Page 1

FALL 2016 canadiangeographic.ca/travel

TOP ESCAPES

19+

AMAZING GETAWAYS

Wonderful

WILDLIFE in the

Galรกpagos The unheralded vineyards of

Arizona

Soaking up

+

the sun in Antigua Hot spots in Miami, California, Hawaii, Bahamas & more


2016 Fall Journey Presentations & Reunions Dear Friends… Once again, we are excited to invite you to join us at

Buenos Aires to Machu Picchu, 2016

our Journey Presentations and Reunions. These presentations are arranged to showcase the magnificent journeys we have meticulously planned to give everyone not just a chance to experience the greatest vacation of a lifetime but also feel the warmth and outstanding quality of service unique only to the Van Dyke family – the reason why more and more guests return. There is no need to RSVP. Just come and enjoy the presentation. Bring a friend and you both benefit from our Friend Referral Rewards program. We are also excited to share the details of an even more rewarding Early Reservation Bonus! for 2017. If you would like a private event planned for your club or organization, please let us know. It would be our pleasure to set a date in the early New Year, or Spring of 2017. New program for Travel Agents!

Halifax, NS Winnipeg, MB Saskatoon, SK Edmonton, AB Calgary, AB Vancouver, BC Victoria, BC Ottawa, ON London, ON Burlington, ON Waterloo, ON Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON Cambridge, ON Toronto, ON Peterborough, ON Barrie, ON Toronto, ON

Ashburn Golf Club St. Charles Country Club The Willows Golf & Country Club Fairmont Hotel MacDonald Scotiabank Theatre Chinook Fairmont Hotel Vancouver Hotel Grand Pacific Hellenic Centre Best Western Lamplighter Inn Burlington Golf and Country Club The Inn at Waterloo White Oaks Conference Resort Galt Country Club Toronto Botanical Garden Peterborough Golf & Country Club Barrie Country Club Islington Golf Club

Thursday, September 15 Thursday, October 13 Sunday, October 16 Tuesday, October 18 Wednesday, October 19 Sunday, October 23 Monday, October 24 Thursday, October 27 Sunday, October 30 Thursday, November 3 Friday, November 4 Sunday, November 6 Tuesday, November 8 Wednesday, November 9 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Thursday, November 17

2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm 2 pm

P P P P P

D D D D D D P D P P P D P P P D P P D P D P D

P = Parking costs covered by Jerry Van Dyke Travel Service (contact our office for details). All other venues have paid parking available. D = Dress code in effect “no denim please”

Contact us for your complimentary 2017 Journal

1. 800. 265. 8174 Cr uis ing t he

e waterways sinc

8 198

jerryvandyke.com journeys@jerryvandyke.com

285 Fountain Street South Cambridge, Ontario, Canada TICO #2069734


CONTENTS

Features 22

MARINE IGUANAS. BLUE-FOOTED BOOBIES. GIANT TORTOISES. MANGROVE FINCHES — and about 200,000 tourists a year. The evolution of conservation and adventure in the Galapagos Islands. by Marina Jimenez

How to pronounce the Caribbean island’s name and other tales of its sun, surf and society by Nick Walker

39

A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE

42

ARIZONA UNCORKED

A group of big city kids from Toronto — the 2016 winners of Canada’s Coolest School Trip — get a taste of nature among the mountains in Alberta’s Jasper National Park by Thomas Hall with photography by Jessica Finn

Forget Napa and Sonoma — the Grand Canyon state is the hottest (literally) new wine hub in America by Kate Harris

30

Departments

COVER: STEWART COHEN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS. THIS PAGE, TOP: ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA TOURISM AUTHORITY; BOTTOM: MICHAEL S. NOLAN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS

30

IT’S AN-TEE-GUH

4 NOTEBOOK

Surprise, surprise by Aaron Kylie

11 GATEWAY

Bahamas, California, Hawaii and On our radar

20 ONECITY

The world’s largest collection of art deco architecture, a renowned outdoor street art gallery and the tastes of Little Havana in Miami by Aaron Kylie

50 TENBEST

Can’t see the city for the skyscrapers? Check out the top places to bask in panoramic urban views. by Nicole Rutherford and Alexandra Pope

22

On the cover: A blue-footed booby and its hatchlings nest on the bare ground in the Galapagos Islands. CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

3


NOTEBOOK

chief executive officer John G. Geiger chief operating officer and publisher Gilles Gagnier chief development officer André Préfontaine editor Aaron Kylie director, production Mike Elston new media manager Paul Politis senior editor Harry Wilson managing editor Nick Walker associate editor Michela Rosano new media editor Sabrina Doyle social media editor Alexandra Pope special projects editor Thomas Hall art director Javier Frutos photo editor Jessica Finn graphic designer Jenny Chew contract designer Alissa Dicaire production coordinator Kendra Stieler cartographer Chris Brackley copy editor Stephanie Small proofreader Judy Yelon colour technician Glenn Campbell editorial interns Vanessa Hrvatin, Nicole Rutherford director of circulation Nathalie Cuerrier newsstand consultant Scott Bullock

Surprise, surprise

AARON KYLIE/CAN GEO STAFF

W

WE LOVE CANADA. (That’s the royal “we”: this magazine and presumably its readers, too.) But many of us also like getting away — Canadians take some 30 million trips to foreign countries each year — so Canadian Geographic Travel has dedicated this issue to exploring the international destinations Canadians visit. As one would expect, the United States is our number-one destination, with Canadians making nearly 3.5 million visits each year. Perhaps also predictably, we spend the most time in Florida. Count me among those tourists, as I visited Miami last October to explore the city’s arts and culture scene (see some of the highlights in “One city,” page 20). During my visit, however, I was struck by the Canadiana I came across in the city best known for its Cuban and Latin American influences. (I suspect many Canadian travellers find similar pockets of their culture in nations around the world.) The Canadian connections kicked off shortly after I arrived at Miami International Airport: my taxi driver was a former Torontonian, with family back home in Mississauga, Ont. At lunch two days later at the hip Wynwood Kitchen + Bar, which overlooks the Wynwood Walls outdoor graffiti

4

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

gallery, I was staring at a wall of artwork by Faile, a New York City-based street art duo, one half of which is Edmonton-born Patrick McNeil. Little over an hour later, while touring the Wynwood neighbourhood’s renowned graffiti, I ran into street artist Jas9 (Jasmine Dearden) — a Montrealer — in the midst of creating her latest mural. (The world’s greatest graffiti artists flock to Wynwood to strut their stuff. See above.) Two cool Canadians I wouldn’t have heard of if not for being in Miami. That evening, I went to the New World Center to see the New World Symphony, the world’s only full-time orchestral academy dedicated to grooming young musicians for careers with the planet’s foremost symphony orchestras. The Canadian connection: the stunning, state-of-the-art theatre, which blends into Miami Beach’s art deco architecture, was designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Two days later as I headed back to the airport, the connections came full circle. My driver went on at length about his dreams of visiting Canada. It seemed a fitting conclusion to my trip. As much as it’s a getaway to visit other nations, it’s also refreshing to return home to the land we love. Aaron Kylie

vice-president, finance and administration Catherine Frame senior accountant Christine Chatland accounts payable/accounts receivable clerk Lydia Blackman executive assistant Sandra Smith receptionist/office coordinator Diane Séguin logistics coordinator Emma Viel project manager Rachel Jobson

advertising sales vice-president, advertising sales Pamela MacKinnon

Phone (416) 360-4151 ext. 378 email: mackinnon@canadiangeographic.ca director of sales Valerie Hall Daigle

Phone (416) 360-4151 ext. 380 email: halldaigle@canadiangeographic.ca adventures/classified Lisa Duncan Brown Phone (905) 702-0899 or toll-free (888) 445-0052 Fax (905) 702-0887 email: brown@canadiangeographic.ca

236 Lesmill Road, North York, ON M3B 2T5 Phone (416) 360-4151; fax (416) 360-1526 Canadian Geographic Travel is published by Canadian Geographic Enterprises on behalf of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Subscriptions are $28.50 per year ($55.00 for two years or $79.50 for three years), plus applicable taxes. For addresses in the United States, add $8 per year. For other international addresses, add $30 per year. Subscriptions and all customer service inquiries: Canadian Geographic c/o CDS Global PO Box 923, Markham Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 0B8 Toll-free (800) 267-0824; fax (905) 946-1679 Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-8 p.m. (EST); Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (EST) Editorial Office 1155 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1 Phone (613) 745-4629; fax (613) 744-0947 Website: canadiangeographic.ca ISSN 0706-2168. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the prior written consent of the publisher or a licence from The Canadian Copyright Licensing Agency (Access Copyright). For an Access Copyright licence, visit accesscopyright.ca or call toll-free (800) 893-5777. Return undeliverable items to Canadian Geographic, P.O. Box 923, Stn. Main, Markham, ON L3P 0B8 Date of issue: September 2016 Copyright ©2016. All rights reserved. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.

Member: Alliance for Audited Media, Magazines Canada, Canadian Marketing Association, Print Measurement Bureau Canadian Geographic and design are registered trademarks. ® Marque déposée.


ONTARIORACING.CA

FOR A FEW GLORIOUS MOMENTS, IT’S YOUR HORSE.

OLG IS A PROUD SUPPORTER OF ONTARIO RACING. PLEASE PLAY RESPONSIBLY.


Surviving looks a lot like thriving Breast cancer flipped Katherine’s world upside down. But in the five years since she underwent treatment, Katherine’s been doing some flips of her own. Thanks to research to discover new treatments, women like Katherine are having their lives put right side up after a cancer diagnosis. That’s why Stand Up To Cancer Canada and Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation have teamed up to accelerate the pace of research done by collaborative teams of scientists working to develop new treatments faster. Giving more women, like Katherine, their lives back. To learn more about advances in research, clinical trials testing innovative treatments, and how to get involved, go to standup2cancer.ca/breastcancer and cbcf.org.

Photography: Andrew Macpherson

Kim Cattrall, Stand Up To Cancer Canada Ambassador Katherine Chan, Breast Cancer Survivor Stand Up To Cancer Canada is a program of EIF Canada, a Canadian Registered Charity (Reg. #80550 6730 RR0001). Stand Up To Cancer Canada brand marks are licensed trademarks of the Entertainment Industry Foundation.


E DU C AT ION THE ROYAL CANADIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

LA SOCIÉTÉ GÉOGRAPHIQUE ROYALE DU CANADA

Awards

Founded in 1929, the Society is a non-profit educational organization. Its object is to advance geographical knowl edge and, in particular, to stimulate awareness of the significance of geography in Canada’s development, well-being and culture. Primary fields of interest include our people, resources, environment, heritage and the evolution of our country. In short, the aim is to make Canada better known to Canadians and to the world. Canadian Geographic, the Society’s magazine, is dedicated to reporting on all aspects of Canada’s geography — physical, biological, historical, cultural and economic — and on major issues of concern to Canada in which geographical dimensions play a significant role. patron

His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston C.C., C.M.M., C.O.M., C.D.

Governor General of Canada honorary president

Alex Trebek

honorary vice-presidents

Pierre Camu, O.C. Arthur E. Collin Alex Davidson, O.C. Wade Davis, C.M. Gisèle Jacob Denis A. St-Onge, O.C. explorer-in-residence

Jill Heinerth president

Paul Ruest, Winnipeg vice-presidents

Gavin Fitch, Calgary Élisabeth Nadeau, Ottawa secretary

Jim Lewis, Winnipeg

counsel

Andrew Pritchard, Ottawa governors

Glenn Blackwood, St. John’s James Boxall, Halifax Wendy Cecil, C.M., Toronto Allen B. Clarke, Toronto Beth Dye, Kamloops, B.C. Joseph Frey, Toronto David Mitchell, Ottawa Lynn Moorman, Calgary, Alta. Jim Murray, Montreal Robert Page, Calgary Paul VanZant, Amaranth, Ont. Connie Wyatt Anderson, The Pas, Man. chief executive officer John G. Geiger chief operating officer and publisher Gilles Gagnier chief development officer André Préfontaine vice-president, finance and administration Catherine Frame

GEOGRAPHIC LITERACY AWARD AWARDED TO individuals who have made significant contributions to geographic literacy among young Canadians. This award is presented in recognition of a specific program or project that is deemed to have improved and enhanced geographic literacy. INNOVATION IN GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AWARD AWARDED TO Canadian educators working in a kindergarten to Grade 12 setting who have made exemplary contributions in fostering geographic engagement and increasing the geographic literacy of their students.

executive assistant Sandra Smith director of advancement Jason Muscant director of education Ellen Curtis education program coordinator Sara Black communications manager Deborah Chapman archivist Wendy Simpson-Lewis

1155 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1 Phone: (613) 745-4629

Email: rcgs@rcgs.org

Website: rcgs.org

NOMINATE SOMEONE TODAY!

Deadline: September 30

rcgs.org/awards CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC

7

CHRIS CULLEN/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB

treasurer

Keith Exelby, Ottawa


ADVENTURE EXPLORATION

GEOGRAPHY

The exclusive inside story and photos of the discovery of HMS Erebus.

Buy it today! rcgs.org/franklinbook


ONLINE Visit Galapagos Want to see the wildlife of the Galapagos Islands (left) with Canadian Geographic this October? In partnership with The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and National Geographic, Lindblad Expeditions is offering an incredible 16-day adventure that will give you access to one of the most special places on Earth. cangeo.ca/sep16/galapagos

canadiangeographic.ca

Sweet escape Get ready to salivate. This tour of Montreal’s chocolatiers, including the Chocolate Academy and Juliette et Chocolat, will convince you that the city is Canada’s dessert capital. cangeo.ca/sep16/chocolate

Your privacy is important to us. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to

reputable companies whose products or services might be of interest to our readers. If you prefer to have your name removed from this list or wish to receive our complete privacy policy, please call (800) 267-0824 or write us at Canadian Geographic Travel, c/o Privacy Officer, 1155 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1 or privacy@canadiangeographic.ca.

SVEN-OLOF LINDBLAD/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS

Caribbean cruising Barbuda has the Caribbean’s longest unbroken beach and one of the world’s largest magnificent frigatebird colonies. It’s also the perfect day trip from Antigua. cangeo.ca/sep16/barbuda


Heading south? We make it easier to pack a U.S. based TD Bank account.

Appl

rom Canada befor

ou go.

Whether it’s transferring mone , withdrawing cash, or pa ing U.S bills, a U.S. based TD Bank account at TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, helps make it easier to bank across the border. Just one more wa e make banking more comfortable.

Appl n-branch or at td.com/crossborder

®

The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion nk.


GATE

BAHAMAS

Discovering Atlantis BY MARINA JIMENEZ

0

250 km

U.S

Bahamas

.A. Freeport Miami

ATLANTIS Nassau

B

C

A

U

H

B

A

A

M

A

S

THE QUEUE at the photo shop in Dolphin Cay at the Atlantis Resort lasts more than 20 minutes. But there is no grumbling — not on a Bahamas holiday, anyway. Sunburned children in fluorescent swimwear and beach shoes stand patiently with their parents, who are getting ready to fork over more than $50 for a photo of themselves smooching a dolphin. Everyone is smiling. Suddenly it hits me why I like this place: Atlantis specializes in uplifting, active experiences. Swimming with dolphins! Vertiginous water slides! Snorkelling ruins! (Well, fake ruins, but still!) It’s a winning formula, even for a cynic like me. Occupying one-third of Paradise Island, the resort is inspired by the mythical lost city of the same name, and rises from sea to sky, with decor featuring seahorses, helmeted domes and giant bronze doors. Its sprawl includes five hotel towers, three celebrity-chef restaurants (Nobu, Olives and Café Martinique), 12 pools, 18 waterslides, a casino, a rock-climbing wall, a golf course, a movie theatre, a

AY

A bird’s-eye view of the spawling Atlantis resort in the Bahamas. The complex takes up about one-third of Paradise Island.

faux-archeological dig with underwater caves and lagoons, and 5,000 marine animals, including piranha, barracuda, sharks and eels. And, of course, the dolphins, which make their home in the 57,000-square-metre human-made Dolphin Cay, a marine habitat and rescue-rehabilitation facility. True, the animals are in captivity, which reduces the happiness quotient, but many of the dolphins were rescued from Hurricane Katrina. Plus, unless they’re really good at faking it, the dolphins seem to enjoy their jobs. With my two young sons, I meet four-year-old Sands and 17-year-old Brewer. They are incredibly friendly and smart, splashing the kids on command and playing dead. Brewer gives me a sublime ride across Dolphin Cay, pushing me by my feet as I hang onto a flutter board. I am utterly charmed. His skin is smooth as silk; he sheds it every two hours. Of course, he smooches beautifully. C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

11


12

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

Miraculously, I shoot out into the lagoon, head still attached to body. I stagger out of the water. “Let’s do it again, Mum,” shouts my 13-year-old. “And again and again!” I look around and see other adults cheering on their lovelies from the sidelines, their faces strategically placed to make the most of the Caribbean sun. Ahhh. I get it. I wave my children to the Leap of Faith (which drops you 18-near-vertical metres from the top of a Mayan-style temple before shooting you through a tunnel in a lagoon filled with sharks) and enjoy my reprieve poolside. That afternoon, we stroll over to the resort’s marina village, which is teeming with families. Ben and Jerry’s Oreo ice cream cones in hand, we wander past luxurious sailboats and shops painted bright pink, turquoise and lemon yellow. Later, we make our way back to the beach near our hotel. Amazingly, there is nobody else around. We stretch out on deck chairs in the sand just in time for a breathtaking

Activities at Atlantis include a thrilling ride down the Challenger waterslide (top) and swimming with dolphins (above).

sunset and then take in the wonders of the clear night sky, happy — for the moment, anyway — to be still. Read about the resort’s animal rescue-andrehab facility at cangeo.ca/sep16/atlantis.

PREVIOUS PAGE AND THIS PAGE: ATLANTIS, PARADISE ISLAND RESORT; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO

THE RESORT IS nothing if not familyfriendly, with people staking out deck chairs in the morning and carrying giant inner tubes for the dizzying variety of rides and slides. My husband opts for the Lazy River ride, while I reluctantly agree to The Abyss. I get butterflies in my stomach as we wind our way up the tower to the top of this 61-metre-long slide. There is a 15-metre vertical drop and you ride in complete darkness. “It’s like falling, but in a good way,” my eight-year-old says. “Not scary at all.” At the last minute, I chicken out. To make up for my cowardice, I agree to try The Falls, standing in line with the kids, gripping my inner tube as we once again make our way to the top. I’m told it’s an 18-metre drop that lasts mere seconds. How scary can it be? I close my eyes and scream like a ninny as I slide down, certain that I’ll be the first person in the resort’s history to emerge with a serious concussion, or possibly even dead.


62%

*

ONE YEAR

for only $28.50 FREE

POSTER

M A P!

ORDERING IS EASY! 6 ISSUES OF CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC, 4 BONUS ISSUES OF CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL PLUS: FREE WALL MAP OF CANADA (WITH PAID ORDER)

cangeo.ca/digital • canadiangeographic.ca • 1-800-267-0824

* off cover price

Subscribe and Save


GATEWAY ‘ELE‘ELE HANAPEPE KEKEHA BEACH WAIMEA CANYON

LIHUE

MAKUA BEACH KALALAU TRAIL

BLACK POT BEACH PARK

0

Kaua‘i cool SECLUDED, SPIRITUAL and worn by time, the island of Kaua‘i, the northernmost and oldest of the eight Hawaiian islands, is defined by an ancient culture deeply connected to nature. Whether it’s lush rainforests, deep canyons, pristine beaches or ocean adventures, here’s a small taste of what awaits the intrepid visitor. FISH Reel in yellowfin or bluefin tuna aboard a fishing charter from Nawiliwili Harbor near Lihue, Kaua‘i’s capital. You may even hook a mahi mahi, the fish so nice they named it twice. SUN AND SAND Frolic in the waves at Kekaha Beach, where you get a superb view of nearby Ni‘ihau Island and sunsets that are hard to beat. STREET FEST Mix with the locals every Friday at Hanapepe’s Art Night, when the main 14

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

10 km

Kaua’i

approximate foreground scale scale varies across the map

street is transformed into an eclectic collection of art and food vendors and street performers, and most shops stay open late. If you get the chance, try the taro chips at the Taro Ko Chips Factory on Hanapepe Road. SURF Learn to surf or hone your skills by the iconic Hanalei Pier at Black Pot Beach Park, where the waves cooperate more often than not, thanks to the gently sloping bay. SNORKEL Some of the best snorkelling on the island is in the lagoon at Makua Beach, where a near-shore reef helps protect snorkellers from the surf. DRIVE Wind north along Highway 550 to see the spectacular Waimea Canyon, a.k.a. the Grand Canyon of the Pacific, and end the day in the bird-watching paradise of

Kōke‘e State Park, where you can take in the view of Kalalau Valley and experience Mount Wai‘ale‘ale, which with more than 1,000 centimetres of rain annually is one of the wettest places on Earth. HIKE Follow the rise and fall of colossal sea cliffs along the nearly 18-kilometre Kalalau Trail on the island’s north coast, renowned for its wet, slippery slopes, steep grades and jaw-dropping views. SAIL Complete your circumnavigation of the island and see another side of the Nāpali coastline in luxury aboard a catamaran from Port Allen Harbor in ‘Ele‘ele. Watch for dolphins, humpback whales and sea turtles, and soak up the incomparable views of the verdant Nāpali cliffs. —Jessica Finn Learn more about why so much rain falls at Mount Wai‘ale‘ale at cangeo.ca/sep16/kauai.

MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO; LANDSAT 8 IMAGE: NOVEMBER, 2014

HAWAII


G A T E WA Y

CALIFORNIA

Hooked on Yosemite

Sacramento

San Francisco

0

100 km

Evergreen Lodge YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK

PACIFIC

Monterey Enlarged area

OCEAN

16

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

I imagine presenting my new facial hardware to Rick Mazaira, our guide from Yosemite Outfitters, a burly flyfishing devotee whose truck and clothing are decorated with flies and who spouts cheery aphorisms such as “A pole is something you dance on; a rod is something you fish with.” I decide to pull the hook out myself. Later that evening in my cabin at the 95-year-old Evergreen Lodge, which resembles a luxe summer camp and has its own tavern, I’ll examine the scab and wonder — not for the first time — if the incident has damaged my credibility with the group of seasoned outdoor adventure writers exploring the wilds of Tuolumne County, the northwestern gateway to Yosemite National Park. Bluntly put, this part of the county is no place for wimps. One hundred and sixty years ago, migrants lured by the promise of gold hacked their way east from San Francisco into the densely forested foothills of the Sierra Nevada, building roads, railways and, over time, thriving, ethnically diverse towns. Modern adventurers satisfy their desire to conquer Yosemite by coming up with ever more creative and

An angler steadies himself as he wades through the water during a fly-fishing trip on California’s Stanislaus River.

dangerous ways to summit (or leap off) Half Dome and El Capitan, the park’s twin granite behemoths located in neighbouring Mariposa County. Accidental self-mutilation aside, fly-fishing is more my speed than highaltitude hijinks. With the hook out of my face and my pole — sorry, rod — reset, I work on my casting form. Nothing’s biting, but the sun is warm on my shoulders, and the only sound is the whisper of the Stanislaus as it rushes west toward San Francisco. Something else Mazaira told us before we dispersed along the riverbank comes back to me: “Fly-fishing runs totally counter to the pace of our culture. It’s all about being in the water, slowing down, smelling the forest. It’s a very Zen experience.” You might say I’m hooked. —Alexandra Pope See a video and more photos of the outdoor adventures on offer in the Yosemite region and San Francisco at cangeo.ca/sep16/cali.

MAX WHITTAKER; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO

“THE HOOK is in my face.” I say it out loud, as if seeking confirmation from the pine trees, because I can’t believe it. It’s my first time flyfishing, and the only thing I’ve hooked in the past hour is my own chin. I deliberate for a moment, waist-deep in the swift, cold mountain water of the south fork of California’s Stanislaus River: do I hike back to the trail in search of help, or do I handle this myself?


RC G S P O L A R E X PE D I T I O N S S E R I E S :: A N TA RC T I C A 2017

ULTIMATE ANTARCTICA W E D D E L L S E A A N D T H E FA L K L A N D I S L A N D S 11 NIGHTS, 12 DAYS | FEBRUARY 21 - MARCH 4, 2017

JOIN THE ROYAL CANADIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY ON THIS EXTRAORDINARY VOYAGE… • Join Antarctic experts in ornithology, marine biology, geology, history, and polar photography • 2017 RCGS expedition series shoulder badge • Lifetime membership into the RCGS Antarctic travel group and OOE One Club • In-room welcome basket • Comprehensive booking package & pre-departure information

EXPEDITION CRUISE HIGHLIGHTS:

• • • • • • •

Photography, tabular icebergs, Weddell Sea More time in Antarctica Up to 8 species of penguins Follow Shackleton’s journey to Elephant Island Enjoy an intimate small ship experience Exceptional customer service Optional overnight camping in Antarctica

PLEASE CALL WORLDWIDE QUEST (QUOTE CDNGEO ANTARCTICA)

1.800.387.1483

W W W. O N E O C E A N E X P E D I T I O N S . C O M


GATEWAY

DESTINATIONS

On our radar

BAY OF EAGLES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC There’s no shortage of beautiful beaches in the Dominican, but for my money, one trumps them all: the Bahia de las Aguilas, or Bay of Eagles. It’s located in Jaragua National Park on the arid southwest coast, and the only living creatures you’re likely to encounter on its eight-kilometre stretch of pillowy white sand are crabs, fish and the odd iguana. Base yourself in Pedernales, a town on the border with Haiti some 300 kilometres from the republic’s capital, Santo Domingo. It has a few clean, comfortable motels whose owners can help coordinate the spectacular journey to the beach, usually either by boat from the nearby fishing village of La Cueva or by an adrenaline rush of a motorcycle ride through the Jaragua desert. —Alexandra Pope, social media editor 18

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

THINGVELLIR NATIONAL PARK, ICELAND Located on the seam of two tectonic plates, it’s no wonder Iceland is called the land of ice and fire. There’s no better place to see these natural phenomena than Thingvellir National Park, located in an active volcano zone 49 kilometres northeast of the capital, Reykjavik. With 24,000 hectares of towering cliffs, glacial lakes and water-filled fissures, it provides some of the best visual examples of continental drift in the world. Journey into the mossy Almannagjá Canyon to walk between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates, or soak up the country’s ancient history during a visit to the Althing, the 1,086-year-old open-air assembly site dotted with the remains of stone-and-turf huts where Iceland became a nation. —Michela Rosano, associate editor CLAYTON, N.Y. Clayton has provided some Thousand Islands R&R for city slickers from both sides of the border since the 1870s, and you can see why. In

Clockwise from above left: The Bay of Eagles; Thingvellir National Park; Clayton’s Antique Boat Museum.

addition to its quiet elegance, the town has a strong maritime aesthetic — think colourful clapboard houses and anchor motifs — that can make you feel like you’ve travelled to the coast rather than to the bank of the St. Lawrence River. In Clayton, the river’s shore is as appealing as any oceanside, thanks to places such as the town’s restored vaudeville-era opera house, the Antique Boat Museum (home to ancient birchbark canoes, the classic St. Lawrence skiff and much more) and the riverside 1000 Islands Harbor Hotel, a 21st-century version of the grand old hotels that helped turn Clayton into the refuge it is today. —Sabrina Doyle, new media editor Tell us what destination is on your radar this fall via

(@CanGeo) or

(fb.com/cangeo).

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC MINISTRY OF TOURISM; GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO; JIM SCHERZI

FROM THE CARIBBEAN to the North Atlantic to upstate New York, Canadian Geographic Travel staff share their top travel destinations for fall.


CA N A DA ’S LA RGEST STU DE N T GE O GR AP H Y C O MP E T IT IO N

JOIN IN THE FUN IT’S FREE! • Registration now open for both • •

level 1 (grades 4-6) and 2 (grades 7-10) All school winners receive a medal A revitalized website makes the Challenge easier to manage than ever

Find out more and brush up on your geography at

challenge.canadiangeographic.ca

Powered by

Trebek Family Foundation


ONECITY 3 VENUES

Miami By Aaron Kylie

1 . ARCHITECTURE

I

2 . ART THIS IS DEFINITELY not your typical art gallery. But visitors to Miami shouldn’t miss the city’s Wynwood neighbourhood, a former warehouse district that has become a veritable Louvre of graffiti art. Dozens of buildings throughout the area are plastered with an ever-changing gallery of street art murals by graffiti artists from around the world, including Canadians Patrick McNeil of Faile and Jasmine Dearden, known as Jas9. The Wynwood Walls (left), just west of the waterfront, are a focal point for the neighbourhood’s collection, calling itself the “world’s greatest street art museum.” Since they were created in 2009, the Walls alone have officially hosted more than 50 artists from 16 countries and art covering nearly 7,500 square metres. miamiandbeaches.com/places-to-see/wynwood; thewynwoodwalls.com

3 . C U LT U R E GET A TRUE TASTE of the history and culture of Miami’s Cuban community along Calle Ocho, the main drag in the city’s Little Havana neighbourhood, with Miami Culinary Tours. The 2½-hour journey reveals the best of the area’s food, booze and culture. Savour a genuine Café Cubano and “real” Cuban sandwich at down-home El Pub Restaurant (right). See experts hand-roll cigars at the Cuba Tobacco Cigar Co. Watch heated games of dominos at public Domino Park. Sip a mojito at Ball & Chain. Delight in a warm pastelito (Cuban pastry) with a guava filling at Yisell Bakery. Sample guarapo (sugar cane juice) at Los Pinareños Fruteria. And finally, cool off with a specialty flavour (such as Abuela Maria) at the Azucar Ice Cream Company. miamiandbeaches.com/places-to-see/little-havana; miamiculinarytours.com See more images of the street art from Miami’s Wynwood neighbourhood at cangeo.ca/sep16/graffiti. 20

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

TOP AND BOTTOM: COURTESY OF THE GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU; MIDDLE: AARON KYLIE/CAN GEO

T’S NO COINCIDENCE that the Miami Design Preservation League’s phenomenal art deco walking tour of South Beach begins about halfway along Ocean Drive at the Beach Patrol Headquarters. With its symmetrical design, porthole windows and iron rails, the building, built in 1934 near the start of Miami’s art deco emergence, is a prime example of the city’s take on the renowned architectural style. From there, the fascinating 90-minute tour (run daily) provides an introduction to art deco (such as the Hotel Breakwater South Beach, right), Mediterranean revival and Miami modern (MiMo) styles in the Miami Beach Architectural Historic District. The area is home to the world’s largest concentration of art deco, with more than 1,500 protected buildings in 2.5 square kilometres, and is considered an open-air museum of 20th-century architecture. mdpl.org


Help our kids

achieve

GETTY IMAGES/ZOONAR RF

their future

GIVE TODAY! Through Canadian Geographic Education, the RCGS provides free, bilingual educational resources to more than 17,300 geography teachers across Canada. We are proud to support geography education in Canada, but we can’t do it alone.

Thanks to your generous donation we can make sure our children have the tools they need to succeed. rcgs.org/donate


MARINE IGUANAS. BLUE-FOOTED BOOBIES. GIANT TORTOISES. MANGROVE FINCHES — and about 200,000 tourists a year. The evolution of conservation and adventure in the Galapagos Islands BY MARINA JIMENEZ

22

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016


Marine iguanas inhabit most of the islands in the Galapagos, including Española, where these particularly vibrant “Christmas iguanas” are found. C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

23


T

HE BLUE-FOOTED booby is one determined suitor. He lifts up one foot and then another in a dancing frenzy, as if showing off a pair of precious new Prada loafers. The object of his affection noses him with her beak, sizing up the shade of turquoise in his feet with her piercing yellow eyes. She is not entirely convinced. The feet aren’t blue enough. Nearby on a rock, a great frigatebird uses a wholly different strategy to pick up the chicks. He blows up a bright red pouch under his chin and squawks loudly — very, very loudly — at females flying overhead, as if saying, “Look, at my red balloon! Fly down and party in my nest!” The birds’ complete absence of fear makes the scene all the more magical as our small group of passengers, from L i n d b l a d E x p e d i t i o n s’ N a t i o n a l Geographic Endeavour, wanders about the Galapagos’s North Seymour Island and watches these famous mating rituals, undisturbed. It is one of Earth’s truly special places, one that humans have touched, but delicately. “Extreme tameness is common to all terrestrial species,” observed Charles Darwin, who came here in 1835 during his round-the-world voyage aboard HMS Beagle. The naturalist was so impressed by the vast number of endemic species, he was inspired to

24

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

develop his then-novel theory of natural selection and survival of the fittest. More than 180 years on, the Galapagos remains both a tame and enchanting place. THE ECOSYSTEM in this volcanic archipelago, located 900 kilometres west of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean, took millions of years to evolve and is very fragile. Most of the 19 islands have their own different species and unique geology, ranging from an extinct volcano on Rábida,

Sally lightfoot crabs (bottom) and bluefooted boobies (above and opposite top) are a common sight in the Galapagos, as are endemic species such as Galapagos sea lions and the famous giant tortoises (opposite, bottom left and right).

with its rocky coastline and stunning red sand (from the iron in the lava) to active volcanoes on Fernandina, covered with black, lifeless lava flows. Giant tortoises find shelter in the shade of cactus trees on Santa Cruz, patiently allowing themselves to be photographed — again and again. Forty-centimetre-high Galapagos penguins — the only penguins in the world this far north — are similarly nonchalant, as are the world’s only marine iguanas. They can dive almost 10 metres, then wade ashore to settle on rocks in the sun, spitting out sea water. Darwin called them “imps of darkness,” and though they are blissed-out vegetarians, there is something faintly terrifying about the


PREVIOUS SPREAD: MICHAEL S. NOLAN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS. OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: STEWART COHEN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; BOTTOM: SVEN-OLOF LINDBLAD/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: MICHAEL S. NOLAN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; STACY SINDLINGER/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; SVEN-OLOF LINDBLAD/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; ; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO

GALAPAGOS

spiky Godzilla-like creatures, as though Rats had been a problem, though they withdrew the designation in 2010 followthey might suddenly grow several sizes have been successfully eradicated, as have ing Ecuador’s determined efforts to limit and roar like a dinosaur. feral goats and donkeys. On Santa Cruz, a tourism, deport illegal residents and do Lars-Eric Lindblad, the Swedish- type of blackberry has overrun the highlands a better job inspecting ships for invasive species. The government also recently American founder of Lindblad Expeditions, and is almost impossible to eliminate. was the first travel company owner to bring “The biggest need in the Galapagos is announced the creation of a marine sancpeople to the Galapagos back in 1967. He to get rid of introduced species, the flora tuary protecting more than 47,000 square supported Ecuador’s efforts to create and fauna that can threaten the unique kilometres, or about one-third, of the water around the islands. That Galapagos National Park, which was means no more fishing. in 1978 declared a UNESCO World It has been a struggle, over the years, Still, the sheer number of tourHeritage Site. His son, Sven-Olof to protect such an incredible ecosystem. ists — about 200,000 a year — and Lindblad, has continued the tradithe infrastructure needed to suption, with two ships based in the There used to be 15 species of giant port them makes it a challenge to Galapagos year-round and ongoing tortoise; today, four are extinct. keep this environment intact. efforts to fundraise for conservation With more than 97 per cent of the projects undertaken by the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz. natural species still living here,” says islands uninhabited, rules for visitors are It has been a struggle, over the years, Fabian Bucheli, one of several naturalists very strict. We have to stay on marked to protect such an incredible ecosystem. who accompany Lindblad guests on daily trails, can go ashore only with a certified There used to be 15 species of giant tor- hikes. “In some cases that can be done guide, and cannot use flash photography, toise; today, four are extinct, including with poison. But sometimes they must be stay after sundown or remove anything. Meanwhile, conservationists are conthe tortoises of Pinta Island. The last hunted one by one, and that is extraorditinually working to win the support and member of his species, Lonesome narily time-consuming and expensive.” The UN placed the Galapagos on its cooperation of the local population. In George, was thought to have been more than 100 years old when he died in 2012. world heritage danger list in 2007. It 1990, just 10,000 people lived here, mainly C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

25


on Santa Cruz and San Cristóbal islands. conjunction with the national park, San Around 50,000 Galapagos sea lions (left) Today, the number of Galapaguenos Diego Zoo Global and Durrell Wildlife live in the archipelago. Like Darwin’s stands at about 30,000, the same as the Conservation Trust — has operated a pro- mangrove finch, the San Cristóbal mockinggiant tortoise population. gram to boost the bird’s population. The bird (top right) and several giant tortoise And not all locals are enthusiastic about chicks are raised in captivity for the first species (bottom right) are endangered. eradication programs, we’re told — or as eight weeks of their lives, during which they one naturalist puts it, some people would are fed up to 15 times a day, and then they findings until 1859, more than two decades after he set foot in the Galapagos. His prefer to be eating goats, not getting rid of are returned to their natural habitat. them. “We need locals to buy into the It was this famous songbird that helped deeply religious wife, Emma Wedgwood, importance of conservation,” says Arturo Darwin develop his scientific theory of remained vehemently opposed to his theory, as did many other critics. Izurieta, executive director of the I feel a deep thrill as we land on Charles Darwin Foundation, the I feel a deep thrill as we land on Santiago Island, where Darwin scientific organization that operates Santiago Island, where Darwin spent spent nine days camping. We wade the Santa Cruz research station. nine days camping. I imagine how he felt ashore from the Zodiacs to avoid the swell, then take an early morning LIKE SEVERAL of the islands’ giant when he saw his first giant tortoise. walk along the pristine beach, jumptortoise species, the mangrove finch ing over poisonous green apples is endangered, but all because of a common fly that lays eggs in its nests and evolution. He identified 14 finch species that cover the ground and marvelling at the feeds on its blood. That’s why for the last that live only in the Galapagos, and sea turtle tracks in the sand. This is where three years, the research station — in observed that their beaks had evolved to Darwin collected many of his plant species. different lengths and shapes. Darwin I imagine his delight as he took in the sight Marina Jimenez is a National Magazine attributed this to their geographical isola- of the fur seals playing in the water. With Award-winning journalist whose work has tion and exposure to different environmen- their whiskers, huge eyes and short, flat appeared in the Globe and Mail and the tal conditions. It seems like a logical tails, they resemble playful bears. I imagNational Post. She works for the Toronto Star. conclusion today, but at the time, the idea ine, too, how he must have felt when he was so revolutionary he didn’t publish his saw his first giant tortoise. 26

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

LEFT: SVEN-OLOF LINDBLAD/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; TOP RIGHT: CYNTHIA M. MANNING/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS; BOTTOM RIGHT: MICHAEL S. NOLAN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS

GALAPAGOS


Thank you! The My Parks Pass partners would like to thank the following contributor for helping make Canada’s Coolest School Trip a great success!

Educators, are you looking for a fun and innovative way to teach your Grade 8/Secondary 2 curriculum?

Participate in the next Canada’s Coolest School Trip contest! You could win an all-expenses-paid trip for your entire class to a Parks Canada place, and other cool prizes! Destination and contest rules will be announced soon. Visit contest.myparkspass.ca

For more information about the My Parks Pass program, please visit myparkspass.ca


MICHAEL S. NOLAN/LINDBLAD EXPEDITIONS

GALAPAGOS

“I was always amused when overtaking one of these great monsters [tortoises], as it was quietly pacing along, to see how suddenly, the instant I passed, it would draw in its head and legs, and uttering a deep hiss fall to the ground with a heavy sound, as if struck dead,” Darwin wrote in his journal, published in 1839 as The Voyage of the Beagle. “I frequently got on their backs, and then giving a few raps on the hinder parts of their shells, they would rise up and walk away; — but I found it very difficult to keep my balance.” Today, visitors would be thrown off the island for merely thinking such a thought. But the “great monsters” remain a sight to behold and underline the need to preserve these islands for future generations. Watch a video from this trip and get details on how to book your place on the next Lindblad Galapagos expedition at cangeo.ca/sep16/galapagos.

28

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

The tiny Galapagos penguin is the Northern Hemisphere’s only penguin.


87 Fellows Dinner The

th Annual

College of

Celebrating the Geological Survey of Canada’s 175th Anniversary with special guests featuring …

SIMON WINCHESTER Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016

SIMON WINCHESTER is the author of 26 books, including The New York Times bestseller The Map That Changed the World — the fascinating story of William Smith, the orphaned son of an English country blacksmith, who became obsessed with creating the world’s first geological map and ultimately became the father of modern geology. Born in London, Simon Winchester studied geology at the University of Oxford. After working as a field geologist in western Uganda, he began his career as a foreign correspondent for The Guardian and The Sunday Times, based variously in Belfast, Washington, D.C., New Delhi and Hong Kong.

BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW!

Regular price

Last-minute tickets

$225

$250*

Until October 16

* subject to availability

For more information, please visit

RCGS.ORG/DINNER

SETSUKO WINCHESTER

Ottawa, ON


30

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016


It’s

An-TEE- guh How to pronounce the Caribbean island’s name and other tales of its sun, surf and society BY NICK WALKER

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

31


“Y

OU’VE NEVER BEEN in the Caribbean before and you’re starting with Antigua?” Friends say this when they hear about my upcoming West Indies debut, as though there’s a proper order for breaking into the Antilles. “Also,” says another, “it’s An-TEE-guh. Not An-TEE-gwuh.” I’m not confident that’s correct, so I make a mental note to pay attention to how Antiguans say it. What a bit of pretrip Googling turns up, other than photos of palatial resorts sprawled along beaches or plunked on rocky cliffs, is that the island nation comes in two chunks — rolling Antigua itself and Barbuda to the north, flatter and not nearly as developed, but fringed on the west by the white-and-coral 17-Mile Beach, allegedly the longest unbroken beach in the Caribbean. Antigua’s coastal claim, meanwhile, is that it has 365 beaches — “One for every day of the year.” For someone who once suffered a mild case of sunstroke in Scotland, the prospect of virtually inescapable sunlight is both exciting and unnerving. Reservation confirmed at the small, family-owned Catamaran hotel, I pack three bottles of sunscreen (two SPF 30s and a 45), an insulated cold-water bottle, a straw hat, flip-flops, sunglasses and white linen pants like you see on folk in Caribbean travel ads. I’m eager to see what brings nearly a million visitors to this set of little Leeward Islands every

32

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

year, albeit in October, a month or so before cruise-ship hoards start flowing into the capital city of St. John’s. If it simply turns out to be bright strips of sand and robin’segg-blue water, I’ll be ready. ANTIGUA WAS BRITAIN’S most valuable Caribbean colony by the 1700s. For protection from hurricanes and enemy navies and for access to the trade winds, there were no better anchorages in all the West Indies than the island’s southern Falmouth and English harbours, and the Admiralty turned the area into a tropical stronghold. Today you’re more likely to see dozens of yachts flying as many countries’ flags than a fleet of British cargo and gun ships, and the coastlines are divided between forested hills, restored naval dockyards and stone forts, marinas and boutique hotels. The Catamaran, at the head of Falmouth Harbour, isn’t a converted Georgian historic site, nor is it much like the opulent resorts from my Antigua image searches. But it’s precisely what I’d hoped: comfortable and clean, and furnished with a story all its own. Owner Feona Bailey and her children have run the inn and marina since it passed to her from her father, Hugh Bailey, one of Antigua’s great sailors. For decades he had cared for the little retreat’s original owners, an older British couple, taxiing them around, performing repairs and running their errands, and after


ANTIGUA

0

10 km

17-Mile Beach Codrington

BARBUDA

PREVIOUS SPREAD: TED MARTIN/PHOTOFANTASY. THIS SPREAD, TOP LEFT AND BOTTOM RIGHT: NICK WALKER/CAN GEO STAFF; TOP RIGHT: PILLARS RESTAURANT AT ADMIRAL’S INN; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO

CARIBBEAN

Antigua

SEA

A N T I G U A

St John’s

Ffryes Beach Johnsons Point Fig Tree Drive

Betty’s Hope Catamaran Shirley Heights Falmouth Harbour

English Harbour

both had died he was stunned by a lawyer who called with news that the whole property had been left to him. Today the lush grounds and my tasteful room relay that this place is still loved. The bed comforter is patterned like the blooming hibiscus shrubs outside, and the morning reveals a balcony view of a small groomed beach and milky-blue water opening up into the harbour. It inspires me to take a morning swim, which is how I discover that I failed to pack swim trunks. That’s why I’ve been lazing in the Catamaran’s outdoor lounge area watching land crabs and house geckos (and wondering how long cotton shorts take to air dry) for half an hour when John Henry of J.H. & Son taxi service pulls up in his black SUV. He’s been hired to guide me around the island for the week, collect me from beaches and after boat rides. Henry is a lifelong Antiguan, a local historian and, it turns out, a riveting storyteller with a wry wit. He might be 45 or 65. He eventually tells me 67. After a good laugh at the expense of my packing skills, Henry begins a welcome lesson on the fruit groves and plantations we’re passing on our tour of Fig Tree Drive, on the western rainforest side of the island — papaya, coconut, banana and pineapple to name but a few — how they grow and which country roads have the best fruit stands. His father was head gardener at Jolly Beach resort and a prolific farmer, and it rubbed off. “Take that banana tree,”

The Caribbean Sea, as seen from Cocobay Resort (opposite); Nelson’s Dockyard and the Admiral’s Inn, in English Harbour (top); bananas at a roadside fruit stand (above); an aerial view of English and Falmouth harbours (previous pages).

he says. “The plant gives you but one bunch, then it’s gotta die. The bunch is the heart of the plant. If you take a man’s heart from his chest, what’s gonna happen?” I’ll never look at a banana the same way, I admit. Henry talks also about Today you’re more the villages along our purlikely to see dozens of posely roundabout route, yachts flying as many many named for the last plantation owners on the countries’ flags than land: Swetes, John Hughes, a fleet of British cargo Bolans, Jennings. The and gun ships. British, who started colonizing Antigua in 1632, eventually answered Europe’s booming demand for sugar by covering the island — and many others — with sugarcane and by shipping in African slaves to plant, cut and process it. Slaves weren’t emancipated until 1834, and it was decades before many former slaves and their children benefited from their freedom, and longer still before tourism replaced the cane as Antigua’s economic mainstay. C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

33


ANTIGUA

We order a lunch of conch fritters at Turner’s Beach Bar and Grill on Johnsons Point, then double back to Betty’s Hope. Built on a windy hilltop in 1674 and named for the daughter of Sir Christopher Codrington, governor of the Leeward Islands, it was Antigua’s first large-scale sugar plantation. Now it’s a sobering open-air museum of ruins and two looming stone sugar mills, one fully restored. At the plantation’s peak, when there were more than 200 such mills in Antigua and 84 per cent of the island’s population was slaves, around 400 were bound to Betty’s Hope alone, and each Henry shows up one windmill crushed two acres of cane a day. When the wind morning with a mango, died, beasts of burden would a bunch of ‘finger rose’ be harnessed in to turn the bananas and a prickly huge mechanism. When they would not cooperate, slaves green lump called were set to it. As I learn this, a soursop. it’s 32 C in the shade. “People were happy to see the back of the sugar industry, which lasted long into the 1900s,” says Henry. “Even after slavery, it was a hand-blisterin’, back-achin’ job. But we want people to see this place.” HENRY SHOWS UP ONE MORNING with a mango, a bunch of “finger rose” bananas and a prickly green lump called a soursop, which he had pointed out dangling in a tree the day before. It’s filled with a soft, fibrous white Nick Walker (@CanGeoNick) is the managing editor of Canadian Geographic Travel.

34

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

flesh — the sharper, pulpier love child of a pineapple and a banana. “Now at least you’ve had a chance to taste it!” he says. “And the mangos here are pretty sweet and juicy, so don’t mess yourself up right away. I’m takin’ you to some of the best beaches in Antigua today.” The sandy chain where I end up, on the island’s southwest side, is indeed idyllic and all but empty. But as if Henry had set the tone with the soursop, it’s tropical fruits that define the day. Between splashing around under the flaring sun and seeking palm-shade on Ffryes Beach, I’m approached by a local selling fat bunches of pale green-shelled “guineps.” They’re shiny and smooth, and about the size of Brussels sprouts. “They look delicious, but I don’t have cash right on me,” I say, honest on both counts. My shorts are still dripping. “That’s a’right. Enjoy somma these anyway,” he says, squeezing the salmon-pink flesh from its casing and into his mouth to prove they’re safe. Then he drops three clusters on my towel and saunters off. The edible part of a guinep is a layer of tangy sweet pulp around a large seed, and I shuck a branch’s worth on the 10-minute walk between Ffryes Beach and busier Coco Beach. When my tongue can take no more I soothe it with the rich water straight out of a green coconut, expertly macheted and topped off with a generous shot of “bush rum” and a straw. The young man wielding the machete — who introduces himself as Damien O’Connell Lynch — is camped out under a palm with a table, a coconut stack and an unlabelled bottle of the brown rum. He says he infused and aged it himself, for 1½ years. “A family recipe,” he smiles, and starts hacking at another of the head-sized fruits for the next customer.

NICK WALKER/CAN GEO STAFF

John Henry: guide, resident historian and storyteller extraordinaire (left). Wandering a stretch of Barbuda’s 17-Mile Beach (above) on a day trip to the island.


ANTIGUA

THE DAYS MORE OR LESS flow by like a warm current: sunny breakfasts at Pillars Restaurant in the Admiral’s Inn and Gunpowder Suites overlooking English Harbour; a catamaran voyage north to Barbuda to wander a fraction of 17-Mile Beach and be surrounded by a protected colony of magnificent frigatebirds; bobbing around in bright blue waves, reapplications of sunscreen and always more fruit. But on the last evening, there’s no option but the Shirley Heights Sunday Barbecue Party. The historic site, a former British military lookout and gun battery, was co-opted more than three decades ago for this weekly event, and partygoers start arriving at 4 p.m. to listen to a traditional steel drum orchestra and celebrate the knockout sunset view of English and Falmouth harbours from the 150-metre-high perch. 36

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

Redcliffe and Heritage quays, the colourful duty-free, boutique and restaurant neighbourhoods in St. John’s, edge Deepwater Harbour in Antigua’s capital city.

Spiced rum punch and piña coladas flow, and long grills are piled with jerk pork, ribs, chicken and lobsters. After dark, a live reggae and soca band takes the stage and dancing begins. By all accounts, the Sunday Barbecue Party is one of the biggest “limes” in the Caribbean, and while it might sound like a cut-and-dried tourist trap, Shirley Heights is teeming with sunburned foreigners and locals alike. Antiguans know — and revel in — what they have here. The lime is a perfect distillation of their compulsive hospitality and the island’s farmed, wild-picked and fresh-caught bounty. As we leave Shirley Heights, I remember to ask Henry about the correct pronunciation of Antigua. I’m pretty certain he’s been saying it both ways, story dependent. It’s not a simple answer, and involves Christopher Columbus’s 1492 voyage for Spain, his naming the island after the church Santa María la Antigua back in Seville and so on. “So An-TEE-gwuh is Spanish, and was always the way,” says Henry. “But once we get around to later generations and everyone’s speakin’ English, they mostly drop the U. It’s still all right to say -gwuh, but if your friends say -guh, don’t be lookin’ at them hard, ’cause you know what? They’re right too.” That’s good enough for me, and I promise not to look at my friends too hard. Pronunciation aside, I add, it will be hard to leave the island tomorrow, and not because I haven’t seen 365 beaches. “Well, you can always come back,” says Henry. “It’s always like this here. As long as you’re on the island, no matter who you are, Antiguans want you to know that Antigua is also yours.” For more pictures and a story about a catamaran trip to the island of Barbuda, visit cangeo.ca/sep16/barbuda.

ANTIGUA & BARBUDA TOURISM AUTHORITY

Sautéed calamari and gin and tonics follow at nearby Cocobay Resort’s elevated and alfresco Sheer Rocks restaurant. It’s one of the finest views of the trip — Technicolor greens and blues and the occasional bolt of white foam as a Sea-Dooer dashes along below. The high point of the neighbouring island of Nevis sits in the distance. The local squid is light and delectable, but the constant produce intake has curtailed my appetite for more from the popular tapas menu. That doesn’t surprise Henry when he returns, recalling the childhood he shared with 10 brothers and four sisters. “There was a time when 99 per cent of what we were The ‘lime’ is a perfect eatin’ were fruits and vegetables,” he says. “Guavas distillation of Antigua’s plentiful to us, avocacompulsive hospitality were dos, papayas, mangos, and its farmed, wildoranges, bananas, carrots, the prettiest cucumbers picked and freshand tomatoes. The only caught bounty. time you’d feel hungry was before dinner, because you were home and you could smell the fish. But no one ever went hungry. If you did, it was your fault.”


CONSERVATION. TOGETHER. The waters offshore Nunavut support spectacular Arctic marine life. Shell’s gift of 860,000 hectares of offshore rights to the Nature Conservancy of Canada will protect an area larger than Banff National Park. Conservation of this area will protect an important piece of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and could enable greater marine protection in the region.

www.shell.ca


OUR 2017 CALENDARS ARE NOW AVAILABLE To see all our calendars visit, cangeo.ca/calendars

16

MONTHS OF STUNNING PHOTOGRAPHS


A WALK ON THE

Wild side A group of big city kids from Toronto — the 2016 winners of Canada’s Coolest School Trip — get a taste of nature among the mountains in Alberta’s Jasper National Park BY THOMAS HALL WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA FINN

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

39


JASPER NATIONAL

BRITISH PARK

A th

COLUMBIA

16

ab as

ca Rive

ALBERTA

0

40

93

r

Enlarged area

ALBERTA

25 km

BANFF N.P.

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

Connaught Junior and Senior School in Toronto. Their video about the natural and cultural significance of Rouge National Urban Park garnered the most votes in the annual national competition put on by Parks Canada, The Royal Canadian Geographical Society, Air Canada, Nature Canada, the Canadian Wildlife Foundation and Historica Canada. Their prize? An all-expenses-paid, week-long trip to Alberta’s Jasper National Park. Brown, a local Cree knowledge keeper, begins a “heartbeat beat” on her elk-skin drum. The rhythm echoes through the Palisades Stewardship Education Centre, a group of century-old log buildings about 15 kilometres east of Jasper that once made up a dude ranch. Brown is a regular at the centre, which runs experiential education programs that blend mountain recreation with environmental stewardship and emphasizes the importance of the rich First Nations and Métis history of the region. “It’s the heartbeat of Mother Earth; the first thing we hear when we’re born,” she says, continuing the drumbeat. “It’s also called ‘weak-strong’ because you can’t be one without the other.” The students’ adventure is made up of moments like this, a collage of experiences in the wild Rockies that 25 kids

from North America’s fourth-largest city will never forget. “THERE ARE NO BUILDINGS,” Houzayfa Mahamat Zene says, peering at the roaring Athabasca Falls. The Grade 8 student is used to skyscrapers, condo towers and houses. “This is so much greener.” The falls are the first stop on day three and a convenient way to show how the glaciers that once covered most of what is now Jasper National Park — and now make up the Columbia Ice Field — have affected the geography of the region. “That’s called a braided river,” Paul Langevin, a Parks Canada educator says a little later, pointing out the bus window at the spaghetti-like mess of rivulets winding down the valley. “They’re formed by the changing levels of fastmoving glacial rivers. During the day, the sun melts the glaciers, causing the river to rise and change course. At night it cools, the flow drops and the river settles into its new channels until it all happens again the next day.” Around a bend in the highway, a lip of sea-blue ice peeks out from a mountain pass, welcoming the students to glacier country. Soon, they’re tromping around

MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO

AS THE PUNGENT SMOKE wafts over the students, the only sound is the rustle of wind in the aspens and the burble of water in the nearby brook. “Smudge is a prayer,” Matricia Brown says. “This smudge is made of four sacred medicines: sage, sweetgrass, tobacco and cedar. We take the medicines and burn them to purify.” She inhales deeply. “Oh, this is a good smudge. The creator is being kind to us today.” It’s day one of Canada’s Coolest School Trip and it’s already living up to its name. This year’s winners were Megan Ramsay’s Grade 7/8 class from Duke of


on the Athabasca Glacier, where neither biting wind and rain nor sub-zero temperatures stop them from filling bottles with the pristine glacial water running through channels in the ancient ice or peering up in wonder at glaciers high above the valley. Langevin explains that the water from the glacier runs down to the valley, creating the Sunwapta River, which joins the mighty Athabasca as it flows out of the mountains to the Arctic Ocean via the Mackenzie River. “Tomorrow you’ll be rafting on the water that comes from this glacier.”

appear along the banks where springs join the river. “The area is full of caves and springs because of paths carved through the limestone by water seeping down from nearby lakes,” the guide says. The raft spins a final time before crashing into another set of waves. As the students wring out their clothes, the guide tells them how the Athabasca was an important trade route before there

Clockwise from opposite: Atop Whistlers Mountain; mountain biking; the Athabasca Glacier; rafting the Athabasca River; Matricia Brown, a Cree knowledge keeper. previous pages: The students at Maligne Canyon.

animal and its cub. The bear swings its head around, looks back at the bus and then saunters across the road and into the thick bush, unimpressed with what it sees. As the bus resumes its journey, the students add the bear to the list of animals they’ve seen that you wouldn’t normally find on the streets of Toronto: elk, mountain goats and black swifts, to name but a few. They’ve gone from skyscrapers to Douglas firs; from the flow of traffic to rivers of glacial runoff; from pigeons and raccoons to osprey and bears. It has been an exhausting but exhilarating week. As they steep in the 42 C hot springs, their sore feet, weary legs and stimulated minds finally begin to relax — the perfect finale to their Rocky Mountain adventure.

‘In the city it ’s all buildings and houses. This is so much greener.’

“HOLD ON AND LEAN IN,” the guide from Jasper Raft Tours shouts over the rumble of the raft as it slams into a series of standing waves called haystacks. The frigid water of the Athabasca River pours over the shrieking students. Day four of the trip will turn out to be a wet one. As the raft lazily spins toward the next set of rapids on the 16-kilometre trip, the guide explains that the water’s slate-grey colour is because of silt, or “rock flour,” which comes from the millstone-like action of the glaciers on the valley floor. But occasionally, shoots of turquoise

were roads through the region. “Loaded canoes would have travelled up and down the river throughout the summer,” he says. “Now imagine trying to paddle up this river in a canoe full of supplies instead of floating down it.” The current whips the raft around another bend. “I don’t know how they did it.” That afternoon, en route to a session of soaking in the Miette Hot Springs, the students spot something they’ve been waiting to see since arriving in Alberta — a bear. Their bus stops in the middle of the narrow road that snakes up the valley to the hot springs, and everyone cranes for a glimpse of the

Read more about the experiences of the winning class during the 2016 Canada’s Coolest School Trip at cangeo.ca/sep16/ccst. C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

41


Arizona uncorked BYBY KATE KATE HARRIS HARRIS

Forget Napa or Sonoma — Arizona is the hottest (literally) new wine hub in America BY KATE HARRIS

42

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016


Rows of grapevines soak up the Arizona sunshine at the Carlson Creek Vineyard, just outside the city of Willcox. C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

43


W

HEN THE WALLABY shows up, I forget all about wine. The creature is a coiled spring of muscle and mousy brown fur the size of a carry-on suitcase. When Kief Joshua Manning brought her home as a joey, he slung her in a makeshift stomach pouch and worked the vineyard as usual, a young man with a maternal silhouette pruning grapes in the cool dawns and dusks of the desert. Now full-grown, the wallaby is the only hopping member of Manning’s menagerie, which consists of two goats, five sheep, four cats and four rescue dogs — a greyhound, a Yorkshire terrier, a whippet and a basset hound, who are collectively howling at the fact that the wallaby has stolen my attention. I’ve always wanted to travel to Australia, home to winsome marsupials, glittering wines and huge sun-baked horizons. For now, though, Arizona is a near-perfect substitute — or better yet, its own fascinating, far-out place entirely. Manning lacks an accent but he could otherwise pass for a wrangler in the outback. He has a gravelly voice, sky-blue eyes and a squared jaw edged by sideburns. His whole face crinkles when he grins, which is often. He wears dusty jeans, scuffed work boots and a backward ball cap. He is 33 years old. Even the wallaby aside, Manning is not your usual vintner, and this is not a typical vineyard. The eponymous KiefJoshua Vineyards makes wine based on the biodynamic principles of Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian philosopher who took sustainable organic farming to the extreme — of outer space. “We plant and

44

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

harvest grapes according to the gravitational pulls of the sun, moon and five closest planets,” explains Manning, who, despite this statement, is the least newagey person I’ve ever met. From a biodynamic perspective, a vineyard is a singular organism kept alive through a vintner’s close attention to biodiversity, crop rotations, symbiotic livestock, closed-loop fertilization and, yes, the harmony of the spheres. “It’s really esoteric and strange,” Manning admits with a grin, “but it gives a focus for my days. I wake up, check the biodynamic planting calendar and if it says bury cow horns stuffed with manure, I do that.” Welcome to Arizona, the quirky Wild West of wine.

IF A STATE FAMOUS for canyons and cacti strikes you as an unlikely venue for vineyards, you’re not wrong. In parts of Arizona, though, the confluence of arid days, cool nights, higher elevations, volcanic soils and — most crucially — deep wells for drip irrigation renders the desert into an oasis for grapes. As a result, Arizona hosts a fledgling wine industry that aims to rival Napa and Sonoma, only without the pretentiousness or price tags associated with more established wine regions. Every winter, nearly a million Canadian snowbirds flock to this state for its warmth, rugged scenery and highwattage sunshine; wine offers just another good reason to go south. In vino veritas, as the saying goes, and in Arizona vino. I migrate there myself, albeit in August, to sample the truth of its wines. Leaving Phoenix on a road trip arranged by the Arizona Office of Tourism, the concrete sprawl of the city yields to open desert. The sky is a pale and cloudless blue, sapped of colour and texture by the heat (by 9 a.m., it’s 40 C). Mountains are dark suggestions in the distance — dark in part because conifers thrive in the cool relief of high-altitude outcrops


ARIZONA

Arizona

Kief-Joshua Vineyards

TUCSON

ELGIN

Wine growing region

Flagstaff Prescott PHOENIX Tucson

Willcox

Carlson Creek Vineyard

Carlson Creek Tasting Room

Aridus Wine Company

WILLCOX Lawrence Dunham Vineyards 10

Keeling Schaefer Vineyards 0

10 km

PREVIOUS SPREAD: CARLSON CREEK VINEYARD. THIS SPREAD, TOP LEFT: KIEF-JOSHUA VINEYARDS; BOTTOM LEFT: COCHISE COUNTY, EXPLORECOCHISE.COM; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO; LANDSAT 8 IMAGE: OCTOBER, 2014

approximate foreground scale scale varies across the map

known as “sky islands.” Along the road, dozens of ocotillo plants, a spiny, longstemmed shrub, resemble explosions of green snakes from prank cans. Everything about the Sonoran desert of southern Arizona seems exaggerated, almost cartoonish, from the roadrunners speeding across the highway to the fleshy, shrugging torsos of saguaro cacti patrolling its shoulders. The saguaro is the flagship species of the Sonoran desert, a unique ecosystem that sprawls from Central Mexico to the southwestern United States (there’s even a relict chunk stranded in British Columbia’s Okanagan). Home to yucca, prickly pear, staghorn and agave, the Sonoran looks surprisingly lush and green — at least during the monsoon season, when I visit. Every afternoon, dark purplish clouds bunch in the sky and bolts of lightning sting the horizon. The deluge that follows hints at how thirsty plants such as grapevines survive here: the Sonoran receives up to 38 centimetres of rainfall annually, barely qualifying it as a desert.

Heat is another matter. With summer temperatures climbing to 48 C, humans are a rare species in the Sonoran, clinging on only where there’s air conditioning. Take Willcox, for example, the former “cattle capital of America” and my first stop on the wine tour. This town of 3,700 boasts fewer cowboys than in previous eras, but exponentially more vintners.

Reasons to smile: Kief Joshua Manning (opposite top) samples some of his own wares, and a rainbow forms over Lawrence Dunham Vineyards (opposite bottom).

room was once a bank. Today, the building deals more in currencies of wine than cash. Hosting the tasting is Jan Schaefer, a charming, white-haired retiree who owns and runs the vineyard with her husband, Rod Keeling. In 2000, the couple bought land “45 minutes from nowhere” and planted vines based on what they’d learned through avid reading and a three-day oenology course. Fourteen years later, after producing some impressively sophisticated wines — rated “very good” by Wine Spectator magazine — Keeling Schaefer was crowned “winery of the year” by the Willcox Chamber of Commerce and Agriculture. Across the street is the tasting room for Carlson Creek, a family-owned vineyard run by two young brothers from California. The elder sibling, Robert,

‘I wake up, check the biodynamic planting calendar and if it says bury cow horns stuffed with manure, I do that.’ Fodor’s hailed Willcox’s twice-annual wine festival (held on the third weekends of October and May) as a “can’t miss” event. But fear not: if you do miss it, Willcox hosts year-round tasting rooms, and all of them are air-conditioned. The batter-proof copper door, tin roof and polished hardwood floors hint that the Keeling Schaefer Vineyards tasting

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

45


ARIZONA

is 35; his brother, John, is 28. They pour me a glass of Sweet Adeline, a Riesling named for their grandmother, and explain how they came to run a vineyard. Robert worked as a stockbroker until the financial crash in 2008, when he decided to invest in what he truly loved: wine. Teaming up with his brother and family, the Carlsons bought 65 hectares just outside Willcox, and Robert has rarely spent time at a desk since. “We could never do this in California,” Robert says, citing the cheaper land and lower startup costs for vineyards in Arizona than in his home state. In that sense, the Sonoran desert is the final frontier of wine: anyone with a little land, a lot of savvy and reliable well water can live the vintner dream in Arizona — and even adopt a wallaby to boot. Asked how he afforded a vineyard at such a young age, Manning says “I got lucky — sort of.” At 12, he was hit by a car and received a five-figure settlement. With his parents’ guidance, he used the cash to buy a house in Phoenix, and sold it after college for many times its original price. He bought 16 hectares in Willcox and eight hectares in Elgin, planted vines, built a castle-like home (which doubles as a tasting room and production facility), rescued marsupials and countless other creatures, and began making award-winning wines. Among them is a red blend called Magdelena, named for his grandmother — apparently a nomenclatural trend among young Arizonan winemakers. Her response to his loving gesture? She said he got her name wrong (she goes by Lena) and that she prefers white wine. “At 96,” Manning says admiringly, “she’s still the biggest smartass I know.”

TAKING GRAPES from the vine to the glass is a process part science, part alchemy. Many artisanal winemakers in southern Arizona bring their harvests to the Aridus Wine Company’s custom crush facility, on the outskirts of Willcox, for custom processing. Scott Dahmer, the Canadian ex-pat owner, shows me around the facility, which smells — not unpleasantly — like the day after a party.

Bob Carlson stands with his sons John (left) and Robert in the Carlson Creek vineyard, which the family started in 2008.

to two years to go from grape to glass. Dahmer uses a “wine thief” — a pipette for sampling wine from barrels — to give me a sample of his Syrah-inprogress, for in addition to crushing grapes from other vineyards he also produces wine under the Aridus label. Already the Syrah tastes delicious, spicy and full of motion, the gustatory equivalent of a brief wind stealing through the desert’s blaze. If Arizona vintages lack the reputation of their Californian or Old World counterparts, poor distribution, not poor wine, is to blame. “We still have Prohibition: we just don’t have Al Capone anymore,” jokes Curt Dunham, a retired urban planning consultant who started the Lawrence Dunham Vineyards. Politicized liquor laws mean a small number of people control what wines get sold where, without much regard for quality. As a result, exporting local wine from the state, never mind the country, is

Kate Harris is a writer who lives off-grid in Atlin, B.C. Her first book, Lands of Lost Borders, will be published in spring 2017.

46

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

Gleaming space-age vats bubble as yeast transforms grape sugars into ethanol and carbon dioxide. Two men shovel a tub of fermented grapes into a plastic bin to be forklifted into a giant press. From there, wine will be poured into oak barrels for a spell of slow, concentrated evaporation in a refrigerated room with strictly controlled humidity. Depending on the wine, it can take up

CARLSON CREEK VINEYARD

Arizona hosts a fledgling wine industry that aims to rival Napa and Sonoma, only without the pretentiousness or price tags.


Presented by

Canadian students increase their energy awareness while educating the nation.

2017 CHALLENGE IS COMING! IS YOUR CLASS UP TO THE CHALLENGE? • Kindergarten to Grade 12 • 25 energy-themed, curriculum-linked classroom challenges • $40,000 in prizes available to be won! • Register for free at energydiet.ca

Register at energydiet.ca


ARIZONA

and corn in the Sonoran for millennia. Judging from the woven baskets on display in the state park’s museum — objects more beautiful than they would need to be, if strictly for harvesting crops — I suspect that farming, for them, was a matter of not strictly sustenance but also spirituality. A way of life. Modern winemakers in Arizona take a similarly reverent approach to growing grapes, and maybe this is why Arizona wines, for lack of a better word, have soul.

Clockwise from above: The Carlson Creek Vineyard; Aridus Wine Company’s tasting room; wine at Keeling Schaefer Vineyards.

terroir — the characteristic taste and flavour imparted to a wine by the total environment in which it is produced — unique to southern Arizona. In the end, though, the Sonoran desert serves up the most timeless vintage. Outside the Tubac Presidio museum, an ethnobotanical garden features plants used by the Pima, Tohono O’odham and Apache. Some, such as Mormon tea, have pharmaceutical qualities. Others, such as agave, provide vitamins and calories. Still others, more reminiscent of wine, boast no clear utility beyond the elevation and appreciation of life they bring about. For example, the creosote bush has medicinal properties but it also falls in that latter, more evocative category: if you cup your hands around its resinous green leaves, breathe on them as though fogging up a mirror, and inhale deeply, the plant smells exactly like the desert after rain.

The Sonoran desert is the final frontier of wine: anyone with a little land, a lot of savvy and reliable well water can live the vintner dream in Arizona.

48

C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L

FALL 2016

Or heart. Or whatever you want to call that combination of sweat and whimsy and fanatic commitment to farm chores that sees 30-something prodigies and 60-something retirees plant neat rows of Merlot and Syrah among hardscrabble sweeps of saguaro and yucca. These vintners know wine is not just the sum of its grapes but also the people and soil and water and history that go into making it. Such is the

Check out winemaker Scott Dahmer’s top Arizona wines at cangeo.ca/sep16/wine.

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: ARIDUS WINE COMPANY; COCHISE COUNTY, EXPLORECOCHISE.COM; CARLSON CREEK VINEYARD

complicated. If you fancy a glass of Arizona wine, you’ll get it faster by heading south than by waiting for bottles to show up on Canadian store shelves. Despite the distribution system being stacked against him, Dunham is content with staying small. “I want to keep my fingerprints in everything,” he says. “I’m not trying to mass produce.” Like the other winemakers I met in Arizona, Dunham sells all his wine — several thousand cases a year — at the vineyard itself, or through its dedicated wine club. For him, winemaking is less about profits and more about people. “When I look at a barrel of wine in progress, I see people. I see gatherings, dinners, weddings, funerals. Wine is a social occasion,” he says. “If it were up to me, I’d love to meet everyone drinking our wine.” He’d also love to meet the desert’s original farmers. Dunham finds metates (to grind grain) and other native artifacts on his property whenever heavy rains erode the creeks. A few days later, in the Tubac Presidio State Historic Park’s museum, I see these tools on display and learn who made them: the Pima, Tohono O’odham and Apache people, who cultivated squash


All maps tell stories,

and our Giant Floor Maps tell

great

big stories

ADVENTURES See us at canadiangeographic.ca

NOW AVAILABLE

War, Art and Poetry | L’art Poems of the First World et la poésie de la Grande War | Poèm es de la Premi Guerre ère Guerre mond

iale

Near Verm and By Ivor Gurn ey

Vimy (A crête de 1-0116 re sur la Cimetiè MCG 1971026 1-0116/ rook 1971026 Beaverb Art CWM militaire n of War llection d'art rook Collectio s BushCo Beaverb k Thwaite s Bush k Thwaite Lieutenant Frederic par nt Frederic Estampe Lieutena Print by on Vimy Ridge) y Cemeter

Lying flat on my belly shive There was ring in clutch time frost, Looking eastw to watch the stars, we At our sense ard over the low ridge had dug in; ; March s, no use either Low wood dying or strug scurried its blast, s to gling. Showed throu left, Cotswold spinn ies if ever, gh snow fl And nothi ng but chill urries and the cleare r star and wonder But loathing lived in mind weather. and fine beaut Here were ; nothing y, and wet thoughts. clothing. Cold smoth A day to follow ering, and like this or fire-desiring, in digging or wiring.

Learning materials included

Canadian Sentry, Moonlight canadienne , Clare de lune, , Neuville-Vitasse Painted Neuville-V itasse Peinture by Lieutenant Alfred Theodore par Lieutenant Alfred Theodore Joseph Bastien Beaverbroo Joseph Bastien k Collection Collection of d’art militaire War Art CWM 19710261-0 Beaverbroo k MCG 19710261-0058/ Sentienelle 058

8 - Poems

of WWI.ind

d 1

2016-05-04

REQUEST ONE TODAY!

y Ridge

y on Vim

A cemeter

2:59 PM

8

indd 1

Cards.

Parks Canada:  Places and Spaces  for Everyone  Energy Production and Transmission

crête du

Vimy

PM 5-04 3:00

2016-0

geo.ca n a c . n o i t educa Image - War Art

re sur la

| Cimetiè

EIGHT GIANT FLOOR MAPS

AVAILABLE TO TEACHERS

Arctic Alive

Drawn to Victory

Wild Migrations

Canada from Space

Canada: A Reference Map

featured Vimy Ridge CANGEO.CA / DIGITAL


TENBEST

Vantage point

Can’t see the city for the skyscrapers? Check out Nicole Rutherford and Alexandra Pope’s picks of the 10 best places to take in astounding urban panoramas.

HE CN TOWER, the Empire State Building, Seattle’s Space Needle: these towering landmarks are usually top of mind when it comes to the best places to rise above the noise and bustle of the modern metropolis. Here are 10 more spots — some iconic, some lesser known — to get you a bird’s-eye view of the world’s most spectacular cities.

Parc de Belleville, Paris, France This 45,000 square-metre hilltop park is the highest in Paris and offers a different view of the City of Light than the touristpacked Eiffel Tower. It also boasts a toboggan hill, numerous streams and waterfalls and even a small vineyard, making it a restful retreat from the clamour of the 7th arrondissement. Piazza Duomo Bell Tower, Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence, Italy Construction of Florence’s central cathedral began in the 13th century and finished in the 15th with the addition of the soaring dome from which it derives its nickname, Il Duomo. Those willing to make the trek up 463 steps (no elevators here!) will be treated to a dazzling view of the Tuscan capital. €15 (C$21.45) Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Opposite Rio’s famous Christ the Redeemer statue is the ultimate city viewpoint: Sugarloaf Mountain. The granite monolith punches skyward from the shore of the Atlantic Ocean to an altitude of 396 metres. To get to the peak, it’s easier to climb Sugarloaf’s baby brother Morro Da Urca (a 40-minute walk) to catch the Sugarloaf Cable Car. Adults R$26.50 (C$9.50), children R$13.00 (C$4.65) 50

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL

FALL 2016

Taipei 101, Taipei, Taiwan Standing 508 metres high with 101 floors, this architectural spectacle was the tallest building in the world until 2010. Ride the highspeed elevator, which travels 17 metres per second, to the observation decks between the 88th and 91st floors. While there, check out the impressive 730tonne steel pendulum that stabilizes the building during earthquakes and typhoons. NT$500 (C$19.60) Stawamus Chief, Squamish, B.C. Okay, so Squamish isn’t exactly a major metropolis, but the view from the top of the Chief and the fact that it’s only an hour’s drive from Vancouver makes this a West Coast must-do. Hike the maintained backside trails to any of the Chief’s three peaks to fully experience the area’s waterfalls and old-growth forests, or zip to the Summit Lodge observation deck on the Sea-to-Sky Gondola ($40 round-trip). Minčeta Tower, Dubrovnik, Croatia The Minčeta Tower is part of a fortress built in 1319 to protect the city of Dubrovnik from invaders. It is the highest point on the old fort walls, affording a wonderful view of Old Town Dubrovnik, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Scenes from HBO’s medieval fantasy epic Game of Thrones are filmed here. Adults 120 kn (C$23), children 30 kn (C$5.75) The High Line, New York City, New York Weaving among the buildings of Manhattan’s busy West Side, the High Line, a two-kilometre linear park installed on a disused railway spur, offers visitors nine-metre-high views of the city and the Hudson River as they walk alongside thick vegetation. Shops and attractions

line the route, and tour guides are happy to brief you on the history of the New York Central Railroad. Sky Tower, Auckland, New Zealand A local favourite in Auckland for two decades, the Sky Tower is the best way to see the city at a glance. Enjoy dinner with a side of panoramic views at the art deco-themed Sugar Club or, if you’re feeling brave, try the SkyJump, a wired base jump with a 192-metre freefall. Tower admission NZ$28 (C$24.30), SkyJump NZ$225 (C$198) Diamond Head Monument, Honolulu, Hawaii Arguably the most famous volcanic crater on Oahu, Diamond Head, with its unobstructed view of the island’s south shore, was used as a military lookout in the early 1900s and was fully equipped to defend Oahu from attack. The trail to the summit is a challenging scramble featuring tunnels, steep, narrow stairways and a short crawl onto the promontory, but the view of Waikiki is ample reward. US$5 per vehicle, US$1 if you’re on foot Burj Khalifa, Dubai, United Arab Emirates We would be remiss if we didn’t include the tallest building in the world on this list. A jagged spire soaring nearly 830 metres above Dubai, the Burj Khalifa holds a number of world records, including highest occupied floor, highest outdoor observation deck and longest single-running elevator. Visit at dusk for the most mind-blowing view (pictured above) of the U.A.E.’s ultra-luxurious oasis. ~C$50 Did we miss a can’t-miss place? Let us know on

(@CanGeo) or

(fb.com/cangeo).

GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

T


SAIL THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE

ADVENTURE CANADA

© André Gallant

To sail the Northwest Passage is to join the ranks of fearless adventurers and explorers who came before—to be a part of Canada’s past, and its future. Experience the landscapes, wildlife, and culture that have enchanted our nation for centuries. Travel with regional experts in comfort and style aboard an ice-class expedition vessel. Visit some of the world’s northernmost communities, pay respects at ghostly monuments to the region’s history, and experience legendary hospitality far north of the Arctic Circle.

INTO THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE Aug 22 – Sep 7, 2017 Aboard the Ocean Endeavour OUT OF THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE Sep 7 – 23, 2017 Aboard the Ocean Endeavour

1.800.363.7566 2015 WINNER

adventurecanada.com 14 Front Street South Mississauga, Ontario L5H 2C4 Canada

TICO Reg# 4001400


Canadian Geographic Travel - Fall 2016  

Canadian Geographic Travel - Fall 2016 | 52 pages www.canadiangeographic.ca/travel

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you