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Volume 23 N umber 1 1 HOM E & DESIG N 20 1 6

ON THE COVER 4 SERENE QUEEN

Lea Michele relishes the mountain views and fresh air from her L.A. oasis.

14 COUNTRY 16 GOOD MORNING, SUNSHINE Vintage finds bring a sense of history to Michelle Monaghan’s charming L.A. abode.

28 A PLACE TO DREAM

Escape to Diane von Furstenberg’s western Connecticut retreat.

36 CITY 38 WHERE LIFE MEETS ART

Fashion designer Lisa Perry’s N.Y.C. apartment pops with brilliant color and style.

46 TORY’S GLORY

Hotel living is an everyday event for Tory Burch.

52 CHAINS OF LOVE

Visit Jennifer Fisher’s art-filled Manhattan loft.

60 FUN HOME

Isaac Mizrahi lives out his real estate fantasy in his beloved Greenwich Village neighborhood.

68 BEACH 70 TOMMY’S GREAT ESCAPE

A place to unwind: Tommy Hilfiger’s Mustique mansion.

78 BEAUTY & THE BEACH

Kelly Wearstler invites us into her stunning Malibu sanctuary.

88 THE MANY SHADES OF AMBER Amber Valletta stays close to nature in Santa Monica.

ETC. 3 WELCOME 96 FLASHBACK

COVER CREDITS

dress Jason Wu. earring and ring Gabriela Artigas & Company. stud and necklace her own. sandals Jimmy Choo. chair Cisco Home. Photographed for InStyle by Gentl and Hyers. Styled by Ali Pew. Hair Laura Polko. Makeup Mélanie Inglessis.

HOUSE CAT So You Think You Can Dance host Cat Deeley lounges in her Alice in Wonderland–esque poolside garden area, which she’s adorned with layers of colorful rugs and piles of pillows. Photographed by Douglas Friedman. Alberta Ferretti gown with embellished collar.

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Imagine being a houseguest for a living. In a way, that is what I have been for the past seven years as the lifestyle director of InStyle— and it is a privileged perch. Some of the most fascinating style and Hollywood notables have thrown open their doors to us and offered up a cup of coffee and conversation as they walked through the rooms where they live, sharing their daily rhythms, passions, and memories. Our cover girl, Lea Michele, is the ideal subject to kick off this year’s Home & Design issue. Her new L.A. abode embodies all that we dream a home can be: a quiet place to recharge and a refuge that represents one’s aesthetics, interests, and history. From her photographic shrine to Barbra Streisand to the cameo appearance by her cat, Sheila, named after Sheila Franklin from Hair (Michele always names her pets after favorite Broadway characters), the actress’s story is written on every corner and surface. In his novel The Journey Home, Irish writer Dermot Bolger wrote, “Home was not the place where you were born but the place you created for yourself, where you did not need to explain, where you finally became what you were.” I hope you’ll hold that idea close as you enjoy this special issue.

Follow us on Twitter @instyle Follow us on Instagram @instylemagazine, and follow me @jbober


WHEN GLEE ALUM LEA MICHELE ISN’T SHOOTING HER TV SERIES, SCREAM QUEENS, SHE’S NESTING IN HER L.A. SANCTUARY, HANGING WITH FRIENDS AND COOKING UP A STORM by JOANNA BOBER photographed by

GENTL AND HYERS styled by ALI PEW

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“I was swimming in my pool the other day thinking, ‘If you had told me years ago that I, a girl from the Bronx, would someday live in this beautiful home ... it really is the greatest blessing,’ ” says Michele. La Ligne dress. Anita Ko earrings.


THIS HOUSE HAS SLEEK LINES AND AN ORGANIC VIBE—I FEEL AS THOUGH IT WAS DESIGNED JUST FOR ME.” — LEA MICHELE

The kitchen, dining, and living-room areas in Michele’s house share an open space and an immense skylight. Multiple floor-to-ceiling sliding doors lead outside to the pool area. Cisco chair. Rug from HD Buttercup.

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“My mother recently gave me this china from my grandmother Sylvia, who was such a sweet, delicate woman. I’ll leave it for my own children someday,” says Michele.

A Restoration Hardware table anchors the dining room. The murals behind it are from Anthropologie. 8

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Interior designer Estee Stanley helped Michele create a seating area under the house’s main staircase, which leads to a home gym.

“Some of my records were passed down to me from my parents, but the Barbras and the Judys are mine,” says Michele. “Obviously, anytime I can go to a record store, if I find Barbra, I take it.”


Michele eats breakfast every day at the marble bar in her kitchen. “When I’m home, I keep my diet vegetarian, almost vegan, and gluten-free,” she says. Calvin Klein Collection tank top. Altuzarra skirt. Faris necklace. David Yurman rings. Gianvito Rossi sandals. Drinking glasses from Lost and Found.


“I asked the former owners of the house if I could keep their plants. I like how they connect with the greenery outside,� says Michele, seated in the living room. Nellie Partow sweater. Prabal Gurung skirt. Top earring, her own. Anita Ko earring. Leather chair and wooden vase from HD Buttercup.


neat stack of vintage Barbra Streisand albums rests in a corner of actress Lea Michele’s modern two-story Los Angeles home. Framed black-and-white photos of the iconic songstress from her ’60s-era Funny Girl days hang nearby. A Judy Garland biography sits on a bookshelf in the living room. Not far away is a photo of Michele embracing her friend and Spring Awakening co-star Jonathan Groff, an ethereal image that appeared on a poster for the 2007 Tony Award–winning musical. Music is clearly the through line in Michele’s life (at only 8 years old, she launched her Broadway career in Les Miserables as the young Cosette), and yet, she says, some of the happiest times she’s spent in this house have taken place without any soundtrack at all—unless you count the trill of the birds outside the glass doors that lead to the pool area. “Sometimes I listen to music when I cook, or if I take a bath,” she says. “But I’m also fine to just have it be quiet. I like to keep the doors open to the outside. When I’m driving, I don’t play music much either. It’s a very busy world, there are so many people around, and it takes up a lot of your energy, so it’s nice to have that peace.” The tranquility surrounding the four-bedroom home, nestled in a canyon in West L.A., inspired her to purchase it in 2015. Up until then she had been living in Hollywood, and “that became very suffocating for me, with all the tour buses around,” she explains. Coming off seven years playing the role of the wonderfully geeky, singing-and-dancing high school chorus member Rachel Berry in the cult TV show Glee, Michele was

ready for a retreat. “I needed a home that would allow me to recover and breathe and recharge. I fell in love with this place the minute I saw it, just being so far from people, and really being in nature and in the mountains. It’s spacious, and you see so much green. This house is healing.” The sudden death of her co-star and boyfriend, Cory Monteith, in 2013—a tragedy she bore amid clamoring fans and onlookers—heightened her need for an escape. At the time she publicly thanked her friend Kate Hudson for opening her home so Michele could mourn her loss in greater privacy. Now, by all measures, the 30-year-old has her own oasis of calm. On a recent sunny afternoon, while on hiatus from shooting the comedy-horror series Scream Queens, in which she stars as the kooky sorority girl Hester Ulrich, she pads around the house barefoot, her long hair loose around her shoulders. She wears a flowing teal blue cross-back sundress by Natalie Martin, a designer she discovered through fashion stylist and interior decorator Estee Stanley (“Estee said to me, ‘Oh my God, you need these dresses in your life!’ ” says

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Michele, laughing). Stanley also helped her set up her new house, creating white, airy rooms appointed with comfortable seating, plus the occasional Buddha statue and crystals given to Michele by friends. “I accept them from people I care about and believe have good energy themselves,” she says, noting that Hudson and actress Jamie-Lynn Sigler offered her pink ones that she treasures. There’s an expansive kitchen and a saltwater swimming pool where she invites a pal or two to hang out when she’s not working. A recent video on her Instagram shows her lounging on a pool float shaped like a lemon slice with friend and Glee co-star Becca Tobin kicking their feet and clearly having some fun. “I’m a homebody,” she says, curled up on a couch, her feet tucked beneath her. “I’m not a party girl. I’ve never been that. Trust me, I love to go out and share a nice bottle of wine with some friends over a delicious meal, but my perfect night “I made this guest room is at home with people I love.” very inviting for my parents,” she says. “I wanted it to Michele’s inner circle includes a look kind of like a hotel: handful of close-knit girlfriends, Casa de Michele.” her mother, Edith, a former nurse, Gray pillow from Nickey Kehoe. This Is Totem and her father, Marc, who owned a leather pillow and throw. deli in the Bronx when she was Hair: Laura Polko for The growing up. Her parents, now both Wall Group. Makeup: Mélanie Inglessis for Forward retired, often visit from New York, Artists. Prop stylist: Kim so she designed a guest suite with Ficaro for Edge Reps. them in mind (“I wanted it to be a very sleek, clean space,” Michele says). “My mom and dad have done so much for me and helped me along the way imthan a dozen cousins for a feast of ziti, meatballs, and mensely, both logistically and emotionally. Opening salads. Now, for her own friends, Michele likes to cook my home to them and treating them to a beautiful, rehomemade pizzas; her latest specialty is a truffle, radiclaxing time makes me happy,” she says. chio, and Parmesan combo on a whole-wheat crust. Sense memories from her years growing up as an “When I was a little girl, I used to play a game where I only child weave easily into Michele’s conversation, was a waitress, and I would say to my parents, ‘Can I from the music that her parents played in their house take your order?’ I love asking people what they want to (Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, and Queen to eat, and I love making it for them.” name a few) to the ingredients she and her dad used for Michele plans to embrace that propensity even more their late-night snacks. “We loved to make paninis in the next phase of her life. “I am so looking forward to with sun-dried tomatoes and mozzarella, or turkey having a big family and being a mom, though I’m in no and arugula,” she recounts. “I grew up in a house where rush,” she says. “The thing that I’m the most happy about food was family, it was joy, and I believe that’s really is that I wake up every day feeling content, just me. I’ve what makes a home a home,” she says, describing a regnever really had that before.” She smiles, adding someular Sunday supper at her aunt Carmela’s house, where what philosophically, “I think that once you find that, she would join her parents, aunts, uncles, and more then all the things you want in life come your way.” ■

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GET THE LOOK

Pale pink pinks, soft grays, and natural wood tones turn Michele’s Mi s ssun-drenched home into a peaceful retreat.

Leather Braided and Tassel pillow, This Is Totem, $180; totemhome.com.

Porcelain China plate, Elsie Green, $39/4 assorted styles; elsiegreen.com.

Wood Organic vase, HD Buttercup, $85 (left) and $215; hdbuttercup .com.

“A neutral palette works so well for me. It’s very calming.” —LEA MICHELE Paper Petrichor tapestry, Anthropologie, $168/98¼" x 57½"; anthropologie.com.

Teak Root side table,, Terrain,, $168;; shopterrain p .com. co .

Stoneware Indigo Striped bowl, MQuan Studio, $ $175/small; mquan.com.

Linen Savannah chair, Cisco Home, $2,119; ciscohome.net.

Wool hand-knitted Moroccan Trellis rug, Nuloom, $194/5' x 8'; overstock.com.

Cotton and polyester Kivik sectional, Ikea, $1,079; ikea.com.


F E AT U R I N G M I C H E L L E M O N AG H A N C AT D E E L E Y DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

As designer Diane von Furstenberg leads writer Hal Rubenstein through a barn on her lush Connecticut property, profiled on p. 28, she calls it “my place to think and my place to dream.” Her retreat and the other glorious houses in this section share a certain hallowed quality—they’re vantage points for gazing at mountains and watching the sun rise, as actress Michelle Monaghan does with her young kids each day in their California home, spotlighted on p. 16: “My daughter says, ‘Here it comes! Here it comes!’ And it’s magical.” 14

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AT HER CHARMING, COLOR-SPLASHED HOUSE IN THE HILLS OF LOS ANGELES, ACTRESS MICHELLE MONAGHAN AND HER FAMILY EMBRACE EACH DAY WITH A HEALTHY DOSE OF HOMEMADE FUN by DEGEN PENER photographed by

DOUGL AS FRIEDMAN styled by SUE CHOI


A pair of vibrant paintings by German artist Thomas Wachholz punctuates the walls of Monaghan’s open living and dining area. “We found so many of the things in this house during our travels all across the country,” she says. “One of the coolest aspects of my job is that it’s taken me to so many places.” Dior top. Sportmax pants. Jimmy Choo sandals.

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The actress says the leather couch in the living room was her husband’s preference given that they have two young kids. “I kind of fought him over it, but I’m so glad that I gave in,” she says. Roland Mouret dress. Faris bangle. Miansai ring. Loeffler Randall sandals.

The breakfast area right off the kitchen features an Eero Saarinen table, “one of our first purchases for the house—and it’s a goodie,” Monaghan says.


hen Michelle Monaghan and her husband, graphic designer Peter White, moved to Los Angeles from New York eight years ago, one of the things they most loved about their new home was the splendid view east toward the San Bernardino Mountains. “This house has beautiful light, and we get incredible sunrises,” says the actress. “You can see the rays coming up from behind the ridge.” Little did the couple imagine that welcoming the day would turn into a family ritual. Since having two children—daughter Willow is 7, and son Tommy is 2—the sunrise has become something they savor together every day. Early in the morning, the kids tiptoe into the master bedroom to spy those first rays. “Willow is like, ‘Mommy, here it comes. Here it comes.’ There’s this orange glow that fills the room, and it’s magical,” says Monaghan. The family takes pictures and plays music too. “Sometimes we put on ‘Here Comes the Sun’ by the Beatles, and sometimes it’s Taylor Swift’s ‘Welcome to New York’ on Willow’s request—even though we’re clearly in L.A. Something about that song gets you up and moving,” says the actress, who stars in the Hulu series The Path, a drama about a couple whohavejoinedareligiouscult.(Onaprofessionalroll,she was also nominated last year for a Golden Globe for her role in HBO’s True Detective.) Mornings are just the start of the couple’s inspired, creative approach to time spent at home. The geometric brass cuff bracelet Monaghan is wearing on this sunny afternoon, for example, is a unique piece of jewelry that she and her husband (a branding specialist and an expert in graphic, interior, and product design) had custom-made after sketching it out together at their dining room table. On the weekends, she and Willow cultivate their baking skills, making things like madeleines and lemon and lime tarts with fruit picked from their backyard trees. “It’s all about perfecting the crust,” she says. Monaghan approaches another at-home passion with equal vigor—namely, her quest for vintage treasures, which pop up throughout the house. To wit, the Karl Springer chairs with colorful chevron upholstery were definitely not bought at a showroom. “They are among my all-time favorite 6:30 a.m. finds from the Rose Bowl Flea Market,” says Monaghan. She has fond memories attached to practically everything in their home, which combines cozy touches—more her style—with clean modern furniture, which better suits her husband’s taste. Upstairs, a pair of vintage pale pink vases on the art deco mantel in the master bedroom remind her of one of the first weekends she traveled to L.A. for an acting job. After her audition she spotted them at a flea market (“I love that color so much, and they instantly bring me back to that moment”). Other pieces, such as a vibrant Picasso print, were gifts to herself after wrapping some of her more than two dozen movies, which range from studio films like Pixels and Mission Impossible: III to gritty indie

fare such as Trucker and early next year’s Sleepless, in which she plays an internal affairs investigator opposite Jamie Foxx. In 2017, she’ll appear with Mark Wahlberg in Patriots Day, a drama depicting the events leading up to the 2013 Boston marathon bombing. Almost none of her films, she notes, are appropriate for her kids to watch. And as of now her daughter doesn’t have a burning desire to go into her mom’s line of work. “One time a couple of years ago I was doing a scene with an actor, and we were drinking coffee in a café. The next weekend, we were out to brunch with friends and somebody asked her, ‘Oh, Willow, do you want to be an actress someday?’ And she said, ‘Oh, no! I can’t be an actress because I can’t drink coffee.’” The artwork around the house has personal associations as well; it’s a mix of gifts from loved ones, art by friends (such as watercolor nudes by Mary Schepisi, the wife of one of Monaghan’s directors, Fred Schepisi), and pieces from a nearby gallery owned by a close pal. In the dining area there’s a movie poster for a 1949 Ginger Rogers film called The Barkleys of Broadway, a present from a director. He surprised Monaghan with it after she told him that Rogers had lived in their house, built in 1923. When Monaghan and White bought it, the kitchen and bathrooms needed complete redos. The floors were not in great condition either, but the couple decided to preserve them as much as possible by refinishing them and replacing a few of the boards only where necessary. “She danced on these floors,” says Monaghan, referring to Rogers. “That’s why we never tore them up.” Two of White’s own creations decorate the living room: a geometric ’70s-style mirror and a plastic breakfast tray designed with a built-in bud vase. “He’s a jack-of-alltrades. And he’s truly my favorite person in the world.” The pair met 15 years ago in New York. On an early date Monaghan asked him if he’d join her to watch football because,shesays,“I’mabigsportsfan.”Itwasn’tuntilmonths later—after she had watched countless other games with him—that he finally fessed up that he wasn’t a sports guy. “Basically, he pretended to like football, and he followed me all the way through March Madness and the NBA playoffs until baseball season, when one afternoon he was just like, ‘I can’t do this anymore,’” says Monaghan, a selfdescribed tomboy who loves doing her own movie stunts. To this day, the actress, a fan of the Hawkeyes from her home state of Iowa, still has football games running on the TV during the weekends. On Sunday nights the couple often makes a roast. And on warm evenings the family eats outside on that large terrace with the sweeping views. They dance on those original floors as well, though not exactly Ginger Rogers style. “We kind of like to cut loose in the living room right after dinner, which is good for all of us,”saysMonaghan,whoaddsthatthecurrenthitwiththe children is Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’s party anthem “Downtown.” “The kids have fun dancing around,” says Monaghan. “As do I.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in April 2016. InST YLE HOM E & DESIGN 20 16

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Doors in the master bedroom lead out to a terrace with sweeping views of downtown L.A. The sofa is by B&B Italia, and the bedding was designed by Kelly Wearstler.

In the kids’ shared bedroom, Tommy’s crib sits in front of a framed print by the New York design company Super Rural.

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The couple completely renovated the bathroom, decorating it with a custom-made yellow mirror and a bold lithograph by Australian artist Amaina.


Marble and brass Hawley side table, Egg Collective, $2,475; eggcollective.com.

GET THE LOOK

Flea-market scores alongside clean, modern pieces make Monaghan’s rooms feel cozy but never cluttered.

Walnut Vortex side chair, Modway, $227/2; allmodern.com.

Mouth-blown glass Kartio tumbler, Iittala, $22; shophorne.com.

Abstract Ombré prints on matte fine art paper, Simple Geometry, from $13/5" x 7" each; simplegeometry .etsy.com.

“I like to find things for my home wherever I go because it’s a way of preserving a memory.” —MICHELLE MONAGHAN

Wood and leather Toro lounge chair, Blu Dot, $1,299; bludot.com.

Wood Ashen Oak bowl, Calvin Klein Home, $400; calvinklein.com.

Cotton Velvet Blush pillow, Consort, $125/20" x 20"; consort-design.com. Linen Graffito pillow, Kelly Wearstler, $295/20" x 20"; kellywearstler .com.


HOUSE

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE HOST CAT DEELEY DOESN’T JUST THINK SHE CAN DECORATE—SHE REALLY CAN. IN HER BOHO-CHIC BEVERLY HILLS HOME, CHAMPAGNE FLOWS AND GUESTS CAN’T HELP BUT LINGER by DAVID KEEPS photographed by DOUGL AS FRIEDMAN styled by KUSUM LYNN


In the living room, Deeley relaxes on a 1970s De Sede DS-600 leather sofa purchased in Paris that can “be moved around like a caterpillar,” she says. “I wanted a couch you can really hang out on.” A.P.C. shirt. Acne jeans. Giles & Brother necklace. Right hand: Jennifer Fisher and Pamela Love rings. Tom Binns Design cuff. Left hand: Rings, stylist’s own. Watch (worn throughout), her own.

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“I love having fresh flowers around,” says Deeley, standing in her living room next to a painting from a vintage store in Palm Springs. Of the upright piano she occasionally plays, she notes, “I’m a sucker for strings of fairy lights. I drape them over the piano to add some fun.” Line sweater. Jonathan Saunders skirt. Lulu Frost necklace. Jimmy Choo pumps.

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A midcentury-modern table, picked up on a trip to Palm Springs, pairs nicely with linen-covered chairs from Environment in Los Angeles. “I quite like the juxtaposition with the industrial light fixture,� Deeley says.

The bright white kitchen, which Deeley renovated after moving in, boasts a double oven and a wine fridge. Open walnut shelves hold knickknacks from her travels and cookbooks written by her chums Sophie Dahl and Jamie Oliver. Left: Deeley transformed a brass frame from India into a mirror and centered it over a bar cart she found at Empiric in Los Angeles.


at Deeley is a committed do-itherselfer. “I don’t have a fashion stylist, and I didn’t use an interior designer,” declares the Emmy-nominated host of Fox’s So You Think You Can Dance, who then adds conspiratorially, “Do you think I have control issues?” She breaks into peals of laughter. Whatever her issues may be, they sure don’t seem to be getting in her way. Wearing a paisley Topshop frock that looks like a psychedelic nightie, Deeley is padding around her Beverly Hills house barefoot, her toes painted a neon orange. “I’m going through a hippiechick phase,” says the leggy blonde. That certainly explains her outfit and the playful Morocco-a-go-go look of her three-bedroom hilltop home, which is filled with ethnic textiles, 1970s furniture, and even macramé. Known for her fresh style sense, Deeley is a voracious shopper, snapping up finds in Los Angeles and New York as well as in London, where the British native still keeps a home. “It’s a very girlie two-bedroom flat that looks like Carrie Bradshaw’s place in Sex and the City,” she says. “And one bedroom is completely filled with clothes.” When Deeley purchased her Southern California property 10 years ago, she had just gone through a breakup with a long-term boyfriend. She opted to look at her relocation to America as a new adventure. “Trying things you’re afraid of is very healthy,” she says. “Finding a home, driving a car on the other side of the road—all of that took my mind off the relationship.” Renovations also kept her busy. The house, built in 1972, was too boxy for her taste, so Deeley had walls knocked down to create an open-plan living and dining room. “I wanted it to feel like an art gallery—simple and modern,” she says about her choice of white walls and oak floors. A novice cook, she tore out view-obstructing kitchen cabinets and built a streamlined galley that lets her watch the sun set while she tries out new recipes. “I made a white-truffle risotto last night,” she says with pride. “I am trying to be grown-up-ish. Not so much as to be boring, but grown-up enough to roast a chicken.” Another project on the agenda is storage for the trove of fashion pieces she has amassed over the years. “I have shoes for days and clothes for centuries, and I am determined to archive all of it,” she says. She plans to build closets in her garage and park her Lexus in the driveway, so it comes as no surprise that this style lover has a dedicated getting-ready-to-go-out area, which also doubles as an office and a yoga studio. Bursting with personality, the room is every bit as vibrant as Deeley, who anchored it with a heart-shaped illuminated frame

that she found at a flea market and transformed into a makeup mirror. “When you look around my home, you see delicate, pretty things,” she says—then adds, furrowing her brow in an attempt to look mysterious, “and some dark, edgy things.” Indeed. Skull candles sit on the living room coffee table, and two framed nudes by Jonathan Yeo are, upon closer inspection, a collage of clippings from X-rated magazines. Deeley’s friends, who include fellow Brits like actress Keira Knightley and fashion designer Matthew Williamson, have come to expect such delightfully titillating details from their pal. She loves her guests to stretch out and relax on her 1970s Swiss leather sofa, which can seat a dozen. But perhaps her favorite visitor is boyfriend Patrick Kielty, a TV personality she met while hosting a British television show in 2002. In the fall of 2011, Kielty flew to L.A. to celebrate her birthday, and they’ve been together ever since. Flea markets are a favorite haunt for them. “Cat is really good at mixing modern and old pieces,” Kielty says over the Duran Duran songs playing in the background. “On the other hand, she had the place done as a ‘smart home,’ with lights and speakers controlled from her iPad, and she still hasn’t figured out how to work it.” As if she has time for that. Most days she rises early to make business calls to London then takes a 45-minute hike—which she jokingly calls “the death walk”—down a nearbycanyonwithhermutt,Lilly.Shealsopracticesyoga and rides horses. All that keeps Deeley, who loves to eat cheese and thinks “there’s happiness in every bubble of Champagne,” in great shape. But dancing? Forget it. “I’m the clumsiest person ever,” she says. “And I have massive feet. But I’m a very good swimmer since they’re like paddles. And I love living in L.A. because here I have a pool.” That groovy pool area, decked out with whimsical wicker chairs and Mexican blankets, is her personal retreat. “It’s my little hippie hideaway and a commune for my gypsy friends,” she says contentedly. “There’s always someone in my spare room, which was kind of the idea behind the house: Make it so relaxed that no one ever wants to leave.” Editor’s update: Deeley and Kielty married in 2012 and now have a baby boy named Milo, who was born in January. They still love to entertain (“We just pop Milo in his chair at the end of the table,” says Deeley), and their zest for collecting furniture and art is satisfied by various online shopping sites (“We still have the passion for it but not the time, so the Internet is our saving grace!”). Even their pup, Lilly, has adjusted to the new addition: “Milo grabbed her muzzle recently and Lilly just smiled, with one bit of her lip raised like Elvis did, and then sauntered away.” This story was first published in InStyle in August 2012.


GET THE LOOK

Snow white walls and comfortab ble furniture covered in pale linens and leather create a neutral canvas, highlighting Deeley’s joyf yful jumble of sparkly mirrors, brass accents, and funky artwork.

Iron, brass, and glass Libations bar cart, Crate and Barrel, $599; crateandbarrel.com.

Recycled-paper y p p r Savannah Story y zebra bust,, Anthropologie, g $68; anthropologie.com. g

Recycled synthetic Zaer pillow, Lulu & Georgia, $76/22" x 14"; luluand georgia.com.

“I want my house to be like a diary. Your home should reflect your travels and your history.” —CAT DEELEY LEY

Porcelain Dora Maar vase, Jonathan Adler, $295; jonathan adler.com.

Wood, g glass, W and a d metal eta Hayworth lingerie chest, Pier 1 Imports, $500; pier1 .com.

Linen and birch Erin Cute as a Button bed, Cost Plus World Market, $500/queen; worldmarket.com.

Leather Channel sofa, Shine by S.H.O, $17,425; at Shine by S.H.O showroom, 949-643-1000.

Wood and glass Peacock mirror, RH, Restoration Hardware, $945–$1,195; rh.com. InST YLE HOM E & DESIGN 20 16

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SHE TRAVELS DOWN RUNWAYS AND AROUND THE WORLD, BUT DIANE VON FURSTENBERG NEVER STRAYS FROM HER IDYLLIC HOME IN THE COUNTRY FOR TOO LONG by HAL RUBENSTEIN photographed by JAMES MERRELL

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Her treasures from far-flung locales are proof that von Furstenberg “must shop everywhere.” The portrait above is from a Paris flea market, and the art nouveau vases come “from anywhere I can find them,” she says. Opposite page: A bronze Viennese art nouveau mirror, iron “coatracks” by Saint Clair Cemin, and an armored trunk from Morocco


Convinced that a library “should be filled with light and comfortable furniture,� von Furstenberg chose plush sofas, art deco chairs, and a dense pile rug with her initials (not visible here) woven into the design.

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I’VE GOT BOOKS SIGNED BY EVERYONE FROM DEEPAK CHOPRA TO NOVELIST SUSAN ISAACS, AND ALL MY DIARIES AND ALBUMS. MY ENTIRE LIFE IS IN THESE BOOKSHELVES.” — D I A N E VO N F U RS T E N B E RG


One of the designer’s favorite places to relax with a book is on an antique French daybed piled high with cushions. Here she’s pictured with her late Jack Russell terrier, Shannon. 32

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There’s fashion history in DVF’s master bathroom, and it’s not made of Carrara marble. The screen was created by one of Coco Chanel’s assistants out of strips of silk that once belonged to Chanel herself.

In her bedroom is the only small table in the house, a delicate 19th-century French piece she has paired with a modern swirl-back, three-footed brass chair by Salvador Dalí.

Big tables like this rustic wood slab by Nakashima “are my obsession, because I love spreading things out,” she says. “It’s a great way to zero in on the best ideas.”


n New York, Diane von Furstenberg sleeps in a glass-walled bedroom in an apartment atop her headquarters and flagship store smack in the middle of the West Side’s Meatpacking District, Manhattan’s mecca for everything new and everyone noisy. Through the windows you can hear trucks slamming against the cobblestone streets, and you note that the only trees in view are those planted up on the High Line, the former train tracks that have been miraculously transformed into an elevated park that necklaces the area. “It’s very exciting here; I love it,” says von Furstenberg, surveying the neighborhood she was instrumental in creating. “But as a place to be alone with your thoughts or the people you care about, it’s not exactly what nature had in mind.” Mother Nature, however, would probably declare her country home just this side of paradise. For in western Connecticut, along a road so winding, visitors always swear they’ve gone the wrong way, you come to a place that’s seductively sylvan. Even before getting out of your car, you’re trying to figure out ways to get the woman who’s welcoming you to let you stay longer. Frankly, if you pulled up to a log cabin lit by a handcranked generator, you still might never want to leave, since von Furstenberg is as celebrated for her beguiling charm as she is for fashioning one of retail’s greatest success stories, which started back in the ’70s with her now-legendary wrap dresses. The sprawling property, a vast landscape that beckons in every direction, reflects the creativity of its chief resident. You can head toward rows of roses and hydrangeas spilling into lobelia under massive willows and hemlocks. Or walk down to the lake by a stream that passes by a stone pool and tumbles over rocks into a waterfall. Beyond that are steep trails for hiking, which DVF (as everyone around her calls her) climbs virtually every day, sometimes with her husband, media titan Barry Diller, sometimes by herself. There’s a barn with chickens. And in the middle of this rambling yet brilliantly orchestrated Illyria stand two buildings: One is the property’s original 19th-century residence, which has been renovated to house the kitchen, living room, and bedrooms for children, friends, and guests. The other, a former barn, is now “my home, a must for me,” says von Furstenberg. “Welcome to my salon, my sanctuary, my archive, and my studio. This is my place to think and my place to dream.” Finding her dream now seems both predestined and serendipitous, she says. In November 1974, the young designer went to Farmington, Conn., to do a personal appearance at Lord & Taylor to introduce her wrap dress, and she fell in love with the area. “I was just separated from my first husband [Prince Egon von Furstenberg, the father of her two children, Alexandre and Tatiana]. I wanted to take my children to the country, and I hated the Hamptons,” she recalls. “I went into a phone booth and

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asked Information for a real estate broker, who brought me here while it was raining. I drove up the driveway and said, ‘OK, I’ll give you a deposit.’ ” On New Year’s Eve, von Furstenberg’s birthday, the house was hers. “Besides my children, this house is the most consistent part of my life and the best thing I have ever done for myself.” Her haven is a spirited mix of the divinely lush, intriguingly discordant, and comfortably pragmatic. A huge Nakashima table that could be freshly milled from a backyard tree sits on a carpet that is a Mondrian-like collage of her initials. Across from it are French art deco chairs and a sofa inspired by ones used in the apartment of the legendary fashion editor Diana Vreeland. Books, glass vases, and flowers are always within reach, and furniture is arranged in ways to encourage conversation. The light is glorious in every room, each one filled with her favorite things. “I don’t understand why anyone would want to live with furniture that isn’t comfortable, or display something they have no personal history with or emotional attachment to,” says von Furstenberg. The accumulation of so much that means so much to her creates a very personal environment—and a bit of a problem. “On one hand, this place is blessed with some of life’s great luxuries—silence, nature, and space,” says the designer. “On the other hand, unlike some of the men in my life, I don’t throw anything I love away. I have a library with all of my diaries and albums, and a basement with shelves of every ad campaign and photos of each collection I’ve ever done. There’s an armoire with nothing but signed books by authors. I have an unfortunate weakness for beautiful furniture that kicks in especially when I travel, and I travel all the time. I have no more room to put anything, so now I only allow myself to rearrange things.” Still, transporting a massive desk from a faraway land doesn’t compare to the task of taking a brand that a decade ago fell into near obscurity and nurturing it back to life. “After I sold my company in the mid-’80s, I ran away and lived in Paris,” recalls the Belgian-born designer. “But when I came home I realized my identity was as connected to my work as it was to my family, and the label had become dusty and unworthy of respect. It made me lose confidence, and without confidence, you are nothing. Slowly, I bought back my licenses. And then I discovered QVC. No one I knew thought it was a good idea then, but my gut told me that it was the future.” Trust yourself—it’s one of her strongest beliefs and a secret to her fulfillment. “If I’ve taught my children anything, it’s that you must find ways to empower and nourish yourself. This home feeds my soul. This ground is mine. I’ll be buried here. Fashion is a wonderful but crazy world. But when I come here, I remember I’ve given my family a happy life. That’s all anyone wants.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in September 2010.


GET THE LOOK

Comfort is king in von Furstenbeerg’s bucolic Connecticut escape. Eclectic finds from her global C t travels, books, and famiily photos make it a living catalogue off her experiences. p

Feather Juju hat, L’Aviva Home, $595/30"; lavivahome.com.

Solid brass Leda Armchair sculpture, Salvador Dalí, $36,870; ddcnyc.com.

Cashmere Solid throws, Williams-Sonoma Home, $249 each; williams-sonoma.com.

“I have an unfortunate weakness for beautiful furniturre tthat kicks in especially when I travel.”

Tin Lara mirror, Made Goods, $550/20" x 28"; mecox.com.

—DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

Solid redwood slab and brass Live Edge desk, Arhaus, $9,499/108"; arhaus.com.

Leather and aluminum Egg chair and ottoman, Fritz Hansen, $17,422; dwr .com.

Polypropylene Patchwork area rug, Kalora, $254/5'3" x 7'7"; wayfair.com.

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F E AT U R I N G L I S A P E R RY TO RY B U RC H JENNIFER FISHER I S A AC M I Z R A H I

It’s hardly a new conceit: New York fashion designers often credit the city’s overthe-top energy with fueling their creations. Their homes, tucked inside that constant visual swirl, tell the story of what inspires them most. “When people who only know about my fashion come here, they say, ‘Oh, now I get it!’ ” says Lisa Perry of her op art–filled Manhattan penthouse, profiled on p. 38. Check out the urban dwellings of fashion’s brightest lights on these next few pages—and prepare to “get it.” 36

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TO FIND INSPIRATION FOR HER COLORFUL CLOTHING LINE, LISA PERRY NEED ONLY LOOK WITHIN HER WOWWORTHY MANHATTAN APARTMENT: POP ART MASTERPIECES GRACE HER WALLS AND TERRACE, REFLECTING A PASSIONATE LIFESTYLE AS BOLD AS HER FASHION by SARAH MEDFORD photographed by

JASON SCHMIDT styled by

ALI PEW

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“Pop art is silly—in a good way. Giant cutout lips are fun!” says Perry. “People say the same thing about my clothing, so it all ties together.” Here, a Tom Wesselmann painting called Mouth #1 hangs on the wall near a custom-made dining table and tangerine Cappellini chairs. Clothing, worn throughout, Lisa Perry. Gianvito Rossi shoes. Painting © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/VAGA, New York, NY.


I LIKE SERENE-LOOKING ROOMS WITHOUT A LOT OF NOISE OR CLUTTER.” — L I S A P E R RY

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“[Interior designer] Tony Ingrao had said, ‘You have to keep the original fireplace in the living room.’ It was white marble and beautiful. But then we found Interior with Built-In Bar by Roy Lichtenstein [1991, © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein] and it was ‘Bye-bye, fireplace!’” says Perry. “When you find a piece of art for a space, in the end, the art wins.”

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“The kitchen is my favorite room to hang out in because it’s light and bright,” says Perry. The table by Maria Pergay is based on a collection from the ’60s, when the French furniture designer started working with stainless steel.

One of Perry’s closets has an open design that doubles as a showcase for vintage finds.

“I love colorblocking,” says Perry. “I started seeing it as a fun way to do the library.” Even her books are organized by shade.


hen fashion designer Lisa Perry was house hunting more than a decade ago, she toured a penthouse on New York’s pedigreed Sutton Place. “It was about as oldworld as it could get,” she says. “Dark paneling everywhere, two ballrooms—it looked like a mini Versailles.” As resolutely new-world Manhattanites, Perry and her financier husband, Richard Perry, didn’t connect with it, until they took in the view from the encircling terrace: Chrysler Building, Empire State Building, 59th Street Bridge—here was the modern Gotham they loved. They closed on their new home in 2000, did a gut renovation soon after, and in 2007 contributed to the view with Diamond (Green), a ring sculpted in glittering stainless steel by artist Jeff Koons. It now rests like some celestial meteorite on the couple’s terrace. Talk about “if you like it, put a ring on it.” Even such high-wattage art can’t outshine Perry herself, whose buoyant personality is as vibrant as the ’60sstyle cuts and colors of her dresses—looks that have become favorites for Karlie Kloss, Jennifer Lopez, Lupita Nyong’o, Katy Perry, and even Hillary Clinton. “When I design, I focus on words like ‘confident,’ ‘comfortable,’ ‘timeless,’ and ‘authentic,’” says Perry, whose positivity and energy are contagious. In 2006, besotted with the vintage looks she had long collected and worn, Perry turned her style interests into a business that keeps revealing shiny new facets with each season. In recent years she has added home accessories, swimwear, a children’s line, and evening gowns. “I live and breathe it,” she says of her fashion brand. “The ’60s were a forwardlooking time, so in my designs, women feel modern.” Dressed down in skinny Levi’s, one of her boxy colorblock tops, and Louboutin stilettos, Perry clicks across the white marble floors of her apartment past an Andy Warhol Colored Campbell’s Soup Can painting from 1965, the first pop art piece she and Richard bought together. “When people who only know about my fashion come here, they say, ‘Oh, now I get it!’” she says gleefully of her and her husband’s shared enthusiasm for ’60s-era art, architecture, and design. The Perrys are justifiably proud of the bluechip painting and sculpture collection they have built, which mixes pop art with pop-influenced contemporary works. But it’s the showstopping setting for the art that gives the couple’s home its air of futuristic cool. A custom low-rise sofa and contemporary furniture classics from Cappellini, Saporiti Italia, and others are arrayed with iconic European discoveries against mostly snowy walls, whose finishes range from matte to auto-body slick.

“I choose white for almost everything. I could never have a pink closet, for example,” says the designer, who grew up in suburban Chicago with midcentury-modern décor and color (“Our living room had yellow shag carpeting!”). Her mom ran an art gallery, and her dad, who was in the textile business, became a passionate Sunday painter. “He would put the canvas on the floor just like Jackson Pollock,” Perry recalls. “He was very cool.” Fashion was an early focus, and she came to Manhattan to study at the Fashion Institute of Technology. After meeting her husband and starting a family (the Perrys have twins, a daughter and a son who are 30), she took a studio in SoHo and started painting, which eventually led her back to clothing. “I was in my 40s, with my own sense of style,” Perry says. “I wanted something that everyone else didn’t have. So I made it myself.” Today Perry has plenty to wear, though you would never know it from the gleaming white box she inhabits. By now she is used to being asked how she lives with such minimal décor. “I think it’s easy! But Richard and I are really, really neat,” she admits. “Our twins are grown up now, and we’re not pet people. Besides, I don’t like stuff. My kids have said to me, ‘Mom, why don’t you have more things around—you know, family photos and mementos?’” She laughs, eyeing the color-coded bowls of candy and the books shelved neatly by hue that surround her in the library. The apartment’s lack of stuff is a blessing when it’s time to entertain, something the couple loves to do often. At one dinner party to introduce a limited-edition dress collection inspired by Robert Indiana’s artwork, she served food that pays homage to the state of Indiana: grilledcheese sandwiches on Wonder Bread, tomato soup with an Original Kettlecorn garnish, and a Hoosier sugarcream pie for dessert. At a dinner for Koons in 2012, she decorated the tables with balloon animals. She boasts that the oval-shaped sofa in the living room can seat about 40 for cocktails, like the wheelhouse of a yacht on a happy-hour cruise. When guests move into the dining room, however, the scene shifts to dry land—and a velvety black box outfitted with a large round table, neon orange chairs, and a billion-dollar view. “At night the bridge and the city are all glittering, and it feels like you’re on a movie set,” says Perry. “It’s very cinematic.” While the view outside is awe-inducing, the designer confesses she favors the inspiration inside, on her walls. “Warhol, Lichtenstein, Koons, Indiana—these guys are my touchstones,” Perry says with a smile. “I could do a hundred collections without leaving my house.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in September 2014.

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A Jeff Koons sculpture shines bright on the terrace. Diamond (Green), 1994–2005, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 78" x 87" x 87", © Jeff Koons.


GET THE LOOK

I a home In h th t’ as sophis that’s histicated as its owners, bold graphic shapes against expanses of glossy white telegraph a passion for color and w nd form.

International Klein Blue pigment, glass, plexiglass, and steel coffee table, Yves Klein, $21,000; at Artware Editions, 212-463-7490.

P Powder-coated iron Peacock chair with P w leatherr cushions, Bend Goods, $1,000; shop.bend goods.com. Cotton Damien Hirst Spot tea towel, Other Criteria, $20; gagosian.com/shop.

“Warhol, Lichtenstein, Koons, Indiana—these guys are my touchstones.” —LISA PERRY

Wood Shadow Lines place mat, Tisch New York, $49; tischnewyork.com.

Small Flowers wallpaper, Flavor Paper x Andy Warhol, $300/24" x 21' roll; flavor paper.com.

© Damien Hirst & Science Ltd. 2016

Cotton and polyester Norsborg sofa, Ikea, $579; ikea.com.

Lambswool striped throw, Arthur Arbesser for Hem, $149; hem.com.

Roy Lichtenstein, by Gianni Mercurio, Skira, $36; amazon.com.


The library, the unofficial center of Burch’s home, showcases her signature mix of exuberant prints. Opposite page: The designer in her dining room.

IN THE NEW YORK LUXURY HOTEL THAT SHE CALLS HOME, DESIGNER TORY BURCH TAKES A CASUAL APPROACH TO SPLENDOR—IDEAL FOR THREE SKATEBOARDING SONS AND A LIFE OF ENTERTAINING by HAL RUBENSTEIN photographed by FRANÇOIS HAL ARD styled by KUSUM LYNN


All clothing and shoes, her own. InST YLE HOM E & DESIG N 20 16

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The dining alcove is a clever combination of two celebrated designers. It features an adaptation of a Billy Baldwin print (in his favorite Matisse blue) and a classic ’50s Eero Saarinen Tulip table.


“Emerald green makes a great backdrop for Tory’s Ming porcelain,” says her interior designer, Daniel Romualdez. Even more striking: the Yves Klein gold leaf and plexiglass table that separates two white sofas.

The remodeled kitchen is another popular hub. “The kids hang out here, since they’re always hungry,” says Burch, who loves the spacious layout. “One key to entertaining is having enough room to be organized.”

Burch collects antique Imari porcelain, a translucent china from Japan notable for its vibrant cobalt blue and iron red enamels. “I caught the urge to collect it from my mother,” says Burch. “The dining room was designed around it.”

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t all seems so stately when you first walk into designer Tory Burch’s New York apartment in the Pierre hotel. The marble-floored foyer flanked by wood-paneled walls and topped by a coffered ceiling leads to one plush salon after another, each anchored by tables laden with art books and vases of fragrant flowers. It’s shelter-magazine material except ... there’s a full drum kit in a corner of the expansive entryway. And near the Ming vases is a plexiglass table filled with curls of gold leaf. But those aren’t the only elements that take you by surprise. In every room of the single-floor, Georgian-inspired home, there is something decidedly and wildly off, which is precisely what makes Burch’s 7,000-square-foot apartment so much fun to explore. “I always fantasized about Tracy Lord’s home in The Philadelphia Story—it was so serene and grand,” she says. “But it’s so much easier to live that way when you exist in a movie.” For one thing, Katharine Hepburn’s character in the classic film didn’t run a skyrocketing fashion business built on a keen eye for lively prints and eclectic colors and a canny way of making T-shirts work for evening and sequins for daytime. The fictional role model also didn’t have three boys who live to skateboard—everywhere. Nor did she grow up mad for one particular color. “I always wanted an orange bedroom when I was a little girl but never got one,” says Burch. “My favorite color combination was plum and orange.” With a sensibility like that, there’s no way that her apartment’s décor was likely to follow the traditional rules for a Fifth Avenue residence. “When I first met Tory she gave off the air of a perfect lady,” recalls architect Daniel Romualdez, Burch’s decorator and friend. “But she was always wearing Helmut Lang or someone equally edgy. So when it came time to do her apartment, how could we possibly follow a straight line? Quirkiness had to be an essential, if subtle, ingredient.” Actually, maintaining straight lines would have been nearly impossible, considering the home is an amalgam of three hotel suites and a hallway acquired over the years by the designer and her then-husband, veteran retailer Chris Burch. “Daniel and I planned the layout on a napkin over dinner one night 17 years ago,” says Burch, “and then we added on piece by piece as the spaces became available.” Their plan was not unduly influenced by Burch’s affection for the old-world charm of the glamorous hotel she calls home. “We gutted the place completely,” Burch says. “There isn’t a doorknob we didn’t replace. You wouldn’t see a marble floor as graphic as this in an old apartment. “I wanted a kitchen big enough for my boys, my girls”— she has three stepdaughters—“and their friends to hang out in. And because I love to entertain, I wanted to be able to do that both formally and informally,” she says.

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I’M A RELAXED PERSON. I DON’T STRESS OUT. HOPEFULLY, YOU SENSE THAT WHEN YOU’RE HERE, BECAUSE THINGS AREN’T PERFECT, BUT THEY’RE COMFORTABLE.” - TO RY B U RC H A semicircular floor plan allows the rooms used most often for entertaining to gracefully open and flow into one another. Distinct wall colors define each room—a brilliant yellow orange for the library, emerald green for the sitting room—and blend together in spectacular fashion. “These are the colors I see when I look out my window onto Central Park,” says Burch. “They’re so lovely, especially in the fall when the leaves turn. So I took the cue.” That touch of nature and an abundance of scented candles contribute to the comfortable mood of the whole apartment, despite the grandeur of 18th- and 19thcentury portraits and antique artifacts basking in the amber glow of silk-hatted swing lamps. “I’m not going to banish my kids from a room to preserve its purity or reserve one room just for company,” Burch says. “I entertain a lot, but this house is for my family. The boys do their homework on the Saarinen table, and we all curl up on the big sofa and leopard chairs in the library to watch movies. I don’t care if the kids jump up and down on the sofa. There isroomforeveryonehere—andeveryone’staste,”sheadds. “Sometimes the music you hear when we’re home is hiphop, and sometimes it’s Bing Crosby. Well, that’s also because I’m obsessed with playlists—I have so many.” Burch’s compulsion for collecting is plain for all to see, as the rooms are filled with finds from sources as diverse as the William Doyle Galleries, 1stdibs, and decorator Liz O’Brien’s formidable website (lizobrien.com). But clearly her biggest preoccupation is with the color orange. The shade painted on the dining room walls is so brightly lacquered, you can practically see if your makeup needs a touch-up. “The glow is glorious,” Burch says with a sigh. “It makes me so happy. I could eat in here every night, but I can’t get the kids out of the kitchen.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in March 2011.


GET THE LOOK

Burch loves sumptuous fabrics and high-gloss walls. But her special sauce comes f from h her arttist’s eye for color and the occasional oddball flourrish.

Limoges porcelain gold–plated Cristobal Marine dessert plate, Raynaud, $129; jungleeny.com.

Steel and vintage g brass Antiqued d Metal Drum pendant lamp lamp, RH, Restoration Hardware, $425/19½" x 9¼"; rh.com.

“My taste is so varied that I havee no o m master plan. Plus, I keep k lookingg for m more because you caan always makee rroom for somethin ng wonderfull.”” — O —TORY BUR U CH

797 Madison candle, Tory y Burch, $68; toryburch.com. y

Laminate a ate and a d aluminum oval v l Saarinen dining g table,, Knoll,, $5,233/78"; , ; knoll.com. o co .

Limoges porcelain,, 24kt gold, and g d crocodile Rectangug lar box, L’Objet, j $235; l-objet.com. j .

Italian ta a linen e Chain a Embroidered place mat, p Bella Lino,, $44;; bellalino.com. be a o co C Cotton and d viscose S l d T Scalamandre Tiger pillow (cover only), Williams-Sonoma Home, $249/22" x 14"; wshome.com.

Crystal Pedestal obelisk, Bliss Home and Design, $139/16"; blisshomeand design.com.


CHAINS OF

DON’T LET THE CLEAN LINES AND BEIGE TONES FOOL YOU: JUST ABOUT EVERY OBJECT IN RED-HOT JEWELRY DESIGNER JENNIFER FISHER’S DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN LOFT TELLS A STORY OF A LIFE VIBRANT WITH LAUGHTER, CREATIVITY, AND A PARADE OF AMAZING MEALS (HAVE YOU SEEN HER INSTAGRAM?) by ERIC WILSON photographed by DEAN K AUFMAN styled by ALI PEW


“This library is a hodgepodge of my life,” says Fisher about one of the home’s central seating areas. The leather sofa and Arteriors Home chain-link lamps are from an old showroom; the wool zebra rug is from Diane von Furstenberg for The Rug Company. Opposite page: Fisher relaxes in her bedroom. The Row sweater, pants, and belt. Jenni Kayne mule slides. All jewelry, worn throughout (except wedding ring), Jennifer Fisher.

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WHEN I WAS YOUNGER AND GOT MY FIRST PAYCHECK, I DIDN’T WANT TO BUY BAGS AND SHOES— I WANTED TO COLLECT PHOTOGRAPHY.” — JENNIFER FISHER


“As a kid, I went to cooking class after school for a year and learned how to make all the basic things you need to get around the kitchen,” says Fisher. “It relaxes me.” A brunch specialty she loves: chocolate chip pancakes. Go to instyle .com/pancakes for the recipe. On Shane: Clothing, his own. Nike sneakers. On Kevin: Steven Alan shirt. Adidas Originals sneakers. Jeans and ring, his own. On Drew: Dolce & Gabbana Children’s dress and mary janes. Bracelet, worn throughout, her own. On Jennifer: Dolce & Gabbana dress. Paul Andrew pumps.


A modern white steel Ping-Pong table by RS Barcelona doubles as the family’s dining room table. “The net comes off,” Fisher explains with a laugh. On Kevin: Rag & Bone pullover. All other clothing, his own. On Jennifer: Rosie Assoulin top. Gucci jeans. Eyeglasses, her own. On Shane: Crewcuts by J.Crew T-shirt. On Drew: Little Marc Jacobs dress.

ennifer Fisher changes apartments like she changes jewelry—with a great deal of style, that is, and as often as possible. “I love to move,” says the indemand accessories designer, who happens to be in her fourth home since coming to New York 16 years ago. This one is a full-floor, 4,100square-foot loft in TriBeCa with plenty of living space for Fisher; her husband, Kevin; two delightfully engaging children, Drew, 9, and Shane, 11; and Tito, a Brussels griffon named after the Texas brand of vodka. Growing up in Santa Barbara, Fisher became accustomed to moving a lot; one of her father’s hobbies was renovating and flipping lavish Spanish estates in the horse country of Montecito. Once, in her teenage years, she was forced to leave behind a beautiful bedroom with walls she had painstakingly plastered with clippings from fashion magazines. (Fun fact: Jane Seymour later bought that house and kept the wallpaper intact for her daughter.) “I don’t get attached to things,” Fisher says. “Besides my family, and maybe my photographs.” As the elevator doors open directly into the apartment, this trait becomes abundantly clear. A leather couch covered in fur throws faces a modern stone fireplace that is almost entirely hidden by a collection of contemporary photography—portraits,fashioneditorials,andlandscapes

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by artists as diverse as René Burri, Arthur Elgort, Dennis Hopper, and Bruce Weber. This is the kind of open downtown loft that Fisher had dreamed about when she thought of moving to New York, a home where the only real walls are the ones between bedrooms and bathrooms. “There’s something about the feeling you get when you go from the street to the elevator and then step right into your home—you can’t get that anywhere but here,” she says. “You can be in the kitchen and yell and everyone will hear you. Since I’m a mother, that’s great.” For such a large space, it is also surprisingly intimate, probably a result of Fisher’s ability to turn any room into a warm, inviting place. There are touches of her humor throughout—a large ant sculpture, or a gold skull placed on top of a pile of art books, or the portrait by David LaChapelle that hangs next to the Saarinen dining table (it’s an image of Angelina Jolie in which, Fisher points out conspiratorially, Jolie’s Billy Bob tattoo is still visible on her left shoulder). When we sit for a chat over a bottle of rosé on a sunny afternoon, Tito, wearing one of the designer’s signature gold-chain necklaces instead of a dog collar, makes himself at home on a visitor’s lap, though he has his pick of comfortable spots. “I wanted to make sure we had a space where we could clean things up easily and hang out without feeling like we had to worry about anything,” Fisher says. Animal-print rugs, for instance, are good at hiding stains. And the Montauk Sofa couches have been reupholstered in a cuddly fabric so soft, it would not be out of place in the wardrobe


Interior designer (and close friend) Michelle Gerson designed throw pillows with the family initials in the same gothic typeface Fisher uses in some of her edgier designs.

of a teddy bear. A large ottoman made of python-printed pleather was custom-designed with padded edges by Fisher’s friend Michelle Gerson, an interior designer who collaborated on both her home and her showroom. “She’s my rock and roll client,” Gerson says. “You can give Jen a bag of garbage and she’ll make it look cool.” Her interest in photography, Fisher explains, started during the 12 years she worked as a stylist on the West Coast for television shows and commercials. Each image tells a story, like a portrait of Lenny Kravitz by Cliff Watts that was taken on a day when Fisher happened to visit the photo set. Nearby hangs a large-scale version of Kate in Jail, one of the last prints made by the artist Sam Haskins, whose photography books were hugely influential on the fashion industry, before his death in 2009. “It’s my life in pictures,” Fisher says of her collection. “I have distinct memories of every single photograph.” There is an obvious parallel to Fisher’s jewelry designs. Her first big hit was a customizable necklace inspired by the mementos of a charm bracelet like the one her parents gaveherandstrungwithtrinketsfromtheirtravelsaround the world. She designed the first one to commemorate the birthofherson,Shane,afteryearsoftryingtoconceiveand struggling through a life-threatening scare—chemotherapy treatments for a desmoid tumor that had once made having children seem impossible. Fisher engraved Shane’s name on a dog tag and wore it on a heavy gold chain. “I was still working at 3 in the morning, and I looked down at that necklace and thought, ‘What am I doing

here?’ ” Fisher recalls. Noticing how many of her friends were asking for similar looks, Kevin, who was working in finance, encouraged her to start a business, which she did from their bedroom, about 11 years ago. Her daughter Drew arrived two years later. And last year, Kevin left his job as a managing director at the investment banking firm Jefferies to become the consulting president of the Jennifer Fisher brand. Fisher herself shows no sign of slowing down. She recently expanded her business to include jewelry for men, and one day she may venture into home décor—a reflection of her passion for cooking. Her current designs for women alternate between fine jewelry and a more moderately priced brass collection. Both lines offer sophisticated and unapologetically daring pieces that are almost like sculptural talismans. Rihanna was one of her first customers, choosing some of the more provocative pieces: a snake ring coiling across two fingers and a three-pronged choker that grasps the neck like a diamond-encrusted claw. “No one has exactly the same look because everyone layersthepiecesdifferently,”Fishersays.“Jewelryislikeyour armor. Personalizing it gives you strength and power.” The same holds true, she says, with the home, where “your taste, your clothing, the way you dress your children and even your dog—it’s all part of making your stamp on the world.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in September 2015.

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“Our bedroom is my quiet zone—plush and white and serene,” says Fisher.

A round table adorned with flowers greets guests at the loft’s entrance.

MARILYN MONROE: THE LAST SITTING, 1962 (YELLOW CROSS) © ESTATE OF BERT STERN, COURTESY STALEY-WISE GALLERY

A Marilyn Monroe print from Bert Stern’s 1962 The Last Sitting series hangs just inside the master bedroom.


GET THE LOOK

Artwork and animal prints mixed with chilled-outt neutrals strike the perfect balance in Fisher’s downtow wn loft.. Iron and linen Chain floor lamp, Arteriors Home, $912; lampsplus.com.

Cotton and linen Indig ndigo di 5/15" x pillow, St. Frank, $195 m. 15";; stfrank.com.

Musk + Smoke candle e e, L Feu F de d l’Eau, l’E $65 Le $65;; lefeudeleau.com.

Steel and cotton Sayulita chair, CB2, $349; cb2.com.

“There’s so much color in my day-to-day. I like to come home to a natural palette.”

Limoges porcelain and 24kt gold Lapis vase, L���Objet, $375; l-objet .com.

—JENNIFER FISHER Faux-fur Threshold blanket, Target, $40; target.com.

Glass and d d fiberboard d Mongstad mirror, 0;; Ikea, $100; at Ikea.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, by Dieter Buchhart et al., Hatje Cantz Verlag, $65; barnesand noble.com.

Hand-knotted Tibetan wool Funky Zebra rug, Diane von Furstenberg for The Rug Company, $6,156/9' x 6' or $114/square foot; therug company.com.

Steel and MDF Ping-Pong conference table, Poppin, $2,999; poppin.com.

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WHAT’S THE SMARTEST WAY TO GIVE A BRIGHT WHITE APARTMENT PERSONAL FLAIR? FOR DESIGNER ISAAC MIZRAHI, IT STARTS WITH A BIG, COLORFUL LIFE by ERIC WILSON photographed by DEAN K AUFMAN

Isaac Mizrahi and his husband, Arnold Germer, created their sprawling N.Y.C. home by combining three small units. “It’s hard to find a big apartment in our neighborhood,” says Mizrahi.


A gilt-framed 17th-century Flemish portrait by an unknown artist (left) faces a Tomory Dodge painting in Mizrahi’s study. Antique chairs have been refinished with fabrics from the designer’s ready-to-wear collections.

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“I’ve always loved the idea of an eat-in kitchen,” says Mizrahi, describing the marble and stainlesssteel space. He also managed to install an electric stove, a rarity in older Manhattan buildings.

The guest bathroom is mirrored from floor to ceiling with a translucent vanity that appears to pulse with violet hues when the room is lit.

A spa-like master bath features a step-in rain shower and a marble tub with built-ins for towel storage.

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A heady array of sketches, photos, and paintings animates the walls of Mizrahi’s bedroom. An abstract autumnal forest scene by Viennabased artist Benjamin Butler hangs over the couch. “I love his feeling for color,” Mizrahi says.

Personal touches include Annie Leibovitz’s portrait of Mizrahi’s pal Mark Morris.

Mizrahi organizes his closet by item, with bright pops of color peeking out from the dressshirt section. One reason he’s lived in Greenwich Village so long: “The idea of changing dry cleaners is abhorrent. After all these years of getting it wrong, he finally gets it right.”


n Isaac Mizrahi’s nightstand in the master bedroom of his Greenwich Village home of the past 25 years, along with several other books and a crystal-encrusted turtle that he designed, is a copy of Henry VI. The play is generally considered one of Shakespeare’s lesser works, and yet the designer is slogging through all three parts, his curiosity stoked after engaging a tutor on the Bard. “What are you reading?” Mizrahi asks with genuine interest from his perch in the adjacent study, the perfect place for enjoying a good story. As it happens, I have just downloaded Act One, the 1959 autobiography of the playwright Moss Hart, after learning Terrence McNally included it on a list of books he would take with him if he were to be marooned on a desert island. “The greatest book!” Mizrahi booms. “In. The. World! “You know, I was friends with Kitty Carlisle,” he says of the legendary Broadway doyenne who was Hart’s widow. “She had the most unbelievable apartment. In. The. World. It was so un–art directed, so not bourgeois. Just these crazy old rooms filled with antiques, velvet pulls, and crochet, as if she had just moved in and put books on the shelves. We should all live like that! It doesn’t hurt to have Gershwin sheet music on the piano, written in his own hand.” Somehow, I am not surprised to have found a fellow theater lover in Mizrahi, a neighborhood fixture who lives with his husband, Arnold Germer, and their aging mutt, Dean, a beagle mix, in an apartment that merits a bit of hyperbole of its own. Actually, “hyperpersonal” is how one of fashion’s greatest showmen describes the décor, which results from having lived in the same place for so many years. Originally a one-bedroom, it has been joined with two neighboring apartments to create a fabulous 4,000-square-foot showplace. Several floors below is the office space for his production company, Isaac Mizrahi Entertainment; for his TV, film, and theater projects; and for meeting with designers for his fashion collections. There is no stage, nor apartment, too expansive for Mizrahi to fill—especially when he has company. Scene: One fine day in 2001, Mizrahi is walking down Fifth Avenue. Germer, who has recently moved to the city from California, is walking uptown. Their eyes meet. “It was like a complete gay legend,” Mizrahi says. “We hit it off. And then we had a date. And that was it.” Only that was not it. In the wake of 9/11, they clung together, perhaps a little too tightly, and then they broke up. Germer moved to Santa Fe. He lived there about four years before returning to New York, where the duo carefully rekindled their friendship. They married four years ago in a simple civil ceremony at City Hall, around the

same time that they completed the current renovation with architect David Bers, bringing together two personalities in ways that are both seamless and intentionally separate. As in their bedrooms. “I think that’s very civilized,” Mizrahi says. “The fact that I don’t sleep well has always been such a sensitive part of my life. So I think it’s best not to test the waters. I sleep better now. It even brings us closer, but if we have kids, that might not continue to be an option.” Mizrahi’s favorite room is the study next to his bedroom, with a fireplace, a wall of books, and a couch covered with a blanket emblazoned with a photo of Dean. He bought it on QVC, the network where the designer appears regularly, selling his enormously popular beauty and fashion products while playing up a carefully cultivated air of arch drama (his calling card since the 1995 documentary Unzipped made him famous). His persona is a cross between high culture and high camp, reflected in illustrations around the apartment by Cecil Beaton alongside a photograph of Sandra Bernhard by Albert Watson and, incongruously, a classic 17th-century Flemish portrait that caught the designer’s eye because the subject so closely resembles his late psychiatrist. The choreographer Mark Morris, a close friend, appears in an Annie Leibovitz photograph in Mizrahi’s bedroom, where there’s also an illustration of Germer and the dogs by Maira Kalman, his neighbor and the Mary to his Rhoda. On the mantel in the living room is a small George Hoyningen-Huene portrait of Gypsy Rose Lee displayed next to a flea-market miniature bust of Julius Caesar and a souvenir figurine of Pope Francis— “just a happy trio,” the designer says. And yet everything here seems to have a deeper meaning, or memory, attached to it, like the piano he bought two decades ago at auction, a meticulously restored 1930s Steinway with real ivory keys. The sheet music on it is a selection of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti. “I’m not worthy of this instrument,” Mizrahi says. “Someday a real pianist will play it.” Such introspection is significant because he is currently at work on his own memoir, about a young boy from Brooklyn who makes it big-time in fashion, acquiring many colorful friends and stories along the way, not to mention a deluxe apartment in Greenwich Village. He inevitably begins this chapter—the tale of how he chose his home—with what his mother always told him: If you want to stay young, you move to the Village. “When I first moved in, it was so beautiful because there was nothing in it,” he says. “I swear I want to put everything into storage and get rid of it all. I want a big, open room with only the piano so I can do whatever I want. Isn’t that the best luxury? Just plain nothing space? In New York City, it is.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in March 2016.

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THE DINNERS THAT I’VE LOVED MOST HAVE BEEN AT THE KITCHEN TABLE WITH MY MOM, MY HUSBAND, OR MAIRA [KALMAN]—NOT THE ONES WITH CATERERS AND WAITERS.” - I S A AC M I Z R A H I

Mizrahi worked with architect David Bers to design a kitchen with a built-in dining area in his sun-drenched apartment. “We spend a lot of time at this table,” Mizrahi says.


GET THE LOOK

A pleasing g blend of framed art, floral patterns, soft jewel tones, and oh-so-many gloorious books gives Mizrahi’s home a comfortable, refined vibe.

Stoneware pitcher, Sir/Madam, $135; shopsir madam.com. Polished nickel Lydney pendant lamp, Hudson Valley Lighting, $399; foundrylighting.com.

Spring Morning print on archival paper, Meredith Aitken, $20/7.6" x 7.6" (unframed); artfullywalls.com.

“I just collect things I really like and that somehow look good together. ‘Hyperpersonal’ is how I’d describe my style.”

Velour and linen Berlingot pillows, Iosis for Yves Delorme, $95/17" x 17" each; usa.yvesdelorme.com.

—ISAAC MIZRAHI

Iron and glass Nicolina coffee table, Lulu & Georgia, $526; luluandgeorgia.com.

Wool and bamboo Murray Watercolor rug, Kate Spade New York, $4,785/5' x 8'; katespade.com.

Polyester Haydon sofa, Lillian August for Hickory White, $4,498; lillianaugust.com. InST YLE HOM E & DESIGN 20 16

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F E AT U R I N G TO M M Y H I L F I G E R K E L LY W E A R S T L E R A M B E R VA L L E T TA

“You sleep well hearing the sound of the waves,” says white-hot interior designer Kelly Wearstler of the restorative effect of her Malibu haven, featured on p. 78 as part of our tribute to coastal glamour. “Time slows down here, and the day kind of stumbles upon itself.” These covetable homes take their settings very seriously, inviting the colors and textures of the outdoors inside for a seamless communion with the ocean and sky. 68

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AS RUSTIC AS IT IS ISOLATED, THE CARIBBEAN ISLAND OF MUSTIQUE TAKES EXTRA EFFORT TO GET TO. BUT ONCE YOU ARRIVE AT TOMMY HILFIGER’S OCEANFRONT HOME—A CROSS BETWEEN A BRITISH COLONIAL MANSION AND A PLANTATION—YOU FORGET ABOUT THE TRIP AND DREAM ABOUT STAYING THERE FOREVER by HAL RUBENSTEIN photographed by JASON SCHMIDT styled by MORGAN PILCHER

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The island’s largest palm grove frames the entrance amid climbing jasmine and locally quarried blue-stone paths.


I WANTED SOMETHING CHIC, BUT IT HAD TO BE IN HARMONY WITH ITS SURROUNDINGS.” - TO M M Y H I L F I G E R

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“A real vacation takes you away from your worries,” says Dee Ocleppo Hilfiger, pictured here with her husband, Tommy Hilfiger, on their bedroom balcony. “We wake up every morning to a view that does just that.”

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The stone and marble foyer appears formal, but “kids rule around here,” says Tommy. “Plus, it’s still a beach house—all the surfaces can be washed, swept, or hosed.” The shell mirror on the far wall was crafted by a local artisan.

An ornate convex mirror hangs above a group of tortoise shells.

Hurricane lanterns embellished with ceramic coral sit on an oval Chippendale table in the dining room. “Each room is a mix of Victorian, Regency, and a little kitsch,” says Tommy.


f you’re the kind of person who can thrive without a timetable, then welcome to Mustique!” says Tommy Hilfiger, who first started coming to this small island in the Grenadines more than 25 years ago. You’ll want to switch off your cell phone and disconnect from civilization as soon as you pass through the wood-and-thatched customs terminal and catch a glimpse of the wonders beyond. On the way to the designer’s estate there is no stopping for a red light—in fact, there are none on any of the roads. You do, however, pass Mustique’s one grocery store, a restaurant, two bars, and its most prominent hotel (really more of a guesthouse). Occasional traffic tie-ups occur when members of the island’s large turtle population cross the street at their predictably deliberate speed, unless—as most of the locals do—you get out of your car and pick one up yourself to gently move it along. Tommy and his wife, Dee Ocleppo Hilfiger, find the slow pace addictive. “I fell in love with the island the first time Tommy brought me here,” says Dee, riding next to Tommy in an open-air Jeep. “To me it means no makeup, no dress code, no shoes, and no imperative to be anywhere.” For others, though, the Mustique mystique takes a bit of attitude adjustment. “We warn friends when they come here not to be disappointed that there are no Prada or Gucci boutiques, no nightlife, no duty-free malls,” says the designer. “You can’t even buy clothes by Tommy Hilfiger here.” Once privately owned by Scottish nobleman and ’60s bon vivant Lord Glenconner (aka Colin Tennant), Mustique now operates like an exclusive country club, albeit one that has no need for a golf course, slips for yachts, or a dock for visiting cruise ships. The British West Indies island holds 100 homes, and nearly every one of them sports a name—Point Lookout, Stargroves, Clonsilla—and many have been lived in by notables including Mick Jagger and the Guinness family, who all cherish the absence of paparazzi and busloads of tourists. Architectural styles vary from Balinese and modernist to Victorian gingerbread— there’s even a house modeled after the Taj Mahal—but these places have one trait in common: Each is take-adeep-sigh divine. One of the most impressive is Palm Beach, the twostory, stone-faced residence owned by the Hilfigers, which is set on 10 acres of a former coconut plantation— hence the name. (“It’s not in honor of anywhere in Florida,” says Tommy.) The designer has developed a real attachment to his home away from home. “Not to sound arrogant, but I do feel like a local,” he says. “Thirty-one years ago I was going to St. Barts a lot, but the streets and restaurants started getting crowded. It felt like New York in Bermuda shorts. I went from island to island looking for a quiet getaway, unimpressed until I became seduced by Mustique’s privacy and grace.” Soon after, Tommy bought a fixer-upper but realized it didn’t suit his ambitious vision. “I have a very large, close family,” says Tommy, who is the second oldest of nine

siblings and has four children, Ally, Richard, Elizabeth, and Kathleen, from a previous marriage, and a 7-year-old son, Sebastian, with Dee. “I have more than 25 nieces and nephews, and I wanted a place where we could all be together during Christmas and Easter,” he says. It felt like design kismet when he discovered the blueprints of an unrealized dwelling drawn up by famed English set designer Oliver Messel, who had built several houses on Mustique, including that of its first celebrated resident, the late Princess Margaret of England. (Members of the British royal family continue to holiday on the island.) “Messel’s design was perfect—a combination of British-colonial-style mansion and old-world plantation. It was traditional enough that it would never seem dated like so many other modern beachfront properties do. I wanted something chic, but it had to be in harmony with its surroundings,” he says. To ensure that, Tommy employed local craftsmen and used indigenous stone for the exteriors, along with dark woods like mahogany for the interiors of the six-bedroom main house and four guest cottages. The décor also conforms to the intimacy of the location. Individual rooms are open but not huge, and walls are painted in warm yellows and soft khaki rather than the traditional colonial bright white. There are more windows than wall space for a reason: “The salt air will destroy any precious art you hope to hang,” says Tommy, whose home in Connecticut is filled with work by contemporary-art masters like Andy Warhol and Damien Hirst. Instead, he and Dee opted for framed prints, their kids’ art, and a collection of tortoise- and seashells. Because Mustique’s year-round weather is fairly constant and glorious, sunlight pours in all day long, so there is hardly ever the need for artificial illumination. At dusk the light is golden, slowly fading as if “on dimmers,” says Dee. Tommy admits caving in to family wishes on two popular additions to the house. “We have a soft-serve ice cream machine that’s used nonstop whenever we’re here,” he says with a sigh that indicates he was overruled. “And worse—yet wonderful—is a wood-burning pizza oven” that was constructed on-site by builders from Vermont. “If we have any regrets about coming down here, it’s because of the pizza oven,” says Dee. “We often leave here 10 pounds heavier than when we came.” The growth of Tommy’s global business doesn’t keep the couple from heading to their exotic paradise, though he says he yearns for “a way to fly direct. It would save time. But the sound of jets overhead would be jarring. And it is surprisingly wonderful how little has changed. Shop owners are content being dependent on residents. If you go out, it’s to a neighbor’s house for dinner.” Adds Dee: “We lead such a busy life in New York. Here we relax and put on sarongs and shorts and picnic on the beach. What’s more delicious than dining in barefoot elegance?” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in September 2012.

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All of the English furniture was chosen by the interior design team of Colefax and Fowler in London.

The master bedroom features a peaked roof made of local woods and a carved mahogany four-poster bed and chair.

There are four guest cottages; this one has its own pool. “I think guests should have as much privacy as they need,” says Tommy. “Everyone enjoys being together more when it’s by choice and not by proximity. It makes for a happier host too.”


GET THE LOOK

White canvas, dark woods, and coral motifs set a gracious, breezy tone at the Hilfigers’ beachside manse.

Cotton and birch Henriksdal chair, Ikea, $89; ikea.com.

Linen Chiang Mai Dragon throw pillow, Furbish Studio, $175/22" x 22"; furbishstudio.com.

Faux-coral and acrylic Wayfarer Coral Mother of Pearl lamp, Couture, $266; lampsplus.com.

Wood and glass Round Girandole Convex mirror, The Federalist, $2,499/24"; at The Federalist, 203-625-4727.

“We simplified the décor here to make room for the wind and the sand.” —TOMMY HILFIGER Glass Coral Bead hurricane lantern, Kim Seybert, $188; kimseybert .com.

Wood and cotton Shiloh Spool chair and ottoman, Ballard Designs, from $1,399; ballarddesigns .com.

Brass ass Torto o toise Shell on stand, WilliamsSonoma, $168; wshome.com.

Framed Palm Tree print, Birch Lane, $175/set of 4 assorted styles; birchlane .com.

Polypropylene indoor/outdoor Diamond rug, Annie Selke’s Dash & Albert, from $43/2' x 3'; dashand albert.com. InST YLE HOM E & DESIGN 20 16

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B E AU T Y

T H E B E AC H


LOS ANGELES INTERIOR DECORATOR KELLY WEARSTLER DEFTLY BLENDS ART DECO, HOLLYWOOD REGENCY, MIDCENTURY MODERN, AND DISCO-ERA DECADENCE FOR HER BUZZY LIST OF CELEBRITY CLIENTS. BUT IN HER FAMILY’S MALIBU RETREAT, SHE KEEPS THE MOOD NATURAL, LETTING THE SAND, SUN, AND SEA STIR HER IMAGINATION by DAVID KEEPS photographed by DEAN K AUFMAN styled by NICOLE DEUTSCH

Wearstler relaxes on a low-slung vintage Tobia Scarpa sofa in a living room awash with sandy beiges and stony grays. “It’s all about texture and movement,” she says of the scheme. An oversize wooden artist’s model sits on a 1970s geometric cabinet from JF Chen in Los Angeles. Suno dress. All jewelry, worn throughout, Kelly Wearstler.

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EVERYTHING IN THE HOUSE IS INSPIRED BY A FOUND-IT-INTHE-SAND FEEL.” — K E L LY W E A RS T L E R


“I wanted objects specific to this location. The chandelier resembles seaweed washed up on the shore,� says Wearstler. A fish-scale pattern in shiny leather covers ocean-facing chaises. On Wearstler: Altuzarra blouse. Haute Hippie skirt. On Elliott (top): Bonpoint pullover. La Miniatura jeans. On Oliver: La Miniatura henley.

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The kitchen and an eat-in nook are elevated above the dining room to allow for ocean views. Rain forest marble covers the walls and island, and the cabinets are made of bleached Douglas fir.

The sunken dining room features a monumental stone table and modern chairs. “Artwork leaned casually against the wall keeps the room from feeling too formal,� Wearstler says.


Shades of cream and white give a light-filled guest room a sense of tranquility. “I found this Medusa sculpture and turned it into a headboard. The boys love jumping off her and onto the bed!” Wearstler purchased the ’60s Murano glass chandelier at an auction.

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In the master bedroom a gallery of graffiti-style artwork creates a youthful vibe. “Black-and-white doesn’t have to be boring, especially if things have a bold pattern or a textured surface,” Wearstler says.

Skylights and sculpture add drama to Wearstler’s marble master bathroom, which includes his and hers sinks and a dressing room that looks out onto the Malibu hills.

A paper and plaster sculpture hangs above the bed in a second guest room and “kind of looks like me and Brad,” she says.


n a Sunday evening in Malibu, interior designerKellyWearstler sits in her luxurious but low-key beachfront living room, listeningtohertwosons, Oliver, 13, and Elliott, 12, recap the weekend. There was practicing music for the Negotiators (their alt-rock trio), playing hockey, seeing friends, boogie-boarding, and surfing, as well as hiking on the beach with Mom and Dad. The boys’ descriptions paint a blissful picture, and Wearstler, who has created dream homes for Cameron Diaz and Gwen Stefani, wouldn’t have it any other way. “I work hard all week, and I want a place to just chill out with my guys,” she says (that posse includes husband Brad Korzen, a real estate developer who formed the Viceroy Hotel Group, known for Wearstler’s glamorous interiors). Dressed like a ’90s grunge version of Malibu Barbie, in vintage Levi’s cutoff shorts and a tartan boy’s shirt with torn-off sleeves, the diminutive designer—who adores Gucci, Jonathan Anderson, and Libertine—kicks off her Birkenstocks and smiles. “We try to come here every weekend,” she says of the beach retreat, a short drive from her family’s main residence in Los Angeles. “I love Malibu—the coastline is so picturesque, it’s insane—and I can be a hockey mom, hanging out with my kids, dressed like this all day long, and then go out to dinner. And it’s, like, who cares, right? I want to be relaxed.” Though her oasis has the polish of a big-city residence, Wearstler crafted it to reflect the barefoot, carefree spirit of beach life, using neutral tones and natural materials. With a cedar exterior and a copper roof, bleached walnut floors, and walls clad in textured paper and richly patterned marble, the getaway is a calming sea of casual rooms designed for decompression. “I grew up in a bungalow-style beach house in Myrtle Beach, S.C., and this home reflects the coziness of that place,” she says. “But I also wanted it to feel like Malibu.” That meant modernizing the architecture and decorating with elements that are both weathered and sleek. “I like things that are glamorous and sexy—everyone does—but I really like the tension between raw and refined,” she says of the interiors, which mix slick vintage American and modern European upholstered pieces and contemporary art with relaxed, shaggy Moroccan rugs. “Everything in the house is inspired by a found-it-in-the-sand feel,” says Wearstler, who has a keen eye for beachy décor, like the driftwood centerpiece on her coffee table. It’s also a showcase for her latest obsessions and something of a think tank for her own branded product line of home

goods, sold at Bergdorf Goodman and on her website. Her newest passions include alabaster lights by the French architect Pierre Chareau, Italian furniture from the 1950s to the 1980s, and a fascination with metal and stone. “I love minerals, and that’s evident in everything I do,” she says, gesturing toward a black-and-white marble checkerboard console table and a brass bottle opener encrusted with jewels. “Mother Nature is the best designer.” Nature was also the motivation behind Wearstler’s decision to renovate this two-story, four-bedroom residence. After purchasing the place from Janet Jackson in 2007, the designer spent nearly two years supervising its reconstruction, reconfiguring the ground floor to maximize views of the water, with an elevated kitchen and an atrium that leads to sunken living and dining rooms and a beachfront deck. “It’s like being on a boat,” she says. “You can see the ocean wherever you are.” Thanks to her open floor plan, the rooms flow gracefully into one another, creating “a great energy,” says Wearstler. “And with kids, it helps you hear everything that’s going on and lets you easily call out to everyone.” The family haven is a hive of activity. After whipping up French toast for her sons in the morning, the devotee of boot-camp workouts likes to do hot yoga at a local studio and then hit the waves to surf with her boys. “Even in the winter, even if it’s raining, it’s so incredible being here,” she says. “We hang out in the den and watch SportsCenter.” She happily plays host to her sons’ friends and invites other couples with children to laid-back dinners of fish stew and salads. “We like to build a bonfire on the sand and make s’mores too,” she says. The ocean has a tonic effect on her life, Wearstler adds. “You sleep well hearing the sound of the waves. Time slows down here, and the day kind of stumbles upon itself.” As she gazes out at the water or hunkers down to watch a movie with her sons on the weekends, the ceaselessly imaginative Wearstler gets ideas for new objects to design. In the family room, two surfboards made from a patchwork of fine woods lean against the wall. “You can’t actually ride waves on them,” she admits, “but they look so cool as sculptures.” Calling Oliver, Elliott, and Brad for dinner, she clicks off the nearby TV that’s built into a custom cabinet of her creation. “I love the hardware,” she says, pointing out the sculpted black metal drawer knobs that, she notes with a laugh, are a nod to her sons’ preoccupation with Star Wars. “Those handles look like little Darth Vader heads—when we’d watch the movie, I always thought the shape was so interesting. That’s what happens when you live with kids!” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in February 2014.

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Bleached walnut floors and marble-paneled walls divide the kitchen and sunken living room. Wearstler says she “opened up the space as much as possible to bring the outside in.� Dress, her own. Canfora sandals.


GET THE LOOK

A strict neutral palette and a combination of textures set a tone of calm seaside sophistication.

Wood and W metal Audrey y nightstand, g , West Elm,, $349;; westelm.com. w

Wood and bone Rounded Inlay side table, Anthropologie, $598; anthropologie.com.

Brass Trek bookends, Carl Auböck, $566/ pair; thefuture perfect.com.

“I like things that are glamorous and aan sexy—everyone does—but —but I really rre like the tension betw ween n raw and refined.” —KELLY WEARSTLER

Steel Arc floor lamp, Pacific Coast Lighting, $270; lampsplus.com.

Pick Up Sticks print, Kim Johnson, Minted, from $21/7" x 5" (unframed); minted.com.

Ruched lambskin Souffle settee, Kelly Wearstler, $13,900; kellywearstler.com.

Polypropylene Lappljung Ruta rug, Ikea, $99/6' 7" x 9' 10"; ikea.com.

Teak with bone Starburst trays, Serena & Lily, $295 (small) and $595; serenaandlily.com.

Stainless steel and leather Oviedo chaise, RH, Restoration Hardware, $3,395; rh.com.

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JUST BECAUSE SUPERMODEL AND ACTRESS AMBER VALLETTA’S SANTA MONICA ABODE IS ECO-FRIENDLY DOESN’T MEAN IT HAS TO BE EARTH-TONED AND UNDERSTATED. INSTEAD, IT’S A LIGHT-FILLED HOME INFUSED WITH SPLASHES OF COLOR AND IRRESISTIBLE ENERGY by L AURIE SANDELL photographed by DEAN K AUFMAN styled by TRACY TAYLOR

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The books in Valletta’s cozy Dutch blue office are organized by hue. “I have a thing about color-coding,” she says. Chanel dress and necklace. Dior heels.


Valletta on her back patio. Most of the rooms open out onto the garden. Alberta Ferretti dress. Maiyet cu. Burberry Prorsum sandals.

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Pendant lights in the kitchen, purchased at the L.A. store Obsolete, were originally used in a Midwestern factory. Small appliances are tucked behind walnut panels.

Hot-pink walls in the master bedroom make a bold statement. “It's such a happy, powerful color. I love the way it deepens at sunset,” says Valletta.

In the dining area a hand-painted de Gournay wallpaper mural of birds and purple flowers “adds a traditional flavor to a very contemporary space,” says interior designer Ross Cassidy.


A 1967 Robert Indiana lithograph anchors the living room. The throw pillows are covered in vintage African textiles, which Valletta’s Chihuahua-pug mix, Mumsie, has “a particular taste for—unfortunately, she likes to chew them.” Vera Wang Collection dress.


t’s always good to share a creative vision, but few client-designer relationships are as simpatico as that of Amber Valletta and her interior designer– cum–best friend Ross Cassidy. The handsome South African, best known for his role on Bravo’s MillionDollarDecorators,firstspottedthemodel and actress nine years ago, when she was working out on the Santa Monica steps, a pair of steep outdoor staircases where locals like to exercise. “I wanted to shout, ‘I loved you in last month’s Italian Vogue!’ ” he says with a laugh, “but I didn’t want her to think I was a weirdo.” A few months later Cassidy happened to be riding his bike down a sleepy Santa Monica street only to spot Valletta hanging Halloween decorations in her front yard. This time he piped up, and the two soon realized that Valletta had been “stalking” Cassidy’s Hamptons-style cottage near the spot of their first meeting, intrigued by the patios appointed with cushy seating, umbrellas, and lamps. She invited Cassidy in, and before long they were chatting like old friends. A year and a half later they started talking renovation—something Valletta’s 1929 Spanish Revival home desperately needed. Fated encounters such as these are a theme in Valletta’s life. When she was 15 and living in her hometown of Tulsa, Okla., a scout from Italy came through the local modeling school where her single mother, a post-office worker, had enrolled the waifish blonde. “From that moment on I never stopped working,” Valletta says. Her transition to acting was equally fortuitous, she says. Out of the blue, Steven Spielberg requested footage of the supermodel, who, at 24, had never tried acting before. “That was a strong sign that if I wanted to act, this was the time to do it,” she says, reflecting on that moment. Next, Valletta landed roles in What Lies Beneath and Hitch; most recently she appeared on the cult TV show Revenge and the TNT series Legends, starring Sean Bean of Game of Thrones fame. On a recent sunny afternoon Valletta answers the door of her three-bedroom home in a nubby Stella McCartney sweater, Strom jeans, and Isabel Marant shoes, looking ridiculously beautiful as she shows off the revamped abode where she lives with 15-year-old son Auden (his father is Valletta’s former husband, Chip McCaw,

an Olympic volleyball player). Making the place ecofriendly was one of Valletta’s key objectives. She’s relieved to see that the world has evolved for the better when it comes to considering the environment, which she views as a lifestyle, not a trend. “I remember being in NewYork22yearsagoandtalkingaboutclimatechange,” she says. “That’s just part of who I am.” To make the space eco-friendly, Cassidy painted only with Benjamin Moore’s Natura line and had custom-upholstered furniture filled with an alternative foam. Boldly colored natural fibers are used throughout—one bedroom is covered with hot-pink sea-grass walls. It was a daring move, she admits, but “I’ve never walked in here and said, ‘God, I hate this color.’ I knew it was going to be really cool,” she says. Those more adventurous hues play off of neutraltoned surfaces, from walnut floors to low-slung couches covered with undyed linen fabrics. “I love all the wood in this home, and the unexpected elements like wallpaper on the ceiling,” she says, referring to a hand-painted design created for her meditation room by local artist Kelly Porter. The kitchen offers a study in zen with its long white marble island and wooden cabinetry. Without a doubt, the most personal touches hang on the walls. A self-professed art junkie, Valletta owns various pieces from a portfolio made in support of the president, titled Thirteen Artists for Obama, which includes work by John Baldessari and Jasper Johns. An Annie Leibovitz shot of Valletta holding a young Auden graces the kitchen, and there’s no shortage of images from her magazine shoots by Richard Avedon and Steven Meisel. In the bedroom hangs a nude by Irving Penn: “I try to hide the ones that are really obvious modeling shots,” Valletta says. “I don’t want it to be the ‘me’ show.” In fact, Valletta seems far more interested in spotlighting her surroundings rather than herself. Sinking into her dining room banquette, she tucks her long legs beneath her and sighs. “When it’s high noon the whole room glows,” she says. “And it changes with the light, so when the sun sets the room transforms.” There’s so much she adores about her home, from the colors to the stories behind every object. She surveys the space with satisfaction. “It feels like a little jewel box to me.” A version of this story was first published in InStyle in April 2014.

Valletta had the pillows on a daybed in her bedroom covered with a vintage embroidered fabric she discovered in Paris. InST YLE HOM E & DESIG N 20 16

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GET THE LOOK

Eco materials in luscious shades prove that natural doesn’t have to mean neutral. Wood Estelle chair, Copeland Furniture, $770; allmodern .com.

Brass Factory Modern No. 4 pendant lamp, Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co., $269; schoolhouseelectric.com.

Cotton Coral Euro sham, John Robshaw, $65; johnrobshaw .com.

“My decorating philosophy is to be daring and bold with color and texture— they add so much dimension.” —AMBER VALLETTA Manila hemp Grasscloth wall covering in Honeysuckle and Peacock blue, Phillip Jeffries, $42/yard; at Phillip Jeffries, 973-575-5414.

Linen and jute H Harbor Stripe th throw, Pine Cone Hi $214; pine Hill, co conehill.com.

Wood and cotton Sleigh bed, West Elm, from $899; westelm.com.

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Meta al and glasss awkesbury Ha y mmon Com o sside de e, Brayden table y dio,, $122/2 Stud 2 nesting g pieces; ayfair.com. way

Linen Leighton (top, (top $198/ 24" x 24") and Everly ($128/24" x 24") embroidered pillow covers, Serena & Lily ; serenaandlily.com.


Cover: Gentl and Hyers/Edge Reps; hair: Laura Polko/The Wall Group; makeup: Mélanie Inglessis/Forward Artists; styling: Ali Pew; prop styling: Kim Ficaro/Edge Reps; production: Kelsey Stevens p. 2: Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive p. 3: From top: courtesy Ikea; Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive; Dean Kaufman/ Trunk Archive; Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive pp. 4–12: Gentl and Hyers/Edge Reps; hair: Laura Polko/The Wall Group; makeup: Mélanie Inglessis/Forward Artists; styling: Ali Pew; prop styling: Kim Ficaro/Edge Reps; production: Kelsey Stevens p. 13: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Totem; courtesy Anthropologie; courtesy Ikea; courtesy Terrain; courtesy Overstock; courtesy Cisco; courtesy HD Buttercup; courtesy Elsie Green; Gentl and Hyers/Edge Reps p. 15: Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive pp. 16–20: Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive; hair: John Ruggiero/Bumble & Bumble/ Starworks Artists; makeup: Shane Paish/ Diorshow/Tata Harper/Walter Schupfer Management; styling: Sue Choi; manicure: Debbie Leavitt/The Nailing Hollywood Collection in Flesh/Nailing Hollywood; prop styling: Kim Ficaro/Edge Reps; production: Kelsey Stevens; p. 17: artwork in photo, clockwise from bottom left: Thomas Wachholz/Mier Gallery (2); Terry Haggerty; p. 20: artwork in photo, clockwise from top: Jan-Ole Schiemann/ Mier Gallery; Alf Crossley; Amaina; Super Rural p. 21: Clockwise from top right: courtesy All Modern; courtesy Simple Geometry (2); courtesy Calvin Klein; courtesy Egg Collective; courtesy Blu Dot; courtesy Horne; courtesy Kelly Wearstler (2); Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive; artwork in photo: Himba Boy portrait by Lyle Owerko pp. 22–26: Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive; hair: Sallie Ciganovich; makeup: Amy Strozzi/ AimArtists; styling: Kusum Lynn/Brydges MacKinney; manicure: Michelle Saunders/ Forward Artists; prop styling: Kim Ficaro/ Edge Reps; production: Barbie Duarte/3Star Productions p. 27: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Crate and Barrel; courtesy Pier 1 Imports; courtesy Restoration Hardware; courtesy Shine by S.H.O.; courtesy Jonathan Adler; courtesy The Rug Company; courtesy Lulu & Georgia; courtesy Anthropologie; Douglas Friedman/Trunk Archive pp. 28– 34: James Merrell/Ashley Klinger; hair: Max Pinnell/See Management; makeup: Robert Greene/Honey Artists; prop styling: Martin Bourne/Judy Casey; production: Joseph Nicholas p. 35: Clockwise from top right: courtesy CB2; courtesy Made Goods; courtesy DWR; courtesy Arhaus; courtesy Wayfair; courtesy Williams-Sonoma (2); courtesy DDC; James Merrell/Ashley Klinger p. 37: Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive; artwork in photo: Diamond (Green), 1994–2005, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 78" x 87" x 87", © Jeff Koons pp. 38–44: Jason Schmidt/ Trunk Archive; makeup: Jason Ascher; styling: Ali Pew; production: The Custom Family; p. 39: artwork in photo: Mouth #1, 1966, Art © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/ VAGA, New York, NY; Jason Schmidt/ Trunk Archive; p. 41: artwork in photo: Interior with Built-In Bar, 1991, © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein; Jason Schmidt/Trunk

Archive; Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive; p. 44: artwork in photo: Diamond (Green), 1994–2005, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 78" x 87" x 87", © Jeff Koons p. 45: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Gagosian; courtesy Artware Editions; Brian Henn; styling: Bill Laughlin/Marc Edward Inc.; courtesy Ikea; courtesy Amazon; courtesy Hem; courtesy Tisch New York; courtesy Bend Goods; Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive pp. 46–50: François Halard/ Trunk Archive; hair: Jessica Gillin; makeup: Berta Camal; styling: Kusum Lynn/Brydges MacKinney; manicure: Eglys Madeira; prop styling: Noemi Bonazzi/Art Department p. 51: Clockwise from top right: L’Objet; Brian Henn; styling: Bill Laughlin/Marc Edward Inc.; courtesy Jung Lee NY; courtesy Williams-Sonoma; courtesy Bella Lino; courtesy Knoll; courtesy Tory Burch; courtesy Restoration Hardware; François Halard/Trunk Archive pp. 52–58: Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive; hair: Jessica Crocetto; makeup: Imane Fiocchi; styling: Ali Pew; production: Elizabeth Rundlett/ A+ Productions; p. 53: artwork in photo at left: Marilyn Minter p. 59: Clockwise from top right: courtesy CB2; courtesy L’Objet; Brian Henn; styling: Bill Laughlin/Marc Edward Inc.; courtesy The Rug Company; courtesy Target; courtesy Poppin; courtesy Ikea; courtesy Barnes & Noble; courtesy St. Frank; courtesy Lamps Plus; Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive pp. 60–66: Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive; grooming: Claudia Lake/Contact NYC p. 67: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Yves Delorme (2); courtesy Sir/Madam; courtesy Lillian August; courtesy Kate Spade; Lulu & Georgia; courtesy Artfully Walls; courtesy Foundry Lighting; Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive p. 69: Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive pp. 70–76: Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive; hair and makeup: Kristin Hilton/The Wall Group; styling: Morgan Pilcher/Tim Howard Management p. 77: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Ikea; courtesy The Federalist; courtesy Lamps Plus; courtesy Dash and Albert; courtesy Furbish Studio; courtesy Ballard Designs; courtesy Williams-Sonoma; courtesy Kim Seybert; courtesy Birch Lane; Jason Schmidt/Trunk Archive pp. 78–86: Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive; hair: Leland Ferrell; makeup: Kristee Liu/ TMG-LA; styling: Nicole Deutsch; manicure: Kevin Dang; prop styling: Lisa Bazadona p. 87: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Anthropologie; courtesy Serena & Lily; courtesy Lamps Plus; courtesy Restoration Hardware; courtesy Kelly Wearstler; courtesy Ikea; courtesy West Elm; courtesy Minted; courtesy The Future Perfect; Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive pp. 88–93: Dean Kaufman/Trunk Archive; hair: Rob Talty/Forward Artists; makeup: Rachel Goodwin/Starworks Artists; styling: Tracy Taylor; manicure: Nettie Davis; prop styling: Ross Cassidy; production: Kelsey Stevens; p. 88: artwork in photo at left: © The Richard Avedon Foundation p. 94: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.; courtesy Serena & Lily (2); courtesy West Elm; courtesy Phillip Jefferies (2); courtesy Pine Cone Hill; courtesy Wayfair; courtesy John Robshaw; courtesy All Modern; Dean Kaufman/ Trunk Archive p. 96: Art Streiber/August

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Editorial Offices: 225 Liberty St., New York, NY 10281, 212-5221212. Los Angeles Bureau: 11766 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1700, Los Angeles, CA 90025, 310-2687200. Customer Service and Subscriptions: For 24/7 service, please use our website: instyle.com/ customerservice. You can also call 800-274-6200 or write to ef® at P.O. Box 30606, Tampa, FL 33630-0606. Subscribers: If the postal authorities alert us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within two years. Your bank may provide updates to the card information we have on file. You may opt out of this service at any time. Mailing List: We make a portion of our mailing list available to reputable firms. If you would prefer that we not include your name, please call or write us. © 2016 Time Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. ef® and the ef® Cover Design are registered trademarks of Time Inc.

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F L A S H B AC K

Twenty years and one month ago, mother-daughter besties Goldie Hawn and Kate Hudson, then 17, first appeared together on the cover of InStyle. The feature inside that August 1996 issue welcomed readers into the gracious, seven-bedroom L.A. home they shared with Hawn’s partner, Kurt Russell, and Hudson’s three siblings. Here they are, giddy in the backyard, consumed with laughter. Since then, Hudson has become a successful actress, landing on our cover seven more times—and counting. 96

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ADVERTISEMENT

MAKEOVER Imagine a whopping 300 square feet for your living room, dining room, and kitchen. Now, add in a dog, a love for home entertaining, and the fact that it doubles as your workspace.

Welcome to food and lifestyle blogger Jane Ko’s home.

With the help of IKEA, Jane was able to transform her space into a functional and beautiful living area. “Before my IKEA makeover, I was embarrassed to have people over and didn’t really spend much time downstairs. IKEA sent its experts to help change all that. They listened to my space challenges and came up with really great solutions like a modular sofa, which is perfect for entertaining or relaxing—something I never envisioned could work in my space!” says Jane. In addition to the sectional, the functionality and look of the room was improved with one of IKEA’s multi-use entertainment centers. “It not only stores my electronics but also doubles as a liquor cabinet, complete with a backlit area for glasses,” says Jane. For the kitchen and dining area, rethinking the format to cut down on clutter was particularly important. To gain counter space, a microwave with a built-in vent replaced a range hood. And a light color table was brought in instead of the previous dark one, allowing Jane a better area in which to take food photos for her blog. For her entryway, a mirror was installed. But it’s not just any ordinary mirror. Hidden behind it are hooks that hold Jane’s keys, her dog’s leash, an umbrella, among other essentials. “The clutter by the door was something I just assumed there was no real solution for. I was wrong!” says Jane. “This makeover has really elevated and enhanced my lifestyle.”

brought to you by

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The American Dream has changed a lot in 240 years. And the dreamers…they’ve changed a whole lot too. But the dream lives on in American homes. It’s just a little different. Today, it’s not about having more, but being more. For ourselves. For our loved ones. For the world. Today, it’s not about “bigger is better,” but about having smaller, more meaningful experiences. Some things, like space-age technology, bring our dreams closer to us. But other things, like sky-high college tuition, mean working even harder to reach them. No matter what you dream, we want to help you achieve it. Because… We believe all homes are created equal. We believe in upward mobility for all. We believe sustainability should be everywhere, not just in Oregon. Because no matter what you do, who you are, or how much you make, you deserve to make the dream yours.

See IKEA store for country of origin information. Valid in US IKEA stores. Some products require assembly. ©Inter IKEA Systems B.V. 2016


InStyle Home & Design - Nov 2016