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Madonna Fanos

Intermediate Gate Submission Gerald Hines College of Architecture


Table of Contents 2501

3

Barton Springs Pool House Spring 2017

Michael Gonzales

3500

Houston Center for History and Future Studies Fall 2018 Jesse Hager

3501

11

CAMH - Mediatheque Spring 2018 Christian Sheridan

21


2501: Barton Springs Pool House

The Design focuses on the form of the space in order to create hierarchy for the main pool room, the building’s form starts as a narrow space with low ceiling on both ends, and as you move towards the middle, the space gets wider and the ceiling higher. This form allows for movement in the building and various views outward. The skin and roof systems are used to control the light in the different programs of the building. 3


2501: Barton Springs Pool House Initial Schemes

Massing

Overall Mass

Form

Open Views

Roof Panels

4


2501: Barton Springs Pool House Site Analysis

Site Plan

The modern occupation of Barton Springs was founded almost 175 years ago. Before that it was a familiar site to the Native Americans, they knew it as a sacred place where they could heal their wounds. It only became a public swimming facility in the 20th century.

5 10 20

140 ft

0

Topography

Figure Ground

Circulation & Traffic

Streams & Trees

Views

5

Parking Roads Trails


2501: Barton Springs Pool House Floor Plan 5

10

B

20ft

A 3

4

5

6 6

2

1

6 6 8 9

2

7

11

10

A

B

1. Lobby 2. Lockers 3. Mechanical 4. Hot Plunge 5. Cold Plunge 6. Therapy Rooms 7. Pool Room 8. Equipment 9. Storage 10. Sun Room 11. Winter Garden

6


2501: Barton Springs Pool House

Section A

Section B

5

10

20ft

5

10

20ft


2501: Barton Springs Pool House

Light Studies

8


2501: Barton Springs Pool House

9


2501: Barton Springs Pool House

10


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies

The main idea of the project is having a circulation path parallel to the main road on the site. Programs are placed on either side of the path that create diverging and converging moments of interaction between people. In contrast with the heavy concrete exterior walls, the interior walls are light wood screens that allow people to see into the programs. The wood panels are also placed to direct visitors through the building, and to the end of the walkway, where the path is angled abruptly to exit the building towards the exterior performance space and the rest of the park. 11


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies Program vs. Circulation

Structure Grid

Field of View

Circulation Path

12


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies Scheme A A linear circulation path with programs placed on each side.

Scheme B

13

The building is divided into 3 sections. The gallery and exhibit are on either side, while the middle section include all the other programs in a vertical tower.


Design Development

3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies

14


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies Site Plan 10

20

40ft

Bagby St

Mckinney St

Lamar St

15

Library


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies C

First Floor Plan 5

10

C

Second Floor Plan 5

20ft

10

20ft

5

6

7

7

4

8

Proj.

B

B

3

3 1

2

1

2

A

A

C 1. Lobby 2. Exhibit 3. Storage 4. Vault

C

5. Private Research 6. Mechanical 7. Exterior Performance Stage 8. Projection Room

16


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies Wall Section

2

4

8 ft

Concrete Panels

Wood Floor Finish

Treated Wood Screeds

Polished Concrete Panels

Batt Insulation

Cast-in-place Concrete

Section A 5

10

20ft

Section C 5

10

20ft

Section B 5

10

20ft


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies

South Elevation 5

10

20ft

East Elevation 5

10

20ft

North Elevation 5

10

20ft

18


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies

19


3500: Houston Center for History and Future Studies

20


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque

The project starts as a vertical lobby with all the programs coming off it at different heights and places. The lobby is placed on Montrose, the same side as the CAM entrance, and the programs are distributed into two stacks. The stack is rotated so that the outer angle attracts people in, and once inside, the other side opens up to make the space feel larger. The programs determine the height of each stack; where on one side the theater is double height topped by the library with shorter ceiling, and it alternates on the other side as the offices are topped with the double height gallery. The top floors are moved inwards to create an overhang that provides shading for the plaza. The material of the facade is fiber cement for most of the building except for the two art displaying programs, the theater and gallery, where the facade is limestone to indicate that something different is happening in there. 21


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Initial Schemes

Form

Rotation

Top Floors

Private vs. Performance

Equitone

Limestone

22


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Scheme A

Scheme B Most of the programs are on street level. The overhang marks the entrance of the building while also informing that the event space is upstairs. Once in the lobby, it leads to the outdoor plaza where a visitor would pick to enter the theater or gallery on opposite sides.

23

The programs are divided into two stacks that connect to create the lobby. Each stack is extruded differently depending on what program it has.


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque

Design Development

24


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Structure Grid First Floor Plan

Structure Grid

10 10

20 20

40 40 ftft

Dressing Control Room Green Room

Black Box Theater

Dressing

Storage

IT// Prep p

Gallery G

Mechanical

Columns Girders Beams Heaviest Load

Structure Sizing As the second floor is moved inwards to create an overhang for the plaza, the beam depth needs to get bigger to carry the load of the overhang. The best structural system for this design is a steel system, to be able to carry the overwhelming weight of the overhangs on both sides of the building.

Beams: W18*35 Weight: 35 lbs/ft Depth: 17.7 in Flange: 6 in Web: 0.3 in

25

Lateral Bracing Diagram


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Site Plan 40 ft

Berthea

Montrose Boulevard

20

Bayard Lane

10

Bissonet Avenue

26


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Third Floor Plan

5

10

20ft

A

Second Floor Plan

B

C

5

10

20ft

A

B

1

C

C

C

6

1

A

B

A

Mechanical

Section A 5

10

20ft

Section B 5

10

20ft

B


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque First Floor Plan

5

10

A

20ft

Ground Floor Plan

B

5

10

20ft

B

5 4

C

3 5

C

2 1

B

A

B

1. Mechanical 2. Storage 3. Green Room

4. Control Room 5. Dressing 6. IT/ Prep

Mechanical

Section C 5

10

20ft

28


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque Materials

Limestone

Wall Section

Equitone

Limestone advantages: 1. Simple care and maintenance 2. Inalterable colors that last over time 3. Resistant to fire and heat * Their low thermal conductivity allows them to act as insulators in extreme weather conditions.

2

4

8 ft

Parapet wall

Fiber cement is a mineral composite material made of cement, cellulose and mineral materials, reinforced by a visible matrix. Equitone fiber cement materials can be perforated, printed or sanded.

Steel Beam HVAC Ceiling Channel Glass Limestone

Attaching limestone to the rest of the wall components with wall ties:

Insulation & Sheathing

Attaching equitone to the rest of the wall components:

Steel Column Drywall

3

3 6

8

1. Steel Studs 2. Sheathing 3. Vapor Barrier 4. Cavity Insulation 5. Drainage Matt 6. Concrete Masonry 7. Wall tie 8. Limestone

8 1

7

4

7

5

CMU backup

4 5

2

East Elevation 10

Water Drainage

2. Metal Studs 3. Insulation 4. Sheathing Panel

Composite Floor Equitone

5. Building Wrap 6. Metal bracket

Concrete Foundation

7. Horizontal Rail

Steel Stud backup

5

1. Plasterboard with vapor barrier

20ft

8. Equitone Panel

West Elevation 5

10

20ft


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque

North Elevation 5

10

20ft

30


3501: CAMH - Mediatheque

31


Undergrad Architecture Portfolio  

Intermediate Gate Submission at Gerald Hines College of Architecture

Undergrad Architecture Portfolio  

Intermediate Gate Submission at Gerald Hines College of Architecture

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