a c y ’ about a Strictly d a n c e r ’s o u t f i t .

Y o u r un c l e w a l k s i n at the end of a murder mystery and says, ‘ Wh a t ’ s t h i s a l l about then?’ You realise there are too many awkward sex jokes in this Live At The Apollo stand-up show for family viewing.

Lunch overruns and you miss the Queen’s speech. Your preferred spy drama is vetoed in favour of the Call The Midwife Christmas special. Y o u r da d i n s i s t s o n watching Pointless C e l e b r i t i e s , then fa l l s a s l e e p five m i n u t e s i n .

There’s fake snow on This Morning. Y o u r mu m switches off the TV and suggests a nice game of charades.

Y o u r au n t gets upset that you’ve missed the Queen’s speech. You secretly really enjoy the Call The Midwife Christmas sp e c i a l .

You get emotional at Ca r o l s Fr o m King’s.

Y o u r mu m t u t s a t a below-the-belt joke in W a l l i a m s An d F r i e n d .

Y o u r au n t s a y s , ‘ Su r e l y t h e r e ’ s a Poirot on?’

The Strictly winner celebrates under a gold confetti canon.

The Snowman comes on. You and your brother watch Home Alone and quote the whole film b a c k a t each other.

Y o u r gr a n n y says she misses ‘that brilliant Downton’.

Michael Bublé is played over a Christmas TV mont age age.

You finally watch the Queen’s speech on catch-up and someone says, ‘ Aw w w , l o v e h e r ’ .

The entire cast of EastEnders has a terrible Christmas (again).

A gingerbread h o u s e gets binned in The Great British Bake Off Christmas special.

A TV host wears a novelty Christmas jumper.

Y o u r gr e a t au n t makes everyone watch a M o r e c am b e a n d Wise retrospective.

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151


Mu sical roots ‘I don’t remember a weekend when there wasn’t music blasting through the house. My mum was really into motown and ska; my dad was into Radiohead and Björk. I was listening to S Club 7!’

FOR THESPIANS

FOR BOOK LOVERS

For when a bubble bath set just won’t cut it

Tr y t icke t s t o t h e L o n do n A r t F air (londo nar t fair.co .uk, 18- 22 Januar y), which br ings t oget her wo r k fr o m over 125 galler ies. Near B r ist ol? Gift t hem a t o ur o f B anksy’s hometown (wherethewall.com).

Her b Lest er Asso ciat es make beaut iful, cult ur e- t hemed maps of places all o ver t he wo r ld, fr o m LA’s old pict ur eho uses t o a punklo ver s guide t o Londo n (her blest er.co m).

P l a y i n g a t G l a ston b u r y ‘I was like, “No one’s really going to come to my set, are they? They’ll look at the sign, wonder who I am and then just not bother.” But then I went on and the tent was completely full. It was a relief!’ T h e p e r fect l ove son g ‘Whenever I hear an amazing love song, the lyrics in it are probably things that I have actually said myself – I think that’s what makes a song relatable.’ Fellow ladies in m u si c ‘I think you can be a really unique artist musically, but stay down-to-earth in real life. You don’t have to carry your onstage persona around with you. I love Dua Lipa, she’s cool but she’s also very nice, which is refreshing.’ Th e n ew album ‘I mostly just play the piano and sing, but there are more modern elements to it, too. I finished it a week ago. I had to hand over the final product and think, “I can’t change this any more,” which felt quite scary!’

Frances’ debut album Things I Never Said is out December

PLANET IVORY Leonardo DiCaprio used his 2016 Oscar acceptance speech to highlight the damage we’re doing to the planet. This month, he’s focusing on the plight of elephants by executive producing a powerful new documentary about the ivory trade. The film pulls no punches – and rightly so. At the rate we’re going, African elephants will be wiped out in 15 years. The Ivory Game, hailed as this year’s Blackfish, comes to Netflix on 4 November. Sponsor an elephant to protect it from poaching by visiting BornFree.org.uk

WORDS BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON AND LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON JOYCE, LONDON ART FAIR – MARK GERTLER 1891 – 1939. THE DOLL, 1914, OIL ON CANVAS, REX FEATURES

can already count Sam Smith as a fan

B o o k A lice’s Adventu r es Under gr ou n d, an immer sive sho w wit h t hemed fo o d and cockt ails. It definit ely beat s ano t her knit t ed jumper (alice- under gr o und.co m).

F O R C U LT U R A L EXPLORERS

Meet the soulful new ballad queen who

Zadie Smit h’s new novel S wing Tim e , about a complicated friendship bet ween t wo gir ls, is t he smar t wo man’s Christmas gift.

FOR ARTY TYPES

5 MINUTES WITH... FRANCES

C U LT U R A L C H R I S T M A S P R E S E N T S

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152


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Gift guide FROM INSTA-WORTHY INTERIORS TO CUT TING-EDGE TECH, WE’ VE GOT YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENT LIST SORTED – LEAVING YOU MORE TIME FOR THE FESTIVITIES. MULLED WINE, ANYONE?

Photographs by DAVID ABRAHAMS Styled by SIAN PARRY


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Premium products in sumptuous packaging. Here come the girls…

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0 1 Givenchy Dahlia Divin Poudre D’Or, £ 46; sweater, from a selection, Jaeg e r . 0 2 Burberry Kisses Gloss in Parade Red, £ 21. 03 Acqua di Parma Peonia N o b i l e ED P, £ 76 for 50ml. 04 Decléor Advent Calendar, £ 60. 05 Philosophy Christ ma s Cookie S hampoo , Sho wer Gel and B ubble B at h, £ 14.60. 06 Clarins Festive E y e Mak e- U p Palet t e, £ 35. 07 Chanel No.5 The Body Oil, £ 62 fo r 200ml. 08 Gu e r lain Mét éor it es Per les De Legend, £ 42.50. 09 Nars Give In Take DualIn te nsit y Eye & Cheek Palet t e, £ 55. 10 Givenchy Le Rouge Lipstick in Rose A u dacieux, £ 29. 11 Rituals The Ritual of Dao Calming Treat Gift Set, £ 19.50. 12 Marc Jacobs Beauty Your Place Or Mine? 5-piece brush collection, £ 95. 13 By Terry Impearlious Voile De Perle Premium Highlighter Compact, £ 46

Gift guide

b eauty

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Gift guide

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Cue darling details for the most fashion-forward recipients

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01 Bag, £895, JW Anderson; jeans, model’s own 02 Bra, £34, Triumph 03 Shoes, £135, COS 04 Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov, £65, The Folio Society 05 Earrings, £8, Debenhams 06 Hat, £65, Le Kilt 07 Phone case, £40, Kate Spade New York 08 Necklace, £19.50, Marks & Spencer 09 Trainers, £310, Golden Goose at Net-A-Porter 10 Clutch, £350, Sophia Webster at Net-APorter 11 Bag, £8, Tu at Sainsbury’s 12 Dress, £29.99, New Look 13 Candle, £40, Bella Freud


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Pimp their pad with our pick of hot new grand designs

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01 Watering can, £40, Labour and Wait; sweater, £319, The White Company; socks and boots, model’s own 02 ‘Balloon Dog’ ornament, £15, Very.co.uk 03 Plant pot, £25, Studio Emma McDowall at Etsy.com 04 ‘Foot’ match strike, £42, Jonathan Adler 05 Print, £20, V&A Shop 06 Clock, £18, Notonthehighstreet.com 07 Candle, £60, The White Company 08 ‘Lit Arrow Metal Art’, £60, Graham & Brown 09 Ringholder, £12, Debenhams 10 Vase, £30, Habitat 11 Candle holder, £8, Matalan 12 Plate, £45, Liberty 13 Lantern, £60, The White Company 14 Teapot, £30, Oliver Bonas

Gift guide

interiors

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Luxe leather, a cult read and our Christmas Day game crush. Yup, this is officially a sock-free zone

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01 Shirt, £ 180, R ichar d James; bow t ie, £ 65, Hug o B oss. 02 Backpack, £ 95, V&A Sho p 03 Backgammo n set , £ 495, Aspinal o f Londo n 04 Hat, £ 45 , Jaeger 05 Mug, £ 10.95, Liber t y 06 Liberty-print boxer sho r t s, £ 40, Sunspel 07 Reu n io n by Fred Uhlman, £ 9.99, Vint age 08 ‘Napoleon’ candle, £ 108, L Ma i s o n Lo ndo n 09 Jeans, £ 85, Levi’s 10 Slippers, £ 75, U g g 11 ‘Console Gaming’ device for iPhone 6, £ 79, Gamevice 12 Card holder, £ 110, Paul Smith 13 T-shirt, £ 30, Selfish Mot her


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01 ‘Solo3 Wireless On-Ear headphones in Gold, £249.99, Beats at Apple; sweater, £150, Jaeger 02 ‘Too’ portable speaker in Caribbean Green, £109.95, Libratone at John Lewis 03 Travel adapter, £26, Cath Kidston 04 Slate 2, £139.99, Iskn at Harrods 05 iPhone case, £26.95, Sonix at John Lewis 06 Headphones, £25, Sound Boutique at Debenhams 07 Wooke Micro USB Cable, £10, iamfy.co 08 Sticker, £45, Anya Hindmarch 09 iPad sleeve, £125, Aspinal of London 10 ‘Blaze’ f i t n e s s w a t c h , £ 1 6 0 , F i t b i t a t D e b e n h a m s 1 1 ‘ O l f a c t o r y ’ a l a r m c l o c k , £ 78, Se n s or wake at Har r ods 1 2 ‘ M e g a D r i v e C l a s s i c W i r e l e s s ’ g a m e s c o n s o l e , £49.99, Sega at Selfridges 13 ‘Ixus 180’ camera, £129.99, Canon

Gift guide

technology 01

Cutting-edge tech and stylish gadgets for the IT crowd

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ki d s

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Super-cute stocking fillers and new-gen toys the tots will love

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01 Games compendium, £ 35, John Lewis 02 S leepsuit , £ 5, Mat alan 03 Virtual Reality Headset , £ 25, Tekki at Habit at 04 ‘Cactus’ rattle, £ 9, Julia S t ait e at Et sy.com 05 Personalised Frosties box, £ 4.99, Selfr idges 06 Bag, £ 6, Next 07 Minnie Linen S pr ig Kids Mini Rucksack, £ 18, Cath Kidsto n 08 Helmet, £ 34.95, Micr o Sco o t er s 09 ‘Shark’ pencil case, £ 8, Alex and Alexa 10 Potato clock, £ 11.50, Eden Pr oject S ho p 11 A n im al Masks, £11.99, Anthropologie 12 Musical instruments, from £ 6.50, V&A S ho p 13 Sweater,from £ 32.50, B oden


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Using WhatsApp will never be the same again. Introducing the bureau beauties…

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01 Notebook, £35, and pencil, £20, both Smythson; top, £110, Whistles 02 Stapler, £22, Anthropologie 03 ‘Wish List’ notes, £3.95, Knock Knock at Liberty 04 Card, £6.95, Liberty 05 Calendar, £25, Kate Spade 06 ‘Teds Stationery Stack’, £24.95, Ted Baker at Wild & Wolf 07 Fashion, Print & Colouring by Matthew Williamson £15.95, Laurence King 08 Bauble, £3, Habitat 09 Weekly planner, £8, Papio Press at Etsy.com 10 Bookmark, £12, Tom Dixon at John Lewis 11 Playing cards, £55, Smythson 12 ‘Woodland Trails’ jar of paperclips, £3.50, Paperchase 13 Notebook, £70, Hermès 14 ‘Compliment’ pencil set, £10, Ban.do at ASOS

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01 Tennis balls, £7 for four, John Lewis 02 Sports bra and shorts, £25 each, Victoria’s Secret 03 ‘Smart Rope’, £75, The Conran Shop 04 Pouch, £18, Alphabet Bags 05 Ren Neroli Duo, £29. 06 Bag, £39.99, Mi Pac 07 Bodyism D e t o x B ox, £ 180, Har r ods 08 Pouch, £ 30, S weaty B et t y 0 9 T r a i n e r s , £ 8 0 , P u m a 1 0 S w e a t e r , £ 1 2 0 , Lacoste 11 Fitbit, £99, John Lewis 12 Water bottle, £14.99, Full Windsor 13 ‘Scandi Ski’ leggings, £60, Sweaty Betty Q

HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY NATALIE PIACUN AT UNTITLED ARTISTS USING MAC COSMETICS. NAILS BY JESSICA THOMPSON AT FRANK. MODEL: SOPHIA WASSERMANN AT WILHELMINA

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Winning kit upgrades for the champions in your life. Gym membership, optional


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STYLED BY JAYNE PICKERING. PHOTOGRAPH BY JESSE LAITINEN. CRÊPE SATIN DRESS, £2,295, CHRISTOPHER KANE

Fashion ece ber

Party pieces get a fresh spin, designer jewellery shows metal, and two Brit actresses take centre stage


All woman

Styled by JAYNE PICKERING Photographs by JESSE LAITINEN

Feminine frills and sheer, sumptuous fabrics give a modern twist to festive dressing


T h i s p a g e : S atin and silk-mix corset, £885, and viscose rayon shirt, £420, both Maison Margiela; nylon tulle skirt, £295, Mother Of Pearl; pants (worn underneath), £34, Triumph. Opposite p ag e: leather and cotton ruffle dress, £4,780, and embellished cotton, silver and jewel scarf, £540, both Louis Vuitton


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Th i s p ag e : silk organza blouse, £1,500, and cotton crêpe trousers, £980, both Delpozo. Opposite pag e : khaki silk Chantilly lace and velvet dress, £11,040, Gucci


T hi s p a ge : embroidered cotton shirt, £1,590, and silk lace skirt, £3,020, both Valentino; 18ct-gold and freshwater pearl earring (just seen), £615, Delfina Delettrez Opposite page: silk organza top, £2,300, and cotton cady trousers, £750, both Roks anda; leather shoes, £525, Rupert S anderson; 18ct-gold vermeil earring, £169, Phoebe Coleman

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T hi s p a g e: cirĂŠ with embroidery coat, from a selection, Miu Miu Opposite page: silk and wool blouse, s atin trousers with Swarovski-cryst al belt, and silk bra, all from a selection, all Dolce & Gabbana; leather shoes, ÂŁ1,030, Gucci


T hi s p a ge : silk-lace and knit-mix dress, £2,395, and leather belt, £795, both Alex ander McQueen Opposite p a g e: silk blouse, £630, and silk trousers, £925, both Albert a Ferretti; leather shoes, £280, Toga

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HAIR BY JOHNNIE BILES AT FRANK AGENCY USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP BY LINDA ÖHRSTRÖM USING MARIA ÅKERBERG DEEPSKIN ORGANICS. ALL NAILS BY GEORGIA HART AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING CHANEL LE VERNIS IN BALLERINA AND BODY EXCELLENCE HAND CREAM. MODEL: ALINA LEVICHKINA AT IMG MODELS


L E A D I N G

LADY

Enchanting on stage, compelling on screen, and equally intriguing in real life, Ruth Wilson talks sex scenes, ambition and remembering to breathe with Jane Mulkerrins Photographs by DREW WHEELER Styled by JAYNE PICKERING


Th is pa g e and opposite page: all clothing, shoes and jewellery, Dior Haute Couture


Th i s pag e and opposite page: all clothing, shoes and jewellery, Dior Haute Couture


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It’s a sultry September morning in Manhattan, just after Labor Day, which marks the ‘official’ end of summer in the US. The mercury, however, is paying no heed to the change in seasons. Despite sweltering temperatures, Hurricane Hermine is sitting somewhere just off the east coast and high winds and rough waters are battering the beaches. Filming of American TV drama, The Affair, set partially in the affluent Hamptons, has been thrown into turmoil, along with the schedule of its star, Ruth Wilson. There will be no lazy lunching over lobster rolls, just coffee (and lots of it) when she tiptoes into The Greenwich Hotel at 8am. In a courtyard filled with oversized ferns and rubber plants, Wilson is inadvertently dressed for her surroundings in a safari-style shirt and jeans and minimal make-up. Until a couple of years ago, the 34-year-old was most widely recognised, in Britain at least, as manipulative sociopath Alice Morgan in BBC police drama Luther. But The Affair (on Sky Atlantic in the UK) is the next level. Wilson’s profile is rising dramatically on both sides of the pond and she bagged a Golden Globe for Best Actress in 2015. She bought a flat in London’s hip Bermondsey with her earnings from the first series, but its success means that, ironically, she now lives five months of the year in New York. ‘I am tempted to move here,’ she admits, apologetically. ‘I love it.’ In the show, Wilson plays Alison, a woman unable to move past her grief over the loss of her child, and who begins an affair with a married author and father-of-four, Noah, played by Dominic West. This in spite of being married herself, to Cole, played by Dawson’s Creek star Joshua Jackson. (The notion that anyone would cheat on Pacey is the only element of the show I find slightly far-fetched.) The Affair stands head and shoulders above other dramas because of its unique storytelling. In recalling the same events from the perspectives of different characters, it sparks all sorts of questions about perception, memory and truth, not to mention infidelity, betrayal, bereavement, divorce and the ensuing guilt and self-loathing. I’m dying for some season three spoilers, as Wilson is a few weeks into filming. Plot points in US TV shows are a notoriously closely guarded secret, but she does let slip that Alison – who now has a child with Noah – will become embroiled in an ugly custody battle. The intense subject matter, ‘pushing its characters to really dark places’, is incredibly emotionally demanding on its stars. ‘The first season was relentless and draining,’ recalls


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Wilson. ‘I’m not someone who can ever do something half-arsed, but at points I did think, “Oh my god, I can’t go any deeper.” I didn’t know if I could sustain it.’ In fact, four weeks before the end of the first five-month shoot, she called her mother, a former probation and social worker, who dropped everything and jumped on a plane to join her. ‘Good old Mum,’ she smiles, sipping on her cappuccino. She didn’t even have a break after the show wrapped. ‘I went straight from season one to doing a play [Constellations on Broadway, opposite Jake Gyllenhaal], and then straight back to the second season…’ Her mum, she explains, is not one to usually get so directly involved in her career, although she has long acted as wise counsel; Wilson plundered her experience of working with psychopaths when she was preparing to play Alice. The Affair involves a great deal more sex scenes than anything Wilson has worked on before. ‘If something’s called The Affair, apparently people demand lots of sex scenes.’ Her deadpan tone and expression suggests she finds the volume of sex in the show unnecessary. ‘Do you like watching sex scenes?’ she asks me, with genuine curiosity. Not particularly, I tell her. And isn’t it all about the build-up rather than the act itself? She nods, alluding to the sexual tension between Luther (Idris Elba) and Alice. ‘You’ve never seen anything happen, they’ve never kissed, and the sexual tension is what is so exciting about it.’ By the very nature of its title, The Affair is a story spun from a central, initial infidelity, and the ripples that resonate are myriad. Coming from a very solid family, this took Wilson a while to get her head round. ‘All my three brothers are married, and have all got kids, and Mum and Dad are still together,’ she ventures, by way of explanation. Her own relationship status is something she’s never addressed – cue annoying press speculation of romances with co-stars like Jude Law and Jake Gyllenhaal. It’s safe to say we’re not going to see Wilson papped hand-inhand, Taylor Swift-style, with a fellow celeb any time soon. ‘Any relationship you have will never be conventional, because you will always be away from home for a while,’ she shrugs. ‘You just have to figure out with your partner how that works; they have to be very understanding, or able to travel with you. ‘It does limit your choices,’ she confesses. ‘But I wouldn’t live without it [being in a relationship].’ She’s not so crazy about marriage. ‘I hate the thought of walking down an aisle in a white dress – I think it’s just a horrible idea,’ she says. ‘And I’m just not that excited by the idea of a wedding day, or of a ring on my finger. I’m not even interested in jewellery.’ We digress for a moment to discuss the obsession many New York women have with enormous, unwieldy diamonds; the size and cost of the rock is a factor in engagements here. ‘It’s awful, you go to SoulCycle, and there will be gangs of girls discussing it,’ she says, looking mystified. Thanks to her brothers, she has seven nieces and

nephews, aged from five months to 12 years old, whom she beams at the very mention of, so the pressure, if there was any, to provide grandchildren is off. ‘I think my dad just wants me to be looked after, you know? I tell him that I am pretty good at looking after myself, but I get it…’ she tails off. My guess is that she hasn’t figured out exactly what she wants yet, or how that will chime with the expectations of others. ‘I think, if you’ve got a great family, you fear they will be more disappointed by your choices than they probably will be in reality,’ she muses. Her schedule is as busy as ever. She finishes filming The Affair, then flies directly overnight to London to begin rehearsals the very next day to take on the iconic role of Hedda Gabler at the National Theatre from early December. No matter what else she is doing, theatre is the medium she will always return to. ‘I just love being in front of a live audience and having a whole stage to kind of… breathe in,’ she enthuses. That’s not to say she doesn’t suffer nerves. ‘Oh my god, when I was doing Constellations with Jake, it was like a boxing ring – the fear was so great each night. We’d stand there, on opposite sides of the stage, and [I’d] just breathe and pray I’d get through it.’ She beams broadly. ‘That fear is so exhilarating – it is such a high that you get.’ She will take a break at some point, won’t she? ‘There are just opportunities you can’t miss,’ she shrugs. ‘I’ll get through it, because I have to.’ I’ve never met Wilson before but there’s something strangely familiar about her. It’s more than the highly recognisable features – the architectural eyebrows and wide, mobile mouth, which is even more mesmerising in person. Maybe it’s because, in spite of her success, she feels like one of us. Off-screen, she speaks not with the cut-glass tones you might expect from someone theatre critics have dubbed a ‘Dame in waiting’, but with an estuary accent which befits her solidly middleclass upbringing in Shepperton, Surrey. The daughter of Nigel, an investment banker, and her mother, Mary, she was very much a tomboy growing up alongside her older brothers, Toby, Sam and Matthew. She says it was a childhood of ‘being thrown off things and pushed off things and beaten up on a daily basis’ by the three of them. We discuss the dynamics of having brothers, and valuing platonic male company. ‘I’ve always had loads of men in my life, as my good friends,’ she says. In moving to New York, she found social groups more firmly divided down gender lines, with ‘gangs of girls that you just don’t get in London at all.’ She looks bemused. ‘It felt bitchy and weird, and I didn’t want to be part of it. It felt like being back at school.’ The only one of the four siblings to pursue acting beyond a Sunday drama club – two of her brothers are teachers, and one is a BBC journalist – she studied history and drama at Nottingham before landing a place at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Prestigious as it was, ‘I did wonder why I’d chosen acting,’ she admits. ‘It sometimes seemed


All clothing and jewellery, Diorand Haute Couture T his pa g e all clothing, shoes jewellery, Dior Haute Couture


HAI R BY S E IJ I AT TH E WALL G R O U P U S I N G O R I B E. MAK E-U P BY TALIA S PAR R OW AT K RAM E R + K RAM E R U S I N G D I O R C H R I STMAS LO O K AN D CAPTU R E TOTALE D R EAM S K I N. NAI LS BY YU KO WADA AT ATE LI E R MANAG E M E NT U S I N G C HAN E L LE VE R N I S I N BALLE R I NA & B O DY E XC E LLE N C E HAN D C R EAM. P R O D U CTI O N BY TH E P R O D U CTI O N FACTO RY NY

T h is p a g e and opposite p ag e : all clothing, shoes and jewellery, Dior Haute Couture


193 odd. I didn’t know where it had come from.’ Then, a decade ago, it emerged that her paternal grandfather, Alexander Wilson (who died when her father was just 16), was a British spy who wrote 24 novels, as well as keeping four separate families with four wives. ‘In this other part of my family, there are writers and poets and actors – my grandfather set up these little theatre troupes and groups.’ This newly discovered branch of the family tree had a profound impact on Wilson. ‘It made me feel validated, that I’m not a complete anomaly,’ she nods. It made me feel better about myself.’ Shortly after graduation, she was cast in the title role in the BBC’s adaptation of Jane Eyre, opposite Toby Stephens, and has never looked back. Since then she’s picked up consistently rave reviews whether on stage, for A Streetcar Named Desire (alongside Rachel Weisz as Blanche DuBois) and Anna Christie (opposite Jude Law), both at the Donmar Warehouse, winning Olivier Awards for both; on TV, in Small Island and Luther; and in intelligent, character-driven films such as Suite Française and Saving Mr Banks. Wilson had reservations about taking on Hedda Gabler – considered one of the greatest dramatic roles in theatre – at this stage in her career. ‘I thought, it’s the one everyone has to do, and I didn’t want to do it just to tick a box,’ she says. But she was persuaded by the prospect of working with avant-garde director Ivo van Hove, who recently directed A View From The Bridge to enormous acclaim in the West End and on Broadway. Hedda is not only another unhappy wife, but a schemer and a manipulator too, encouraging a former lover to kill himself. ‘Ivo calls it a suicide play,’ Ruth says, brightly. ‘That’s the only note he’s given me so far.’ Wilson herself has previously directed a short film as well as The El Train, a series of three short plays by Eugene O’Neill. ‘It’s weird, – as actors, it’s sometimes just: come on, say your lines, and go away again.’ It is not, she says, that people are dismissive – quite the opposite. ‘We’re called…“the talent,”’ she says, pulling a face of disdain at the notion of being considered some sort of precious jewel. And why shouldn’t she be ‘part of the whole conversation’? ‘I loved having involvement in the music, and the costumes, having a lot of decisions to make,’ she enthuses. ‘I don’t know if now is the right time, but I am definitely looking out for opportunities.’ And as she finishes her coffee and gears up for another day on set, I look at her and think, she probably won’t have to look very far. Q


H E A V Y

M E T A L

fan Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN Styled by DES LEWIS

Solid gold chains and statement silver are rocking winter’s jewellery collections


T his p a g e: Clockwise from top left,18ct rose-gold chain bracelet, £9,300, Pomellato; 18ct rose-gold locket bracelet, £4,100, Louis Vuitton; 18ct gold ring, £1,610; Gucci; cotton-mix dress, about £1,680, Céline. Opposite page: 24ct gold earrings, £180, Alighieri; 18ct gold ring, £1,600, Asprey; 18ct gold bracelet, £4,950, Gucci; cotton-mix dress, about £1,680, Céline

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T h is p a g e, clockwise from left: 18ct gold and diamond necklace, £9,550, Piaget; 18ct gold ring, £2,250, Van Cleef & Arpels; cotton dress, £2,050, Dior. Pearl and rose-gold ear cuff, £750, and garnet, pearl and rose-gold earring, £1,250, both Annoushk a; 18ct white- gold and diamond ring (model’s left hand), £6,250, Shaun Leane; silver and gemstone ring (model’s right hand, middle finger), £111, Carat London; 18ct white-gold, diamond and pearl ring (model’s right hand, ring finger), £4,750, Chanel; cotton-mix dress, about £1,680, Céline. 14ct gold ear cuff, £280, Aniss a Kermiche; gold and diamond bee earrings, £1,950, Dior; 18ct gold and diamond earring, £690, Mappin & Webb.


This page: 18ct gold and diamond earrings, ÂŁ3,975, B anneya London; gold chain with gold, white-gold, pink-gold and diamond pendant, ÂŁ2,300, De Beers; silk-mix dress, ÂŁ995, Nina Ricci


HAIR BY JOHNNIE BILES AT FRANK AGENCY USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE MAKE-UP BY PHOEBE WALTERS USING MAC COSMETICS. NAILS BY KIM TREACY AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING OPI. MODEL: CARRIE-ANNE CROLLY-BURTON AT TESS MANAGEMENT


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T hi s p a g e, from top: 18ct white-gold ear cuff, £5,200, and 18ct white-gold and diamond earrings, £5,520, both Messik a; silver double ring, £225, Georg Jensen; 18ct gold and white-gold bracelet, £4,250, Van Cleef & Arpels; 18ct white gold bracelet, £4,430, Bulgari; silk-mix dress, £995, Nina Ricci. 18ct pink-gold earrings, £3,650, Cartier; cotton-mix dress, about £1,680, Céline. Opposite page: 18ct gold ring, £1,600, Asprey; 18ct gold ridged bracelet, £5,100, B oucheron; 18ct gold and diamond bracelet, £5,800, Tiffany & Co; cotton dress, £2,050, Dior


Modern

muse

British actress Ellie Bamber plays dress-up in Chanel Resort Styled by JAYNE PICKERING Photographs by CAMILLA ARMBRUST


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Cotton jacket, £2,795, linen and silk waistcoat, £1,865, cotton voile blouse, £2,020, cotton tie, £180, silk tulle skirt, from a selection, leather brogues, £770, glass, pearl and met al brooch (on tie), £725, and 18ct white-gold, diamond and mother-of-pearl ring, £4,075, all Chanel


203 This page: cotton toile blouse, £7,155, beaded toile skirt, from a selection, leather belt, £665, leather shoes, £770, 18ct-gold, diamond and mother-of-pearl earrings, £8,700, 18ct white-gold and diamond cuff, from a selection, 18ct white-gold ring (right hand), £2,125, and 18ct white, yellow-gold and diamond ring (left hand), £6,000, all Chanel Opposite page: white cotton jacket with multi-coloured trim, £7,285, white, red and blue cotton top, £560, 18ct-gold and diamond ring, and 18ct white-gold and diamond rings, all from a selection, and 18ct white-gold and diamond earrings, £10,750, all Chanel


‘The producers dyed my hair. The next day I woke up and was like, “Wow, I actually like it – this is me”’

‘Come and see this’ says Ellie Bamber, leading me into the make-up room of an east London studio and shrugging on a tin-foil silver bomber jacket. Her ‘oh-my-god’ face says it all. The jacket is a recent gift from Chanel, along with a few other ‘bits and bobs’ including ‘a lovely little cardigan’ – a perk of being one of the French brand’s newly appointed ambassadors, as well as an actress whose career is very much on the rise right now. If you recognise 19-year-old Bamber it’s probably from her role as Lydia Bennett in the period drama-horror mashup Pride And Prejudice And Zombies, where she fought her way in Regency costume through murderous hordes with Lily James and Suki Waterhouse. She got her first big break back in 2010 on stage as Dinah Lord in Sir Trevor Nunn’s Aspects Of Love, despite a slight misunderstanding at the audition. ‘He told me, “Steal your father’s chair,” which I took literally by picking up the chair and running off stage with it. Apparently Trevor turned to his right-hand man and was like, “I really like that girl, but I have no idea what she’s doing with that chair,”’ she laughs. ‘He just wanted me to sit in it.’ Bamber grew up in a village near Reading and doesn’t come from a big family of actors; her early start with Aspects Of Love (she was just 13) led to an agreement with her parents that she’d finish her GCSEs before embarking on a full-time acting career. ‘My mum is sort of managing me now,’ she says, ‘but she’s not your typical “momager”. She’s very chilled, but takes the reins every now and again.’ Karl Lagerfeld isn’t the only designer Bamber has won over recently. Her latest role is as India Hastings in Tom Ford’s new movie Nocturnal Animals. The film, also starring Isla Fisher, Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal, won rave reviews and plenty of awards-season buzz at its premiere at the Venice Film Festival in September. But meeting Tom Ford in his immaculate office full of stiletto-wearing assistants doesn’t sound like a relaxed experience. ‘I thought about what to wear for ages,’ she says, ‘but in the end I went for flared jeans, brown clogs – because of the whole 70s trend at the time – and a white shirt.’ A natural aesthete, Ford was clearly won over. With her long red hair and cherubic face you can see why Bamber was the perfect choice to play Isla Fisher’s onscreen daughter, but in real life she’s actually a natural blonde. ‘When I was doing PPZ [Pride And Prejudice And Zombies] the producers were like, “We’re turning you ginge.” I remember the day they dyed my hair I was wearing this pastel purple top. I went home and said, “Dad, nothing matches my hair, I can’t wear anything,” but the next morning I woke up, had a shower and was like, “Wow, actually I like it – this is me.”’ And luckily, pretty much any hair shade will go with a Chanel silver bomber jacket. Q Nocturnal Animals is in cinemas now

INTERVIEW BY LUCY PAVIA. HAIR BY JAMIE MCCORMICK USING LESS IS MORE ORGANIC HAIR CARE. MAKE-UP BY KELLY CORNWELL AT PREMIER USING ROUGE ALLURE INK AND NO.5 L’EAU. NAILS BY CHISATO YAMAMOTO AT DAVID ARTISTS USING CHANEL LE VERNIS IN ORGANDI AND BODY EXCELLENCE HAND CREAM

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This p a g e: cotton jacket, £2,910, cotton voile blouse, £1,100, 18ct-gold ring, £2,400, and 18ct white-gold, diamond and pearl earrings, £11,500, all Chanel Opposite pag e : white, red and blue cotton top, £560, green, pink and blue silk gauze skirt, £2,260, and 18ct white-gold and diamond cuff (just seen), from a selection, all Chanel. Make-up this page: Les Beiges Healthy Glow Foundation Beige Rosé 12, Joues Contraste Powder Blush 320 Rouge Profond, Les 4 Ombres Multi-Effect Quadra Eyeshadow 268, Candeur Et Expérience Le Volume de C HAN E L Mascara 10 Noir, and Rouge Allure 168 Rouge Ingénue, all Chanel


STYLED BY SOPHIE QURESHI. PHOTOGRAPH BY BETINA DU TOIT. MAKE-UP BY ANDREW GALLIMORE AT CLM HAIR & MAKEUP FOR NARS COSMETICS, ASSISTED BY ANA FRY. MODEL: GRACE ANDERSON AT PREMIER

Beauty

R U L E

BREAKERS

Pro-hacks for the new power pout, the latest breed of dark, dramatic fragrances and hero treatments for morning-after skin

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Beauty

GAME CHANGER: NEW-GEN CREAM BLUSHES

The geniuses at Dior have bottled a luxurious oil that can be massaged into skin or combined with water for a milky bath, leaving you beautifully scented with rose, jasmine, neroli and vanilla. I mean, come on.

Cream blush has seriously upped its game – time to invest, we say. (From left to right) Korean brand 3 Concept Eyes Barbapapa Blush Cushion in Pink, £12, creates a healthy ‘winter walk’ flush, while Lancôme Cushion Blush Subtil in Rose Givrée, £28 (Fabled.com), gives skin an ultra-sheer pop of colour. For a more traditional look, Rimmel London Royal Blush Cream Blush in Coral Queen, £5.99 (Boots.com), is a cream-to-powder compact that can be dabbed on with fingertips. B obbi Brown LongWe a r L iqu id L in e r in B alt ic B lue Spar kle, £ 23.50 (Fabled.co m)

B U R B E R RY

MC LOVES…DIOR J ’A D O R E H U I L E D I V I N E ROSE DE GRASSE, £63 FOR 200ML

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STARRY EYED Fabled by Marie Claire The best beauty brands, hourly delivery slots and advice from the MC beauty team – meet Fabled by Marie Claire, our amazing new beauty shop! Keep your eyes peeled for fab blackFriday deals in store and online at Fabled.com.

beauty

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N E W S ANATOMY OF… SUNDAY RILEY U.F.O. ULTRA CLARIFYING FACE OIL, £68

Also kno wn as ‘U .F .O.’, it cont ains 1.5 per cent of bact er ia- bust ing salicylic acid, making it a total winner for pr oblemat ic, pimple- pr o ne skin.

If Sunday Riley products don’t currently feature in your washbag, it’s definitely time they did. Why? Because her cult skin saviours (with genius names like Good Genes) are fast becoming faves among skin experts, celebrities and bloggers around the globe.

S alicylic acid for mulat io ns can be a bit drying, but no t t his one. Sunday Riley has also snuck in milk t hist le, cucumber seed o il, neroli and chamo mile t o no ur ish and soo t he. Plus, because it ’s a dr y oil, it basically disappears into the skin – per fect if you’re oil phobic. Mix three or four dr o ps wit h your fo undat io n t o give it blemish- bust ing super power s.

Festivals aside, this is the only time you can legitimately wear shimmer with abandon. At Burberry, glitter was applied to the tops of cheekbones (using Burberry Shimmer Dust in Gold Glitter) – ideal for winter weddings after dark. If that’s too much bling, Givenchy Palette Ors Audacieux contains gold and bronze shades to brighten tired eyes. For just a smidge of sparkle, try Bobbi Brown Long-Wear Liquid Liner, which comes in five jewel-toned shades.

B ur ber r y Shimmer Dust in Gold Glit t er, £ 20 (Fabled.co m)

y nch Give te Ors t e l Pa ux, acie Aud 50 ) . £40 enhams b (De


210 Prep Spray, £23 (Fabled.com). Spritz this on before Ne utroge na Hydro B oos t

make-up. It contains a stabilised form of vitamin B6

Wa t e r G e l Mo is tur is e r, £12.99.

t o r educe excess oil pr oduct ion (w hich occur s w hen

Wi t h a p o te n t m i x th a t i n cl u d e s

your skin is dehydrated) and make pores look smaller.

h y aluronic acid, this comforting ge l wi l l i n s tan tl y s o o th e yo u r p o s t-Pi n o t s ki n .

D r S e b a g h R o se d e Vi e H y d r a t i n g M a sk, £ 7 4 . A s w ell

SKIN SOS

as br i g ht eni ng v i t am i n C a nd r os e oi l , t hi s

Hangover skin

c ont a i ns c i t r ul l i ne (an ami no a c i d der i v ed from watermelon)

Bring your complexion back to life with

t h a t b i n d s w i t h w a ter i n y our s k i n t o b oo s t

our party-proof skincare saviours

h y dr a t i on l ev el s .

Words by ANITA BHAGWANDAS

It’s that time of year. A speedy post-work gin Th e Estée Edit By Est ée La ude r Me ga C h l o re lla Alga e C l e ans ing B a r, £1 7 . C onsi d e r th i s a gi an t g r een j u i ce fo r y o u r f a c e. Fu l l o f ch l o re l l a algae, it instantly perks up skin and washes away last night’s sins (almost).

turns into an impromptu all-nighter. Afternoon tea descends into several negronis with a side of tequila. We know that drinking alcohol affects our bodies internally, because we feel horrific (and because, well, science tells us), but it has pretty dramatic effects on our complexion, too. ‘Alcohol is a diuretic, so it seriously dehydrates your skin,’ says Dr Sam Bunting. ‘It also triggers the dilation of blood vessels and causes inflammation, resulting in redness, blemishes and accelerated ageing.’ Eek! According to Dr Bunting, your best bet is to fight dehydration and get moisture back in, pronto. ‘However tired you are, use a rinse-off cleanser followed by a moisturiser rich in hyaluronic acid to trap water into the skin,’ she says. The morning after, apply a face mask straight from the fridge to reduce puffiness. And it goes without saying, make that glass of water before bed a big one.

Rodial Super Acids X-treme Hangover Mask, £45. This

BareMinerals Dirty

rub-off mask blitzes impurities

Detox Skin Glowing And

and helps skin regain its

Refining Mud Mask, £32.

glow with a cocktail of

Four different soothing clays

exfoliating fruit acids.

and a skin-refining papaya enzyme will make you look and feel like a new person. Skin Ceuticals Phyto Corrective Masque, £55. For blotchy morning-after skin, this Erbori an Gi nseng S hot M ask, £6 (Fabled.com).

mask has your back with calming cucumber and

Ent er t aining on a hang ov er ? antioxidant-rich mulberry. This sheet m a s k ’s hydrating It’s also got a hefty dose of effects are instant and the plumping hyaluronic acid. ginseng extract will speed up cir culat ion t o make you look mor e aliv e. B onus.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES. DRSAMBUNTING.COM

Beauty

Urban Decay B6 Vi tami n-I nfused Compl exi on


ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

EV ERY GR EAT H A I R STORY S TA R T S H E R E M OROCCANOIL T R E AT ME NT A ND MO R O CCAN OI L TRE ATM E N T L I G H T: THE ULTI MATE FOU N DATI ON F O R A L L H A I R C A R E A N D S T Y L I N G INFUSED WITH NOURISHING ARGAN OIL

ONE BR AND: A WORLD OF OIL-INFUSED BE AUT Y

#ArganEveryDay | Learn more at Moroccanoil.co.uk


Beauty

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the edit

After dark Absinthe and ouzo, leather and bitter chocolate – it’s time to rethink your evening spritz Words by ABBIE SKLIARSKY Photograph by DAVID ABRAHAMS 01 Givenchy Dahlia Divin Le Nectar EDP, £67.50 for 50ml W a r mi ng mi mo s a f l owe r an d sa nd a l w o o d w i l l ha v e you d re am i n g o f s a nd y b ea ches a nd b ook i n g y ou r w i nt er g et a w a y sh arpi sh . 02 Juliette Has A Gun Into The Void EDP, £200 for 75ml (harrods.com) Da rk a nd my s t er i o us , th i s sc e n t i s n ot f o r w a l l fl o w er s . T he b l ac k orc h i d an d l i q u o r i c e n o t e s n e e d to be worn with b uck et l o a d s o f co n f i d e n c e . 03 Serge Lutens Veilleur de Nuit EDP, £525 for 50ml B i t t e r d a r k - c h o c o l a t e is enhanced w i t h t ub er o s e a nd v e ti v e r. A lit t l e g o es a v er y l o ng way , so you r c o s t p er s p r i t z i s p r e tty j u sti f i abl e .

04 CK One Gold EDT, £40 for 100ml Cal l i n g al l CK fans: t her e’s a new bot t le on th e bl ock. Juicy fig and ear t hy patc h ou l i have been co mbined t o c re ate th e u lt imat e day- t o- night scent . 05 Jo Malone London Orange Bitters Cologne, £90 for 100ml Th e ol f ac tory ver sion of a wint er war mer c oc k tai l – orange bit t er s and mandar in m ak e th i s i d eal fo r a cr isp, chilly night . 06 Elie Saab Éclat D’Or Collector’s Edition EDP, £58 for 50ml Th i s i s El i e Saab’s fir st ever Chr ist mas edition and it’s worth the wait with sweet orange and rose honey notes. Yes, please. 07 Tom Ford Vert des Bois EDP, £148 for 50ml (selfridges.com) Tom Ford strikes again with a blend

of ouz o , olive leaf and plum. Pr epar e t o be asked what you’r e wear ing. 08 Comme des Garçons Blackpepper EDP, £83 for 100ml An o pulent blend o f pepper , cedar woo d and t onka bean, t his is guar ant eed t o spice t hings up. 09 Byredo Le Gant Extrait de Parfum, £325 for 30ml (libertylondon.com) R ich in T uscan leat her , t his is t he sme ll of new wint er boo t s, fr esh out of t he box. Mmm. 10 L’Artisan Parfumeur 18 Glacialis Terra EDP, £140 for 75ml Vet iver r o o t s infused in absint he, ser ve d up in an apothecary-style bottle make this a chic addition to any dressing t able.


The beauty pros backstage were all in agreement this season: statement lips are where it’s at

Talking points

Words and styling by SOPHIE QURESHI Photographs by BETINA DU TOIT

DIFFUSION LINE

‘Wearing a darker colour in the centre of your lips gives an amazing dimension to the mouth,’ says backstage regular and Nars UK make-up artist ambassador Andrew Gallimore, who created the looks for our shoot. Quash the suspicion that you’ve just had a beetroot juice (or a large glass of red) by ensuring the darker centre blends seamlessly outwards. ‘An easy way to do it is to concentrate the colour just in the centre of the lips using a lip pencil or stain and then, with a fluffy eyeshadow brush, tease it out towards the edges.’


DARK MATTER

OPPOSITE PAGE: TOP, J. JS LEE. THIS PAGE: TOP, LUISA BECCARIA

If you rarely venture far from nude, it’s easy to dismiss a vampy, dark lip like this out of hand. But you know what? You might surprise yourself. ‘Once people get over the initial fear, they love it,’ says Gallimore. ‘Done well, a velvety plum lip looks really expensive. Let the mouth be the exclamation mark and keep everything else minimal and fresh, with just some highlight on your cheekbones.’ While the catwalks showcased the full spectrum of vamp, we wouldn’t recommend onyx for the uninitiated. ‘A blackened plum like Nars Velvet Lip Glide in Toy, £22, is softer on the skin.’

Beauty

215


BALMED AND READY

OPPOSITE PAGE: EARRINGS, KATERINA MAKRIYIANNI

While a dramatic pigment pop makes the strongest statement, a balmed, barely-there stain (as seen at Erdem this season) is equally beautiful. It’s the makeup equivalent of well-worn jeans: easy, flattering and works with everything. ‘Use a product that’s dark and highly pigmented, but apply a tiny amount,’ says Gallimore. ‘That’s what creates the transparency of a stain.’ Here, he buffed a matte lip colour on to the centre of our model’s mouth and then got her to blot her lips together to soften the effect.


WELL RED

A swipe of red lipstick on a bare face has long been the lazy girl’s default ‘out out’ look. But this season’s reds had an altogether more precise feel – painstakingly shaped, curved, lined and layered to create a much more ‘done’ look. ‘Use a flat-edged lip brush to paint on the colour and then sharpen it with lip liner,’ says Gallimore. You don’t have to settle for the silhouette you’re born with, either. ‘If you block out your Cupid’s bow with concealer, you can carve out exactly the shape you want on top.’


219

DRESS, ASOS

CHERRY PICK

If the last time you wore lip gloss was in secondary school and it was bubblegum flavoured, it’s time to revisit it. ‘We see a lot of matte nowadays, so a vinyl gloss makes a real statement,’ says Gallimore. ‘It’s high-maintenance – unless you go nil by mouth – but it gives lips this amazing plasticised finish.’ To create the look, Gallimore used a black cherry lipstick and layered Nars Lip Gloss in Triple X, £19.50, over the top.


BROWNIE POINTS

DRESS, LUISA BECCARIA; POLO NECK, HOBBS

On paper, brown lipstick isn’t perhaps the most obvious choice (unless you’re a big fan of 90s Drew Barrymore), but when it’s more of a brown/burgundy hybrid – as spotted at many a show this season – it totally works. ‘This conker shade looks amazing on redheads or warm brunettes,’ says Gallimore. And if you’ve got blue eyes, like our model, you should definitely get involved. ‘Just keep it modern by choosing a texture that isn’t too matte’. Whatever you do, park the lip liner.

Beauty

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223

Lip lock Nail the statement pout with our pick of the crop DIFFUSION LINE 01

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01 Barry M Satin Super Slick Lip Paint in Wine Not, £4.99. 02 Burt’s Bees Lip Crayon in Napa Vineyard, £8.99. 03 Nars Velvet Lip Glide in Unspeakable, £22 (Fabled.com). 04 Clinique Pop Lip Colour + Primer in Rebel Pop, £16 (Harrods.com). 05 Stila Stay All Day Lip Liner in Cabernet, £13.50

DARK MATTER 01

02

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01 Urban Decay Vice Comfort Matte Lipstick in Disturbed, £15 (Fabled.com). 02 Dior Rouge Dior in Poison Matte, £26.50 (Selfridges.com). 03 Illamasqua Glamore Lipstick in Vampette, £19.50. 04 Lipstick Queen Bête Noire in Possessed Intense, £28. 05 Too Faced Melted Matte in Evil Twin, £19

BALMED AND READY MAKE-UP BY ANDREW GALLIMORE AT CLM HAIR & MAKEUP FOR NARS COSMETICS, ASSISTED BY ANA FRY. HAIR BY LEIGH KEATES AT PREMIER HAIR AND MAKEUP USING BABYLISS PRO. NAILS BY AMI STREETS AT LMC WORLDWIDE USING NAILS INC. MODEL: GRACE ANDERSON AT PREMIER. FROM TOP: EARRINGS, MARNI; RED EARRINGS, AS BEFORE: MUSTARD SWEATER, LINDEX; DRESS AND POLO NECK, AS BEFORE

01

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01 Burberry Kisses Sheer in Oxblood, £25 (Fabled.com). 02 Shiseido Rouge Rouge in Toffee Apple, £23. 03 Nars Velvet Lip Glide in Chez Claude (part of set), £32. 04 Fresh Sugar Cream Lip Treatment in Blush, £19. 05 By Terry Rouge-Expert Click Stick in Garnet Glow, £24.50

WELL RED 01

02

03

04

05

01 Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet in 302, £27. 02 Tom Ford Lip Contour Duo in 07 Secret Escort, £29 (Harrods.com). 03 Givenchy Le Rouge in Heroic Red, £26. 04 Maybelline Vivid Matte Liquid in Rebel Red, £6.99. 05 Nars Lip Glide in Mineshaft, £22 (Fabled.com).

CHERRY PICK 01

02

03

04

05

01 L’Oréal Color Riche Gold Obsession in Plum Gold, £6.99. 02 No7 High Shine Lip Gloss in Glazed Plum, £9 (Boots.com). 03 Kat Von D Beauty Studded Kiss Lipstick in Prayer, £16 (Debenhams.com). 04 Nars Audacious Lipstick in Bette, £24. 05 Smashbox Be Legendary Lipstick in Witchy, £17.50

BROWNIE POINTS 01

02

03

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01 Clarins Rouge Eclat in 22 Red Paprika, £20. 02 Chanel Rouge Allure Ink in Expérimenté, £26. 03 Nars Audacious Lipstick in Sandra, £24 (Fabled.com). 04 Elizabeth Arden Beautiful Color Moisturizing Lipstick in Chocolate, £21. 05 Rimmel The Only 1 Matte Lipstick in Look Who’s Talking, £6.99 (Superdrug.com). Q

05


01 Sebastian Professional Sublimate, £18 02 Shu Uemura Urban Moisture Hydro-Nourishing Double Serum, £32 03 Wella Professionals Oil Reflections Light Luminous Reflective Oil, £11.75 (out January) 04 L’Oréal Professionnel Série Expert Nutrifier Glycerol + Coco Oil Blow Dry Cream, £13.99 05 Charlotte Mensah Manketti Oil Conditioner, £22 06 GHD Platinum Styler Premium Gift Set, £175

01

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Words by CHARLOTTE CLARK

03

HAIR BUZZ

Take two

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

Making waves is twice as fun with this season’s texture mash-up. Go on, do the double…

04

Hairstyles generally fall into one of two camps: soft and polished or sleek and structured. But after spotting this hybrid hairdo at Giambattista Valli, we say rock both. The wet-look roots and soft, wavy ends are surprisingly easy to recreate (and a clever fix if you’ve got a party to go to and no time to wash your hair). First, curl the lengths and brush out once cool to create a smooth, uniform wave. Next, comb a high-shine oil from your hairline to the tops of your ears and finish with a smoothing cream on the ends to tame any flyaways. Time to hit the dance floor.

05

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225


Promotional Feature

The smart

skin-saver There’s a new must-have for your anti-ageing arsenal – Tria’s Age-Defying Laser NOT SO LONG AGO, THE THOUGHT OF using lasers to battle fine lines and restore your skin’s luminosity would have been the stuff of science fiction. Even today you might assume you have to head for an expensive salon to benefit from laser treatment. Not so thanks to Tria, the global leader in light-based skin technology. Its brilliant Age–Defying Laser, which uses the same tech as professional clinic and salon treatments, can help you achieve a more youthful, radiant and refreshed look in as little as two weeks. So how does it work? Starting in our late twenties we all begin to lose collagen – and collagen is key to youthful-looking skin. The Age-Defying Laser uses targeted beams of light that work below the skin’s surface to accelerate collagen and elastin production not only to smooth fine lines and wrinkles, but also to improve pigmentation and smooth skin texture. Definitely one for your Christmas list.

83% of users agreed Tria’s Age-Defying Laser and 77% reported a reduction in fine lines* The Tria Age-Defying Laser is £450. For more information and to buy, go to triabeauty.co.uk/marieclaire or you can find it at Argos. You can follow Tria at: Twitter: @triabeautyuk; facebook.com/uktriabeauty and on Instagram: @triabeautyuk

*TRIA CLINICAL DATA ON FILE

is as effective as professional laser treatments


Beauty

229 WORKOUT WONDERS Athletic Propulsion Labs Techloom Phantom Mesh Sneakers, £130 ‘Need to wake up your workout kit? These pink trainers are our new crush.’

02 ‘This contains 20 (yes, 20) w at er -and oi l-

‘Wit h a rose , f r eesia and

soluble pl ant extract s

p at chouli scent , t his soap

t o r educe por es,

s mells g or geous and looks

w r inkles and r edness ,

s up er-chi c on your sink for

and r e v u p yo u r gl ow . ’

when guest s come r ound. ’ 01

Port De Bras Allegra Leggings, £90 ‘Marrying tulle and jersey, these leggings are (just about) keeping us motivated to exercise through winter.’

‘Can’t face the great outdoors? Blend together the two shades in this blush and apply liberally f or an inst ant heal thy f lu sh . ’

03

#MCBeautyDesk

‘ N eed a ma ni m a k e o v e r ? S h a ke

LOVES

t hi ng s up w i t h t h i s b a l l e t - p i n k p o l i sh t ha t ha s a r ubber-

04

Must-have products the MC team want to nab for themselves this month

inspired matte finish.’ 05

‘Our winter-weathered face sighed with relief

‘ We lov e a mat t e lip 07

colour, and t his one

when we applied this

t icks ev er y b ox. I t ’s

velvety cream. Slather

lightweight, but

on dry, sensitive skin for

fe e l s super-crea my

immediate comfort.’

and w on’ t budg e – even through lunch.’

06

‘The equivalent of a spa break,

STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

this clever lotion hydrates, ‘It’s the supplement everyone’s

brightens and smoothes

talking ab out. Take one pink and one

stressed-out complexions.’

08

purple capsule every day – the 19 nutrients make skin look fresher.’ 01 Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb Soap, £19.50. 02 Clarins Double Serum Complete Age Control Concentrate, £56. 03 Marc Jacobs Beauty Air Blush Soft Glow Duo in Kink & Kisses, £28. 04 Chantecaille Matte Chic in Dorian, £36. 05 Chanel Limited Edition Le Vernis Velvet Pink Rubber, £18. 06 Beauty Beneath, £39.99 (for 60 capsules). 07 Kenzoki Cosmic Night Cream, £40.50. 08 Origins Original Skin Essence Lotion, £22 (Fabled.com).


Objects of 02

DESIRE Treat your nearest and dearest to a beautiful Christmas with some gorgeous buys from L’Occitane

L’Occitane is the ideal destination for all your beauty and Xmas needs YOUR SPECIAL OFFER Receive a free mini cracker containing a 10ml hand cream with any purchase from L’Occitane boutiques upon presentation of this page, and online at loccitane.co.uk and loccitane.ie (enter code MCAD1 at checkout). Or spend £30 or more and receive a trio of mini crackers (enter code MCAD30).* For full T&Cs go to uk.loccitane.com/terms.

01

*This offer is valid until 24 December 2016 and while stocks last. Offer not valid in Bicester Village, Portsmouth, Cheshire Oaks, Kildare, department stores, airport stores or any other independent stockist. Only one gift per customer. Photocopied or damaged Marie Claire offer pages will not be accepted

THE CHRISTMAS COUNTDOWN IS OFFICIALLY on and if you’re looking to impress with your presents this year you need to make a pit stop at L’Occitane. The much-loved beauty brand is all about luxury, and its Christmas gift exclusives will make even the most difficult person on your list smile. What’s got us excited are the two new fragrances. For him, there’s L’Homme Cologne Cedrat, which has an intoxicating citrusy scent and comes in a cool hip-flask bottle. For her, there’s Arlésienne, a fragrance that magically weaves together floral and musky notes. And we’re treating ourselves to the Divine Harmony advanced anti-ageing skincare – a gorgeously light microencapsulated serum and a luxuriously smooth cream both packed with active ingredients. This duo works together to soften lines, redefine facial contours, and smooth and perfect your skin’s texture. Need stocking fillers? Choose from L’Occitane’s colourful baubles and crackers, all filled with mini beauty treasures to truly delight. Happy shopping…


Promotional Feature

04

03

05

01 Arlésienne Eau de Toilette 75ml, £49 02 Divine Harmony Cream 50ml, £126, and Divine Harmony Serum 30ml, £139 03 Christmas Bauble containing Cherry Blossom Shimmering Lotion 35ml, Cherry Blossom Hand Cream 10ml and Cherry Blossom Bath & Shower Gel 35ml, £10. Also available in Verbena and Shea Butter varieties 04 Christmas Cracker Set with handpicked surprises from the Almond, Cherry Blossom and Lavender collections, £20 (available from 25 November) 05 L’Homme Cologne Cedrat Eau de Toilette 75ml, £45


 @   < 0 - ; + - 6 < 7 . ; - 6 ; =) 4 1 < A

KWUXTQUMV\IZa LMTQ^MZa I\ ;0)A)6,*4=-+75


233

Men’s

GROOMING SPECIAL

One man’s face odyssey He was a skincare virgin.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASPER ABELS. STYLING BY SOPHIE QURESHI. SHIRT AND SWEATER, BOTH BURBERRY; EARRING, MODEL’S OWN

Now he exfoliates like a boss

The androgynous arsenal Gender-neutral beauty brands stage a bathroom-shelf takeover

Head strong Catwalk-worthy hair trends hit the boy zone


246

257

C ON TENT S 239 Shared assets These gender-neutral skincare buys will be your best beauty investment yet

241 Manscaping 101 All his waxing, plucking and shaving dilemmas solved

246 Head boys

GROOMING

M e n ’s Directional hair looks hot off the catwalk

257 The rise of omnisex fragrances

S OPH I E QU R E SH I, Acting beauty & style director

Break the his ’n’ hers mould with this hot perfumery trend

260 Bronze age man Forget fake tan – meet the products that have kick-started a new era in male cosmetics

263 How I lost my skincare virginity One man’s journey to complexion perfection

267 Seven mantras for growing bald gracefully Our fool-proof guide for the follicly challenged

270 Eau selecta! Scent stumped? Take our male fragrance finder quiz

239

241

As someone whose other half resolutely refuses to extend his grooming regime beyond shower gel and toothpaste, I’m in a distinct minority. Global sales of premium men’s grooming products totalled £32 billion last year and are predicted to hit £38 billion by 2020. Clearly plenty of men are exfoliating and moisturising, even if mine isn’t. And it’s not just skincare, either – on p260, we report on why bronzer and brow gel are becoming staples of the modern man, while our hair shoot (p246) showcases the new catwalk styles that are making a short back and sides seem distinctly unimaginative. (Be warned: the Acne look is only for the brave.) If you fear all this may bring on a territory war in the bathroom, check out the new gender-neutral beauty brands that are made for sharing (p239). And if you wonder how much of a difference a good grooming routine can actually make to a guy, turn to Stuart Heritage’s piece ‘How I Lost My Skincare Virginity’ on p263. We persuaded skincare novice Stuart to dive in at the deep end and try everything from man masks to mesotherapy (oh, and a bit of Botox for good measure). I’ll be leaving this issue conspicuously open on the coffee table – maybe my other half will finally step up his grooming game.

Look out for our online grooming special, too #HeSmellsGood


NUTRIENT SKIN THERAPY

James Anderson

from

England’s No.1 wicket taker of all time* “Wellman® Skin Technology keeps my skin refreshed, energised and protected.”

Wellman® Skin Technology • Dynamic performance for male skin • Formulated by Vitabiotics scientific experts using Advanced Research in Male Skincare ( ) • Concentrated nutrient and botanical skin complexes • Energise and rejuvenate your skin

ADWELSKINMCONP 24-06-16E

anti-ageing moisturiser Nutrient Skin Therapy available from†

& www.wellman.co.uk *England’s all time highest international wicket-taker, 451 test wickets correct at 31 May 2016. Source: www.jamesanderson613.com **UK’s No1 men’s supplement brand. Nielsen GB ScanTrack Total Coverage Unit Sales 52 w/e 26 March 2016. †Available from larger Boots stores, subject to availability.

under eye serum

facial scrub

face wash


Shared assets With a growing crop of gender-neutral beauty brands, it might be time to start learning to share…

01 The star of unisex skincare line Sam Farmer is undoubtedly the Face Wash, £8 – it cleans gently but efficiently, whether used on beardy or smooth skin.

02 Part of its new ge n d e r- neut r al c ol l e c ti on , Natural Spa Factory’s Fa c e Tonic, £ 20, balances the skin’s p H an d sp eeds up healing – whether that’s from breakouts or sh avi n g nicks.

05 The Ordinary “Buffet”, £12.70, uses a triple whammy of peptides, hyaluronic acid and probiotics to tackle multiple signs of ageing in one go. Use am and pm and you’ll both reap rewards.

03 Man hands get dry too, and Verso Hand Serum, £45, is the bomb (Idris Elba is a fan). Not cheap, we’ll admit, but since you’re splitting it…

04 Aesop Parsley Seed Anti-Oxidant Facial Hydrating Cream, £53, is an all-round people pl e ase r – h e ’l l l ove th e n on- gr easy t ext ur e; you’ll l ov e h ow e asi l y y ou r m ak e -up glides on aft er war ds.

WORDS BY SOPHIE QURESHI. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

06 Ideal for digitallydependent couples, Ma ke M o o n l i g h t Primer, £42, mattifies s kin a n d s hi el d s a g a i ns t HEV light from mobiles a n d c o m p ut er s .

Any woman who shares a bathroom with a modern male (i.e. one who washes his face and knows what exfoliating means) will welcome beauty’s new gender-neutral mood. Instead of cluttering your shelves with hordes of his-andhers lotions and potions, a new wave of genderless brands are advocating a ‘what’s mine is yours’ approach. New York-based skincare line Context was created by former fashion exec David Arbuthnot, because he bought women’s skincare for himself (for the more advanced formulations), but wasn’t a fan of the heavy fragrance. ‘I thought, “Why not use the same ingredients – minus the perfume – and present them in an aesthetic that appeals to everyone?’” he says. ‘Today, most beauty products are still marketed towards either women or men, but I think people are looking for something different.’ It seems he’s right. According to The NPD Group,

07 A chic addition to any shared bathroom, Context Micro-Derm Regenerator, £27, buffs away dead skin cells and teases out ingrown hairs.

non-gender-specific brands are experiencing doubledigit growth. Aesop – arguably the pioneer of genderblind beauty – is up 40 per cent year on year and set to turn over a whopping $250 million (about £192 million) in 2017. ‘We’re seeing a more fluid outlook on gender that rejects rigid categorisations,’ explains Victoria Buchanan, trends analyst at The Future Laboratory. ‘Some of us no longer want to be targeted by our sex.’ Of course, the assumption has always been that male and female complexions need different things. Admittedly, men’s skin is thicker (about 25 per cent) and tends to produce more sebum, but (as you’ll know if you’ve ever nicked a pump of your other half ’s face wash without ill effect) many products are perfectly capable of working on both. So, in the interests of saving valuable bathroom real estate, here’s our edit of the best sexless skincare.

Men’s grooming

239


Beauty is in our nature The intricacies of your DNA make you utterly unique. From skin hydration to anti-ageing, find the right supplements to enrich your inner beauty regime at solgar.co.uk/beauty

est SolgarÂŽ stockist t www.solgar.co.uk

Zinc c contributes co to o th the maintenance a ce o of normal skin, hair and nails. ls. Fo Food supplements m should d not be used instead nst off a varied v balanced n ed diet a and a healthy lifestyle. yle. Solga SolgarÂŽ is a registered te trademark. de


Manscaping

101

VALE NTI N O

DIOR

A guy’s guide to what hair to shave, wax, pluck – and leave

UNIBROW W

Manscaping is a bit of a retro term – it’s traditionally been used to mock menfolk for taking pride in their appearance. But these days, groomed guys are the norm. In fact, male waxing is reportedly up by 85 per cent. ‘It’s not considered vain any more – men aren’t as embarrassed by it as they once were,’ says expert waxer, Kim Lawless. So here’s our guide to male body hair – how to deal with it and when to just leave it the hell alone.

Back in the day, the unibrow was something to aspire to. In fact, there’s even a phrase in the Old Testament: ‘Ye shall not cut yourselves, nor make any baldness between your eyes.’ NIX IT QUICK: One in ten men pluck on a daily basis. Just avoid plucking under the arch. THE TOOLS: Tweezerman’s Slant Tweezers, £14.95 (Fabled.com), get it done with minimum wincing. Tidy with Murdock London Wooden Beard Brush (above), £12. THE SERVICE: Blink Brow Bar does male threading, from £5.

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Sadly, ear hair is one of those things that is a gift bestowed by age. Scientists believe that hair growth on the ears is due to testosterone. But whatever the cause, nothing gives away your age more than tufts from your trophy handles. NIX IT QUICK: Tweezing works, as does cutting them with facial-hair scissors (this is a sober operation, FYI). THE TOOLS: The Bluebeards Revenge Moustache & Beard Scissors, £6.99 (right), are

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super-sharp, but also rounded on the ends to avoid mishaps. THE SERVICE: You can have them waxed but Turkish barbers use a technique where they apply alcohol to the hairs, set them alight and burn the hair off. It’s very effective – and painless.

B O T T E G A V E N E TA

CHEST WIG For a while (blame Peter Andre) waxed, oiled chests were desirable. A decade on, we’re embracing a hairier chest. But it still needs a little taming. NIX IT QUICK: Unless you’re an Olympic swimmer, avoid waxing and shaving. ‘Shaving can cause rashes and stubble. Trimming’s best,’ says Lawless. THE TOOLS: The trimmer to use is the Braun Body Groomer, £39.99. If you must shave, use a sharp, moisturising razor, such as Dorco Pace 6, £7.99 (above) or the Gilette Fusion ProShield Chill, £12. THE SERVICE: ‘The chest is the most painful part of the body to have waxed, so I would avoid it,’ advises Lawless.

‘ Nothing gives away your age more than tufts of hair from your trophy handles


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BACK BEARDS Back hair can harbour sweat and feel a little scratchy. Bottom line: you’re not obliged to get rid – but, well… NIX IT QUICK: Hair-removal cream – try Veet For Men Hair Removal Cream, £7.49 (right). THE TOOLS: For a more permanent fix, use a home IPL device like SmoothSkin For Men, £299. THE SERVICE: Waxing works, too. ‘Just avoid the gym for 24 hours to allow the skin to settle,’ says Lawless.

SACK AND CRACK There’s a lot going on in this area, but there are options. You could remove the hair around the tops of

SCHNOZ HAIR A quarter of men think they have too much nose hair and they’re probably right. There’s even a service in Japan called Chololi, which lets you send someone an anonymous email to let them know their nose fluff is out of control. But you don’t want to blitz it – you need some to keep out pollution and dust. NIX IT QUICK: Avoid plucking. It feels likes death and upsets the nasal membrane, which can cause infection. Trim instead. THE TOOLS: Try the Philips Nose Trimmer Series 3000, £12, which is nonslip, to avoid accidental rhinoplasty. If you’re feeling brutal, try Nad’s Nose Hair Wax, £12.99 – an at-home nose-hair removal kit. Let us know how that goes. THE SERVICE: Most reputable waxers will be able to sort them out with minimal hassle (and pain). Q

WORDS BY ANITA BHAGWANDAS. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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the legs and pubic region, and your butt and perineum may need a little attention, too. ‘Go for short and tidy – the area will look cleaner, and yes, a bit bigger,’ says Brad Wicks from The Bluebeards Revenge. NIX IT QUICK: Go for a beard trimmer with a guard. THE TOOLS: The Panasonic ER-GB80, £59.99 (above) – it has three attachments for varied levels of trimming. THE SERVICE: You need an experienced waxer. Try Strip (stripwaxbar.com) – 20 per cent of customers are men and they have dedicated male treatment rooms.


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Head boys

Men are becoming as experimental with their hair as we are (man buns, anyone?). So if yours needs a nudge in a more stylish direction, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some inspiration from AW16â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catwalk looks


SWEATERS, BOTH ACNE

Words and styling by SOPHIE QURESHI Photographs by JASPER ABELS

ACNE’S PUDDING BOWL

Boys who blow- dry might soon be the norm, if Acne’s pudding-bowl cuts are anything to go by. S ome of the models wore their hair brushed right over their faces, but a side -sweep is advisable in the real world (for safety if nothing else). ‘To get the curved shap e, he’ll need to blow- dry his hair forwards with a round bru sh , b ending it under at the ends,’ says hairstylist and VO5 ambassador Aaron Carlo. ‘Make sure he goes easy on the product, though. All it needs is a bit of styling spray or shaping cream.’ The catch? You’ll have to deal with him having better hair than you do. KIT Dyson Supersonic Hairdryer, £299.99; Denman D74 Brush, £1 2; Label.m Blow Out Spray, £13.95

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BURBERRY’S

If he’s pretty low-maintenance (or, ahem, lazy) about his grooming regime, Burb erry ’s tousled lo ok has got his name on it . It works with almost any cut (bar a bu zz cut ), takes less time than brushing his teeth , and requires almost zero skill and dexterity. Arm him with a b ottle o f salt spray or a p ot o f texturising paste and s cho ol him in ‘the ar t o f s crunch’ (tip: twist with finger tips – don’t grab a fist fu l). If he’s still not getting it , just intervene and do it yours elf. KIT VO5 Extreme Style MattPaste, £4.19; Toni & Guy Men Messy Salt Spray, £ 7.99; Fudge Matte Hed Gas, £10.95

SHIRT AND SWEATER, BOTH BURBERRY; EARRING, MODEL’S OWN

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SHIRT AND SWEATER, BOTH RAF SIMONS

RAF SIMONS’ CURTAINS Thos e with memories o f gawky 1 5-year- old b oy friends with cur tains might struggle to get behind the Raf Simons look. But, when they ’re not being used to hide teenage awkwardness (or spots), curtains can look cool. ‘They ’re great for men who are growing out the front of their hair and are at that in-between stage,’ says Carlo. ‘His locks must be clean, though – lank cur tains are never a go o d lo ok. S traight-haired guys can get away with creating a centre-par ting when wet and running s ome smo othing cream through it .’ Otherwis e, you’d better be prepared to share your Ghds. KIT Bumble And Bumble Bb Grooming Creme, £ 2 3; Redken For Men Get Gro omed Finishing Cream , £1 3; Kiehl’s Creme With Silk Gro om , £1 8


SHIRT, CRAIG GREEN; EARRINGS, MODEL’S OWN

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JW ANDERSON’S BOY BAND The JW Anders on lo ok was pro o f that men can carry o ff Alice bands far b etter than we ever did. Worn over tousled, wet-lo ok hair raked back from the face, this style works on pretty mu ch every cut – although we liked it b est on the mo dels who had a bit o f length . ‘It’s easy to create,’ says Carlo. ‘Just run s ome gel through wet hair, then rake it back with your fingers and add a skinny band to hold it in place.’ On our sho ot , we u s ed a piece o f thin black elastic – p erhaps more palatable to most men than an access ory named after a girl… KIT VO5 WetL o ok S tyling Gel, £ 3.1 5 ; L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Wet Domination Extreme Splash , £1 4 .29; S chwarzkop f P ro fessional [ 3D]MEN S trong Hold Gel, £10.20


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If Don Drap er hadn’t already convinced us o f the transformative effect o f a shar p side -par ting , this s eas on’s Vuitton show con firmed it . The mo dels were gro omed to the extreme, with dramatic side -par tings slicked into place with gel (and not a single rogu e hair to sp oil the effect). We’ll b e honest , it’s a lo ok that works b est when teamed with equally shar p cheekb ones and a defined jawline, but it als o adds welcome angles to the fu ller o f face. And since all he’ll need is a tail comb and a decent p ot o f highshine gel, we say a trial par ting can only b e a go o d thing . KIT Malin+Goetz Firm Hold Gel, £18; Aveda Men Pure-formance Firm Hold Gel, £1 9.50; Mens S o ciety Brass Comb, £1 9 Q

SHIRT, CRAIG GREEN; SCARF, LOUIS VUITTON. HAIR BY JOHNNIE BILES AT FRANK AGENCY USING VO5 FOR MEN. MAKE-UP BY SONIA DEVENEY AT ONE REPRESENTS USING GIVENCHY. NAILS BY AMI STREETS AT LMC WORLDWIDE USING ORLY. MODELS: CONRAD LEADLEY AT NEXT MODELS, ANGUS EATON AT NEXT MODELS, JOHN COMPTON AT IMG MODELS. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: ALEX GERBER

LOUIS VUITTON’S


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Traditionally ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ notes are being fused in a completely different way, heralding an exciting new world of fragrance

Women have been borrowing from the boys for aeons, but now the men of Generation I are willing to borrow back – and after a lifetime in trousers, can you blame them? Think Pharrell Williams in a Chanel pearl necklace or the pussy-bow blouses, pink cardies and man-skirts at the AW16 menswear shows. We all want it all, and this is having a huge cultural ripple effect. Enter the omnisex fragrance. This is not to be confused with the unisex fragrance. Unisex scents are, historically, androgynous. Their 90s legacy 02 is that they tend to rely on ‘sit on the fence’ ingredients – lots of citrus, maybe a watery accord – the outcome of which is a general palate pleaser. Both genders neutralised in a bid to appeal to everyone. The omnisex scent, on the other hand, is brave. It takes on both genders, and combines what we perceive to be traditionally male and female ingredients in innovative ways to usher in a new, gender-fused era in perfumery. The results are sexy, complex and excitingly unpredictable. BOY MEETS GIRL The fragrance maestros are making this happen by experimenting with extremes. Among AW16 ’s fragrances are a

wave of scents that, on the one hand, include what are known in the industry as ‘fougère’ and ‘fougère aromatic’ accords. These incorporate ‘green’, grassy, fresh and sharp notes traditionally associated with very masculine fragrances – geranium, vetiver, bergamot, oak moss, tonka bean, herbs, spices and resinous woods. But what these fragrances also include are – most unusually – delicate, fragrant blooms like rose, neroli, jasmine, iris, and orange blossom, which we perceive to be feminine. Think of it as the perfumery equivalent of combining testosterone with oestrogen. But how does this work? THE ALCHEMISTS There have been two main approaches to creating omnisex scents. Some perfumers have been all-out reckless in juxtaposing extremes. ‘We took the feminine, floral facets of the fougère structure and intensified them, because we wanted to amplify the contrasts,’ explains Jean-Christophe Hérault who, along with Olivier Polge, composed Thierry Mugler’s Fougère Furieuse. The duo did this by adding the girlie scent of neroli to offset an otherwise ruggedly verdant fragrance.


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Here at Marie Claire HQ, we were curious to see how these extreme fusions fare in real life. A spritz of Tom Ford’s new Vert de Fleur generated interesting results. The scent – which clashes brilliant greens, oak moss and vetiver with super-soft iris butter, jasmine, rose and orange flower – prompted the same reaction from men and women: give us more. One of our favourite (and cleverest) collisions of notes, however, has to be in Dolce & Gabbana’s new Velvet Pure. This is one you’ll either have to hide, or get used to sharing. Its sweet and sour structure, which includes fig and the herby reseda flower, is an oscillation of extremes. We’re not sure how, but it never seems to smell the same twice. In the other camp are those who have bridged the olfactive gender gap with a softer approach. Prada’s L’Homme (which, despite its name, is anything but) has been created for the multi-faceted millennials who refuse to be categorised. ‘Prada’s style has always been to maintain a freedom that never follows typically masculine or feminine codes,’ explains Daniela Andrier, L’Homme’s creator. ‘Mixing up these codes is the interesting part.’ And this is precisely what she has done in L’Homme. Central to the fragrance is geranium, but it also contains powdery iris and violet (once strongly associated with women’s cosmetic compacts) that soften the geranium’s spiky qualities. The result is a scent that’s familiar, yet not. And if, like us, your pupils dilate at the mere thought of a new fragrance by Chanel, then perhaps sit down before experiencing Boy – the latest addition to Chanel’s Les Exclusifs. One colleague described it as ‘nailing that masculin-féminin thing that Parisians have going on’. And she’s right. Geranium is again at the core, but perfumer Olivier Polge chose rose geranium, which smells both rose-like and minty – the perfect mediator between the scent’s languid florals and fougère notes. What’s intriguing about Floris London’s new 1988, on the other hand, is that although the heart of the perfume is floral, the green notes make the scent appeal equally to both sexes. Iris, jasmine and rose are permeated by rosemary, thyme and galbanum, giving the flowers an unexpected depth that’s confident, sparkling and, well, different. ‘These fragrances work because they appeal to our desire to redefine ourselves, which includes erasing gender boundaries,’ concludes Judith Gross, creative director of Fine Fragrance EAME at International Flavors & Fragrances. ‘They are defining sensuality and creativity in a new way.’ A way that’s long overdue and most definitely welcome. Q

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‘These fragrances work because they appeal to our desire to redefine ourselves, which includes erasing gender boundaries ’

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01 Chanel Les Exclusifs de Chanel Boy Chanel EDP, £130 for 75ml 02 Prada L’Homme EDT, £69 for 100ml 03 Floris London 1988 EDP, £140 for 100ml 0 4 D o l c e & G a b b a n a V e l v e t P u r e E D P , £ 1 6 5 f o r 5 0 m l 05 Tom Ford Vert de Fleur EDP, £148 for 50ml 0 6 T h i e r r y M u g l e r M u g l e r L e s E x c e p t i o n s F o u g è r e F u r i e u s e E D P , £ 1 3 5 f o r 8 0 m l

WORDS BY FLEUR FRUZZA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID ABRAHAMS

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Clinique For Men Face Bronzer, £19.50 (Fabled.com) Most men can’t be bothered to apply fake tan, but this super-subtle wash-off gel can be worn alone or mixed with moisturiser.

Lab Series BB Tinted Moisturizer SPF35, £37 Ticking all the right boxes with SPF35, UVA protection and a sheer tint of colour, this is an essential buy for every millennial man.

Myego Matifiant, £18 Guys have naturally oilier skin than women, so a mattifying powder is a must. This soaks up excess oil without (crucially) leaving any traces of powder visible.

Tom Ford For Men Brow Gelcomb, £32 Featuring a comb-like tip to style and smooth brows, this tinted gel is genius at putting stray hairs back in their place.

a g e

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Move over, Rover – the modern man’s best friend is make-up BLINK AND YOU MIGHT MISS HIM, BUT AMONG the 22 female celebrities and bloggers in the latest L’Oréal Paris campaign, you’ll see a man: make-up artist and blogger, The Plastic Boy (aka Gary Thompson). It’s kind of major. As the first-ever male star of a mainstream beauty brand, it’s reaffirming that actually men do wear make-up, and not just the orange faux glow associated with Joey Essex. According to Mintel, 31 per cent of UK men aged 16-24 have used BB cream in the past year and are buying (or maybe borrowing) foundation, concealer and bronzer. Leading the way are big players like MAC, whose recent collaboration with New York ‘It’ boys the Brant brothers featured brow products and a sculpting cream, Tom Ford and Clinique, plus a whole host of niche man-make-up brands. With imperceptible textures and formulations designed to require zero application skills, they’re so good you’ll want to swipe them for yourself.

MMUK MAN 6-Well Cream Contouring Palette, £55 (mensmake-up.co.uk) One for the grooming aficionado rather than the novice, this sculpting palette is ace at accentuating cheekbones and sculpting a less-than-firm jawline. Our advice? Watch a YouTube tutorial first.

Recipe For Men Concealer, £17 Available in three shades, the creamy formula covers up pesky dark circles and puffiness brilliantly, erasing all signs of a latenight pub session.

WORDS BY ALICE MANNING. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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HOW I LOST MY SKINCARE VIRGINITY MY COMPLEXION IS RUINED. IT WAS ruined by dumb male neglect. It’s somehow white and grey at the same time. It’s simultaneously sore-looking and pallid. Since my son was born two years ago, the whole thing has gone into active decay. The circles under my eyes are dark and permanent, the crow’s feet chiselled deep. It’s more pub settee than human face. So, when Marie Claire suggested improving my skincare regime, I jumped at the chance. But first I needed to see just how bad things were. The Elemis Skin Lab facial analysis machine is brutal. You sit down in front of a camera, close your eyes, wait for two bright pops and suddenly all your flaws are up on a giant screen, ready for inspection. I found myself confronted with a swarm of blackheads and burst pores, and sun damage so extensive that you’d rightly be forgiven for thinking I’d walked into a flamethrower showroom and slagged off someone’s mum. Annabel, my therapist, stared at the results. ‘What do you

Skin sloth Stuart Heritage tries a new regime to rescue his face, but how much is too much?

use on your skin at the moment?’ she asked. ‘Soap’, I replied. ‘What sort of soap?’ ‘I don’t know. It’s orange.’ Annabel went quiet. ‘Is it h...hand soap?’ she eventually croaked in dismay. This is where my skincare masterclass began. In a desperate bid to return my complexion to something resembling actual skin, I was given an hour’s intensive treatment. I was cleansed. I had electrically-charged rollers rubbed across my face. I was extracted. A quick word about extractions. I wish somebody had warned me about them. Extractions are when Annabel leans over you and squeezes the blackheads on your nose with such ferocity that you literally start crying like a baby in front of her. I do not care for extractions at all. Two hydrating masks later and I was done. To my absolute surprise, I looked like a different person. Cleaner, smoother. Younger even. Perhaps this skincare thing isn’t total nonsense after all. While this was going on, Marie Claire had sent me a box of skincare products. There were cleansers, toners, moisturisers, lotions, wipes and a L’Oréal caffeine roll-on


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that was why my face was “ So a mess. I was basically cheese-

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gratering it off my head

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Pre vious page: 01 Tom Ford For Men Skin Revitalizing Concentrate, £ 110. 0 2 B a xter Of California C l a y M a s k , £ 2 0 . 0 3 A n t h o n y E x f o l i a t i n g & C l e a n s i n g B a r , £ 1 7 . Thi s page: 0 4 R e c i p e F o r M e n U n d e r E y e P a t c h e s , £ 1 8 . 0 5 L a b S e r i e s D a i l y M o i s t u r e Defense Lotion SPF 15, £41. 06 Clarins Men Anti-Fatigue Eye Serum, £29.50. 07 C l a r i s o n i c Alpha Fit, £170. 08 Elemis Anti-Fatigue Day Cream, £36. 09 No7 Men Energising F a c e S c r u b , £ 8 . 5 0 1 0 C l i n i q u e F o r M e n 2 In 1 Skin Hydrator + Beard Conditioner, £28

that you wipe under your eyes. And, most terrifyingly of all, a sort of gigantic electric toothbrush for your face. This was a mistake. Although I’d been warned by the beauty team to start slowly, I paid no heed. I went nuts with these products. At night I slept underneath thick layers of acidic cream. I rubbed eye gel into my face like my life depended on it. I exfoliated like mad, at least three times a day, purely because I never wanted to have another poxy extraction ever again. But something was up. My youthful glow began to vanish, and was instead replaced by a brightred sheen. Was I doing something wrong? Well, yes. I next went to The Refinery in Mayfair for a microdermabrasion treatment. The manager described it as a sandblast, but in reality it was more like a light Ped Egging to rid your face of dead skin. When my therapist asked about my regime, I reeled off dozens of products that I had been subjecting my face to. ‘That’s too much,’ she told me, horrified. ‘You have sensitive skin. You only need to exfoliate every three days.’ So that was why my face was a mess. I was basically cheese-gratering it off my head. Over the next few days, I pared things back, only judiciously using a small selection of the products I’d been sent. It seemed to work. While I couldn’t hope to replicate the just-been-born freshness of a professional facial, I managed to keep my face looking smooth, soft and hydrated. But still, I wondered what else I could do. Marie Claire pointed me towards cosmetic dermatologist Dr Frances Prenna Jones, mentioning a word I hadn’t heard before (mesotherapy) and a word I had (Botox). Mesotherapy, I discovered, was the application of vitamins and minerals to the face via around 30 injections, which are either painless or like being attacked by bees, depending on who you ask. Botox I knew about. I’d seen enough warped,

frozen celebrity faces to know that it was potentially a very stupid move. Thankfully – after being slathered in local anaesthetic and popped under an LED lamp for half an hour – Dr Prenna Jones told me that too much Botox would make me look weird and unattractive. She suggested having maybe just one injection, so I could see what it was like. The effects would be subtle and temporary, she promised. ‘OK, screw it,’ I replied. The whole thing was over in ten minutes. Thirty mesotherapy injections and a shot of Botox right between the eyes. It was only slightly painful, and my face felt no different at all afterwards. People do know that I’ve had Botox, though. This is because now I tend to charge into all my meetings shouting, ‘I’ve had Botox! Look at my face! Can you tell?’ at everyone, out of a mistaken concern that my face will melt like the end of an Indiana Jones film at any moment. That happened a week ago, and I think it’s starting to kick in. My wife says I look younger and younger every day, to the point where she now pretends to be a toddler around me to fit in. I’m not entirely sure that’s what I wanted to happen. Since then, I’ve narrowed down my daily regime to an Anthony cleansing bar, a Clarins eye serum, an Elemis antifatigue cream, plus some Recipe For Men Under Eye Patches that I occasionally use to make me look less dead. I also returned to Elemis to see Annabel for a second facial analysis. Miraculously, my skin was vastly improved. The sun damage was still there, and I was showing slight signs of sensitivity (thanks to my overzealous start), but my blackheads and pores were definitely in retreat. This stuff actually works. Who knew? So, that’s my skin sorted. Now I just need to work on my teeth, hair, weight, fitness and personality, and we might actually be on to something. Q

PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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Since 1953, the same Astral formula has been used by all kinds of women for all kinds of things. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just been a tweak to the packaging. A ST R A L - CR EA M. CO.U K


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Men’s grooming

Hair loss can be a man’s worst nightmare. But, as Lee Kynaston discovers, with the help of science and a decent stylist, there’s plenty you can do about it

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g ra cef ul l y

IF THERE’S ONE THING MEN REALLY FEAR – EVEN more than commitment, man boobs or a Bridget Jones box set – it’s baldness. I know this because my own hair initiated divorce proceedings from my scalp when I was in my late twenties. And it was not an amicable parting of ways. As with every divorce, there was heartache, resentment and bitterness. Only the money-grubbing lawyer and awkward division of CDs was missing. I’m not alone in undergoing this kind of pain. More than half of all men will experience some degree of hair loss by the time they reach 50, and one in four will notice some thinning in their twenties. No wonder, then, that a whopping 94 per cent of guys surveyed by HIS Hair Clinic in London cited baldness as their biggest fear. It even came above impotence on the league table. Why? Because men still equate hair loss with a decline in virility. There’s no scientific proof that the two are linked, of course – in fact, there’s some evidence to show that bald men are seen as more, not less, masculine – but a full, thick, Samson-esque head of hair is still core to a man’s identity. Alas, until scientists find a way to modify the genes that lead to male pattern baldness or to block dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone that triggers it, men’s quest for follicular reforestation will continue. Thankfully, phoney cures like electromagnetic helmets (ridiculous), standing upside down for hours (exhausting) and having a cow lick your head (difficult to explain to the police) are well behind us. With the help of modern science,

a decent hairdresser and some sleight of hand, there’s no reason why a man can’t deal with a thinning thatch with both dignity and grace. Here’s how… 1. HOLD ON TO WHAT YOU HAVE

An early response to hair loss is crucial if you want to slow its progression. Worth trying at the first signs of thinning is Regaine’s Extra Strength Foam, £69.99. One of the few clinically proven solutions to hereditary hair loss, it contains an active ingredient called minoxidil, which has been shown to trigger regrowth in some men. It’s expensive, doesn’t work for everyone and you’ll have to use it for as long as you want hair, but it remains the best over-the-counter option for the follicularly challenged. It’s worth treating hair with a bit more TLC, too. ‘A big mistake a lot of men make is vigorously rubbing hair with a towel after washing,’ says hairdresser Jamie Stevens. With hair three times weaker when wet, he suggests gently patting it dry to avoid unnecessary breakage. And if you’re a smoker, you might want to kick the habit: a study by Harvard School of Public Health found that as well as increasing levels of DHT, smoking constricts the blood vessels that supply the scalp, starving hair of nutrients. 2. CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS

A man with thinning hair needs to stock his bathroom cabinet with care. As well as using thickening shampoos, which contain special polymers to temporarily plump it f


268

up and make it look fuller, Stevens recommends a decent conditioner. ‘It’s a myth that conditioner makes hair appear flat if it’s thinning,’ he says. ‘Conditioner will strengthen and soften the hair, helping avoid breakage.’ He also suggests swapping heavy styling products like waxes and gels, which can weigh hair down and make it look gappy, for lighter salt sprays that add texture and volume. Try Bumble and Bumble’s Surf Spray.

“ Facial hair helps draw

02

attention away from the

03

top of the head and down towards the face

3. DISGUISE THE PROBLEM

A crafty way to disguise thinning hair or a small bald patch is to use electrostatically charged fibres, which merge with your real hair to fill in any gaps. ‘They’re very easy to use – as simple as sprinkling salt and pepper on to your head,’ says Stevens, who developed his own product, MR. Hair Fibres, for men wanting a simple way to create the illusion of thicker locks. Think of them as seasoning for your scalp.

04

6. RULE NOTHING OUT

Hair transplants have come a long way since the days when they left you with a bonce that looked like an upturned yard brush. These days, techniques like follicular unit extraction – a minimally invasive procedure where individual hairs are taken from the back of the head or the chest and transplanted into existing, vacant hair follicles – are commonplace. The process takes about eight hours to complete (thousands of individual hairs have to be resettled, after all) and will cost you as much as a small car, but the scars heal in days and the transplants themselves are almost unnoticeable. Even for heads that are indistinguishable from a snooker ball, there’s hope in the form of scalp micropigmentation, an increasingly popular procedure where tiny dots matching your previous hair colour are tattooed on to the scalp to create an illusion of stubble and a hairline. It’s a great solution provided you can prevent people from stroking your head and discovering your inky deception. 05

01 Yarok Styling Whip, £4.50 (abeaut ifulwor ld.co .uk) . 02 Regaine Extra Strength Foam, £69.99 (Fabled.com). 03 VO5 Extreme Style Matt Clay, £3.99. 04 Bumble and Bumble Surf Spray, £22. 05 MR. Hair Fibres, £18 (Mrjamiestevens.com)

4. IF YOU CAN’T DISGUISE, DISTRACT

Ever noticed how many bald men have beards? ‘That’s because growing facial hair, even if it’s just a little stubble, helps draw attention away from the top of the head and down towards the face,’ says Adam Brady of Ruffians Barbers in London’s Shoreditch. It’s like pointing at something and asking ‘What’s that?’ when you want to distract someone for long enough to zip up your flies. If a man’s worried about a beard line jarring with a bald head, Brady suggests gradually lowering the grade of the beard trimmer’s guards towards the ear to create a less obvious line of transition.

7. EMBRACE YOUR BALDNESS 5. GET A GREAT CUT

‘The right cut can definitely help to add the illusion of thicker, fuller hair,’ says celebrity hairdresser Jason Collier, whose clients include Brooklyn Beckham, Damian Lewis and Justin Timberlake. And contrary to what most men think, when it comes to disguising a thinning thatch, less is always more. ‘Men should ask for a short crop like Jude Law’s, finger-length or shorter and more tapered at the sides and back than on top,’ says Collier. ‘This will give the appearance of full hair on the top of the head, without it looking like you’re trying to cover anything up.’ He also suggests using a matte-finish sculpting paste like VO5 Extreme Style Matt Clay or Yarok’s Styling Whip, which will add definition and texture without weighing hair down or exposing the scalp beneath.

There comes a point in every balding man’s life when he realises the game’s up and he’s got to roll with it. That day is an epiphany of sorts, one tinged with sadness (you’ll never have a quiff again) but also joy (you can clipper your hair at home, thus avoiding conversations about holidays with obviously bored stylists). Prince William clearly reached the point of no return at the start of 2016, when he finally ditched the spun-sugar confection sitting on top of his head and went for an altogether more regal crop. In many respects, this is the most dignified way to go bald: to just let it happen and think of it not as an act of cowardice but as one of courage. After all, as actor, comedian and Seinfeld co-creator Larry David once said, ‘Anyone can be confident with a full head of hair. But a confident bald man – there’s your diamond in the rough.’ Q

PHOTOGRAPH BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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270 Men’s grooming

Eau selecta! Does the man in your life – or men, no judgement here – need a cool new cologne? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered…. A R E Y O U I N A R O M A N T I C R E L AT I O N S H I P W I T H T H I S M A N ?

No, he’s my brother/ best mate/one of five guys I still have on my Christmas list

Not yet...

H O W L O N G D O E S I T TA K E H I M T O R E P LY T O A T E X T ?

As soon as he seees it,, you think (he’s turrned off ff ‘last seen’ on Wh hatsApp) pp

HOW DOES HE FEEL ABOUT TINDER?

Days

Boring, he’s on Feeld instead

Straight away

D O E S H E K N O W W H AT A TOP NOTE IS?

W H AT D I D H E L A S T W AT C H O N N E T F L I X?

Of course!

H I S F L AT IS ON FIRE. W H AT D O E S H E S AV E ?

Him: ‘It’s what Drake hits, right?’

House Of Cards

Sons of Anarchy

His bespoke suits uits

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FA C I A L HAIR – WHERE DOES HE S TA N D ?

Depends on how much time he has that morning

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No way – he finds it too impersonal

A family of blue tits could set up home in his beard

IN BED HE WEARS…

BURB MR E

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V O LTA Elegant without G & IR advice on it bottoms E DI b e ing stuffy; classic . A Z b u t cool, this scent’s One for no ng r a p ef ru i t an d t arragon ’HOM confo r mist s, Zadig & N L M E top notes give it freshness, AI Volt aire’s fragrance is L I R w h i l e a base of vetiver and an unusual combination The name s ays it s and a l wood a d d sm ok y of grapefruit and black all. An intoxicating s ens u al i ty. For th e m an pepper, wit h a blend o f heady almond, who has a better T sur pr ising, soft hint leat her and vanilla N w ardrobe than you. E of vanilla. You’ll fall tincture makes this C Seductive and £6 5 for 1 0 0 m l fo r it h ar d. ut t er ly delicio us. War m, Woody, spi c y an d s u l t r y, t h i s i s t h e Chic without £ 58 for 100ml charming and rich, sop h i sti c ate d, th i s i s f ra g ra n ce t o b uy t he ma n being try-hard, YS L’s Guer lain’s st ylish scent on e f or th e g rown -u ps. you want to take home scent is one of Mad e f or opu l e n t n i gh ts a t t h e e n d o f t h e p a r t y. cont r ast s: clar y s age – is the one for ‘The One’. £56 for out (a hint for your next B o a s t ing new ap hro d is ia c fo r a masculine hit – 50ml d ate n i gh t, p e rh aps? ) ingredient, the Maninka slices t hr ough damask th e warm th of s af f ron, fruit, it may not be rose, which provides a nutmeg and cinnamon a good idea if you’re more delicate touch. is seriously addictive. the jealous type… Perfectly balanced. £71 for £ 4 5 f o r 5 0 ml £55 for N U T 10 0 m l L Y 60ml T L

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COMPILED BY JO HOARE. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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YOUR PARISIAN ZEST Cointreau and Liberty London have joined forces to design an exclusive Limited Edition gift box ‘Your Parisian Zest’ and to launch #1orange1tree project, which works to restore local biodiversity and create a social impact in the region of Senegal. Only 50 will be available in the UK, and one of the 50 “coffrets” will also hide a ticket for one lucky recipient to get a chance to visit Senegal and personally assist with the reforestation project. What’s more, Cointreau invites everyone to participate in #1orange1tree project simply by sharing a photo or video of themselves with an orange on social media using the hashtag #1orange1tree and nominate friends to do the same. For every image posted, using the hashtag, Cointreau will commit to planting one tree in Senegal. ‘Your Parisian Zest’ is exclusively available at Liberty London from mid-November for an *RRP £250

#1orange1tree Enjoy Responsibly For more info, please visit cointreau.com


273

Words by CHARLOTTE HAIGH MACNEIL

Health

’Tis the season to have sex

We’re more likely to engage in casual or unprotected sex during the festive period. But with STIs on the rise, you need to arm yourself against the main five

YOU MIGHT ASSOCIATE SYPHILIS with Tudor monarchs, but according to a recent report by Public Health England, cases leapt up 76 per cent between 2012 and 2015. Meanwhile, gonorrhoea jumped up 53 per cent in the same time. And worryingly, the sexual-health charity FPA reveals that 68 per cent of Brits have never had an STI test, so could be unknowingly affected. This is bad news if you’re single and dating because several of the most common infections have serious long-term health consequences. ‘As the party season approaches, it’s a good time to evaluate your sexual health’, says Dr Claudia Estcourt, who specialises in sexual health. ‘People drink more at Christmas and it’s easier to get carried away and take risks. We see a rush in the clinic after the festive season as people have had unplanned sex and not used condoms so need an STI test or emergency contraception.’ Dating apps have also changed our sexual habits. ‘Women using apps like Tinder are having sex with more partners,’ says Estcourt. ‘In clinics,

I’ve noticed they now talk about their sex lives with a new level of frankness.’ Her main three tips for the party season? Always use condoms with new partners. View a sexual health MOT as something you do regularly, like going to the dentist (if you’re having sex with new partners, aim for a check-up every three months). And once you get serious with a new partner, both book in for a full check-up before moving on to nonbarrier methods like the Pill that do not protect you from STIs. In the meantime, here are the main five STIs to watch out for. CHLAMYDIA What is it? The most common STI, with 220,000 cases a year in England alone, half of them in women. ‘The under-25 group is most affected but it’s far from exclusive – we see chlamydia in women through to their thirties,’ says Estcourt. Symptoms: Bleeding after having sex and between periods, and pelvic or abdominal pain. However, 70 per cent of women don’t have any symptoms at all.


Risks: Pelvic inflammatory disease

(PID), which can start when the bacteria progress through the cervix into the pelvis and can cause inflammation and scarring in the Fallopian tubes, leading to infertility and a raised risk of ectopic pregnancy. To treat it: Get a test – chlamydia can be treated simply with four antibiotic tablets you take all at once. ‘It’s also key to make sure your recent sexual partners are tested and treated if necessary, or you can be reinfected. Repeated chlamydia infections are more likely to lead to PID,’ says Estcourt. Use condoms to be safe. HPV What is it? The second-most common STI, the human papilloma virus (HPV) is actually a family of over 100 viruses, and some of them are responsible for genital warts. Symptoms: Sometimes there are no symptoms at all, but if warts occur, they are small, fleshy growths that might crop up months after initial infection and can recur. Risks: The strains of HPV that don’t cause warts have been linked with cervical cancer. ‘There’s also growing evidence of oral cancers being caused by certain types of HPV, which can be passed on during oral sex,’ says FPA chief executive Natika Halil. To treat it: Treatment usually involves using a topical cream to kill the warts, or they can be frozen or cut off. It’s

passed on easily through skin-to-skin contact, so avoid sex if you or a partner has an active outbreak. GENITAL HERPES What is it? Caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), this STI basically leads to cold sores down below. Symptoms: ‘There are two strains,’ says Estcourt. ‘HSV1 usually causes cold sores around the mouth.’ About 70 per cent of us are affected, and if you’ve had cold sores in the past, you have some protection against contracting genital herpes through oral sex from someone with cold sores. HSV2, meanwhile, only causes genital herpes. Risks: Just as with cold sores, genital herpes might crop up in the first two years after the initial infection, and often when you’re run-down. To treat it: Your doctor may prescribe acyclovir, which suppresses the virus and reduces symptoms or prevents flare-ups. Avoid sex if you or a partner has active herpes, and use condoms. ‘For oral sex, a dam (a square of plastic) can be used to form a barrier between the mouth and genitals,’ says Halil. GONORRHOEA What is it? The infection that used to be referred to as ‘the clap’, Public Health England figures show that gonorrhoea cases jumped by 53 per cent between 2012 and 2015. Symptoms: It can cause a thick yellow or green discharge, pain when peeing

and bleeding between periods, though half of women have no symptoms. Risks: As with chlamydia, gonorrhoea can raise the risk of PID and infertility. It can be treated with antibiotics, but scientists are worried about a rise in cases of drug-resistant gonorrhoea. To treat it: It’s usually treated with an injection, then a tablet. Prevention is key – it’s passed in semen and vaginal fluids, so condoms will keep you safe. HIV What is it? The virus that can lead to

AIDS. ‘HIV doesn’t affect large numbers of British women in their twenties and thirties,’ says Estcourt. ‘But all clinicians know someone who doesn’t fit the usual profile who has been affected, so you can’t afford to be complacent on this one.’ Symptoms: While some people have a mild illness when first infected, HIV usually has no symptoms until it starts to damage your immune system, often many years later. Risks: HIV can be managed so most people with it can live long, healthy lives. But it’s still a serious condition that will affect your quality of life. To treat it: Testing is important – if you’re HIV-positive, the sooner you start treatment, the better. Male or female condoms are the best way to prevent HIV, and use a lubricant designed for sex – this helps stop the small friction tears that can mean HIV is passed on more easily. Q

Moving on from condoms? Find out which contraception is best for you Condoms are the only form of contraception that protect against STIs, but if you’re getting serious with a partner and have both got the all-clear, there are a number of other good options out there… The combined pill

The injection

Copper IUD (intrauterine

(oestrogen & progesterone)

The most common injection (Depo-Provera)

device), or coil

It’s effective one to seven days after the

lasts for 12 weeks. It’s ideal for women in

This lasts for five to ten years so is a

first pill, and is easy to stop if you

relationships who don’t want children for

popular choice for women who don’t want

experience side-effects. But not great for

at least one year (it can take three months

any, or any more, children. The only downside

the disorganised – it must be taken every

to a year for fertility levels to return to

is that it can be painful to insert. Fertility

day to be completely effective.

normal after stopping the injection).

returns to normal fairly quickly after removal.

The mini-pill (progestogen only)

Intrauterine system

The implant

This has the perks of a daily pill and will

The IUS, or hormonal coil, is a plastic device

The implant lasts for three years. The

give you lighter periods (they may even stop).

that is inserted into your womb and releases

progestogen-only implant also

Unlike the combined pill, which is unsuitable

progestogen. This thickens the mucus from

means it’s a good choice for women

for smokers over 35, the mini-pill can be

your cervix, making it hard for sperm to

who can’t take oestrogen, and if any

prescribed to smokers and non-smokers

reach an egg. It also thins the womb lining

unwanted side-effects are experienced,

until menopause. But it must be taken in

so it’s less likely to accept a fertilised egg.

it can be removed in a couple of minutes

the same three-hour period each day.

It works for three to five years.

by a trained doctor or nurse.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE

Health

274


FURNITURE FOR LOAFERS BATTERSEA

NOTTING HILL

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Bullet-train boltholes in the stunning Swiss mountains, boozy bites for Christmas Eve and pro hacks to surviving the office party

277


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279 NO MORE CHEESE ST R AWS

Raise your canapé game with the help of

WORDS BY LUCY PAVIA, HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES

‘ M a k e qu ai l ’s e gg s co t ch e gg s wi th s aus age s f r om th e s up er m ark e t. Ju st p o p t he s au s ag e mea t ou t of th e s k i n, di v i d e i n to e q u a l parts, w r a p around y o ur s of t-boi l e d eg g s , c ov e r i n b r ea d cru m b s an d s ha l l o w f ry. Try i t w i t h chorizo, too.’ O l i v e r Hia m a nd D o m i nic Hamdy, S c o t chta ils

RECIPE

three street foodies

Salted caramel and brandy bites Give party guests a sugar high with this festive treat

‘Jaz z up y o ur c a n a p és w i t h b la ck t r uffl e m a yo . Ad d t ru f f l e o i l , g ra t ed b l a ck truffle and soy sauce t o ho mema d e m a yo nna i s e ( o r y o u r fa v o ur i t e b ra n d , i f y o u’ r e short of time).’ B en C h a n c e l l o r, Sub C u l t

SERVES 6 COOKING TIME 2-3 hours For the dough 375g plain white flour 55g caster sugar 1 tbsp dried fast-action yeast 1 large free-range egg 200ml milk (room temperature) 25g unsalted butter, melted Rapeseed oil, for frying ‘To add a layer of Nordic flavour to your flav c napés, try can s rving smoked ser s al mon or trout o cripsbread on w h one of wit t ese toppings: the f shly grated fres h rseradish, hor c ème fraîche crè a d dill; sliced and q ick pickled qui c cumber; cuc f shly grated fres beetroot.’ bee JJacob Taylor and Sam Riches, Allihopa

For the sauce 125g unsalted butter 340g caster sugar 200g soft light brown sugar 480ml golden syrup 250ml double cream 100ml brandy 1-2 tbsp sea salt flakes Toppings Cinnamon sugar (caster sugar mixed with cinnamon), edible glitter, toasted chopped pecans

Mix all of the dry dough ingredients together in a large bowl, then add the egg, milk and butter, and continue mixing until smooth. Cover with cling film and set aside in a warm place until the mixture has doubled in size. Scrape the dough mixture out of the bowl and knead on a floured surface for about 4 minutes or until smooth. Roll it out to 2cm-thick, then cut out evenly shaped chunks. Place on lined baking sheets and cover with a cloth so that they don’t get dry. Leave for 30 minutes to rise. For the caramel sauce, melt the butter in a pan over a low heat. Remove from the heat and add both sugars and the golden syrup, stirring well. Place back on a medium heat, add the double cream and brandy, and mix together until smooth. Turn the heat up to high and add the salt. Let the mixture come to a rolling boil for 1-2 minutes, then turn off the heat, letting it cool slightly. Use a large pan of hot rapeseed oil (or preferably a small deep-fat fryer turned up to 180°C) and fry the doughnuts for a few minutes on each side or until golden brown, then take out and drain on kitchen towel. Toss them in some cinnamon sugar and edible glitter, then drizzle with the salted caramel. If you fancy, sprinkle over some chopped pecans, then enjoy! Re c i p e f rom Bet sy B uckner and Jo Ryan, fo under s o f gour met do ughnut company, You D ou gh n u t. Find them at Str eet Feast’s Diner ama in Shor editch. Str eetfeast.com


Winter wonder All will be calm and bright with a sophisticated scheme of snowy whites and frosted silver

Champagne flutes, £4 each, glass hurricane (on table), £12, runner, £12, faux-fur throw, £30, polar bear, £16, and frosted centrepiece (on mantelpiece), £30, all Sainsbury’s


Promotional Feature Everyone dreams of a white Christmas – a blanket of snow on the ground, icicles on the windowsills and a cosy vibe inside. The new Ice Palace collection from Sainsbury’s taps into that magical scene with a mix of glittering baubles, shining stars and silver reindeer. Deck the halls with the collection’s festive frosted greenery and all that’s left to do is light the candles. Happy holidays…

On table, from left: gel candle, £12, frosted faux floral (in vase), £14, reindeer tealight holder, £30, and pillar candle, £10, all Sainsbury’s

The Ice Palace homeware collection is available at selected Sainsbury’s stores now. To see more of the new collections and to find your nearest store, visit sainsburyshome.co.uk


Ever so slightly

The Christmas baking range at Lakeland. When it comes to making festive cakes, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve broken the mould.

69 stores nationwide lakeland.co.uk


WORDS BY LUCY PAVIA AND HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, IMAXTREE

Deluxe

GOING OUT

283

This year, management pulled out all t he st ops

The 5 types of...

Office Christmas party 1 The wine-bar binge

The setting: a roped-off section of booths with ice buckets of wine purchased in advance by the office manager. A combination of free-flowing booze and no food leads to one colleague getting drunk and shouty, three decamping to a corner to slur their way through every office grievance of the past year and two realising they have always just ‘misunderstood’ one another, ending the night in a tearful, silent hug. 2 The big company blow-out

When the large firm you work for runs hours that fall into the ‘indentured slavery’ zone, management attempts to blow away the year’s resentment by throwing cash at a huge swanky party. Who cares if you don’t ever see your kids

– there’s a Moët bar and they’ve booked out half of Cirque du Soleil. It’s also the perfect opportunity for your single colleague to hook up with a man from a department you never knew existed. 3 The awkward long-table lunch

Everyone’s far too busy for an evening do, so in the week before Christmas your team heads to the nearest Zizzi for the festive set-menu deal (three courses and a glass of Prosecco for £24.95). A badly timed loo trip means you get stuck at one end of the table talking to Mark from Strategy about all the different stages of his commute. 4 The tiny team bender

You work in a small office, so your boss plans a low-key Christmas dinner at

a restaurant. But, by dessert, everyone is steaming drunk. Here begins the unexpected bender, which propels the dinner on to a noisy cocktail bar, a nightclub, then back to someone’s house for a nightcap. ‘Who knew Boring John was such a legend?’ you think, when you wake the following morning with a styrofoam box of dry cheesy chips on your bedside table. 5 The ‘imaginative boss’ party

Your boss just ran her third ultra marathon and doesn’t see enough bonding potential in a ‘normal’ Christmas party. That’s why you all end up in a converted airport hangar in colour-coded team Santa hats, attempting to transport a ball 100ft using a stretch of rubber tube, a bundle of string and a coat hanger. Ho, ho, ho.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST WORK CHRISTMAS PARTY MOOD KILLER? WE ASKED, YOU ANSWERED...

co-worker getting The bar A married colleague misreading the signs and 35% Adrunk 2% You and shouty 22% going dry 41% hitting on you asking the CEO for a pay rise

F E S T I V E D R I N K S PA R T Y P R O T O C O L

Social minefield? Etiquette expert William Hanson Hanso an has a few pieces of advice Don’t miss the 25-minute window ‘ I f a di n n e r-party i n vi te s ay s 7 .3 0 p m , you would p robably arrive around 10-15 minutes late. As a drinks party is a little more fluid, you can ext end th i s wi n dow of arri val ti m e to 2 5 minut es.’

Always follow the 70 per cent rule ‘Drinks parties normally last two to three hours, so a good rule is to st ay for 70 pe r cent of that time. You don’t want to be t he fir st t o leave, o r t he last .’

Stuck in a dull conversation?

If the host is over 30

‘ N ev er w a l k of f an d l e ave th at p e rson on th e i r o wn. I ns t ea d , s a y, “Si m on , i t h as be e n so l ove l y t al k i ng t o you – I’ve just seen someone over there who I need to catch before they go. Have you met Michael, however?”’

‘Don’t bring a bottle. Turning up with your own can be seen as s aying you don’t think the host’s wine co llect ion is ver y goo d. B r ing choco lat es or – t he only except ion t o t he bo t t le r ule – champagne.’

F ind more e t iquette tip s at Williamh anso n .co.u k


Deluxe

284 Clockwise from below left: Millie Mackintosh, Sarah-Jane Mee and Lilah Parsons; Neutrogena treats; Frankie Bridge and Rebecca Ferguson

Right: beauty innovator Sharmadean Reid M B E, award winner and founder of WAH London

Left : K a t a r i n a Johnson-Thompson. Below: Cointreau cockt ails; winner Amy Cole (centre) and Marie Claire ’s Justine Southall (left) and Trish Halpin (right)

Future shapers Inspiring, exciting and uplifting – it was a night to remember at Marie Claire’s Future Shapers Awards in honour of 2016’s best female innovators

L e f t: Jasm i n e Hemsley. Below: Official awards goodie b ag g i f ts

A host of celebrities and dynamic businesswomen were out in force to celebrate 11 incredible women on Thursday 29 September at the Marie Claire Future Shapers Awards, in partnership with Neutrogena. Our annual event, which honours inspiring women shaking up their field of work in a range of industries from law to beauty, took place this year at the glamorous London venue One Marylebone. Winners included refugee campaigner and Instagram sensation Jaz O’Hara, counterextremism campaigner Sara Khan, beauty innovator Sharmadean Reid MBE, and Phoebe Gormley, who set up Savile Row’s very first tailor exclusively for women. Fresh from competing in the Rio Olympics, athletics star Katarina Johnson-Thompson even popped in to present an award to winner Samantha Payne, co-founder of Open Bionics, a company that makes affordable bionic hands for amputees. Celebrity guests including Lilah Parsons, Millie Mackintosh, Jasmine Hemsley and DJ Billie JD Porter hit the dance floor at the after party, while the bar knocked out punchy Cointreau cucumber and basil cocktails (and guests nibbled on lobster arancini and salt beef bagels) till the wee hours.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVE BENNETT, CHARLOTTE MEDICOTT. WITH THANKS TO COLLECTIVE TWO AND PAPERSHAKE ORIGAMI

Let’s hear it for the


Promotional Feature

Fitness meets

FA S H I O N Team MC took Fitbit’s new tracker – the Alta – out for a spin. The verdict? Fabulous THE ALTA IS NOT YOUR AVERAGE HEALTH and fitness tracker, but what else would you expect from market leader Fitbit? Looking more like a luxury piece of jewellery than a piece of hi-tech gadgetry, our content manager Rachel McAleese was the first to test-drive the Alta. ‘I’m quite a newbie to wearable tech and thought it was only about hitting 10,000 steps a day, but this tracks everything – distance, sleep, water intake, calories burned – which makes achieving my fitness goals so much easier. I also love how you can use the app to link up with friends to have a step challenge.’ And what about the look? ‘The Alta delivers on style. I can wear the Alta at the gym, then switch straps for a work look or a night out so I’m tracking 24/7. I’m a convert. It’s on the top of my Xmas list.’

The Alt a is smart enough f or wor k and nights out

WEARABLE TECH THAT’S CLEVER AND STYLISH The interchangeable bands make the Alta super chic, but it’s packed with tech, too…

THE TRACKING

Make a statement and stay motivated with the Fitbit Alta Choose the classic band (above) or leather band (left) for work and the gold bracelet (below) for nights out

From steps and distance to calories burned, the tracking is extensive and includes reminders to move. There’s a special Auto Sleep feature, too, so you can see your sleep patterns and get on a better routine.

THE APP The Fitbit app allows you to sync wirelessly to computers and 200+ smartphones in order to log food, record workouts, see your stats and connect with friends.

THE CONNECTION The Alta connects to your smartphone, which means you get call, text and calendar alerts. It tells the time, too, and stays charged for five days.

The Fitbit Alta costs £99.99. The interchangeable bands start from £19.99 for the classic band. For more information and to buy, go to fitbit.com


THE GIRL ON THE

SNOW TRAIN

A l l aboard! B ullet t r ains ar e the way to trav el t hr ough Swit z er land


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Left : mount ain- t o p views acr oss Gr aubünden. Abo ve: beaut iful B er n

Ice skating, snow tubing and off-piste plum liqueur chasers… Laura Millar travels beyond the ski slopes on an epic rail trip through Switzerland’s mountains

L a u ra M i l l a r na b s t he b e st se at i n t h e h o us e o n t he G l a ci er Ex p re ss

As I inch gingerly towards the top of a steep slope halfway down Mount Titlis – an icy, 3,238m peak in the Bernese Oberland – I watch everyone else plunge merrily off the edge, but I am gripped with fear. ‘I don’t think I can do this,’ I tell the strapping slope attendant. He looks at me sternly. ‘This is Switzerland,’ he says, incredulously. ‘Everybody does this. Even children.’ I am not, and never have been, A Snow Person. Snow People have fluorescent white teeth, wear neon pink and yellow ski outfits, and think nothing of racing at death-defying speeds down sheer cliff faces. I like lying on beaches, wearing muted colour palettes and avoiding breaking any bones. Yet, here I am, sitting in an inflatable rubber ring, about to throw myself down an icy chute at a supersonic rate, pinballing from side to side. This, they tell me, is called snow tubing. This, they also tell me, is fun. I scream all the way down – a journey that lasts barely 30 seconds. But when I reach the bottom, breathless, I start laughing uncontrollably with sheer glee – before clambering back up for round two. It seems I have finally discovered the joys of a winter adventure break. My boyfriend Daniel and I are taking a train journey through central Switzerland, via the beautiful cantons of Graubünden and Bern, stopping for a couple of nights at the mountain resorts of Chur and Kandersteg, then ending in the lake city of Lucerne. Not only is

Switzerland’s rail service fantastically – and famously – punctual and clean, but travelling by train is, hands down, the best way to see the country’s landscape unfold; a mixture of shimmering, mirror-flat lakes, jagged, ice-capped peaks and chalet-studded hillsides. We arrive at our first stop, Chur, in the middle of Fasnacht – a Swiss carnival to celebrate the run up to Lent, which involves parades and a lot of dressing up. We see people disguised as owls, Minions, pandas and ex-Fifa boss Sepp Blatter – that’s all in the first half an hour. Thankfully, the charming old town has a host of cosy, stone-clad bars in which to get our heads around the fact that, a) we’re seeing several feet of snow for what feels like the first time in years, and b) we’re at the base of a substantial mountain, Brambrüesch, which looms 2,174m above the city. Our plan is to venture up it the next day. The first rule of mountain life? You can’t do much if the weather’s not in your favour. The next morning, dark clouds are rumbling around the peak, and the cable car isn’t running due to strong winds. No matter; we hole up in our cosy, candlelit hotel, the Romantik Stern, and devour plates of air-dried local meats and chicken covered in melted cheese. It’s hearty stuff, and I’m already starting to feel guilty that we haven’t had to exert ourselves to earn it. The following day, we head to Kandersteg on the Glacier Express, a


train that runs along one of the most famous routes in the world, linking the ski resorts of Zermatt and St Moritz in under eight hours. We cross the Rhine Gorge, known – bless – as the Swiss Grand Canyon, passing icy blue rivers, snow-clad pines, and rocky crests that look fresh off a Toblerone wrapper. Kandersteg is a tiny burg surrounded by mountains, with a population of about 1,200, which doubles in ski season. But the area caters for all manner of other winter activities too, most of which we try, orchestrated by the helpful staff at the chic Belle Epoque Hotel Victoria. With the fog still hanging low in the valley, we steer clear of any mountains. Instead, we head for the ice rink for some skating (£7 each, including skate hire). We’re both utterly terrible, managing to inch shakily round the rink three times while barely letting go of the side. In the centre, tiny children are whirring around us doing Olympic-level spins, or playing vicious games of ice hockey. We’re scared. So we focus on food (surprise), heading to nearby ChaletHotel Adler for some rosti with ham and cheese. By now, we’ve learned to avoid pricey wines in restaurants, preferring to buy bottles of the lovely local rosé, Oeil du Perdrix (a fiver from the supermarket) and drink it as an aperitif or postprandial beverage in our room. The next day, it’s gone full Narnia outside: snow, and lots of it, has fallen overnight. After hiring a sled from our hotel (£3.50; three times cheaper than the ski-hire shop at the cable car station), Daniel and I ascend to 1,682m up Oeschinensee. From here is a 3.5km toboggan run back down to town, which, we’ve been informed, starts off gently but accelerates rapidly. I’ve not been sledding since I was about five, but how hard can it be? After I’ve faceplanted into a snowdrift at the side of the track for the second time, I find out. With Daniel laughing hysterically (‘With you, not at you!’ he insists), I manage to get to grips with steering, and soon we’re bombing happily down the track. This is much more fun than skiing, I reckon − and it’s cheaper. For something less adrenalinefuelled, we go for a guided snowshoe hike in the afternoon. Disappointingly, the snow shoes look nothing like the tennis racket shapes of the movies, but more like flat, bright yellow plastic trays. Still, they’re good at gripping the ground as we walk upwards into

Kander st eg – the S wiss Nar nia (above) is ho me t o t he majest ic B elle Epo que Hot el Victoria (left and right) and t he snow- t opped Oeschinensee (below), which has a 750 met r e t o bo ggan r un

the forest behind the village. It’s eerily quiet, the snowfall muffling all sound, but also incredibly beautiful, with the tree branches dredged in snow, like icing. It’s also an insane workout and our thighs are aching by the time we get back down. Finally, we’ve earned our evening fondue and a plum liqueur chaser (hey, it’s cold outside). Our final rail leg takes us to elegant Lucerne, whose lake is straddled by bridges, including the iconic, wooden Chapel Bridge. We wander around the charming altstadt (old town), up to the melancholic Lion Monument – which commemorates the Swiss Guards who died during the French Revolution – then down to the lake front. We pass the dual-spired witch’s hat peaks of the Church of St Leodegar before heading along Schweizerhofquai, lined with chic stores. On our last day, we hop on a train for 45 minutes to Mount Titlis. The snow park, halfway up, is the scene of my virgin attempt at snow tubing. Yes, OK, I admit it – I’ve had fun. In fact, get me a pair of neon orange salopettes – I’m coming back next year. Q

B ook Now Slow holiday specialist Inntravel (01653 617001; inntravel.co.uk) offers the Glacier Express from 7 January to 21 March, 2017. It is priced at £1,280 per person, based on two sharing, and includes return Swiss flights from London Heathrow to Zurich, seven nights on a B&B basis, three dinners, rail travel and det ailed document ation. Travel from London St Pancras is also available. For information on Switzerland, visit Switzerland Tourism at myswitzerland.com

PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, 4CORNERS IMAGES, AXIOM PHOTOGRAPHIC, ALAMY

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Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

Finishing touches

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It’s all about

Punk power

Channel Siouxsie Sioux: add-ons are going back to the 80s 01 Shirt, £350, and trousers, £495, both Kenzo; bustier (worn over shirt), £320, Emporio Armani; shoes, £610, Mulberry; bag, £1,100, Michael Kors Collection 02 Shoes, £695, Tod’s 03 Dress, £1,738, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi; trousers, £195, & Other Stories; shoes, £210, Bimba Y Lola; earrings £150, Joomi Lim 04 Choker, £18, ASOS; top, £95, House of Holland 05 Dress and earrings, as before 06 Sweater, about £765, and shirt, about £510, both No.21; shorts, from a selection, Alexander Wang; boots, £866, Pierre Hardy; earrings, £65, Maria Francesca Pepe; bag, £485, Alexander Wang

HAIR BY CHOCCY AT ONE REPRESENTS USING L’OREAL. MAKE-UP BY NICOLA MOORES-BRITTIN AT COFFIN INC USING YSL BEAUTY. MODEL: SANG IN AT STORM

Styled by ABISOYE ODUGBESAN



marie clair (UK) December 2016