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PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

healthyfood.co.uk

SEPTEMBER 2016 £3.20

How to cut back meal on SUGAR Our guide makes it EASY! COCONUT HIT! LOW-CALORIE

SPECIAL REPORT

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Thai curry & rice

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MARY BERRY’S HEALTHIER SUNDAY LUNCH


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NUTRITIOUS ENERGY!

Also in our range

All Natural Natural source of fibre Omega 3 Goodness Protein packed

Gluten, wheat and dairy free 100% vegan Rich in antioxidants


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

WELCOME

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E’RE ON A MISSION this month to help you, your workmates and children going back

to school to TUCK INTO HEALTHIER LUNCHES. Unless you’re lucky enough to have a canteen on site, it can be hard to eat well and inexpensively at work. The default is often a meal deal or eating the same option every day (which I often do!). But follow the MAKE-AHEAD LUNCHBOX IDEAS by HFG recipe consultant Phil Mundy (p25) and you can enjoy a more varied, healthier lunch, SAVE MONEY and CUT CALORIES. For those who prefer to eat out, nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow helps you steer

WITH THANKS TO: GEMMA DOYLE, SARA NORMAN. PHOTO: CATH HARRIES

clear of the nutrition pitfalls on the high street. We’ve also got ENTICING, WELL BALANCED LUNCHBOXES for children that should keep them on board and not bored, all through the week (see the FREE CARD WITH THIS ISSUE). All the recipes and information are dietitian approved. If you didn’t get the card, it’s downloadable and shareable from our website, healthyfood.co.uk.

YOU CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN If your workplace is falling short when it comes to providing the basics for making healthy lunches, take action! Our experts give advice for TRANSFORMING YOUR WORK ENVIRONMENT into a food-friendly place (p30). At the HFG offices, the team have got into the weekly habit of clubbing

PS Look out for Get Fit with Healthy Food Guide – our weight-loss and exercise special, OUT NOW!

together to make one simple lunch. It saves money and gets us away from our desks. We’d love to hear about POSITIVE CHANGES YOU MAKE at your workplace – email info@ healthyfood.co.uk or share photos of your lunches, tagging us @healthyfoodmag, or post them on our facebook page.

MELANIE LEYSHON, EDITOR

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 3


CO N T E N T S

IN THIS MONTH’S SEPTEMBER p47

p16 p59

p34 p25 p80

p53

p60 p52 p45 TALKING POINTS 3 Editor’s letter 6 Meet our experts 8 Let’s talk… 84 How I stay healthy Professor and researcher into gut health, Tim Spector

HEALTH & NUTRITION 10 Health notes Latest news and stats 16 The truth about sugar in food We analyse what’s on your plate!

4 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

p79

p74

34 When food rules you The newly recognised eating disorder that affects all ages 72 How much omega-3 in our fish? At-a-glance guide 80 Going dairy free Are we milking it? 90 Let’s HIIT those arms Body Coach Joe Wicks’ new workout 94 Why we need vitamin B12

RECIPES 38 September recipe index 40 Your monthly diet planner

44 Weeknight dinners 51 Dinner for one 52 Power up your salad High-protein plates 59 Easy Thai supper Our low-calorie cover recipe 60 Put it on the menu Ready-cooked lentils 62 Extreme makeover moussaka 66 Veggie specials Filling recipes everybody will love 74 Mary Berry’s healthier Sunday lunch 78 Sweet deceits Surprisingly light puds


ISSUE p69

EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES 01795 414778 Healthyfood.co.uk/subscribe EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 020 7803 4128 FAX 020 7803 4101 EMAIL Info@healthyfood.co.uk WEB Healthyfood.co.uk

p90 Editor Melanie Leyshon Art director Tina Betts Assistant editor Liz Atkins Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Editorial assistant/writer Laura Day Web assistant Isabella Bradford Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow Recipe consultant Phil Mundy ADVERTISING SALES Ad director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Senior sales Laura Collinder 020 7150 5043 Group head, partnerships Josh Jalloul 020 7150 5040 Regional business development manager Nicola Rearden 0161 209 3629

p66

SHOPPING 12 Seasonal ways to five-a-day 14 This month we love 25 Your guide to healthy eating at work Everything you need for smarter lunch choices 33 What’s the deal with hemp? 64 Smart swaps Healthier Chinese takeaway options

DON’T MISS 86 Win one of three Stellar juicers Worth £200 each

p78

87 Subscribe to HFG for less 89 Coming up in next month’s issue On sale 30 September 96 References 97 Nutrition lowdown 98 5 top facts to take away

READ MORE ONLINE Find hundreds of healthy recipes, health features and blogs about health trends at

HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Marketing consultant Julia Rich 020 7803 4129 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Adam Wright 01733 373135 adam.wright@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Healthy Food Guide magazine is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT, under licence from Healthy Food Guide International Limited and its content includes copyright material which is owned or controlled by, and is reproduced under licence from, Healthy Food Guide International Limited. The title Healthy Food Guide and the Healthy Food Guide logo are trade marks owned by, and used under licence from, Healthy Food Guide International Limited. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Healthy Food Guide International Limited, its subsidiaries, affiliates or contributors. For licensing enquiries contact Wendy Miller, International Licensing Director, wendy.miller@hlmedia.com.au.

ISSN 2045-8223. Printed in the UK by Southernprint Ltd. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well-managed, certified forests. All prices correct at time of going to press. UK basic annual subscription rate for 12 issues, £38.40; Europe and Eire, £55; rest of the world, £60. Back issues cost £5. Member of the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.


E X PE R T S

We can help you break

O out of yo-yo dieting, as our recipes come in satisfying portion sizes. We use everyday ingredients to make your favourite dishes healthier and no foods are off the menu. We’d never recommend cutting out key food groups, unless you have an intolerance or allergy.

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All our recipes

Eating and living well for longterm good health – that’s the HFG mission. We don’t believe in short-term fad diets, but making small changes for big gains. Read how our experts can help you...

O

Look for the symbols

on our recipes. They will enable you to pinpoint recipes for your needs. See p39 for more information.

LOW CAL

LOW FAT

O are analysed by our qualified dietitians and nutritionists, below, and tried and tested by our recipe consultant Phil Mundy. They are created to guidelines set out by the NHS Eatwell Guide for key food groups, to ensure they’re well balanced.

We look at the science

O behind the headlines to clear up and demystify mixed messages about current health issues. Our experts always look at the body of evidence, never just one isolated study.

LOW SATS

vegetarian

LOW SALT

HIGH FIBRE

HIGH

HIGH

PROTEIN CALCIUM

gluten free

HIGH IRON

1

5-A-DAY

dairy free

Meet our experts: qualified dietitians, nutritionists and medical professionals

JULIETTE KELLOW is Healthy Food Guide’s nutrition consultant. She’s a registered dietitian who has worked in the NHS, the food industry and within the media.

DR DAWN HARPER works as a GP and runs regular clinics on women’s health and weight management. She appears on Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies.

JENNIFER LOW is a dietitian who works as a consultant for the NHS and the private sector. She specialises in eating disorders, IBS and bariatric surgery.

AMANDA URSELL has a degree in nutrition and a post-graduate diploma in dietetics. She is an award-winning writer and a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTING EXPERT PANEL O Tracy Kelly, registered dietitian O Helen Bond, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association O Norma McGough, registered dietitian at Coeliac UK O Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation

6 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


Just like Prosciutto di San Daniele, true taste and real origins simply cannot be imitated. That is why the European Union created the Protected Designation of Origin scheme. PDO makes regional specialities with centuries of tradition easier to recognise. Prosciutto di San Daniele and Grana Padano cheese are perfect companions for every dish – awarded with the prestigious quality mark. So next time !"#%&'((")'*"!(+)#',-.(&/)&01)ϔ1&3"#4ǡ1""/6"4(+)1":"Ǥ Follow our tradition at www.prosciuttosandaniele.it

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION AND ITALY.

Proud carriers of the PDO logo.


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STAR LETTER

So what’s on your mind? Let us know – via email, facebook and twitter

YOUR VIEWS SHORTCUT TO NUTRITION

Oh, wow! You’ve done it again with Phil’s insta-food fixes (cheat’s suppers) and clever use of a microwave in the August issue. Not only are the ideas wonderful for me, but they’re also ideal for my grandsson, who h is off ff to uni very soon. So I think his going g away present is a microwave and a goo ody basket of storecupb board ingredientts so he can make som me of Phil’s healthy an nd inspired suppers, p plus a subscription to HFG. Sorte ed. I think he will soon have lots of hungry friends. Nicole Warner

CONGRATULATIONS The writer of this month’s star letter wins three books from The Medicinal Chef’s Eat Your Way to Better Health series by Dale Pinnock (Quadrille, £14.99 each). Each book has easy to make recipes plus nutrition and diet advice for a specific condition.

8 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE

GO TO EONLINE N MONTER THI COM S T P healt ETITHIO’S hyfo NS o

Having battled eating disorders for many years, I wanted to let you know d.co. how pleased I am to have recently uk discovered your magazine. It is so refreshing to see food and diet being focused on in such a positive way, with the emphasis h on nutritiona al benefits and health boosting properties. Food is something we all need to value and respect but this can often be forgotten as w we are bombarded with messages about the things we should avvoid in order to achieve the ‘perfect’ body. Thank you for giving me pause for thought and for helping me to start thinking about what I put in my body in a positive rather than a negative way. Ch heryl Aston

CEBOOK Do you have a mea at-free Monday? Give us y your go-to recipe… I have a meat-free F Friday, y, rather than Monday following the old Ch hristian abstinence tradition n of eating fish! Sometim mes I’ll eatt eggs iinstead. Either t d Eit way, it gives me a muchneeded boost of omega-3. Gill Wing

Three-lentil dhal & brown rice... the lentil combination ½ lemon, 2 garlic cloves and varies and sometimes I add about 2oz cheddar. Add a some chickpeas or spinach. few peas and serve with Amy Brown 300g cooked tagliatelle. It makes a dinner for one I don’t eat much meat at and a lunch from the all. A quick herb pesto is a leftovers. Heather Cupit nice idea. Whiz about 2 handfuls of fresh mint or GO ONLINE for more meat-free parsley with juice of recipe ideas at healthyfood.co.uk


N E WS A N D V I E WS

YOUR PICS

This @healthyfoodmag lasagne was AMAZING! Spinach, courgette, mushroom and tomato @Natalie_Thomas

OUR NEWS

We’re happy to see you’re living and cooking the good life. We bet they taste as good as they look…

Nespresso coffee and @healthyfoodmag blueberry muffin for a late Saturday breakfast #weekend #breakfast #healthy #yummy #homemade

I’ve made the bakewell tart from the July issue twice now and it’s absolutely lovely! Tastes even better when it’s a couple of days old. Everybody loved it!

@amy1603

AC Meddleton, London (by email)

We’ve challenged our tastebuds to new trends while championing old favourites. Read more at healthyfood.co.uk/blog

FRUITY FINGER FOOD

GETTING CULTURED

DESERT ISLAND DISHES

Grapes, but not as we know them! M&S is branching out into weird and wonderfully shaped varieties. We loved these limited edition sweet Funny Fingers; look out for the similarly shaped Sweet Sapphire this month.

In a rare turn of events, team HFG has fallen hard for a trend: we’ve been topping up our good bacteria by taste testing different brands of kefir – and even making our own. Visit the blog for the easy how-to.

The team has been delving into the HFG recipe archives to pick our all-time favourite dishes. First up is a tasty selection from assistant editor Liz. Find her top 10 on the blog.

EMAIL US info@healthyfood.co.uk

FOLLOW US @healthyfoodmag

TALK TO US ON facebook.com/ healthyfoodguideuk

SHARE PICS ON INSTAGRAM @healthyfoodmag

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 9


S C I E N C E U PDAT E

HEALTH NOTES Diet and fitness facts for your wellbeing

60

THE NUMBER OF MINUTES OFFICE WORKERS should spend exercising daily to offset the harmful effects of sitting. Latest research showing SITTING ALL DAY WITHOUT EXERCISING increases your chance of dying prematurely by almost 10% is a major concern, as an estimated four out of five people in the UK have a desk job. But a team of experts from the University of Cambridge has found that JUST ONE HOUR OF EXERCISE A DAY can undo this risk. Go to Get Active at healthyfood.co.uk for ideas on how to build more exercise into your daily routine. CALORIES, OK… SUGAR? UH-OH

HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MUCH MORE INFORMATION on calories is available on the high street? We welcome efforts made by cafés, but sugar content in most unpackaged food is still a mystery. So it’s a big thumbs-up for the Sugar Snub Eating Out Guide by Claire White, which lists the sugar content, by the teaspoon, of food and drink sold in high-street eateries. As well as the obvious culprits (Costa caramel fudge hot chocolate: 18½tsp!) there are plenty of surprises. As Claire points out, however, data available doesn’t distinguish between added sugars and the harmless ones naturally present (in fruit and dairy products, for example), so use your judgement when sugar snubbing. You can get the paperback (£8.99) at sugarsnub.co.uk or take the discreet e-book option (£4.49, Amazon).


H E A LT H

WHY YOUR BRAIN LOVES OMEGA-3

DRINK THICK, THINK SLIM IF YOU WANT TO STAY FULLER for longer, switch that glass of fruit juice for a smoothie. Researchers have found that the thickness of a liquid has a bigger impact on feelings of fullness than the calories it contains. Forty minutes after drinking a shake, adults who consumed a 100kcal thick shake reported feeling fuller than when they’d drunk a 500kcal thin shake.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

3

That’s the PERCENTAGE OF CALORIES WE NEED to get from plant proteins in order to REDUCE OUR RISK OF HEART DISEASE by 12%, says new research. Fill up on lentils, chickpeas, tofu and soya, for starters…

THE IDEA OF EATING for a bigger brain sounds like science fiction, but research it in the realm of ars showed larger br which is cognitiv who too improve after 24 40% of t matter in brain is f around h that is o Help kee good wo with two fish – on – and tur the omega-3

GET YOUR PRE-HU IT’S A COMMONLY HELD VIEW that y ’re hungry, but what about ordering food in a restaurant? According to a new US study, choosing dishes when hungry leads to an overall increase in the amount of calories ordered. Doing it in advance, however, reduces the likelihood of overindulging. On a university campus, researchers found that for every hour of delay between ORDER AHEAD students ordering and eating, the calorie reduction was around 38 – a daily saving that could stop you gaining 4lb in a year! The researchers say restaurants could pass on potential health benefits to customers by offering an order now, eat later option.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 11


SEASONAL ways to

FIVE-A-DAY IN SEPTEMBER

Celebrate the last of summer’s bounty and welcome early-autumn fruits with ripe-andready PEARS, BLACKBERRIES and CORN ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY

PEARS

10

Unlike most fruits, pears ripen once plucked from the tree – let them soften in your fruit bowl for juicy, sweet and textured rewards.

PEARS ARE RICH in fibre, with one fruit providing 13% of our daily need for this nutrient. They’re a particularly good source of the soluble fibre pectin, which forms a gel in the digestive system and helps to control blood sugar levels. Pectin also binds with cholesterol and stops it being absorbed into the blood, helping to control cholesterol levels. Pears are one of the best sources of flavonoids (antioxidants), which tend to be concentrated in the skin. In fact, studies show the skin contains up to 20 times more antioxidants than the flesh, so don’t peel them. Per pear O 64kcal O 16.4g sugars O 4g fibre

In the kitchen TOSS chopped pears and celery with lemon juice and a little dijon mustard, then spoon on to rocket. Serve with blue cheese crumbled over. SPRINKLE wedges of pear with ground allspice, then roast until sticky. Top with low-fat ice cream. MAKE a sauce with onion, pear and sage. Serve with pork or chicken.

12 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SPETEMBER 2016

ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY

1 pear

BLACKBERRIES Hedgerows and food shops are laden with juicy berries now, calling to be turned into jams and puds. Catch them while they last!

Nutritional reasons to buy BLACKBERRIES ARE a fabulous source of nutrients. They help to top up our vitamin C levels, provide B vitamin folate (usually found in green veg) and contain several other antioxidants, including vitamin E and manganese (the latter helps to release energy from food and is important for healthy bones). These purple berries also contain anthocyanins, which may help to improve blood and oxygen flow to the brain, as well as ellagic acid, which lab tests show destroy cancer-causing cells. Per 10 blackberries O 80kcal O 4.1g sugars O 3.3g fibre

In the kitchen WHIZ a handful of blackberries with chopped apple, low-fat natural yogurt, a pinch of cinnamon and some ice to make a smoothie. STEW blackberries with a splash of balsamic vinegar and some crushed peppercorns, to make a sauce to serve with pork or lamb. FLAVOUR fat-free Greek yogurt with a little vanilla bean paste, then layer in glasses with blackberries and crushed meringues, and sprinkle with finely grated orange zest for a late-summer take on eton mess.

WORDS: JULIETTE KELLOW, PHIL MUNDY, REBECCA ALMOND. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Nutritional reasons to buy

blackberries


S H O PPI N G

CORN Who doesn’t love the tightly packed rows of sunshineyellow kernels that plump when cooked? A nutritious treat of the season.

Nutritional reasons to buy SWEETCORN IN ALL its forms helps to boost our intakes of potassium, phosphorus, manganese and vitamin B1. It’s also a good source of fibre, which helps to support the growth of friendly bacteria in the digestive system. Sweetcorn may also have a role in keeping our eyes healthy, as it’s rich in the carotenoid antioxidants zeaxanthin and lutein, good intakes of which seem to protect against age-related macular degeneration (a leading cause of blindness). Per corn cob O 97kcal O 3.6g sugars O 7.4g fibre

In the kitchen SWEETCORN AND CRAYFISH SALAD serves 2 Spray 2 corn cobs with oil, then cook on a hot barbecue or non-stick griddle pan for 5–6 min, turning, until charred. When cool enough to handle, carefully run a sharp knife down the length of the cobs to strip off the kernels. Mix with 120g cooked crayfish tails, 300g boiled baby potatoes, 1 diced avocado, zest and juice ONE PORTION 1 lime, 200g halved OF YOUR cherry tomatoes and FIVE-A-DAY a handful chopped fresh coriander.

1 corn cob

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 13


THIS MONTH WE We’ve scoured the shelves for greattasting, nutritious products and selected our favourites to make your weekly shop easier

This dip with a beany Who knew egg whites were so versatile? Used twist is a favourite new companion for our in these low-cal bites, wholewheat pittas – they’re helping to fill and there’s no funny our snack gap. About stuff added. 9g protein per pack. Two Chicks Chirps, £1.49/28g, Holland & Barrett, Ocado

Rod and Ben’s Butterbean & Chive Dip, £1.99/200g, Ocado

Per 28g bag (Sea Salt & Cracked Black Pepper) O110kcal O 3.6g fat O 0.3g saturates O 0.9g sugars O 0.8g salt

Per ¼ pot O142kcal O 12.5g fat O 1.6g saturates O 0.4g sugars O 0.1g salt

Add a healthy topping if you like, but we happily munch these wholesome flaxseed, millet and chia seed crackers on their own.

Lost your meat-free Lean, mean and gluten mojo? These recipe free, these meatballs boxes are delivered contain 3% fat or less, with everything you which gives some need to make tasty homemade varieties meals in 30 min or less. a run for their money.

Nairn’s Gluten Free Super Seeded Wholegrain Crackers, £1.75/20 crackers, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Asda

Mindful Chef Plant-based Recipe Box (for two, three or four), from £4.50 per meal, mindfulchef.com

Joe’s Diet Friendly Meatballs, £3.20/12, joessausages.co.uk

Per cracker O26kcal O 1.1g fat O 0.4g saturates O 0.1g sugars O 0.1g salt

Nutrition values vary according to box contents

Per meatball O 34kcal O 0.9g fat O 0.4g saturates O 0.2g sugars O 0.4g salt

14 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


COMPILED BY LAURA DAY. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

S H O PPI N G

Dairy-free bakers, rejoice… Evaporated coconut milk is here. Use sparingly, though – it’s high in saturated fat.

Fres l ngrass? Keep this concentrated extract in the cupboard for the equivalent of 150 sticks. Other spices and herbs available, too.

Bring gluten-free restaurant dining home with a classic cheese and tomato pizza with all the flavour of the original.

Nature’s Charm Evaporated Coconut Milk, £1.84/360ml, wingyipstore.co.uk

Holy Lama Spice Drops, £3.50/5ml, Ocado, Amazon, holylamaspicedrops.co.uk

Pizza Express Gluten-Free Margherita Pizza (10in), £4/310g, Sainsbury’s

Per 100ml O106kcal O 8.4g fat O 6.8g saturates O 4.3g sugars O 0.2g salt

Per drop O 0kcal O 0g fat O 0g saturates O 0 sugars O 0g salt

Per ½ pizza O 350kcal O 9.3g fat O 5.4g saturates O 2.1g sugars O 1.8g salt

The heritage carrots in This luxe-tasting fine this smoothie are cacao powder worked vibrant and earthy. No a treat in our chocolate need to worry about coconut date balls the sugars – they’re all recipe (find it at naturally occurring. healthyfood.co.uk).

Swap peanuts for roasted edamame beans. With a hefty 14g soy protein per pack, they’ll sit well in your desk drawer.

Savse Purple Carrot, £2.49/250ml, Whole Foods Market, Selfridges, savse.com

Sevenhills Wholefoods Organic Cacao Powder, £4.99/250g, sevenhillswholefoods.com

Artisan Snacks Roasted Edamame Beans, £1.20/32g, Ocado, independent health stores

Per 250ml bottle O105kcal O 0.3g fat

Per 100g O 353kcal O 11g fat O 6.8g saturates O 2.5g sugars O 0.1g salt

Per pack (Sweet Chilli) O 138kcal O 6.3g fat O 1g saturates O 1.8g sugars O 0.4g salt

O 0g saturates O 20g sugars O 0.1g salt

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 15


hfg EXPERT GUIDE

SUGAR IN FOOD When is sugar content a concern and when can we enjoy it without fearing for our health? We show you what to watch out for in typical meals


H E A LT H

E

XPERTS CONFIRMED last summer that we’re all eating way too much sugar. As a result, products such as ready-made sauces, pizzas, breads, cereals, drinks, soups and even salads have all been named and shamed for their sugar contents. But the scare stories can be misleading. What most reviews do is simply look at the total amount of sugar in products, rather than the type of sugar – or what else the product contains in the way of nutrients.

THE TWO TYPES WHEN NEW recommendations from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition advised cutting the maximum amount of sugar in half from 10% of daily calories to just 5% (equal to about 30g or 7tsp sugar), they were talking about ‘free’ sugars. Basically the baddies, these include all added sugars, plus fruit juice, honey and any sugars found naturally in syrups or extracts such as maple syrup or agave nectar. The reason? Eating free sugars in large quantities is linked to obesity and dental decay and, when in the form

THE TERMS TO KNOW FREE SUGARS (the ones to limit) O All added sugars,

no matter what they’re called O Any sugars found naturally in a syrup or extract, eg maple syrup, molasses, treacle, rice syrup, golden syrup, coconut syrup and

agave nectar O Fruit juice,

including fruit juice concentrates O Honey

INTRINSIC SUGARS (the ones to enjoy) O Sugars naturally

found in milk, whole fruit and vegetables

of drinks, to type 2 diabetes. The kind we don’t need to worry about are the ‘intrinsic’ sugars found naturally in milk, fruit and vegetables. These come packaged with other valuable nutrients, and we don’t tend to overeat them because all those other nutrients help to fill us up. They’re not as harmful to teeth, either, and tend not to be overloaded with calories.

WORKING IT OUT THE PROBLEM IS, while some foods obviously contain just free sugars (think chocolate, sweets, fizzy drinks and biscuits), many of the foods and meals we eat contain a mixture of free and intrinsic sugars. For example, cereal with milk, a ready-made tomato sauce and a pot of yogurt all contain both types. Unfortunately, the nutrition panels on packs don’t help us to distinguish between the two. Current labelling laws mean manufacturers have to give values for the total amount of sugars in a product, rather than a value for free sugars. It’s this figure that tends to be reported in the media, so a product containing lots of fruit, for example, will score badly. This means we need to look at the ingredients list to get a clearer picture. As a basic guide, alternative names for free sugars include dextrose, maltose, fructose, glucose, any kind of syrup, molasses, corn sweeteners, or any variation of these names. And if a product contains honey, fruit juice or fruit juice concentrates, these also count as free sugars. Even then, it’s impossible to translate the information given into an actual quantity (or

teaspoon equivalent) of free sugars. We can only work out whether most of the sugars are added or occur naturally, and adjust our overall daily intake accordingly.

THE BIG PICTURE WHEN LOOKING AT SUGAR CONTENT, we also need to take into account the whole nutrition package: what else does that food provide in the way of fat, saturates, salt, protein, vitamins and minerals? The HFG team recently came across a document highlighting the sugar content of a range of breakfasts. A smoothie came out as one of the worst choices for sugar, while a blueberry muffin, full English breakfast, pain au chocolat, bacon roll with ketchup, sausage and egg muffin and plain butter croissant were all shown to contain less. The intentions may have been good, but the implication was that all these were better choices as they contained less sugar. Not so. The croissant, which was pinpointed as the best choice for sugar, was considerably higher in calories, fat, saturates and salt, and extremely low in fibre, vitamins and minerals, while the pure fruit smoothie, which came out worse for sugar, was lower in calories, low in fat, saturates and salt, and provided fibre and a range of vitamins and antioxidants. Where does this leave the healthy eater? To point you in the right direction when planning your daily diet, we look at some typical meals and highlight the best – and worst – bits when it comes to sugar. Remember, it’s the free sugars we should limit.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 17


TOTAL SUGARS

33g FREE SUGARS

26.5g (6½tsp)

BREAKFAST

HFG VERDICT

Bowl of wholegrain cereal and milk, wholemeal toast with low-fat spread and honey, plus orange juice PER SERVING O 349kcal O 6.1g fat O 2.2g saturates O 66g carbs O 33g sugars O 4.5g fibre O 11.9g protein O 0.8g salt O 343mg calcium O 5.5mg iron

30g serving of wholegrain cereal and semiskimmed milk A 125ml serving of milk provides around 6g sugars – but these are naturally occurring, so there’s no need to worry about them. However, most cereals contain added or free sugars. The amount can vary widely, so look at labels and choose one containing the least. We’ve chosen one with 6.5g sugars in a 30g

serving. Sugar aside, many cereals are low in fat, high in fibre (if wholegrain), fortified with B vitamins, iron and often vitamin D and help us consume nutrient-rich milk, so they can make an important contribution to our diets. FREE SUGARS = 6.5g

1 slice of wholemeal toast with 1tsp each low-fat spread and honey Bread normally contains a small quantity of free

18 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

sugars, but in this case most come from the honey. FREE SUGARS = 7g

Small glass of orange juice All the sugars in fruit juice are free sugars – even if it’s freshly squeezed. That’s why health guidelines recommend limiting fruit juice to one small glass (150ml) a day. It does count as one of your five-a-day, though, and is rich in vitamin C. FREE SUGARS = 13g

Most (80%) of the sugars here are free sugars, providing almost the entire recommended daily maximum of 7tsp. Having said that, this breakfast is low in fat, saturates and salt, and is high in many nutrients, including calcium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, most B vitamins and vitamin C. HEALTHY BOOST: Swap the juice for a whole orange, replace the spread and honey with 1tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter or opt for a lower-sugar breakfast cereal such as Shredded Wheat, which is sugar free.


H E A LT H

TOTAL SUGARS

5.5g

Poached eggs with grilled tomatoes and avocado on toast

FREE SUGARS

2g (½tsp)

PER SERVING O 470kcal O 25.6g fat O 6.3g saturates O 37.4g carbs O 5.5g sugars O 7.2g fibre O 24.7g protein O 1.3g salt O 158mg calcium O 4.6 mg iron

2 slices of wholemeal toast with 2tsp low-fat spread If you make bread, you’ll know you need to add a little of the white stuff to ‘feed’ the yeast so it springs into action – most loaves contain around 1g free sugars per slice. But the benefits far outweigh this small amount – bread has a range of nutrients, including B vitamins, and wholemeal varieties are a good source of fibre to fill you up. FREE SUGARS = 2g

1 grilled tomato and ¼ avocado The sugar in fruit and veg doesn’t count as a free sugar. FREE SUGARS = 0g

2 poached eggs These are totally sugar free. They come with plenty of protein (important for satiety) and a range of vitamins and minerals. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Glass of water It’s totally sugar free! FREE SUGARS = 0g

HFG VERDICT This meal is low in sugars, but has more calories, fat, saturates and salt than the high-sugar meal. It’s high in many nutrients, though – especially vitamins A, D and E, selenium and zinc. HEALTH BOOST: Watch portions – having just one slice of toast and one egg would bring this brekkie down to 277kcal and 16.4g fat. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 19


TOTAL SUGARS

29g FREE SUGARS

25.5g (6½tsp)

LUNCH

HFG VERDICT

Baked beans on toast and chocolate biscuits PER SERVING O 560kcal O 15.1g fat O 7.2g saturates O 91.5g carbs O 29.3g sugars O 16.2g fibre O 20.4g protein O 2.4g salt O 241mg calcium O 5.7mg iron

1 small pot of baked beans A 200g pot of baked beans provides just under 10g total sugars. At least half of this comes from the tomatoes. The sugar content of baked beans is balanced, however, by the fact that they’re low in fat, high in protein and fibre, and a source of many nutrients including potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, vitamins B1

and B6 and folate. A small pot counts as one of your five-a-day, and eating them regularly fits in perfectly with health guidelines that say we should follow a more plant-based way of eating. FREE SUGARS = 6g (MAXIMUM)

20 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

2 slices of wholemeal toast Around 2g of the free sugars in this dish come from the toast. FREE SUGARS = 2g

2 chocolate biscuits These add 17.5g free sugars to the meal – as well as 225 calories, 12g fat, almost 7g saturated fat but few other nutrients. FREE SUGARS = 17.5g

The key problem here isn’t really the beans on toast (although if you opted for a reduced-sugar variety, you’d have less than 1g free sugars, potentially saving yourself just over 1tsp sugar in this meal). It’s the biccies that turn this into a really high sugar lunch, also adding most of the fat and saturates. HEALTHY BOOST: Replace the chocolate biscuits with a piece of fresh fruit to cut the equivalent of almost 4½tsp free sugars, plus around 12g fat and 7g saturates.


H E A LT H

TOTAL SUGARS

26g FREE SUGARS

2g (½tsp)

Tuna and vegetable rice, plus fruit salad PER SERVING O 523kcal O 5.9g fat O 0.9g saturates O 73.5g carbs O 26g sugars O 14.4g fibre O 48.5g protein O 1g salt O 119mg calcium O 5.2mg iron

Tuna and vegetable rice This homemade dish contains ready to heat brown rice, sprouts, broccoli, chickpeas, tuna in water and a little harissa paste and orange juice – and it’s ready in under 5 minutes. The whole dish provides only 6.5g sugars in total and most of these are from the broccoli and sprouts, so they aren’t free sugars. A hint of orange juice, used to add flavour,

adds just 2g free sugars. FREE SUGARS = 2g

Bowl of fresh fruit salad An average bowl of fruit salad contains around 20g sugars – although this value will vary according to the fruit used. So despite being a high-sugar dish, these are all naturally occurring, so they don’t count as free sugars. FREE SUGARS = 0g

HFG VERDICT This is a great meal, with a minimal amount of free sugars (as well as being low in fat, saturates and salt, and a source of many vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamins A, C and E, and folate). It proves that making your own meals – and opting for fresh fruit – can really help to keep intakes of free sugars down. HEALTHY BOOST: This meal is fine as it is, but if you’re buying a ready-made salad, look at the ingredients list – sometimes sugar is added to dressings. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 21


TOTAL SUGARS

59.5g FREE SUGARS

32.5g (8tsp)

DINNER Sweet and sour chicken (extra peppers and pineapple) and rice, plus a meringue nest, yogurt and blueberries PER SERVING O 658kcal O 4.3g fat O 1.3g saturates O 111.9g carbs O 59.5g sugars O 4.9g fibre O 47.6g protein O 1.1g salt O 178mg calcium O 1.7mg iron

Sweet and sour sauce Most of the sugars in this main dish come from using a ready-made sauce. As a guideline, 150g bought sweet and sour sauce contains 27g sugars. Some of these will be natural, coming from tomatoes, pineapple and other veg – but most (almost two-thirds in one popular brand) are free sugars. In many brands, water is the main ingredient and sugar is second in the list. FREE SUGARS = 17g (approx)

Extra peppers and pineapple Adding extra peppers and pineapple is a great way to bulk this dish out and provide extra fibre – and although these ingredients provide 7.5g sugars, they don’t count as free because they’re naturally occurring. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Chicken Chicken is totally free from sugars. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Blueberries and low-fat natural yogurt These provide 9.5g total sugars but, again, they’re naturally occurring so they don’t count. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Rice

Meringue nest

Even though plain boiled rice is a carb, it’s free from all sugars – all the carbs are in the form of starch. FREE SUGARS = 0g

The meringue nest accounts for 15.5g sugars, all of which are free sugars. Meringue is simply a combo of egg white and sugar. FREE SUGARS = 15.5g

22 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

HFG VERDICT This meal is a mixture of about half and half free and natural sugars. Making your own sweet and sour sauce may seem like a good idea, but if you include sugar, honey and/or fruit juice it may end up with just as much sugar as a ready-made version. But you can always add extra sweetness by including more pineapple. HEALTHY BOOST: An easy way to reduce the amount of free sugars in this meal is to drop the meringue nest – it contains the equivalent of around 4tsp!


H E A LT H

TOTAL SUGARS

21g FREE SUGARS

0g (0tsp)

Homemade chicken and veg curry, plus blueberries PER SERVING O 494kcal O 9.8g fat O 5.4g saturates O 72.7g carbs O 20.8g sugars O 9g fibre O 33.4g protein O 0.9g salt O 101mg calcium O 4mg iron

WORDS: JULIETTE KELLOW. PHOTOS: MELANIE JENKINS, GETTY

Curry sauce Rather than using a jar of ready-made sauce, which often contains added sugars, we made our own curry paste from shallots, lemongrass, ginger, chilli, herbs, spices and garlic. To add sweetness, we blended in fresh ripe mango, then included reduced-fat coconut milk and a little fish sauce. Our sauce contains around 5g sugars but these all occur naturally. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Green beans, carrots and onions The veg in this curry provide around 8.5g total sugars but as they’re naturally occurring, they don’t count. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Rice No free sugars in this. FREE SUGARS = 0g

Chicken Nor in this! FREE SUGARS = 0g

Blueberries An 80g serving (about 2 handfuls) counts as one of your five-a-day. It contains around 7.5g sugars – all naturally occurring, so good for you. FREE SUGARS = 0g

HFG VERDICT With zero free sugars, this is as good as it gets! Yes, the meal is higher in fat and saturates than the sweet and sour meal due to the coconut milk, but it remains lower in calories – and that, after all, is one of the main reasons health experts are encouraging us to cut down on free sugars! HEALTHY BOOST: Don’t overdo the coconut milk or be tempted to use full-fat varieties.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 23


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S H O PPI N G

HEALTHY EATING at WORK C

H

EN

IT

T GET KI

Your guide to

HP HIL

How to eat healthier: PART 4

CLE V E R

W

IT’S EASY TO MAKE poor lunch choices when we’re busy, stressed and hungry. But stock up wisely and plan ahead and you’ll have nutritious DIY options. Turn the page for my simple solutions.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 25


B

REAKFAST IS USUALLY BILLED as the most important meal of the day, but where does that leave lunch? Having a nutritious, filling midday meal is just as crucial if we’re to function effectively until dinner time without snacking or grazing our way through the afternoon. No one functions well on an empty stomach. If you’re stuck in an office all day, chances are you’ll have started thinking about lunch long before elevenses. And if you work in a large town or city, you’ll probably be surrounded by quick meal options to satisfy those cravings. The problem is, these quick-fixes can easily rack up to £50 a week – more when you add coffees, snacks and treats to the bill.

THE REAL DEAL Supermarket meal deals may seem cost effective, but they often encourage us to make bad choices and consume the empty calories in crisps, chocolate bars and fizzy drinks. By mid-afternoon, we feel hungry again as we slide into an energy slump. So it takes a bit of preparation to keep your wallet, your waistline (and, potentially, your colleagues) happy. Over these pages, I’ll show you how to create simple, flavour-packed lunches that will keep your energy levels stable and concentration on point, so you don’t feel the need to reach for high-fat, high-sugar fixes.

SALADS Leaf and veg-only salads are low in calories, but without a protein source they won’t do much to satisfy hunger. Adding boiled eggs, canned tuna or cooked prawns will keep you fuller for much longer.

SNACK MATHS The sums to swot up on for elevenses 2 OATCAKES + 1tsp almond or peanut butter + 1 small apple, sliced

190kcal 1 SMALL POT FAT-FREE GREEK YOGURT + 1tbsp ground flaxseed + 1 small banana, sliced

239kcal 1TBSP UNSALTED PEANUTS + 1tbsp raisins + 1tbsp chopped dried apricots (or, for a treat, 1tbsp plain chocolate chips)

149kcal 2 RYE CRISPBREADS

PASTA SALADS are a great make-in-bulk lunch option, but avoid tossing them in creamy or oily dressings and plump for a tomato salsa instead. Mixing in a few handfuls of crunchy leaves will add texture and filling fibre. 26 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

+ 1 Babybel Light + Handful grapes

152kcal Homemade energy balls made with natural sugars and protein are a great way to satisfy sweet cravings the healthy way. Find a selection of the HFG team’s favourite flavour combinations at healthyfood.co.uk/ 5-amazing-no-cook-energy-bites.


S H O PPI N G

Five grab-and-go healthy lunch options

Kabuto Vegetable Laksa Rice Noodles (£2/85g) A step up from the instant noodles of yesteryear – they’re gluten free and vegetarian, too. Just add boiling water for a meal in minutes.

McCain Ready Baked Jackets (£1.50/ pack of 2) Microwaved jackets can be lacklustre, but these previously slow-baked spuds heat from frozen in just 5 min – and they’re delicious. Top with a small can of reduced sugar and salt baked beans for a classic lunch that’s full of protein and fibre.

Tesco Quinoa & Cauliflower Couscous (£1.50/180g) Just 238kcal per pack. Add some chargrilled chicken pieces, smoked mackerel fillet or cooked salmon for an instant meal.

Bol Moroccan Chicken Tagine g (£3/380g, ( g, Ocado, Tesco) A one-pot hearty meal that provides two of your five-a-day and almost half your daily protein need – and it has just 0.8g salt and fewer than 450kcal. Check out the full microwaveready range at bolfoods.com.

Rod and Ben’s Pea And Mint Soup (£2.99/600g) This satisfying soup will stretch to two lunches, teamed with a small wholemeal roll. Unlike many soups, it has just 0.3g salt per half pot (5% of the daily maximum) – but watch your intake of saturated fat for the rest of the day, as it’s on the high side.

BEWARE THESE ‘HEALTHY’ OPTIONS HFG dietitian Juliette Kellow talks high-street pitfalls OMEAL DEALS

Convenient, yes, but often a nutrition no-no. A BLT sandwich, packet of crisps and can of Coca-Cola typically provides around 750kcal, 20g fat, 40g sugars and over a third of your daily salt allowance – and you’ll probably eat it in 5 minutes flat. Encouragingly, many shops now offer a range of healthier options, so seek these out and change the crisps for fruit and the fizzy drink for water or a diet version. OSUSHI Health guidelines say we should eat two portions of fish a week and one of these should be oily, so fish-based sushi may seem

like a good choice. But a typical pack won’t contain anywhere near enough fish to count as one portion (you need 140g) and there’s usually very little veg involved. Plus, the white rice is low in fibre and usually mixed with sugar, and the soy sauce is high in salt, so high-street sushi isn’t the healthy lunch you might expect. If you’re a big fan, though, choose sashimi over rice-based rolls or look for fibre-rich brown rice varieties, buy packs that come with salad or edamame – and skip the soy. OREADY-MADE SOUPS A bowl of soup is proven to keep hunger at bay, but watch the salt levels as many supermarket and sandwich-shop

options are notoriously high in it. Check out the calories and fat, too – they may surprise you. O CEREAL OR NUT BARS Don’t be wooed by the healthy pull of dried fruit and nuts in snack bars. Many are bound together with oil and sugar – and quite a lot of it! Even ‘natural sugar’ claims for bars made with honey or agave don’t really mean they’re better – it’s still sugar at the end of the day. And while flapjacks may seem a good option, thanks to the oats they contain, they can still be loaded with fat and sugar. There’s no substitute for checking nutrition labels and ingredients. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 27


Five simple make-ahead ’

IN

FI

IL

XE

S

PH S

Pack and chill, then take to work the next

STA-FO O D

BEAN AND FETA FRITTATA serves 2 (or use for 2 lunches)

NUTTY TOFU RICE SALAD serves 2 (or use for 2 lunches)

MED-STYLE PASTA SALAD serves 1

Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/ gas 4. Line an 18cm cake tin with non-stick baking paper. Put 175g frozen broad beans in a mixing bowl, cover with boiling water and leave for a few min to thaw. Drain and put back in the bowl. Mix in 5 eggs, a handful fresh basil, 60g reducedfat feta, a pinch chilli flakes and 3 chopped spring onions. Pour into the tin, then bake for 30–35 min until just set. Cool in the tin, then slice into wedges and chill. Serve with salad and fresh tomato salsa.

Heat a 250g pack ready to heat lime and coriander basmati rice (we used Tilda) according to the instructions. Empty it into a bowl, then add 150g frozen peas or soya beans and 4 chopped spring onions. Leave to cool. Mix in a pinch chilli flakes, 2 chopped satsumas and a 160g pack marinated tofu pieces. Divide between 2 lunchboxes. In a small bowl, whisk 2tbsp each crunchy peanut butter, lime juice and water until smooth. Drizzle over the salads, then cover and chill.

Boil 50g wholewheat pasta according to the pack instructions until al dente, then drain and transfer to a large bowl to cool. (Alternatively, use leftover pasta from the night before.) Mix in 25g sliced dried pitted black olives, 1 large chopped tomato, 100g drained and sliced roasted peppers from a jar, a handful fresh basil leaves and ½ x 125g torn ball light mozzarella. Transfer to a lunchbox, drizzle with 1tbsp thick balsamic vinegar, then cover and chill.

SNACK SWAPS

SAVE 94 calories

SWAP FOR

Maynards Wine Gums (52g) 165kcal

Fill the gap the lighter way with these

By Sainsbury’s Apricots (40g) 71kcal

28 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

SWAP FOR

SAVE 69 calories

OThis snack

O…Or toast

pack of dried apricots is a potassium and iron boost plus one of your five-a-day.

your own: dry-fry 100g unsalted seeds, toss in 2tsp reduced-salt soy sauce and chilli powder to taste, then cool.

Walkers Ready Salted crisps (32.5g) 171kcal

M&S Bombay Spice Super Seeds (25g) 102kcal


S H O PPI N G

LUNCHBOX RECIPES day and pop in the fridge until your break

ROASTED CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS Take off the skin (and save yourself around 30kcal), then serve with a mixed salad and low-fat tzatziki. THAI PRAWN NOODLE BROTH serves 1

TUNA AND POTATO SALAD serves 1

Spoon 2tsp miso paste and 1tbsp Thai curry paste into a 750ml (approx) heatproof jar or container. Add 150g cooked egg noodles, ½ each shredded courgette and large carrot, ½ sliced red pepper, 100g cooked peeled king prawns and a few lime wedges. Seal and chill. Remove from the fridge 20 min before you want to eat. To serve, take out the limes, then top up the jar with boiling water and squeeze in lime juice to taste. Stir, then leave to heat for 5 min before eating.

Boil 140g new potatoes in their skins (sliced if large) for 14 min, adding 100g green beans to the pan for the last 2 min. Drain and rinse, then leave to cool. Mix with 2 handfuls spinach, watercress and rocket salad, a 120g can no-drain tuna and 5 or 6 halved cherry tomatoes, then pack into a lunchbox. In a small lidded jar, shake 2tbsp fat-free natural yogurt with 1tsp dijon mustard. Chill both. To serve, drizzle the dressing over the salad.

bought or home-made options SWAP FOR

SAVE 195 calories OYou’ll take a

Iced doughnut (60g) 250kcal

Kallo Belgian Dark Chocolate Rice Cake Thins (8.9g) 55kcal

similar number of bites with a doughnut or one of these rice cakes and satisfy a sweet tooth – but for a fifth of the calories!

TUNA SARNIE Swap the mayo for fat-free Greek yogurt flavoured with a little mustard. Mix in tuna and some grated carrot, then sandwich in wholemeal bread with baby spinach.

CANNED CHICKPEAS Whiz with a little tahini, lemon juice, garlic and some of the water from the can to your preferred texture for a fuss-free healthy dip. Scoop it up with vegetable crudités. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 29


HEALTHY HABITS to TAKE to WORK

In an ideal world, all workplaces would have canteens serving nutritious food. Alas, few of us enjoy such perks. Here’s how to make your office healthier

1

2

WORKPLACE HABIT

STRETCH YOUR LEGS

As well as making us feel lethargic and giving us bad posture, research shows sitting for hours has more serious health implications, such as increasing our risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Make an effort to stand up every hour and stretch, offer to make the tea round and go for a lunchtime walk. Take one-to-one meetings outside, with a walk around the block and turn group meetings into stand-up affairs – they’re usually shorter for it. Ask your employer to MAKE IT EASIER TO TAKE BREAKS away from your desk. They could organise a lunchtime walking group, negotiate staff discounts at the local gym or introduce a cycle to work scheme. Stand-up desks are worth considering, too, if budget allows.

3

WORKPLACE HABIT

MAKE HEALTHIER FOOD CHOICES

We spend 60% of our waking hours at work, so a significant amount of our food choices are made there. Having healthy cues around will help with better diet decisions. Aim to have a bowl of fresh fruit on your desk at the start of the week, plus other healthy snacks, such as dried fruit and unsalted nuts, in your drawer. Or club together with workmates and take turns to bring in healthy snacks or make lunch – it will save you time and money. Ask your employer to SIGN UP TO AN OFFICE FRUIT BOX DELIVERY SCHEME (see Smart delivery, right) or work with on-site caterers to provide better-for-you choices in the canteen. Could they install a vending machine filled with nutritious snacks instead of chocolate bars? Or suggest they follow Italian food company Sacla’s lead: every Friday, one member of staff makes lunch for the whole team, paid for by the company.

ADDITIONAL WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: PHIL MUNDY, ISTOCK, GETTY

WORKPLACE HABIT DRINK UP It’s easy to forget to drink when you’re busy, which is why many of us become dehydrated at work. Fill a jug at the start of the day and keep drinking. Set yourself regular reminders to down a glass if you need a nudge (there are apps to help). Tea and coffee will also hydrate you, but steer clear of sugary drinks. Ask your employer to INSTALL A WATER COOLER. There’s something far more appealing about sipping chilled water than filling your glass from a kitchen tap that never quite runs cold. Plus, every time you walk by, you’ll be reminded to have a refill.


S H O PPI N G

4

WORKPLACE HABIT

EAT BREAKFAST

We know having a breakfast that combines fibre and protein helps us resist high-calorie, high-fat foods throughout the morning – so make time for breakfast (only 45% of us eat breakfast at home during the week). If you don’t want to get up earlier, prepare something the night before so it’s ready to grab and go, then eat it at the office. Transportable options include boiled eggs, a tub of bircher muesli or a piece of fresh fruit with a pot of low-fat yogurt. Ask your employer to TO PROVIDE BASIC KITCHEN FACILITIES, such as a kettle, microwave and toaster, so you can prepare quick breakfasts and hot drinks.

5

SMART DELIVERY

Have these meals and snacks sent to your home or office

WORKPLACE HABIT

GET AN ASSESSMENT

The British Dietetic Association (BDA) wants employers to offer advice on nutrition through its Work Ready programme (bdaworkready.co.uk), to help reduce the risk of preventable weight-related conditions. Alison Clark, chair of the programme, explains: ‘A dietitian will carry out a workplace assessment to give a clearer picture of what’s needed, whether that’s a new canteen nutrition policy, company health checks or nutrition seminars.’ Ask your employer to READ THE BDA’S WORK READY WHITE PAPER and the workplace wellbeing case studies at healthyfood.co.uk. Both demonstrate where health and fitness initiatives have reduced absenteeism and presenteeism (coming to work when you’re ill) in the workplace, and improved productivity and even company profits.

GONUTRITION (gonutrition.com) No office kitchen? Skip high-fat/salt/ calorie coffee-shop options and order a freshly prepared Gourmet Macro Meals Hamper – seven nutritionally balanced, delicious meals to have hot or cold, for £28.

HEALTHY NIBBLES (myhealthynibbles.co.uk) Vegan or gluten-free boxes, for kids as well as adults. Scale up and order hampers or products for vending machines. Prices from £9.95.

THE GOODNESS PROJECT (thegoodnessproject.co.uk) Treat yourself to an office snack upgrade: start with the Nutty Nibble box at £20, which includes 25 x 40g packs. Or, if you’re feeling flush, splash out and spend £85 for enough bites to feed 35 people! SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 31


Cycle Brazil cancer

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women

9 – 19 October 2017

Join the next Women V Cancer cycle challenge in Brazil and raise funds to fight breast, cervical and ovarian cancers

For information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk events@actionforcharity.co.uk • 01590 677854 Raising funds for these charities:

Registered Charity Nos: Breast Cancer Care: 1017658/SC038104, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust: 1133542/SC041236, Ovarian Cancer Action: 1109743/ SC043478. Women V Cancer is established under the Charities Aid Foundation Charity No. 268369. To take part you need to pay a registration fee of £299 and raise minimum sponsorship funds of £3,300.

ction for charity lifechangingevents


S H O PPI N G

What’s the deal with…

HEMP As heart-friendly seeds and oil or dairy-free ‘milk’, this age-old crop has shaken off its hippy reputation to enter the mainstream

WHAT IS IT? Hemp, also known as Cannabis Sativa, has a cultivation history going back at least 10,000 years; it’s been used to make fabric, paper and, recently, eco-friendly cars. Laws passed in North America in the 1930s lumped hemp in with the narcotic marijuana (same species, different plant) so production was halted, but farming continued in parts of Europe and China.

THE NUTRITION FACTS A highly sustainable crop, it can be eaten in seed form or made into oil, dairy-free ‘milk’ and protein powders. Its nutty taste works in both sweet and savoury dishes – ideal for those with nut allergies seeking an alternative to nut oils for dressings, for example. A 30g serving of seeds can be sprinkled over salads, blended in juices or whizzed into gluten-free ‘breadcrumbs’. And the milk is delicious with cereal and porridge.

Hemp seeds are high in protein (around 9g per 30g) and contain all 20 amino acids (protein building blocks). Both the seeds and oils provide essential fatty acids, while hemp oil has one of the lowest saturated fat contents of all oils (even less than olive oil, although slightly more than rapeseed) and is rich in polyunsaturated fats. Indeed, studies show that hemp seed may be linked to better heart health. Hemp ‘milk’ is a great option for dairy-free diets and is often fortified with calcium and vitamin D.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTO: ISTOCK

FROM THE SHOP TO YOUR TABLE There are plenty of versatile products to help you incorporate hemp into your diet at any time of day. Here are a few of our favourites…

Good Hemp Unsweetened Dairy Free, £1.49/1 litre, Waitrose, goodhempfood.com Per 100ml O23kcal O2.7g fat O0.3g saturates O0.1g sugars O0.1g salt

Linwoods Shelled Hemp, £5.79/225g, Ocado Per 30g O185kcal O15.7g fat O1.7g saturates O0.3g sugars O0g salt

Biona Organic Hemp Seed Oil, £6.99/250ml, health food shops, Ocado Per 1tbsp (11ml) O99kcal O10.2g fat O1g saturates O0g sugars O0g salt

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 33


WHEN FOOD Y Binge eating disorder isn’t just about scoffing a few too many biscuits now and then. It’s a mental disorder that’s most common among the middle-aged. So how do you know when occasional overeating is tipping over into something serious?


H E A LT H

W

^It’s estimated that binge eating disorder accounts for nearly half of all eating disorder cases

_

HEN WE CONSIDER eating disorders we usually think of anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which are both typically associated with teenagers and young adults. But there’s another disorder that’s under-reported and little understood, despite being more common than anorexia, called binge eating disorder (BED). According to a report from eating disorder charity Beat, it’s estimated that around 725,000 people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder. Just under half of these people suffer with BED and the other half with bulimia (anorexia accounts for just under 1% of eating disorder sufferers). Yet it’s only in the past few years that BED has been recognised as a disorder in its own right. ‘Binge eating disorder is much more common than you might think,’ says GP and HFG expert Dr Dawn Harper. ‘Although we have an estimated figure for how many people suffer, we still don’t know the true incidence because so many hide it.’ It can affect both sexes, too. Although it’s thought that eating disorders in general affect many more women than men (around 90% of sufferers are estimated to be women), the number of men and women affected by BED is more equal than for other eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. And, while it tends to develop first in young adults, many people don’t seek help until they reach their 30s or 40s.

THE WARNING SIGNS ‘It’s difficult to recognise a binge eater,’ says a spokesperson for eating disorder charity Beat. ‘They may still eat in a very “normal” way around family and friends, at home and in social settings, because their bingeing will be done in secret. They may become overweight, but not everyone who is overweight is bingeing.’ Some indicators of binge eating disorder include: OBINGEING at least

O SECRETIVE

once a week for three weeks or more

behaviour, such as hiding food

OPLANNING

O FEELINGS of

binges and buying ‘special’ binge foods

extreme guilt after overeating

OANXIETY or

depression

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 35


AN INSIDER’S VIEW Kimberley, 44, links her BED with anxiety

OVEREATING VERSUS BINGE EATING

^It’s associated with a lack of confidence, low selfesteem and anxiety

_

WE’VE ALL HAD TIMES where we’ve eaten to excess and felt uncomfortable for it. We tend to indulge when it comes to holidays and celebrations, opting for extras we know we don’t really need, or use food to comfort negative emotions during periods of stress or upset. But there’s a very clear distinction to be made between these sorts of infrequent behaviours and binge eating disorder. BED is not about indulgence – it’s a mental illness. Binge eaters regularly consume huge quantities of food in a short period, usually in private and regardless of hunger. The disorder is characterised as bingeing at least once a week over a period of three months or more. ‘Sufferers will rapidly eat vast amounts of food until they’re uncomfortably full, often reporting that they’re unable to stop themselves,’ explains HFG dietitian and eating disorder expert Jennifer Low. ‘Although the actual binge consists of a lot of food in a short amount of time, binges can happen several times a day, often in response to stress.’

WHY DOES IT HAPPEN? IT’S ASSOCIATED WITH A LACK OF CONFIDENCE, low self-esteem, anxiety and depression. ‘It’s often about coping with negative emotions,’ says Jennifer. Although the causes aren’t entirely clear, contributing factors may include: O genetics or a family history of eating disorders O hormone imbalances in the brain

36 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: GETTY

‘WE ALL HAVE FOODS we find comforting, but when you have BED you have an uncontrollable urge to eat them – in my case I’m overwhelmingly attracted to processed foods that are high in fat and sugar. I binge to alleviate negative emotions, eating too much too quickly, to the point of feeling physically unwell. If I receive a minor bit of bad news, a binge can last just a few minutes, then I’m back on track. But when something is causing continued feelings of anxiety, I’ll binge regularly over a long period. After every binge, I feel guilty and that I’ve let myself down. It’s not simply a matter of willpower. BED always goes hand-in-hand with another underlying issue, which needs to be treated as well. For me, it’s anxiety. Exercising makes me less anxious, and I’m now doing more things that make me feel good: walking in the fresh air, eating mindfully, being organised. Although I’m not yet in recovery, self-help has helped me to manage my condition. The better I feel about myself, the less frequent the binges. My advice to anyone suffering is to see a GP – the more of us who talk about this disorder, the more it will be recognised as a real problem. To deal with it, first you need to step back and admit there’s something wrong.’


H E A LT H

O stressful or traumatic life events O body dissatisfaction

likely to gain weight and are more likely to suffer associated health risks, including:

O depression or anxiety

O type 2 diabetes

O low self-esteem or lack of

O high blood pressure

confidence O stress, anger, boredom or loneliness O strict dieting

O high cholesterol O osteoarthritis and muscle pain O sleep disturbances O heart disease O increased risk of cancer

THE EFFECTS ON YOUR HEALTH

The disorder affects mental health, too. Emotional and psychological issues are a huge part of BED, and studies have shown that as well as experiencing high levels of anxiety and depression, sufferers have a lower quality of life. As binges are done in secret, people may become socially withdrawn and isolated. ‘It can be difficult to spot binge eating in others as they may go to extreme lengths to hide the behaviour,’ says Jennifer.

‘BINGE FOODS ARE TYPICALLY CONVENIENCE foods, such as high-fat and high-sugar foods like crisps and chocolate,’ says Jennifer. Given the volume of food eaten and the absence of purging (see Bulimia, below), regular bingers are

THE MOST COMMON EATING DISORDERS O BULIMIA NERVOSA

Sufferers tend to restrict food intake, followed by excessive eating and a loss of control. Unlike BED, it involves vomiting or using laxatives to control weight gain. An estimated 1.6 million people in the UK suffer (up to 25% may be male).

^Regular bingers are likely to gain weight and are more likely to suffer associated health risks, such as type 2 diabetes

_

HOW TO GET HELP IF YOU RECOGNISE the warning signs (see p35) in yourself, it’s important to seek help from your GP. ‘Record your triggers and the frequency of bingeing,’ says Dawn. ‘The more information you can give your GP, the better. Don’t be frightened to be completely honest – your doctor will have heard it all before.’ If you feel embarrassed, Dawn recommends taking a friend and showing your symptom diary to your doctor. You may be offered any of the following: O self-help programmes such as books and

online courses O cognitive behavioural therapy O referral to a psychologist or psychiatrist

O ANOREXIA NERVOSA

O medication, including antidepressants

This commonly affects young girls and women, although boys and men can also suffer. It’s characterised by extreme food restriction, excessive exercise with a goal of weight loss and a distorted body image.

or anxiolytics

O EATING DISORDER NOT

OTHERWISE SPECIFIED (EDNOS) This diagnosis used to be given to those who didn’t meet the criteria for anorexia or bulimia, or showed a mix of symptoms – including a significant number with binge eating disorder. The term was replaced with BED in 2013.

‘If your condition has led to significant weight gain your doctor may also want to check you for diabetes and high cholesterol and may offer to help with weight management,’ says Dawn.

WHERE TO FIND SUPPORT ONLINE If you’re concerned about yourself, a family member or friend, find help and information at: O BEAT b-eat.co.uk

O OVEREATERS

O MIND mind.org.uk

ANONYMOUS oagb.org.uk

O SEED Eating

O MEN GET

Disorder Support Service seedeating disorders.org.uk

EATING DISORDERS TOO mengetedstoo.co.uk

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 37


SEPTEMBER

WHAT TO COOK THIS MONTH Our recipe consultant Phil Mundy uses everyday ingredients to create easy, tasty recipes. Each dish is analysed by nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow p79

IF YOU ONLY MAKE ONE THING... This pannacotta is ^such a treat, but has

only 139kcal – that’s lower than many of the creamier fruit yogurts

_

melanie leyshon editor

ALL ES RECIPand triedsted te

38 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


R EC I PE S

RECIPE INDEX WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

p62

44 Pesto and mushroom spaghetti 416kcal 45 Salmon with bulgur and clementine salad 577kcal 46 Pineapple and prawn stir-fry 435kcal 47 Spiced chickpea and chicken fritters 395kcal 48 Korean bibimbap 408kcal

VEGGIE SPECIALS 66 Griddled vegetable and almond quinoa salad 367kcal 67 Grilled aubergines and beans with tahini yogurt 199kcal 68 Sweet potato and fennel parcels 286kcal 69 Spicy cauliflower and chickpea tortillas 337kcal 70 Chickpea, nut and cranberry salad 464kcal

DINNER FOR ONE 51 Creamy mustard and lemon chicken 321kcal

MARY BERRY’S HEALTHIER SUNDAY LUNCH

POWER UP YOUR SALAD

74 Peppadew pepper chicken 445kcal 77 Roasted Mediterranean vegetables 166kcal 77 Cauliflower and fennel roast 103kcal

52 Thai beef salad 468kcal 54 Barley, chicken and mint salad 456kcal 55 Tofu, potato and roasted veg salad 368kcal 56 Cod and feta panzanella 415kcal

EASY THAI SUPPER 59 COVER RECIPE Thai chicken curry 251kcal 59 Ginger rice 177kcal

PUT IT ON THE MENU 60 Warm lentil and beetroot salad 237kcal 60 Lentil ragù with cauliflower steaks 259kcal 60 Chicken tikka with roasted veg and lentils 218kcal

EXTREME MAKEOVER 62 Moussaka 287kcal

SWEET DECEITS 78 Blueberry custard puddings 138kcal 79 Berry pannacottas 139kcal

TURN THE PAGE FOR DIETITIAN JULIETTE KELLOW’S MONTHLY MEAL PLANNER Guide to recipe symbols & nutrition analysis 0.3g salt or less per 100g

vegetarian gluten free dairy free suitable for freezing

At least 6g fibre per 100g or 3g fibre per 100kcal

450kcal or less for a main course; 300kcal or less for breakfast; and 150kcal or less for a starter, snack, drink or dessert

At least 20% of the calories come from protein At least 30% of the RDA per serving

PHOTO: GETTY

3g fat or less per 100g 1.5g saturates or less per 100g 5g total sugars or less per 100g

At least 30% of the RDA per serving

1

The number of portions of fruit and/or veg contained in a serving

O Nutrition is calculated using McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, Seventh Edition, but may vary slightly depending on your ingredients. O All recipes are approved by Diabetes UK as suitable for people with diabetes. O We use standard UK measurements, where 1tbsp is 15ml and 1tsp is 5ml. O For gluten and dairy-free recipes, we recommend you check all product labels. O In vegetarian recipes with cheese, use a vegetarian substitute if you avoid animal rennet. O Our freezing symbol means a recipe can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw and reheat until piping hot. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 39


HFG’S WEEKLY Juliette Kellow HFG NUTRITION CONSULT CONSULTANT

^The keyy to healthy eating is to enjoy it!!_

WEEKDAY MEALS p70

OUR MENU PLAN is designed to help you MEAT lose around 1lb a week FREE MONDAY (and more if you have a lot to lose). It includes BREAKFAST 397kcal 1 segmented orange, 1 chopped at least five portions of peach and a handful raspberries, fruit and veg a day, and topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and two portions of fish 2tbsp unsweetened granola each week, one of them oil rich. We also make SNACK 76kcal 1 oatcake spread with 1tsp no added sure you get enough sugar or salt peanut butter vital nutrients, such as calcium. And, as we use LUNCH 464kcal 1 serving chickpea, nut and many of the delicious cranberry salad (p70) recipes in this issue, SNACK 120kcal there’s no deprivation Bowl of salad with 1 hard-boiled egg involved. Over the and 1tsp light mayo page, you’ll find DINNER 416kcal suggestions for the 1 serving pesto TOTAL and mushroom weekend and the kcal spaghetti (p44) following weeks…

1,473

40 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

p46

TUESDAY BREAKFAST 262kcal 5tbsp bran flakes with 1tbsp sultanas, 1 chopped apple and skimmed milk

SNACK 184kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 thin slice malt loaf topped with 1tsp low-fat spread

LUNCH 425kcal 1 wholemeal pitta filled with 2tbsp guacamole, 2 slices cooked skinless chicken breast and 1 tomato. Plus a handful grapes and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

SNACK 184kcal 30g unsalted almonds

DINNER 435kcal 1 serving pineapple and prawn stir-fry (p46)

TOTAL kcal

1,490


R EC I PE S

DIET PLANNER p62

p69

p78

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST 330kcal

BREAKFAST 371kcal

BREAKFAST 347kcal

2 boiled eggs with 1 slice wholegrain toast topped with 1tsp low-fat spread. Plus 1 orange

170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt with 1 chopped apple, 2tbsp bran flakes, 2tbsp toasted oats, 1tbsp raisins, 2 dried apricots and 1tsp mixed nuts

2 slices wholegrain toast topped with 4tbsp low-fat cottage cheese, 1 sliced tomato and a grind of black pepper. Plus 1 orange

SNACK 179kcal

SNACK 138kcal

1 skinny cappuccino and 1 slice wholegrain toast topped with 1tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter

1 blueberry custard pudding (p78)

SNACK 147kcal Shake made from 200ml skimmed milk and 1 banana

LUNCH 419kcal 1 wholegrain bagel filled with baby spinach, cucumber and ½ small can pink salmon mixed with lemon juice, black pepper and 1tbsp reduced-fat crème fraîche. Plus 1 kiwi

LUNCH 407kcal Large jacket potato with ½ can tuna (in water), ½ chopped red pepper, 2tbsp kidney beans, 2tbsp salsa and salad. Plus 2 handfuls raspberries

SNACK 194kcal

SNACK 120kcal

1 apple, 2 sesame breadsticks and 30g reduced-fat cheddar

4tbsp guacamole with carrot sticks

LUNCH 496kcal 1 wholemeal wrap filled with 2tbsp guacamole, 2tbsp each red kidney beans and sweetcorn, ½ small chopped red onion, 5 cherry tomatoes, fresh coriander, 3tbsp reduced-fat cheddar and a dash of chilli sauce. Plus a handful grapes

SNACK 50kcal 1 apple

DINNER 417kcal DINNER 337kcal 1 serving spicy cauliflower and chickpea tortillas (p69)

TOTAL kcal

1,427

1 serving HFG moussaka (p62) with salad and a 5cm piece granary baguette

TOTAL kcal

1,494

DINNER 428kcal 1 serving Thai chicken curry (p59) with 1 serving ginger rice (p59)

TOTAL kcal

1,459

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 41


WEEKEND MEALS

NOW KEEP GOING...

p45

p79

AROUND 300kcal EACH

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFASTS

BREAKFAST 312kcal

BREAKFAST 284kcal

Toast and shake

1 slice wholegrain toast with 1 small pot reduced sugar and salt baked beans and 1 poached egg

Omelette made from 2 eggs and a dash of skimmed milk, filled with 30g reduced-fat cheddar and 1 tomato

2 handfuls raspberries blended with 1 banana and 200ml skimmed milk. Plus 1 slice wholegrain toast with 2tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter

SNACK 120kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 apple

SNACK 92kcal BLT wrap

15g unsalted almonds

LUNCH 392kcal Ploughman’s lunch made from 30g reduced-fat cheddar, salad, 2 pickled onions, a handful grapes and a 10cm piece granary baguette

LUNCH 548kcal

SNACK 36kcal

SNACK 139kcal

3tbsp salsa with 3 celery sticks

1 berry pannacotta (p79)

DINNER 577kcal

DINNER 417kcal

1 serving salmon with bulgur and clementine salad (p45)

1 cubed lean lamb steak, ½ each chopped red and green pepper and ½ sliced small courgette, threaded on to skewers, grilled and served with 1 wholemeal pitta and salad

1 serving peppadew pepper chicken (p74) with 1 serving cauliflower and fennel roast (p77)

1 wholemeal wrap filled with 1 grilled and chopped lean bacon rasher, 1 tomato, lettuce and 1tsp light mayo. Plus 1 apple

Honey bagel

TOTAL kcal

1,437

TOTAL kcal

1,480

AFTER YOU’VE FOLLOWED our menu planner for a week, create your own using the ideas on the right. Choose ONE breakfast, ONE lunch, ONE dinner and TWO snacks each day. Plus have an extra 300ml skimmed milk in skinny coffees or shakes. 42 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

1 toasted wholegrain bagel with 1tsp each low-fat spread and runny honey. Plus 1 kiwi

Fruit wheats 2 Shredded Wheat with 1 banana, 1 handful raspberries and skimmed milk

Bluberries with granola and yogurt 2 handfuls blueberries topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 2tbsp unsweetened granola

Toast and jam 2 slices wholegrain toast with 2tsp each low-fat spread and no added sugar jam. Plus 1 banana


R EC I PE S

p66

LUNCHES

AROUND 400kcal EACH

p54

DINNERS

AROUND 500kcal EACH

Rainbow salad

Chicken salad

1 serving griddled vegetable and almond quinoa salad (p66). Plus 1 kiwi

1 serving barley, chicken and mint salad (p54). Plus 1 apple

Fruity prawn couscous Chickpea and feta salad Salad made from ½ large can chickpeas in water (drained), cucumber, cherry tomatoes, 50g reduced-fat feta, fresh coriander and 1tbsp fat-free dressing. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt and 1 orange

5tbsp cooked couscous (made with reduced-salt veg stock) mixed with fresh mint and parsley, 1tbsp raisins, 3 dried apricots, 100g pack cooked prawns, ½ large can chickpeas in water (drained) and 2tsp olive oil

Jacket and baked salmon

PHOTOS: ISTOCK. *A SMALL (125ML) GLASS OF 12% ABV WINE IS 1.5 UNITS

Protein crispbreads 4 rye crispbreads topped with 4tbsp low-fat cottage cheese and 1 sliced boiled egg. Plus a handful grapes and 1 kiwi

Guacamole and pitta 1 wholemeal pitta with 4tbsp guacamole and ½ red pepper cut into strips. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt and 1 apple

AROUND 100kcal EACH

Vary your two snacks each day to keep it interesting O Bowl of salad with ½ can tuna

in water (drained) and 1tsp light mayo O 3tbsp guacamole with 1 carrot, cut

into sticks O 1 apple and 1 handful grapes O 1 pear and 1 kiwi O 1 slice wholegrain toast with

1 tomato

1 salmon fillet baked in a foil parcel with garlic, lemon zest and juice and fresh herbs, served with 1 large jacket potato topped with 1tbsp reduced-fat crème fraîche and salad. Plus 2 handfuls raspberries

O 3 celery sticks with a 30g chunk

Lamb steak with new potatoes

O 1 oatcake topped with 1tbsp

Mozzarella and tomato melt 8cm piece granary baguette, halved lengthways and toasted, topped with ½ small ball mozzarella, 1 tomato, fresh basil and black pepper, then grilled until the cheese melts, served with rocket. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt and 1 handful blueberries

SNACKS

reduced-fat cheddar O 1 boiled egg and 1 tomato,

chopped and mixed together O 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt and

2 handfuls raspberries low-fat cottage cheese and 2 chopped dried apricots

1 grilled lean lamb steak, 4 boiled new potatoes in skins coated with fresh mint and 1tsp low-fat spread, and steamed green beans. Plus 1 blueberry custard pudding (p78)

O 1tbsp sultanas and 4 dried

Roast pork

O 1 small (125ml) glass dry white

3 slices lean roast pork with 2 medium roast potatoes, steamed carrots and broccoli, 1tbsp unsweetened apple sauce and fat-free gravy. Plus 1 kiwi

apricots O 1tbsp unsalted almonds

wine* with ice and soda water

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 43


WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

FAMILY MEALS rted! so

This month we bring you a batch of healthy, quick and easy midweek suppers, with chicken, fish and veggie options to please everyone

Pesto and mushroom spaghetti prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 vegetarian 300g mixed baby tomatoes Cooking oil spray 350g wholewheat spaghetti 400g button mushrooms, sliced 4tbsp fresh vegetarian basil pesto 150g baby spinach Zest and juice 1 lemon Pinch dried chilli flakes 25g vegetarian parmesan-style cheese, shaved 1 Heat the grill. Put the tomatoes in a roasting dish and spray with oil, then grill for 10 min or until the skins are blistered. Set aside. 2 Meanwhile, cook the spaghetti according to the pack instructions in a medium pan of unsalted boiling water, until al dente. Drain, reserving a little of the cooking water, then return the spaghetti to the pan. 3 Around 5 min before the end of the spaghetti cooking time, spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set it over a medium-high heat. Cook the mushrooms, stirring, for 5 min or until golden. Add the pesto and enough of the reserved pasta water to make a sauce, then mix gently to heat through. 4 Add the mushroom sauce and roasted tomatoes to the spaghetti, then toss through to coat. Add the spinach, lemon zest and juice, chilli flakes and half the cheese, toss briefly, then divide among 4 plates. Top with the remaining cheese.

2 PER SERVING

Pesto and mushroom spaghetti

416kcal 12.1g fat 2.8g saturates 63.7g carbs 6.8g sugars

12.7g fibre 17.1g protein 0.4g salt 228mg calcium 4.5mg iron


R EC I PE S

Salmon with bulgur and clementine salad prep 10 min cook 5 min serves 4 dairy free 175g bulgur wheat 4 x 150g skinless salmon fillets Cooking oil spray 3 carrots, grated 2tsp grated fresh ginger 1 red onion, finely diced 3 clementines or mandarins, segmented Handful fresh mint leaves, chopped 2tbsp cider vinegar 1tbsp runny honey 2tbsp wholegrain mustard 1 beetroot, peeled and grated Fresh coriander sprigs, to garnish (optional)

1 Bring 750ml water to the boil in a medium pan, then add the bulgur wheat and cook for 1 min. Turn off the heat but leave the pan on the hob for 5 min to dry out the bulgur a little before draining. 2 Meanwhile, season the salmon with ground black pepper. Spray a non-stick frying pan with oil and set it over a high heat, then cook the salmon for 2–3 min on each side or until done to your liking. 3 Put the carrots, ginger, onion, clementine or mandarin segments and mint in a large salad bowl. Mix the vinegar, honey and mustard in a separate small bowl, then add to the salad and toss to coat. Toss in the beetroot and drained bulgur. 4 Serve the salad with the salmon, garnished with coriander, if using.

Salmon with bulgur and clementine salad

2 PER SERVING

577kcal 24.8g fat 4.4g saturates 53.7g carbs 18.6g sugars

9.1g fibre 37.7g protein 0.6g salt 95mg calcium 2.4mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 45


Pineapple and prawn stir-fry prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 gluten free dairy free 220g can pineapple rings in fruit juice (drained and juice reserved), chopped 1tsp cornflour 2tbsp reduced-salt tamari (gluten-free soy sauce) 2tsp toasted sesame oil 20g ginger, finely grated 1 large mild red chilli, finely sliced 2 kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced (optional) 2 red peppers, diced 2 courgettes, halved lengthways and chopped 320g frozen soya beans, thawed 300g peeled and deveined raw king prawns 2 x 250g packs ready to heat brown rice Fresh coriander sprigs, to garnish (optional)

46 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

Pineapple and prawn stir-fry

1 Combine the pineapple juice, cornflour and tamari in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 5–6 min to form a thin sauce. 2 Meanwhile, heat the sesame oil in a wok or large non-stick frying pan. Stir-fry the ginger, chilli, kaffir lime leaves (if using), peppers, courgettes and soya beans for 2–3 min. Add the prawns and cook for 2–3 min until almost cooked through. 3 Add the pineapple pieces and the sauce to the wok or pan and stir gently to heat through and coat the stir-fry mixture.

4 Heat the rice according to the pack instructions. Divide among 4 serving plates with the stir-fry, then garnish with coriander, if using.

3 PER SERVING

435kcal 8.3g fat 1.2g saturates 65g carbs 12.6g sugars

7.8g fibre 28.5g protein 1.2g salt 125mg calcium 4.3mg iron


R EC I PE S

Spiced chickpea and chicken fritters prep 15 min cook 15 min serves 4 200g self-raising flour 1tbsp mild curry powder 250ml skimmed milk 1 egg 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 125g courgette, grated 150g cooked skinless chicken breast, diced 4 spring onions, finely chopped 1 small red pepper, finely chopped ½ x 25g bunch mint, chopped Cooking oil spray 200g low-fat natural yogurt and 70g bag rocket, to serve

1 Sift the flour into a large bowl, then mix in the curry powder and make a well in the centre. Beat the milk and egg together in a separate small bowl, then pour into the well and whisk to combine with the flour. 2 Add the chickpeas, courgette, chicken, onions, pepper and half the mint to the flour mixture. Season with black pepper and combine well. 3 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium heat. Put 4 large spoonfuls of fritter batter into the pan, keeping them separate. Cook for 2–3 min on one side until small bubbles appear on the surface and the underside is golden. Using a spatula, turn each fritter and cook for 2–3 min on the other side until golden. Transfer to

a plate and keep warm. Repeat to make 12 fritters in total. 4 Divide the fritters among 4 plates. Serve with the yogurt, scattered with the remaining mint, with the rocket on the side.

1 PER SERVING

395kcal 6.2g fat 1.5g saturates 59.5g carbs 9.6g sugars

7.6g fibre 29.3g protein 0.7g salt 407mg calcium 4.6mg iron

Chickpea and chicken fritters

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 47


R EC I PE S

Korean bibimbap

Korean bibimbap

Cooking oil spray 200g pack smoked tofu (we used Taifun) 2 x 250g packs ready to heat brown rice 2 carrots, grated, shredded or spiralized 250g baby spinach 250g pack beansprouts 4 eggs 1tbsp toasted sesame seeds 1–2tsp hot chilli sauce (optional) 1 Spray a non-stick frying pan with oil and set it over a medium-high heat. Cook the tofu for 2–3 min on each side until heated through. Transfer to a board, then slice into

48 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

strips and cover to keep warm. 2 Heat the rice according to the pack instructions, then set aside. 3 Put the carrots in a large heatproof bowl, cover with clingfilm and microwave for 1 min. Repeat with the spinach and beansprouts (see tip) in separate covered bowls. Alternatively, steam for 1–2 min. 4 Meanwhile, return the frying pan to a medium-high heat and spray with more oil. Fry the eggs, in batches if necessary, for 2 min or until done to your liking. 5 Divide the rice, tofu and veg among 4 bowls. Top each with an egg, then sprinkle with the seeds and drizzle with chilli sauce, if using.

Tip The Food Standards Agency recommends that all sprouted seeds, such as beansprouts, should be cooked until piping hot, to reduce the risk of food poisoning (simply washing won’t remove potentially harmful bacteria).

2 PER SERVING

408kcal 14g fat 2.8g saturates 51.6g carbs 5.7g sugars

6.9g fibre 22.4g protein 0.3g salt 338mg calcium 4.9mg iron

RECIPES: JESS MOULDS, SARAH SWAIN. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free


ÂŁ5 off

Hansells Starter Kit

quote discount code HFG5


R EC I PE S

DINNER for ONE

Creamy mustard and lemon chicken Don’t wait for company to treat yourself to something a little fancy – this impressive-looking dish is simple to make and ready in a flash prep 10 min cook 10 min serves 1 gluten free 150g skinless chicken breast

1tsp olive oil

RECIPE: LIZ MACRI. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

40g light soft cheese 1tsp lemon juice 1tsp dijon mustard 1tsp wholegrain mustard 175g frozen mixed green veg (such as broccoli, green beans and sugar snap peas) Fresh flatleaf parsley leaves, to garnish (optional) 25g rocket, to serve 1 Slice the chicken breast horizontally through the middle to make 2 thin fillets. Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat, then fry the fillets for 3–4 min on each side until cooked through. Transfer the chicken to a plate, then reduce the heat under the frying pan to low.

Creamy mustard and lemon chicken

2 Add the soft cheese, lemon juice and both mustards to the frying pan, then mix with 2tbsp water. Bring to a gentle simmer, then return the chicken to the pan and cook for 30 sec more or until the sauce is heated through. 3 Meanwhile, steam the vegetables for 4–5 min until just tender. 4 Season the chicken with ground black pepper and garnish with parsley (if using), then serve with the steamed vegetables and rocket.

2 PER SERVING

321kcal 10.8g fat 4.1g saturates 9.9g carbs 6.7g sugars

7.7g fibre 46.4g protein 1.3g salt 203mg calcium 2.8mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 51


POWER UP YOUR SALAD Not ready to hunker down for autumn with heavy evening meals? These pretty, high-protein plates are the perfect bridge between the seasons

Thai beef salad prep 20 min cook 5 min serves 4 dairy free 2 x 200g lean sirloin steaks Cooking oil spray 2 x 250g packs ready to heat brown rice ½ small red cabbage, shredded 2 carrots, grated 2 raw beetroot, grated (or use cooked, diced) Zest 1 lime, juice 2 1tbsp toasted sesame oil 1tsp runny honey 1tbsp reduced-salt soy sauce 1 garlic clove, crushed 40g roasted, unsalted peanuts or cashew nuts, chopped 1 red chilli, sliced, or to taste Handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped 1 Heat a non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Spray the steaks with oil and cook for 2 min on each side or

52 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

until done to your liking. Set aside to rest while you prepare the salad. 2 Heat the rice according to the pack instructions, then transfer to a large bowl and leave to cool for 5 min. Add the cabbage, carrots and beetroot and toss. 3 In a small bowl, whisk the lime zest and juice with the sesame oil, honey, soy sauce and garlic. Drizzle over the salad and toss again. 4 Slice the steak thinly. Divide the salad among 4 serving plates, then top with the steak slices. Drizzle over any meat juices and serve sprinkled with the nuts, chilli and coriander.

2 PER SERVING

468kcal 14.2g fat 3.3g saturates 56.5g carbs 11.3g sugars

6.9g fibre 32g protein 0.7g salt 85mg calcium 3.2mg iron


R EC I PE S

Thai beef salad

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 53


Barley, chicken and mint salad prep 20 min cook 10 min serves 4 dairy free 175g quick-cook barley 1 large avocado, peeled and stone removed Zest and juice 1 lemon 25g bunch fresh mint 25g bunch fresh parsley 1tbsp tahini paste or almond butter 400g cooked skinless chicken breasts, shredded 2 baby gem lettuces, sliced 1 cucumber, sliced 5 spring onions, sliced 100g watercress 3 celery sticks, sliced Fresh red chilli, sliced, to taste

1 Put the barley in a pan and cover with 1 litre boiling water. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to low, cover and cook for 10 min or until tender. Drain, rinse under cold water and set aside. 2 In a food processor, whiz the avocado, lemon zest and juice, two-thirds of the herbs, all the tahini or almond butter, 5tbsp cold water and some black pepper until smooth. Add a little more water if it’s too thick. 3 Combine the cooled barley with the chicken and all the remaining ingredients. Drizzle over the avocado dressing, then toss well and serve.

3 PER SERVING

456kcal 15.8g fat 3.1g saturates 40.8g carbs 3.1g sugars

5.5g fibre 40.3g protein 0.3g salt 161mg calcium 4.7mg iron

Barley, chicken and mint salad

54 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


R EC I PE S

Tofu, potato and roasted veg salad

Tofu, potato and roasted veg salad prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 3 carrots, cut into 2cm chunks 500g potatoes, cut into 2cm chunks Cooking oil spray 1tbsp toasted sesame oil 396g pack firm tofu, cut into 2cm chunks 250g tenderstem broccoli 250g green beans, trimmed 2 courgettes, julienned or peeled into ribbons Zest and juice 1 orange 2tbsp sweet chilli sauce 1tsp smoked paprika 3tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted

1 Heat the oven to 220ºC/fan 200°C/gas 7. Put the carrots and potatoes in a baking tray and spray with oil. Roast for 30 min or until soft and golden, then remove from the oven and set aside to cool. 2 Meanwhile, heat the sesame oil in a non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat and cook the tofu, turning frequently, for about 6 min or until golden on all sides. Remove and set aside. Steam the broccoli and beans for 3 min, then rinse under cold water and drain well. 3 In a serving bowl, combine the roasted and steamed vegetables with the courgettes. 4 In a small bowl whisk together the orange zest and juice, chilli sauce and paprika. Serve the salad

topped with the tofu, drizzled with the dressing and sprinkled with sunflower seeds.

1 PER SERVING

368kcal 13.1g fat 2.3g saturates 44.5g carbs 16.3g sugars

13.3g fibre 19.1g protein 0.3g salt 252mg calcium 4.6mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 55


R EC I PE S

Cod and feta panzanella prep 20 min cook 10 min serves 4 500g skinless and boneless cod (see tip) Cooking oil spray 6 thick slices (about 300g) seeded or wholegrain bread 400g baby plum or cherry tomatoes, halved 150g radishes, sliced 1 red onion, chopped 1 cucumber, diced 75g reduced-fat feta, crumbled Handful fresh basil leaves 2tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 2tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar 1 garlic clove 1 Bring a deep frying pan of water to the boil, then add the fish and cook gently for 4 min. Turn off the heat, leave for 2 min, then drain and leave to cool before flaking. 2 Heat a non-stick frying pan over a

medium heat and spray with oil. Tear the bread into pieces and add to the pan. Fry for 2–4 min (depending on the freshness), tossing, until golden and toasted. Leave to cool, then transfer to a bowl with three-quarters of the tomatoes and all the radishes, onion, cucumber, flaked cod, feta and basil. 3 In a food processor, whiz the remaining tomatoes with the olive oil, vinegar and garlic. Add to the salad, then toss to serve. Tip Replace the cod with 400g cooked peeled prawns if you like.

3 PER SERVING

415kcal 11.6g fat 3.5g saturates 44.6g carbs 10.3g sugars

7.3g fibre 35.2g protein 1.9g salt 296mg calcium 2.8mg iron

RECIPES: NIKI BEZZANT. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

Cod and feta panzanella

56 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


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R EC I PE S

Easy Thai supper Our low-cal curry adds fragrance and flavour to any night of the week

Thai chicken curry prep 10 min cook 45 min serves 6 dairy free Cooking oil spray 2 onions, sliced 4tbsp red or yellow Thai curry paste 750g skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets 4 kaffir lime leaves ½tsp ground cinnamon ½ x 400g can reduced-fat coconut milk (freeze the rest) 150ml very low salt chicken stock 1tbsp fish sauce 450g green beans 4 large carrots, sliced 25g bunch fresh coriander, chopped Lime juice, to taste

RECIPES: SARAH SWAIN. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

1 Spray a deep non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a mediumhigh heat. Cook the onions for 6–8 min until soft, stirring occasionally. Add the curry paste; cook for 1 min. 2 Add the chicken, stir to coat, then add the lime leaves, cinnamon, coconut milk, stock, fish sauce and 100ml water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 30 min or until the chicken is tender. 3 Add the beans and carrots with most of the coriander and cook for a further 5–8 min. Squeeze over lime juice, then serve garnished with the rest of the coriander.

2 PER SERVING

251kcal 8.6g fat 3.5g saturates 14.9g carbs 11.6g sugars

7.5g fibre 29.1g protein 1.2g salt 89mg calcium 2.2mg iron

h

COVfg REC ER IPE

Thai chicken curry with ginger rice

Ginger rice Want a side with that? Try this fragrant rice recipe…

prep 5 min cook 15 min + standing serves 6 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 300g basmati rice, rinsed well 25g fresh ginger, finely grated 2 kaffir lime leaves (optional) 1 Bring 350ml water to the boil in a medium saucepan. Add the rice, ginger and lime leaves (if using), and stir well. Reduce the heat to

a gentle simmer, then cover the pan and cook for 12 min or until the rice has absorbed the water. 2 Remove from the heat and leave to stand for 5–10 min. Fluff the rice with a fork, then serve with the curry.

PER SERVING

177kcal 0.3g fat 0.1g saturates 42.2g carbs 0.1g sugars

0.6g fibre 4.1g protein 0g salt 6mg calcium 0.9mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 59


PUT IT ON THE MENU

READY-COOKED

TURN 4 INGREDIENTS WARM LENTIL AND BEETROOT SALAD

TAKES

5

MIN

Save time and add substance with this good-to-go ingredient

L

ENTILS ARE A GREAT way to add protein and bulk to meat-free dishes. They’re rich in fibre, too, as well as a source of iron, phosphorus, copper, potassium, vitamin B6 and folate. Not sure which colour to choose? Different types are better for different ways of cooking. For example, soft-textured red and yellow lentils are best for soups and dhals, whereas brown and green lentils hold their shape better when cooked, so they work well in sauces, casseroles and pies. It’s the brown and green ones you’ll most often find ready-cooked in cans and pouches. Canned lentils are cheaper, at around 50p per can (choose those in water with no added salt). Pouches are a little more expensive, at around £2 each, but they often come with added flavourings such as herbs and spices, so they make a tasty, fuss-free side dish. Look for nutty-flavoured puy lentils and striking black beluga lentils to make salads more filling.

ADD NUTTY FLAVOUR Merchant Gourmet Puy Lentils With Tomatoes And Basil £2/250g Takes 1 min to heat. Serve with grilled fish or chicken. Per 125g (½ pack) O163kcal O5.1g fat O0.6g saturates O3.6g sugars O1.6g salt

Cook With M&S Puy Lentils, £2/250g

LENTIL RAGÙ WITH CAULIFLOWER STEAKS

Tomato & Basil Sauce, £1.25/350g

CHICKEN TIKKA WITH ROASTED VEG AND LENTILS

Chicken Breast Chunks In A Spiced Tikka Marinade, £4/300g

Beetroot Salad, £1.80/250g

TAKES

15 MIN

Green Lentils In Water, 49p/390g

TAKES

45 MIN

Mediterranean Roasting Vegetables, £1.99/400g


R EC I PE S

into QUICK ON-THE-PULSE MEALS Selected from

237kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 1 min serves 4 Warm the puy lentils in the microwave according to the pack instructions, then tip them into a large bowl. Add the beetroot salad and 4tbsp piri piri dressing, then toss well. Scatter the olives with goat’s cheese over the top, then serve.

Low Fat Fire Roasted Piri Piri & Citrus Dressing, £2/275ml

Spirit Of Summer Fruity Volos Stone In Olives With Goat’s Cheese, £3.25/160g Selected from

259kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 10 min serves 2

Cauliflower Steaks With Lemon & Garlic Drizzle, £2/450g

Basil, 70p/31g

Pour the tomato and basil sauce into a saucepan. Drain the lentils, then add to the pan. Heat gently, stirring occasionally, for 10 min or until piping hot to make the ragù. At the same time, cook 2 cauliflower steaks (the others will keep in the fridge for another meal) in a non-stick frying pan according to the pack instructions (set the drizzle aside to serve). Divide the lentil ragù between 2 shallow bowls, then put a cauliflower steak on top of each and pour over the drizzle. Scatter over a few fresh basil leaves to serve.

Selected from

218kcal PER SERVING

Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Spread the chicken tikka chunks over a non-stick baking tray. Add the roasting vegetables and toss together. Roast for 30 min or until the chicken is cooked and the vegetables are tender and beginning to char at the edges. Scatter the lentils over the chicken and vegetables and stir to mix, then roast for a further 5 min or until hot. Juice the lemon and drizzle over to taste, then serve. Love Life Puy Lentils, £1.99/250g

Lemon, 35p

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 61

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

prep 10 min cook 35 min serves 4


R EC I PE S

EXTREME MAKEOVER

MOUSSAKA prep 20 min cook 45 min serves 6 gluten free 2–3 large aubergines (750–800g total weight), sliced into 5mm thick rounds 375g potatoes, sliced into 5mm thick rounds Cooking oil spray 1 onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, crushed 400g 10% fat lamb mince 2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes 2tbsp tomato purée 2tsp dried oregano, plus an extra pinch ½tsp ground cinnamon 3tbsp chopped fresh mint leaves 200g low-fat Greek yogurt 1 egg, beaten 100g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/ gas 5 and line 2 large baking sheets with non-stick baking paper. Spread the aubergine slices over the baking sheets, then cook in the oven for 15 min. Remove and set aside, but leave the oven on. 2 Meanwhile, bring a medium pan of water to the boil, then add the potato slices and cook for 5 min. Drain in a colander, then rinse under cold water, drain again and set aside. 3 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set it over a medium heat. Cook the onion and garlic, stirring constantly, for 5 min or until softened. Add the lamb mince and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon to break it up, for 5 min. Add the

62 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

chopped tomatoes, tomato purée, oregano, cinnamon and mint and stir to combine. Season to taste with ground black pepper and cook on a low heat for 8–10 min. 4 While the meat mixture is cooking, combine the yogurt and egg in a small bowl, then set aside. 5 Put a third of the meat mixture into the base of a large ovenproof dish. Top with a layer of potato slices, then a layer of aubergine. Repeat the layers until all the ingredients are used up, finishing with a layer of aubergine on top. 6 Pour the yogurt and egg mixture over the moussaka to evenly cover. Crumble over the feta and sprinkle with a pinch of oregano, then cook in the oven for 20 min or until golden and bubbling at the edges. Tip Serve this with a simple salad of ripe tomatoes and red onion, with a good grind of black pepper.

3 MAKEOVER RECIPE

CLASSIC RECIPE

287kcal

606kcal

11g fat

44.8g fat

6g saturates

19.5g saturates

24.4g carbs

14.7g carbs

11.6g sugars

12.8g sugars

6.8g fibre

7g fibre

24.3g protein

36.5g protein

1g salt

1.6g salt

163mg calcium

247mg calcium

3.1mg iron

3.4mg iron

Per serving

Per serving

How it became healthier O It’s traditional to sprinkle aubergine slices with salt, then leave them for 30 min to get rid of the bitter juices before they’re fried in oil. But it isn’t necessary these days as aubergines are far less bitter, so this recipe skips the salting. And as they soak up oil like a sponge when fried, here they’re baked without any oil at all. These simple tweaks cut a considerable amount of salt and fat. O Lamb mince is typically high in fat (around 20%). Using a leaner variety and less of it, and adding more tomatoes plus potatoes makes for a lower-fat but still filling dish. O Traditional moussaka toppings are made from full-fat Greek yogurt and feta, but some are topped with a béchamel sauce (a mixture of flour, butter and milk) and are even higher in calories, fat and saturates than the traditional recipe used for the classic recipe calculation. To cut fat, saturates and calories in the makeover recipe, only reduced-fat dairy products were used.

RECIPE FROM HUNGRY HEALTHY HAPPY BY DANNII MARTIN (JACQUI SMALL, £20). PHOTO: JACQUI MELVILLE

This slimmed-down recipe serves up a fraction of the fat and calories, but all of the big Greek flavours


ONL 287 Y kcal

Madeover moussaka


MENU MENACE

½ carton egg fried rice

4 pieces i off sesame prawn toast

279 kcal 7.4g fat

458 kcal 35.8g fat

Portion of BBQ spare ribs

873 kcal 63.6g fat

64 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

SMART ORDER

SAVE 82kcal a 6.8g faat

173kcal 16.3g fat

SAVE 568kcal 46.1g fat

7 kcal 0.6g fat

5 kcal

½ carton boiled rice

½ bag prawn crackers

19.5g fat

305 kcal 17.5g fat

Crispy pancake roll

ON THE SIDE As a rule, the more things added to rice, the more calories it will contain – opt for plain boiled rice rather than egg or special fried varieties.

MEAT SWAPS Duck dishes tend to contain more calories than anything else on the menu, as the fat is usually left on the meat. Chicken, prawn and vegetable dishes are far leaner choices.


S H O PPI N G

hfg SMARTS SWAP

Having a night off from cooking? Before you ring through your order, check our healthier meal choices to cut calories and fat

MENU MENACE

Chi k and Chicken d sweetcorn soup

COMPILED BY ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Sweet and sour chicken

Crispy chilli beef

170 kcal 3g fat

582 kcal 30g fat

870 kcal 36.9g fat

SMART ORDER

S 9 2

S SAVE 272kcaal 27 18g fat

S 49 99kkcal 16 6.7g g fat

80 kcal 1g fat

3 kcal 12g fat

371 kcal 20.2g fat

Hot and sour soup

Chicken with pineapple

SALT WATCH Chinese takeaways are generally loaded with salt, so don’t be tempted to add more or drizzle over salty soy sauce.

IN THE BAG One-bag ‘takeaways’ from the supermarket tend to have smaller portions. If you opt for one that come with sides you won’t have to add on all the extras – saving money as well as calories, fat and salt.

Beef with green pepper and black bean sauce

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 65


R EC I PE S

Griddled vegetable and almond quinoa salad prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 vegetarian

SPECIALS Our balanced, satisfying recipes make it easy to go meat free once, twice or every day of the week

Griddled vegetable and almond quinoa salad

66 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, chopped Pinch dried chilli flakes 450ml reduced-salt vegetable stock 175g quinoa 400g skin-on butternut squash, deseeded, thinly sliced 1 large red pepper, cut into thick strips 2 courgettes, sliced lengthways Cooking oil spray 150g vacuum-packed beetroot, cut into quarters


ra tantial s b u more s erve the meal, s with boiled ir ines b au erg tatoes in the l p new o r wholemea skins o a bread. pitt TIP Fo

40g roasted unsalted almonds, chopped 75g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 70g mixed salad leaves Lemon wedges, to serve 1 Heat the oil in a large pan (that has a lid) over a medium heat, then add the onion and fry for 5 min or until soft. Add the chilli, stock and quinoa and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, then cover and simmer for 15–20 min until the liquid is absorbed and the quinoa is al dente. 2 Meanwhile, heat a large non-stick griddle or frying pan over a medium heat. Spray the squash, pepper and courgettes with oil. Add the squash to the pan and cook, turning once, for 8–10 min until charred and tender. Set aside, then add the courgettes and pepper to the pan, without crowding (work in 2 batches if necessary), and cook for 5 min, turning once, until tender. 3 Cut the griddled veg into chunks, then fold into the quinoa. Divide among 4 bowls and top with the beetroot, almonds, feta and leaves. Serve with the lemon wedges.

4 PER SERVING

367kcal 13.9g fat 3.2g saturates 47g carbs 18.7g sugars

11g fibre 16.5g protein 1.7g salt 236mg calcium 6mg iron

Grilled aubergines and beans with tahini yogurt prep 15 min cook 15 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free 4 small aubergines (200–250g each), halved lengthways or thickly sliced Cooking oil spray

Grilled aubergines and beans with tahini yogurt

400g can borlotti beans in water, drained 1tbsp avocado oil or extra-virgin olive oil Juice ½ lemon 2tsp toasted sesame seeds ½ x 25g bunch fresh mint leaves 70g baby rocket, to serve For the tahini yogurt 200g low-fat natural yogurt 1 garlic clove, crushed 2tbsp tahini 1 Combine all the ingredients for the tahini yogurt in a small bowl, then set aside. 2 Heat a non-stick griddle or frying pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly spray the aubergines with oil, then put them in the pan, skin-side down, loosely cover with foil and cook for 8 min. Uncover and turn the aubergines, then cover again

with the foil and cook for 5–6 min more until tender and golden. Transfer to a tray or platter and slash the flesh lengthways with a knife. 3 Mix the beans with the oil and lemon juice, then spoon over the aubergines. Add a few dollops of the tahini yogurt, then sprinkle with the sesame seeds, mint and a grind of black pepper. Serve with the rocket and the rest of the tahini yogurt on the side.

3 PER SERVING

199kcal 10.3g fat 1.9g saturates 15.8g carbs 8.1g sugars

10.5g fibre 11.2g protein 0.1g salt 213mg calcium 2.2mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 67


Sweet potato and fennel parcels prep 15 min cook 40 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free 600g sweet potatoes, scrubbed and cut into thin slices 2 small fennel bulbs, sliced 1 small red onion, sliced 1tbsp olive oil 100g ricotta, crumbled 40g walnuts, chopped 2tbsp snipped fresh chives 70g mixed leaves, to serve For the dressing Juice 1 orange 2tsp dijon mustard

Sweet potato and fennel parcels

1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Cut out 4 large squares of foil and 4 squares of non-stick baking paper (each about 30x30cm). Arrange the foil squares over 1 or 2 large baking sheets, then put a paper square on top of each to create 4 double-layer squares. 2 Put the sweet potatoes, fennel and red onion slices in the centre of each square. Drizzle with the oil and season with black pepper, then fold the edges of the squares in to make 4 tightly sealed parcels. 3 Cook in the oven for 35–40 min until the veg are tender (open a parcel to check; take care as the steam that escapes will be hot). 4 To make the dressing, shake the orange juice and mustard together in a small lidded jar until combined. 5 Open the parcels and scatter with the ricotta, walnuts and chives. Serve with the leaves and dressing.

3 PER SERVING

286kcal 13.2g fat 3g saturates 37.2g carbs 13.3g sugars

68 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

8.7g fibre 7.1g protein 0.4g salt 140mg calcium 1.9mg iron


R EC I PE S

Spicy cauliflower and chickpea tortillas

Spicy cauliflower and chickpea tortillas prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 vegetarian dairy free 1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 small head cauliflower, cut into small florets 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 large carrot, grated 400g can chopped tomatoes 2tbsp tomato purée 1–2tsp chipotle paste 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 4 wholemeal tortillas 25g bunch fresh flatleaf parsley, chopped

75g baby spinach and 4tsp hot chilli sauce (optional), to serve 1 Heat the olive oil in a large pan (that has a lid) over a medium-high heat. Add the onion and fry for 5 min or until soft. Stir in the cauliflower florets and cook for 3–4 min until light golden. 2 Add the garlic and carrot to the pan and cook for 1 min. Add the tomatoes, tomato purée, chipotle paste and chickpeas, then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered, for 10–12 min until the cauliflower is tender and the liquid reduced and thickened. When it’s almost ready, warm the tortillas to the pack instructions.

3 Stir the parsley into the spicy cauliflower and chickpea mixture, then serve with the tortillas, spinach and hot chilli sauce, if using. To freeze Cool, then freeze the cauliflower mixture at the end of step 2. Thaw fully before reheating until hot, then complete the recipe.

5 PER SERVING

337kcal 8.4g fat 2g saturates 54.6g carbs 15.9g sugars

11.7g fibre 14.3g protein 0.9g salt 196mg calcium 4mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 69


R EC I PE S

Chickpea, nut and cranberry salad prep 15 min cook 5 min serves 4 vegetarian dairy free

Chickpea, nut and cranberry salad

1 Shake all the dressing ingredients together in a small lidded jar to combine, then set aside. 2 Toast the hazelnuts and almonds in a dry non-stick frying pan over a medium heat for 3–4 min; set aside. 3 Put the spinach, carrot, courgette and chopped mint in a large salad bowl. Drizzle over the dressing and toss gently to combine. Warm the pittas to the pack instructions. 4 Divide the salad among 4 plates, then scatter over the chickpeas, dates, cranberries and toasted nuts, and season with black pepper. Serve with the warm pittas and extra mint.

3 toast

TIP To seeds, min

the cu m in a dry e toss th frying pan k ic t s heat n no edium nd m a r a t ove n a r rag until f risp. c

70 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

PER SERVING

464kcal 17.9g fat 2g saturates 61.8g carbs 25.1g sugars

11.4g fibre 15.8g protein 0.7g salt 140mg calcium 5.4mg iron

RECIPES: SALLY PARKER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

30g hazelnuts, chopped 30g almonds, chopped 100g baby spinach 1 large carrot, grated, shredded or spiralized 1 large courgette, grated, finely shredded or spiralized ½ x 25g bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped, plus leaves to garnish 4 round wholemeal pittas 400g can chickpeas in water, rinsed and drained 4 mejdool dates, stones removed, chopped 30g dried cranberries For the dressing 2tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1tbsp white wine vinegar or white balsamic vinegar 2tbsp orange juice 1tsp toasted cumin seeds (see tip)


Ever so slightly

The Spiralizer. Swap spaghetti for courgetti. Amaze your friends. Surprise your guests. Fool your kids.

69 stores nationwide lakeland.co.uk


How much

OMEGA-3 in our fish?

These essential fats help keep the heart, brain and eyes healthy. We compare amounts in some fish and shellfish favourites to help you get enough

GA-n3 OME es show

valu are per FISH 100g R AWerw ise

T

he Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) says we should have around 3g (3,000mg) omega-3 fats a week. Oily fish is undoubtedly the best source, and the Department of Health translates the SACN advice into eating two portions of fish a week (where a portion is around 140g cooked or 170g raw), including one oily variety. These are large portions, however, so you may need to have fish more than twice a week to meet the recommendations. OThe reality is most of us fail to eat

72 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

even one portion a week – on average, adults manage just one-third of a serving of oily fish a week and teenagers just one-tenth of a serving. OAs our chart shows, it isn’t only oily fish that provide omega-3 fats – shellfish contain good amounts and white fish is also a source. OSome plant foods also contain omega-3s, but only fish has the ‘ready made’ long-chain type that’s thought to be most beneficial to our health. For this reason, vegetarians may want to consider a supplement.

COMPILED BY JULIETTE KELLOW. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

unless oth d state


H E A LT H

Cod

70mg

Plaice

160mg

Brown and white crabmeat (boiled)

585mg

Seabass

1,200mg

Fresh tuna

80mg

Squid

400mg

Rainbow trout

1,030mg

Farmed salmon

2,210mg

King prawns

110mg

Mussels (boiled)

570mg

Sardines

1,110mg

Mackerel

2,600mg SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 73


R EC I PE S

y r a M

s ’ y Berr

HEALTHIER SUNDAY LUNCH Y EAS DISH six

for Peppadew pepper chicken prep 10 min cook 1 hr 40 min serves 6 dairy free 375g jar mild peppadew peppers 2tbsp oil 2 onions, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 3tbsp flour 150ml cold reduced-salt chicken stock 2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes 2tbsp tomato purée 2tbsp brown sugar 12 chicken thighs, skinned, but bone in 300g long-grain rice 2tbsp chopped fresh parsley, to garnish

74 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

The GBBO judge isn’t all about cakes and pastry – she also likes to cook healthier dishes. Try her easy, tasty alternative to a traditional roast and trimmings

1 Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. 2 Put 15 peppadew peppers from the jar (you’ll need a little of the juice in step 6) into a processor or blender and whiz until chopped very finely. 3 Heat the oil in a large flameproof casserole. Add the onions and fry over a high heat for about 5 min until starting to soften. Add the garlic and fry for a further 1 min. 4 Put the flour in a bowl and mix with a third of the chicken stock and all the chopped tomatoes to make a smooth paste. 5 Add the remaining stock to the casserole with the tomato purée, sugar, whizzed peppadews and the flour paste. Stir and bring to the boil. 6 Add 3tbsp peppadew juice from the jar and the chicken thighs, then season with pepper. Stir and bring back to the boil. Cover with a lid and transfer to the oven for 1 hr–1 hr 30 min until the chicken is tender. 7 Meanwhile, cook the rice

according to the pack instructions. When the chicken is cooked, add more black pepper, if needed, then sprinkle with the parsley and serve with the rice. TO PREPARE AHEAD Cool the chicken mixture at the end of step 6, then store in the fridge for up to a day. Reheat on the hob or in a low oven until piping hot, and complete the recipe. To freeze, cool, then freeze for up to 2 months. Thaw completely before reheating thoroughly (adding a touch more stock if it’s a little thick) as above.

2 PER SERVING

445kcal 7.3g fat 1.2g saturates 71.5g carbs 23g sugars

4.2g fibre 27.3g protein 0.6g salt 59mg calcium 2.2mg iron


^

This is a very simple chicken casserole, as the thighs aren’t browned ahead. The sauce is spicy and flecked with the peppadew peppers

_

Peppadew pepper chicken


Roasted Mediterranean vegetables

^

These veg are delicious served hot or cold. I cook them in two tins to ensure they’re chargrilled – if there are too many vegetables piled into one tin they will create too much steam and will be wet and soggy. To serve cold as a salad, tip into a bowl after scattering with basil and leave to cool

_


R EC I PE S

Roasted Mediterranean vegetables prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 6 vegetarian gluten free dairy free

This is a hearty side ^ dish to rival roast potatoes

_

2 aubergines, cut into 5cm cubes 6tbsp olive oil 4 courgettes, halved horizontally and thickly sliced 2 red peppers, deseeded and cut into 2cm cubes 1 onion, roughly sliced 2tbsp balsamic vinegar 3tbsp fresh basil leaves 1 Preheat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. 2 Scatter the aubergines in the base of a roasting tin. Drizzle over half the olive oil and season with freshly ground black pepper. 3 Put the remaining vegetables in another roasting tin, then drizzle with the remaining oil and season with pepper. 4 Roast both tins in the oven for 30–35 min until the vegetables are just soft and tinged brown. 5 Tip into a serving dish, drizzle with the vinegar, scatter the basil over the top and serve immediately. TO PREPARE AHEAD Complete the recipe up to 8 hr ahead, then either serve cold or reheat the veg in a large roasting tin in a hot oven for about 15 min.

4 PER SERVING

166kcal 12.1g fat 1.8g saturates 10.7g carbs 9.7g sugars

6.4g fibre 4.2g protein 0g salt 60mg calcium 1.8mg iron

Cauliflower and fennel roast

Cauliflower and fennel roast prep 10 min cooks 40 min serves 6 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 2 fennel bulbs, a few fronds reserved to garnish (optional) 1 large cauliflower 3tbsp olive oil 1 Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7 and line a baking sheet with non-stick baking paper. 2 Trim off the tops and bottoms of the fennel bulbs. Slice them in half lengthways, then into 4 to 6 wedges. Bring a pan of water to the boil, then add the wedges and boil for 5 min. Drain well. 3 Cut the cauliflower into mediumsize florets, then put them on the baking sheet with the fennel wedges. Drizzle over the oil and

season well with freshly ground black pepper. 4 Roast in the oven for 30–35 min until golden brown. Sprinkle with fennel fronds, if using, to serve.

2 PER SERVING

103kcal 6.2g fat 0.9g saturates 8g carbs 5.6g sugars

5.1g fibre 4.4g protein 0g salt 44mg calcium 0.9mg iron

O Recipes from Mary Berry’s Family Sunday Lunches (Headline, £25), out on 8 September. Photos: Georgia Glynn Smith. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 77


SWEET DECEITS

Tasting far more indulgent than they really are, our creamy desserts are a low-calorie dream for waist watchers

Blueberry custard puddings prep 15 min cook 5 min + cooling + chilling makes 6 vegetarian gluten free 100ml skimmed milk 410g can light evaporated milk 2tbsp custard powder 1tsp vanilla bean paste Calorie-free sweetener, to taste 150g fat-free Greek yogurt 400g frozen blueberries, thawed

Blueberry custard puddings

1 Put the skimmed and evaporated milks, custard powder and vanilla bean paste in a bowl and stir with a whisk until well blended. 2 Transfer the mixture to a pan and heat over a medium heat, stirring, for about 4–5 min until thickened. Stir in sweetener to your preferred taste and leave to cool in the pan, covered with clingfilm (it should touch the surface to prevent a skin forming) for 30 min. 3 Gently stir in half the yogurt. Divide three-quarters of the blueberries with any juices among 6 glasses, then pour over the custard. Add the remaining berries and chill for at least 1 hr. 4 Top with the remaining yogurt.

PER PUDDING

138kcal 3g fat 1.7g saturates 19.9g carbs 15.3g sugars

78 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

1.1g fibre 8.8g protein 0.3g salt 231mg calcium 0.4mg iron


R EC I PE S

Berry pannacottas

Berry pannacottas prep 15 min cook 5 min + chilling makes 4 gluten free

RECIPES: SARAH SWAIN. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

Cooking oil spray 5 gelatine sheets 250ml light evaporated milk 1tsp vanilla bean paste Calorie-free sweetener, to taste 250g fat-free berry yogurt (flavour of your choice) 250g fresh or frozen blueberries or raspberries Fresh mint leaves, to decorate 1 Lightly spray 4 x 150ml ramekins or tea cups with oil. Soak the gelatine in a small bowl of cold water for 5 min, then drain and squeeze out excess water. 2 Put 6tbsp evaporated milk with the vanilla bean paste in a medium saucepan. Heat over a low heat until the liquid starts to simmer. Remove from the heat, then add the drained gelatine and whisk it into the milk mixture until dissolved. Add the remaining evaporated milk and sweetener to taste and stir well. 3 Whisk the yogurt into the milk mixture until well combined. Divide among the prepared ramekins or cups and chill for 2–3 hr until set. 4 Meanwhile, put the berries in a microwave-proof bowl and cook on high for 30–40 sec, or heat gently in a pan until the juices start to seep (allow longer if frozen). Stir, then chill in the fridge until ready to serve.

5 Turn out the panacottas on to serving plates (see tip) or serve in the ramekins or cups. Top with the berries and juices and mint leaves. Tip To loosen the pannacottas, dip each ramekin or cup into a bowl of warm water for a few sec. Carefully turn on one side to create an air pocket, then turn out.

PER PANNACOTTA

139kcal 2.8g fat 1.6g saturates 19g carbs 18.6g sugars

1.3g fibre 10.2g protein 0.3g salt 262mg calcium 0.5mg iron

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 79


GOING DAIRY FREE

Laura Day investigates the growing trend to avoid dairy, plus the nutrition pros and cons of milk alternatives

80 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016


NUTRITION

I

F YOU ASKED SOMEONE five years ago what type of milk they preferred, you’d have got a pretty straightforward answer: skimmed, semi or full fat – maybe soya at a push. Fast-forward to the present day though, and the answer is likely to be very different. Cows are no longer the only providers of this staple. These days we’re buying alternatives to dairy made from many different sources: oats, rice, hemp, nuts – even peas. These ‘milks’ in various guises and varying shades of white/cream/beige are no longer a limited choice for the few. In fact, every year more of us are saying no to cow’s milk as trendy premium nut ‘mylks’ crop up in the nation’s health-crazed capital. So what’s changed?

IT’S THOUGHT AROUND one in five UK households have swapped regular milk for dairy-free alternatives. Between 2011 and 2013, our yearly consumption of free-from milks soared from 36 million to 92 million litres, while last year Waitrose reported its sales of almond milk had overtaken soya milk for the first time. This growing appetite for alternative milks goes hand-in-hand with our increasing dietary awareness (a good thing), better allergy labelling (a great thing) and the current vogue for celebrity and online food blogger endorsement (more dubious). The feeling is, if the glowing elite is saying that cow’s milk is bad for them, the same may be true for us too, right? A full-blown allergy to the protein in milk (which sets up an immune response) is rare. That doesn’t stop more of us than ever identifying with the symptoms of lactose intolerance, and the broad-brush solution is increasingly to self-diagnose and cut out an entire food group. So what’s really going on?

FROM BIRTH WE PRODUCE an enzyme called lactase. This breaks down the lactose (natural dairy sugar) in milk so that it can be absorbed into the blood. Intolerance occurs when we don’t produce enough lactase, so lactose remains undigested and ends up in the gut, where it ferments. This causes unpleasant side effects, including: O flatulence O diarrhoea O bloating O stomach cramps/rumbling O nausea ‘Lactose intolerance is a difficult one, as even people who are intolerant can actually tolerate some lactose in their diet,’ says Dr Miranda Lomer MBE, senior consultant dietitian in gastroenterology at Guy’s and

St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. ‘People who say they can’t tolerate milk find they can spread a small amount throughout the day – a dash in tea, say, as opposed to a latte.’ From birth, milk is vital to our development, either in the form of breast milk or infant formula. Once we hit our first birthday, we’re steered on to a trajectory of drinking cow’s milk for strong teeth and healthy bones. It’s a great energy source, full of protein, and packed with vitamins and minerals – the big one being calcium. It’s recommended that by the time we’re adults we get around 800mg calcium a day. ‘The reason we look to milk for calcium is that it’s very easily absorbed due to the way it’s contained within dairy,’ says Miranda. ‘Alternative milks, while fortified, don’t contain the same structures that allow calcium to be so easily absorbed in the gut. Dairy-free milks can be consumed as part of a healthy, balanced diet but we should be careful not to give regular milk a bad name – if you’re cutting it out, you need to make sure you’re getting nutritional diversity to make up for it.’ SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 81


SO IS LACTOSE INTOLERANCE increasing, or are more of us simply following a trend? Ethnicity plays a part. Around 90% of the population in Asian countries are lactose intolerant because milk doesn’t form a huge part of the diet after weaning, but in the UK, outside the Asian community, it’s rare for us to stop producing lactase. In fact, only about 5% of the UK population are lactose intolerant. What’s perhaps more common, explains Miranda, is secondary lactose intolerance. ‘This is related to a temporary problem, such as gastroenteritis, when the gut has become sensitised,’ she says. ‘But we can usually recover from these incidences quickly.’ Her advice? To add dairy gradually back into your diet after the problem has been resolved.

LACTOSE ISN’T THE ONLY TROUBLEMAKER. In recent years, we’ve heard about the digestive struggles some people seem to have with a particular protein found in milk. Naturally, the food industry has come to the rescue with a dairy-based milk that’s free from this protein. Cow’s milk contains two types of casein (milk proteins): A1 and A2. The A1 protein is the dominant protein in the milk produced in Europe. But according to some, many of us may be struggling to digest A1. Indeed, although research is scant, Australian-founded company a2 Milk insists those who struggle to digest ordinary milk may find solace in the alternative, naturally occurring A2 protein. Some UK farmers are now rearing cows that produce milk containing only A2. Interestingly, although A2-containing milk still contains lactose, research published earlier this year by Professor Sun Jianquin from Huadong Hospital in Shanghai found improved gastrointestinal symptoms in self-reporting lactose-intolerant subjects when they drank A2 milk – indicating, perhaps, that it’s not lactose that’s causing the problem but the A1 protein. This area needs considerably more research, especially in light of a review from the European Food Safety Authority in 2009, which looked at all the available studies into the two proteins and concluded there was insufficient evidence to support the benefits of A2. ‘There’s a lot of misinformation out there and I think it goes along with current diet crazes such as gluten-free eating,’ says Miranda. ‘More of us can tolerate milk than we think, and, for the majority, it should be included in a healthy, balanced diet.’

82 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

COW’S MILK (semi-skimmed and skimmed) BENEFITS It’s an easily available staple. A source of protein, calcium, iodine and vitamin B2 and particularly high in vitamin B12. Skimmed milk contains slightly higher levels of calcium than semi-skimmed (which in turn has more than whole milk) due to the processing. Skimmed milk has had most of the fat removed and is a great choice if you’re watching your calorie and fat levels. DOWNSIDES Small numbers of people have a full-blown allergy to the proteins in cow’s milk and some are intolerant to lactose – although lactose-free versions of cow’s milk are now readily available.

ALMOND MILK (unsweetened) BENEFITS It’s dairy free, low in fat and calories, and, unless you buy an organic version, usually fortified with calcium and vitamins D, E, B2 and B12. DOWNSIDES It’s low in protein and can’t be used as a substitute milk for toddlers due to low calorie levels. Although some contain vitamins D and E, these are fat soluble, so may not be absorbed unless you’re having the milk with a higher-fat food.

HEMP MILK BENEFITS It’s dairy free and hemp seeds are rich in short-chain omega-3s (the ones found naturally in plant foods) and omega-6. Often fortified with calcium and vitamin D, so make sure you read the label. DOWNSIDES It’s relatively low in protein compared with other milks. And it isn’t so readily available, although as it becomes more popular it’s entering the mainstream. Read more on p33.


NUTRITION

Protein (g)

Calcium (mg)

46

1.7

1.1

4.7

3.5

120

(skimmed)

34

0.3

0.1

4.8

3.5

125

ALMOND

27

2.2

0.4

0.2

0.7

120

HEMP

40

2.7

0.3

1

0.8

120

COCONUT

28

1.9

1.7

2.1

0.3

120

RICE

50

1

0.1

5.6

0.1

120

OAT

45

1.4

0.3

3.7

0.5

120

43

2.4

0.4

2.2

3.1

130

26

1.6

0.2

0.2

2.4

120

47

1.8

1.1

4.9

3.6

129

62

3.7

2.4

4.4

3.1

100

COW’S

(unsweetened)

IRUWLƓHG

(g)

Sugars

COW’S (semi-skimmed)

(g)

Saturates (g)

BENEFITS It’s dairy free. Many are fortified with calcium and vitamin B12. DOWNSIDES It contains low levels of arsenic, and for this reason the Food Standards Agency advises against children under four-and -a-half having it at all (although the amounts of arsenic are too small to be a problem for adults). It’s higher in sugars than other milk alternatives.

Fat

RICE MILK

Per 100ml

kcal

COCONUT MILK BENEFITS It’s dairy free and has a pleasing taste, making it one of the most popular alernatives. It’s fortified with vitamin B12 and vitamin D. DOWNSIDES Although low in natural sugars and calories, it contains more saturated fat than other milk, including semi-skimmed. Plus it’s not all that comparable to cow’s milk from a nutrition point of view.

OAT MILK BENEFITS It’s dairy free and can be used as a milk replacement from the age of two if you choose the higher-fat varieties (such as Oatly Foamable). Oat milks are often a source of fibre, in particular beta-glucan, a type of soluble fibre linked to improved blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Some brands have added calcium and sometimes vitamins D, B2 and B12. DOWNSIDES It’s relatively low in protein.

SOYA VZHHWHQHG DQG IRUWLƓHG

SOYA (unsweetened)

A2 (semi-skimmed)

GOAT’S (full-fat)

A2 MILK SOYA MILK (sweetened NUTRITION: JENNIFER LOW. PHOTOS: GETTY

and unsweetened) BENEFITS It’s dairy free but almost comparable to cow’s milk in its high protein content. Plus it’s low in fat, and a source of calcium if fortified. DOWNSIDES People who are intolerant to the protein in cow’s milk are often intolerant to the protein in soya milk, too. In fact, there may be up to a 50% crossover, so it may not work as an alternative for everyone.

BENEFITS It has the same nutrition profile as regular cow’s milk – it’s just free from the A1 protein. It may be easier for some people to digest, although this isn’t proven. DOWNSIDES It’s a lot more expensive than standard milk.

GOAT’S MILK BENEFITS Nutritionally, it’s the most similar to full-fat cow’s milk. Some people who can’t tolerate cow’s find goat’s milk easier to digest. DOWNSIDES Around 90% of people with a true allergy to cow’s milk protein (as opposed to lactose intolerance) will also have an allergy to goat’s milk protein. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 83


HEALTHY Tim Spector professor and researcher

Interest in the link between gut bacteria and our health and weight is growing. We talk to Tim Spector, professor of genetics and lead investigator into gut microbes in the UK, about the impact of his research on his own diet

M

y health now is pretty good, but five years ago, at 53, I was 8kg heavier and did little exercise. It was only when I suffered a scare, while ski touring in the Alps, that I had my health wake-up call, 3,000 metres up a mountain. I had a mini stroke in my eye and suffered double vision for two or three months. It was debilitating and I couldn’t work. Experts couldn’t agree if it was bad luck or the altitude and I still don’t know.


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

At 5ft 10½in and 13st 1lb (83kg), I wasn’t obese but I was above average weight. I wanted to improve my diet, so I started researching different diets and this was the impetus for writing my book, The Diet Myth. I was also trying to get off my blood pressure tablets and live longer than my father, who died at 57 of a heart problem. I gave up meat for four years and was vegan for six weeks, but couldn’t live without dairy, especially cheese. I felt it would seem like a very long life! The biggest thing was learning about being a vegetarian. In the end I became a pescetarian, with the occasional bit of meat. I’d been eating too many carbs (mainly pasta and rice) and not much variety in my fruit and veg. I cut down on sugar and found replacing carbs with good fats was a better way forward. My diet is now mainly plant and dairy based and full of diversity. I have some meat once a fortnight, because after three years of no meat I got vitamin B12 deficiency, and an occasional bit of meat solves that problem. I’m a big believer that diet affects your gut microbes, and a healthy gut can have a positive effect on your health. When I had chronic sinusitis, I would take antibiotics six times a year, but since looking after my gut health I’m much less prone to it. I don’t take antibiotics and I’ve only had a couple of colds in the past five years. I eat to improve my gut health. For breakfast, I’ve switched from granola to kefir [a fermented yogurt-type milk drink you can buy in supermarkets]. Having kefir at least twice a week will give you the best benefits. Kefir and kombucho [a fermented tea] provide a great variety of microbes. Some probiotic

products work for some people. My mum had bowel problems and a product like Yakult sorted her out. Since losing weight I’m more energetic. It’s easier to cycle – when you’re lighter you can go further. I was aware I was building up internal visceral fat – and since losing weight and eating more probiotic foods I’ve reduced it by a third. When you overeat, this is where fat gets stored and it’s a big risk factor for disease. I’ve also been able to reduce my blood pressure medication to one tablet (and take a low dose). I cook more veggie food. The recipe delivery box Hello Fresh! introduced me to new ways of cooking vegetables. And I like cooking from a book called Happy Salads by the chefs at Leon (Conran, £15.99). I also get an organic food delivery, which forces me to cook with unusual vegetables. The key to good gut health is to explore different foods all the time. It’s clear that the more diverse your diet, the

more diverse your microbes and the better your health at any age. I enjoy eating out and like the new trend of having vegetables in an exciting way, with meat as a smaller accompaniment. I like the mezze style dining you get in Turkish and Lebanese restaurants. I fast occasionally as it’s good for your microbes. When you do this, a new team of bacteria comes out and cleans up your gut. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all diet, and there’s no need to follow one book – work out general principles for yourself, but cut back on meat and eat a diversity of plant-based foods. O Tim Spector is a professor at King’s College London and author of The Diet Myth (W&N, £8.99). To help The British Gut Project, which is studying the microbiota (colony of microbes in the body), by having your own gut microbiome analysed, go to britishgut.org.

THREE THINGS I LOVE A SKI RUN through the trees with perfect powder snow.

A LONG CYCLE RIDE with friends in the Costa Brava in Spain, followed by a leisurely three-course lunch around 3–4pm, knowing you’ve earned it.

A GLASS OF PRIORAT – a Spanish red wine I discoverred when I was writting my book in Barcelo ona – with some Engllish unpasteurised cheese.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 85


CO M PE T I T I O N

WIN a Stellar cold-press juicer worth £200

Get juicing with this luxe machine for a more nutritious start to every day

S

ERIOUS JUICERS know the cold-press technique allows you to retain more flavour with less waste by gently pressing fruit, vegetables and herbs to extract juice with minimum oxidation. The new Slow Juicer from Stellar uses stainless steel micro filters to help retain more nutrients while giving

86 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

you a perfectly smooth drink that stays fresh longer. Three lucky winners will each receive a Slow Juicer, worth £200, to get every day off to a more nutritious start. Despite the name, the powerful yet quiet machine will have your juice ready in minutes

3

UP GRAFBOR S

– with no mess, no fuss and no heavyduty cleaning (just pour water through the system after use). For information on the Slow Juicer, go to stellarcookware.co.uk. For your chance to win one of our three prizes, follow the link below.

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN, go to healthyfood.co.uk/competitions by 30 September 2016 and answer the simple question. You’ll find full terms and conditions on the website.


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IN OCTOBER’S

RAISE YOUR HEALTH GAME

T NEXUE ISSSALE ON EPT 30 S

EXPERT ADVICE

to lower 10ways your cancer risk

SPECIAL REPORT

How not to get ‘hangry’ (angry when hungry)

PRACTICAL GUIDE Gluten-free sweet baking made easy

AUTUMN RECIPE COLLECTION

Blueberry cheesecake jars

+ Dinners with

lunch included! + Anjum Anand’s

healthy Indian menu + Trend alert: puds in jars

PLUS + seaweed + cooking with artichokes + herbal teas SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 89


HIIT Struggling with the batwings? Body Coach Joe Wicks has fused two exercise forms to target wobbly biceps and triceps – and burn off extra fat. Here, he explains how it works and gives you a routine to do at home

T

HE NEW FORM OF TRAINING I’m introducing combines two rounds of high intensity cardio with two rounds of weight training – I like to call it Volume Resistance HIIT. The effect of this routine on metabolic rate is insane: it will ramp up, so your body will burn more and more calories post-workout.

A MAGIC COMBINATION IT’S BASED ON A combination of German Volume Training (GVT) and high intensity interval training (HIIT) cardio, which together make a routine that not only allows you to build muscle and strength, but rapidly improves your cardio fitness levels, too. Here, I’m showing you how to target the upper arms, but in my book I’ve also developed workouts to target chest and back, legs and shoulders (find details of the book on p93). The great thing about this training plan is that it can be done at home with minimal equipment, so you don’t need an expensive gym membership. It’s also suitable for all fitness levels as you get to choose the

90 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

weights you lift and the type of cardio exercises you perform based on your own ability. Always check with your doctor before starting a new exercise regime, if you have any health concerns. As you progress, you can increase the weights and intensity.

THE WEIGHTS GVT IS EXTREMELY EFFECTIVE for building lean muscle. It sounds scary, but it’s really not. It basically involves choosing an exercise and picking a weight that allows you to complete 10 sets consisting of 10 repetitions per set (100 reps in total), with a 1 minute rest between each set. This type of training is also great for burning fat as it creates what’s known as the after-burn effect. It means you not only burn calories during the workout, but you also continue to do so for hours afterwards. It’s hard work at the time, but it’s over quickly and it makes you feel like an absolute winner.

THE CARDIO HIIT CARDIO INVOLVES short bursts of intense maximal effort, followed by a resting or recovery period. You can apply it to any cardio machine or body-weight exercise, such as running on the spot, burpees or mountain climbers. Let’s take a treadmill, for example: sprint for 20–30 seconds at maximum effort, then walk or jog to recover for 30–45 seconds. Repeat this several times. The aim of HIIT is to elevate your heart rate to near maximum during the short working sets, so choose exercises that challenge you. You don’t have to do the same type of HIIT all the time, either – that can get boring – so mix it up. You could do outdoor hill sprints one day, then use the cross-trainer or rowing machine another day.


F I T N E SS

Need to know ALWAYS BEGIN with an exercise specific warm-up: if you’re going to work your legs, do some lunges and slow squats before picking up any weights. This is really important to prevent injuries and ensure you get the most out of your workout, so please don’t skip it! O

IDEALLY, you’ll do four sessions a week, targeting different parts of the body, with three rest days (the rest days are essential for recovery and will enhance your results). I recommend doing no more than two days in a row. O

TURN THE PAGE for a workout tailored to tone the arms… O

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 91


F I T N E SS

Round 1 exercise Choose running on the spot OR mountain climbers – perform 6 sets of 30 seconds, with a 45-second rest between sets

O HIIT

O

Rest for 2 minutes

O

GVT triceps Tricep kick-backs – do 10 sets of 10 reps

HIIT EXERCISES

Running on the spot

GVT EXERCISES

Tricep kick-backs 92 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

Mountain climbers


Round 2 exercise Choose running on the spot with punches OR star jumps – perform 6 sets of 30 seconds, with a 45-second rest between sets

OHIIT

ORest

for 2 minutes

OGVT

biceps Hammer curls – do 10 sets of 10 reps

BUY THE BOOK You can find the full series of Volume Resistance HIIT workouts, plus recipes in Lean in 15: The Shape Plan by Joe Wicks (Bluebird, £16.99).

Running on the spot with punches

Star jumps

GO ONLINE Find exercises to target other parts of the body at healthyfood.co.uk. Click on the Get Active tab for 23 how-to fitness videos.

PICK UP A COPY Hammer curls

Don’t miss brand new Get Fit with Healthy Food Guide. It’s packed with exercise inspiration and weight-loss tips – and it’s on the newsstand now!

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 93


Juliette Kellow HFG DIETITIAN

WHY WE NEED…

B12

C

ontinuing our analysis of the B group of vitamins, this month we shine the spotlight on vitamin B12. It’s vital for our NERVOUS and IMMUNE SYSTEMS

Fortunately, most people in the UK get enough vitamin B12 from their diet. But a deficiency causes a form of anaemia, which has symptoms such as yellow-tinged skin,

94 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

The absorption of vitamin B12 declines naturally as we get older, so deficiencies become more common, affecting around one in 20 people aged 65 to 74 years and one in 10 people over the age of 75. A simple blood test can identify whether you’re deficient. If needed, treatment options include supplements or regular vitamin B12 injections, depending on the cause (see The link with autoimmune conditions).

SEPTEMBER 2016

ADULTS CHILDREN

Age concerns

HOW MUCH DO I NEED EACH DAY? 19 yr +

1.5mcg

Breastfeeding women

2mcg

Pregnant women

1.5mcg

15–18 yr

1.5mcg

11–14 yr

1.2mcg

7–10 yr

1mcg

4–6 yr

0.8mcg

1–3 yr

0.5mcg

7–12 mth

0.4mcg

0–6 mth

0.3mcg

The Nutrient Reference Value (NRV) for vitamin B12, which you’ll see on food labels, is 2.5mcg a day. But the figures above show the more detailed guidelines in the UK for vitamin B12 needs at specific ages and stages in life.

PHOTO: ISTOCK

What happens if I don’t get enough?

mouth ulcers, pins and needles, muscle weakness, poor memory, impaired vision and irritability.

BABIES

and is needed to make RED BLOOD CELLS. Many studies link low levels of B12 with DEPRESSION and tiredness; it’s needed to help the body release energy from food and for CELL DIVISION.


H E A LT H

The main sources The main sources of vitamin B12 are animal products, including meat, fish, dairy and eggs. ‘Superfoods’ spirulina and algae are often marketed as containing vitamin B12, but the body isn’t able to make use of the nutrient in this form so these foods shouldn’t be relied on to boost intakes.

When to supplement Vitamin B12 isn’t naturally found in plant foods, but a few foods including yeast extracts (such as Marmite), breakfast cereals and soya milks, are fortified with it, so check labels. As a result, people who follow a vegan diet may be at a greater risk of a deficiency, so supplements are recommended. There are no known side effects from very high doses of vitamin B12 in supplement form, but the Department of Health suggests doses below 2,000mcg.

EVERYDAY FOODS FOR B12 (mcg) 100g calf’s liver

68

100g lamb’s liver

54

100g chicken liver

35

100g lamb’s kidney

17

140g grilled sardines or kippers 100g crabmeat (brown and white)

15.4 13

140g grilled mackerel

12.6

125g can sardines in tomato sauce

11.3

140g baked coley

5.6

140g baked sea bass or grilled salmon

4.2

125g lean grilled rump steak

3.8

140g grilled haddock or baked cod or plaice

2.8

2 slices well-done lean roast beef (80g)

2.4

100g raw lean beef mince

2

½ can tuna in water or oil (60g drained weight)

1.8

200ml 1% fat or semi-skimmed milk

1.8

3 slices lean roast lamb shoulder (90g)

1.8

1 egg

1.6

200ml skimmed milk

1.6

100g pot fat-free fruit fromage frais

1.4

125g grilled turkey steak

1.3

2 slices well-done lean roast pork leg (80g)

0.8

200ml fortified unsweetened soya milk

0.8

30g regular cheddar

0.7

30g fortified bran flakes

0.7

30g fortified corn flakes

0.6

100g cottage cheese

0.6

30g edam

0.6

30g mozzarella

0.5

Fighting depression

150g pot low-fat natural yogurt

0.5

Many studies have found a link between vitamin B12 intakes and depression. For example, in one recent study from Canada, elderly men with the highest dietary intakes of vitamin B12 were 68% less likely to be depressed.

125g pot fortified fruit soya yogurt

0.5

125g pot low-fat or fat-free fruit yogurt

0.4

30g reduced-fat cheddar, stilton, red leicester, danish blue or double gloucester

0.4

30g brie or goat’s cheese

0.2

Autoimmune conditions The most common cause of a vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is an autoimmune condition called pernicious anaemia, most common in women around the age of 60 and in anyone with a family history or another autoimmune condition. The cause is unknown, but it results in the immune system attacking cells in the stomach that produce a protein called intrinsic factor, which normally combines with vitamin B12 so it can be absorbed into the bloodstream. If you don’t produce any intrinsic factor, then B12 can’t be absorbed and a deficiency results.

SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 95


REFERENCES Your guide to the research behind this month’s stories and features HEALTH NOTES (p10)

WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH HEMP (p33)

NHS Choices. Having desk job ‘doubles risk’ of heart attack. Published online 15 October 2012. http://www.nhs.uk/ news/2012/10October/Pages/ Having desk job doubles risk of heart attack.aspx O The Lancet (2016) Physical Activity 2016: Progress and Challenges. Published 27 July 2016. http://www. thelancet.com/series/physical activity 2016 O Camps, G et al (2016) Empty calories and phantom fullness: a randomized trial studying the relative effects of energy density and viscosity on gastric emptying determined by MRI and satiety. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 104 (1), 73 80. DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.115.129064 O Song, M et al (2016) Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All Cause and Cause Specific Mortality. JAMA Internal Medicine. Published online 1 August 2016. DOI: 10.1001/ jamainternmed.2016.4182 O VanEpps, E M et al (2016) Advance Ordering for Healthier Eating? Field Experiments on the Relationship Between the Meal Order Consumption Time Delay and Meal Content. Journal of Marketing Research 53 (3), 369-380. DOI: 10.1509/jmr.14.0234

Rodriguez Leyva, D and Pierce, G N (2010) The cardiac and haemostatic effects of dietary hempseed. Nutrition & Metabolism 7, 32. DOI: 10.1186/1743 7075 7-32

O

SEASONAL WAYS TO FIVE-A-DAY (p12) O Maras, J E et al (2011) Flavonoid intakes in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 24 (8), 1103 1109 O Li, X et al (2014) Chemical composition and antioxidant and anti inflammatory potential of peels and flesh from 10 different pear varieties (Pyrus spp.). Food Chemistry 152, 531 538. DOI: 10.1016/j. foodchem.2013.12.010

96 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2016

O

WHEN FOOD RULES YOU (p34) O Beat (2015) The costs of eating disorders: Social, health and economic impacts O Beat https://www.b eat. co.uk/about eating disorders/ types of eating disorder/binge eating disorder O EDNOS https://www.b eat.co.uk/ about eating disorders/types of eating disorder/ednos O NHS Choices. Binge eating http:// www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Binge eating/Pages/Introduction.aspx O Masheb, R M and Grillo, C M (2004) Quality of life in patients with binge eating disorder. Eating & Weight Disorders 9 (3), 194 199. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed/15656013 O NHS Choices. Anorexia nervosa http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ Anorexia nervosa/Pages/ Introduction.aspx O NHS Choices. Bulimia http://www. nhs.uk/Conditions/Bulimia/Pages/ Introduction.aspx

ARE WE MILKING IT? (p80) O Mintel (2014) Is it game, set and match for traditional cream at this year’s Wimbledon. Press release published 23 June 2014. http://www. mintel.com/press centre/food and drink/is it game set and match for traditional cream at years wimbledon O The Waitrose Food & Drink Report 2015. http://www.waitrose. com/home/about_waitrose/ the waitrose fooddrinkreport.html O British Nutrition Foundation. Lactose Intolerance. https://www. nutrition.org.uk/nutritionscience/ allergy/lactose intolerance. html?limit=1&limitstart=0

O Lomer, M C et al (2008) Review article: lactose intolerance in clinical practice myths and realities. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 27 (2), 93 103. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365 2036.2007.03557.x O NIH US National Library of Medicine. Genetics Home Reference. Lactose Intolerance. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/ lactose intolerance#statistics O Jianqin, S et al (2016) Effects of milk containing only A2 beta casein versus milk containing both A1 and A2 beta casein proteins on gastrointestinal physiology, symptoms of discomfort, and cognitive behavior of people with self reported intolerance to traditional cows’ milk. Nutrition Journal 15, 35. DOI: 10.1186/ s12937 016 0147 z O European Food Safety Authority (2009) Review of the potential health impact of beta casomorphins and related peptides. Report of the DATEX Working Group on beta casomorphins. Published 29 January 2009. http://www.efsa. europa.eu/sites/default/files/ scientific_output/files/main_ documents/231r.pdf

WHY WE NEED B12 (p94) O NHS Choices. Vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia. http:// www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Anaemia vitamin B12 and folate deficiency/ Pages/Introduction.aspx O NHS Choices. Vitamins and minerals B vitamins and folic acid. http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/ vitamins minerals/Pages/Vitamin B. aspx#B12 O Gougeon, L et al (2016) Intakes of folate, vitamin B6 and B12 and risk of depression in community dwelling older adults: the Quebec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Aging. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 70 (3), 380 385. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2015.202


T H E FAC T S

NUTRITION LOWDOWN We cut through the science to help you work out how our recipes – and the foods you buy in the supermarket – fit into a balanced, healthy diet JUST LIKE PRE-PACKED FOODS, all our recipes provide detailed nutrition information for a typical serving. But how does that compare with your total daily needs for energy, protein, fat, carbs and certain vitamins and minerals? Provided you stick to the serving size we recommend for each recipe, the easiest way is to compare the nutrition information for each recipe with the Reference Intake (RI). You’ll gradually see this term being used on food labels in place of Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). The RIs are benchmarks for the amount of energy (kilocalories), fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt we should have each day. The RIs for fat, saturates, sugars and salt are the maximum amount you should have each day, while you should aim to meet the values for carbs and protein each day. There is no RI for fibre but health experts recommend we have 30g a day. Although everyone is different and has different needs for energy and nutrients, the RIs are designed for an average adult, so there’s only one set of values. See the table, right, for the figures. We also analyse our recipes for calcium and iron – this is because these two nutrients are often low in people’s diets in the UK. We can see how much a recipe contributes to our daily needs for calcium and iron by comparing

WHAT IF I WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT? The only way to shed the pounds is to take in fewer calories than you use up, so your body draws on its fat stores to supply it with enough energy. To lose 1lb (0.5kg) of fat you need to create a calorie deficit of 3,500kcal. This means cutting your calorie intake by just 500kcal a day should help you lose 1lb (0.5kg) a week – so, for example, women should lose this amount of weight each week on 1,500kcal and men on 2,000kcal. If you’re also more active, you can expect it to be a little more. However, nutrition experts agree that for good health in the long term, you shouldn’t lose more than 2lb (1kg) a week. REFERENCE INTAKE

it with Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs), which are starting to appear on food labels in place of Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) – again, there is just one set of values.

ENERGY (kcal) FAT (g)

2,000 70

SATURATES (g)

20

CARBOHYDRATES (g)

260

SUGARS (g)

90

PER SERVING

PROTEIN (g)

50

All our recipes come with nutrition information per serving, so as long as you stick to the serving sizes we recommend, the nutrition information we provide will be accurate.

SALT (g)

6

NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE

CALCIUM (mg)

800

IRON (mg)

14

O Individual needs vary considerably, so use this as a general guide only. Ask your GP or doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian if you feel you would benefit from personalised advice. Nutrition is calculated accurately, but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Only listed ingredients are included in the calculations. SEPTEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 97


T H E L A S T WO R D

5 TOP FACTS to TAKE AWAY

Our favourite healthy snippets and d tips from f the h exxperts in this month’s m issue ONE PEAR HAS 13% of our daily fibre needs. But don’t peel, as a tribe of antioxidants live there, too (p12)

Sitting at your desk all day is unhealthy, but IT ONLY TAKES 60 MINUTES of exercise to undo o the damage. How about turning part of the commute into a walk/jog/ cycle workout? (p10)

THE THICKER your smoothie, the more filling it will be, whatever the ingredients. We’re showing those watery shakes the fridge door (p11)

ONE IN FIVE HOUSEHOLDS has switched to dairy-free milk alternatives – yet few of us have an allergy. If you’re tuning into the non-milk buzz, check the nutrition pros and cons (p80)

COMPILED BY LIZ ATKINS. PHOTOS: ISTOCK, POSED BY MODELS

Connect with your inner hippy by EATING HEMP THE MODERN WAY: in seeds, ‘milk’ or oil. It may be linked to better heart health (p33)


Linwoods Shelled Hemp has a rich, nutty, soft texture and is high in natural protein, making it a great source of protein for vegetarians and vegans. It also provides a convenient and tasty way to add energy boosting iron and magnesium to your diet. The shelled nature of our hemp means it can be added to any meal, snack or smoothie.

linwoodshealthfoods.com Available in Tesco, Sainsburys, Waitrose, ASDA, Holland & Barrett, Ocado and all health food stores in the UK or visit linwoodshealthfoods.com.


healthy food guide (UK) September 2016