Page 1

FILIPINO-STYLE BARBECUE CHICKEN

FIND YOUR

SHHH! OUR SECRET B&B ON KAUAI

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MARCH 2017

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EXPERIENCE TABLE OF CONTENTS the WEST

March

“We came here because of the lifestyle, where family and community come first. People here work to live.” KAUAI’S NEXT WAVE, p. 44

44

KAUAI’S NEXT WAVE

Meet the modern clans bringing the island’s surf schools, shave ice, and more into the next era. By Chloe Roth

56

SWEPT AWAY

On a tiny island off British Columbia’s coast, one restaurant lures adventurous diners on an unforgettable journey. By Margo True

66

WILD AT HEART

A Washington landscape designer re-creates a warm beachside oasis in an unexpected Bainbridge Island setting. By Elizabeth Jardina

Mychael Henry carries fresh coconuts back to The Palmwood, his family’s idyllic Kauai B&B (on our cover; see page 44). Photograph by

ERIN KUNKEL


EXPERIENCE the WEST

March 4

THIS MONTH’S RECIPES

CONVERSATIONS

DRINKS

BEST OF THE WEST

Meyer Lemon Crush .............82

Shishito Sour............................8 APPETIZER

Flower and Herb Butter ........38

7 Shop a modern coastal look, a gardening school’s premiere, THIS MONTH’S PICKS

29

arty beach towels, our latest favorite cocktail, and more TRAVEL

Where to 13 eat, sleep, and explore on seven spectacular Pacific

A free-flowing 36 look transforms a suburban front yard. MAKEOVER

GUIDEBOOK

islands

38 How to grow and use spring flowers that are pretty enough IN THE SUNSET GARDEN

to eat

20 Four days in the wild with no food, shelter, or human MILE MARKER

contact can make a person see things—beautiful things.

FOOD & DRINK

A new wave of 73 Filipino American chefs is putting a fresh spin on the GATHER

islands’ cuisine. Three quick 80 weeknight meals, including butternut squash posole FAST & FRESH

82 Sample the recipes from spring cookbooks that have

IN THE SUNSET KITCHEN

Venture 24 thousands of miles across Western wilderness with a WANDERLUST

us racing to the kitchen.

86 California wine regions to score hidden deals on SIP Look beyond hyped

canine pal in the backseat.

STEAL THIS LOOK

becomes a trove of lost and found objects.

Butternut Squash Posole LC/VG .....................81 Chicken Inasal ......................75 Corned Beef Salad...............80 The “Ham” Burger ................81 SIDES

Calamansi and Green Onion Pancit .......................74 Roasted Asparagus with Arugula........................82 Roasted Cauliflower with Pickled Onion and Yogurt Sauce GF/LC/V .............................76 Warm Shiitake and Celery Salad GF/V ............84 DESSERT

Mango Royale LS/V ............78

superb bottles.

HOME & GARDEN

A 29 waterfront cabin on Washington’s Vashon Island

MAINS

Win $1,000 worth 94 ofthecustom-selected plants from Sunset Western Garden UP NEXT

40 What to do in your garden in March GARDEN CHECKLIST

Collection, just in time for spring planting!

On our cover Find your perfect island pages 13, 44 Secret Kauai B&B page 44 Filipino-style chicken page 73 Cabin chic page 29 Lessons from a coastal garden page 66 Pupfriendly road trip page 24

On 5 quiet acres in Kauai’s Moloa‘a valley, The Palmwood B&B is a relaxing retreat from busy island resorts (see page 44). Photograph by Erin Kunkel.

RECIPE GUIDE GF: Gluten-free; LC: Low calorie; LS: Low sodium; V: Vegetarian; VG: Vegan Our full guide to nutrition and good cooking: sunset.com/cookingguide.


TODAY’S FORECAST:

Palmy and CHILL

Plan to get away for some relaxation and Vitamin-D. Seize the moments that make your true self shine. Once you arrive, find your oasis under a shady palm and chill away. 9 RESORT CITIES. ONE BEAUTIFUL OASIS. palm springs | desert hot springs | cathedral city | rancho mirage palm desert | indian wells | la quinta | indio | coachella

GreaterPS.com


CONVERSATIONS

New & Now

FIESTA TIME

I have from my childhood in Manila, Philippines, is of a daytime party at a relative’s house—platters of pancit noodles, buckets of San Miguel beer, chicken thighs sizzling on the charcoal grill, and my cousins and I playing barefoot tag in the backyard. In the center of it all was a gleaming lechon, the whole roast suckling pig that holds court at Filipino festivities ranging from baptisms to funerals. (Apple in mouth optional.) Like most gatherings I remember from my native country, it was a rollicking good time. And 20-plus years later, when I threw my 300-person wedding reception in San Francisco, my Uncle Tong brought—what else?—a lechon for the occasion. A generous home-cooked meal shared with friends: Truly, does life get any better? That’s why, as we began planning the lineup for this islands-themed issue, a Filipino entertaining idea (page 73) was one of the first things I set my heart on. Senior food editor Elaine Johnson immediately suggested chef Alvin Cailan of Eggslut, the stall with a cult following (and the lines to prove it) in Los Angeles’ Grand Central Market. To our delight, Chef Cailan not only said yes but also invited our photo crew to shadow him at work in his Chinatown incubator, Unit 120, where some of the city’s most talented cooks are currently experimenting with pop-up restaurant concepts that reference the Asian food traditions they grew up with. The day after she reported the story, Elaine came back raving about the experience. It takes a lot to impress a Sunset food editor, but Alvin Cailan and his compadres did the trick. Along with his new Eggslut locations in Glendale and Venice, California, Cailan is also launching a line of chefs’ gear called Gourmand and overseeing an ongoing stream of events at his incubator. The craze for Filipino-style cooking has taken hold of L.A., a testament to the city’s cred as the West’s most exciting food town of the moment. Myself, I’m just proud as a Filipino American to see the once-unfamiliar flavors of my homeland make it into mainstream conversation. If I do nothing else during my time at Sunset, I’m grateful to have been able to add this story to the mix.

ONE OF THE EARLIEST MEMORIES

JOIN THE SUNSET COMMUNITY facebook.com/ SunsetMagazine

4

MARCH 2017

❖ SUNSET

Savory artichokes, sweet and tangy rhubarb, and other delicious fresh ingredients are back in season. Get cooking with tasty dishes like this Millet Amaranth Buddha Bowl: sunset.com/springrecipes.

Ultimate guide to cruises in the West

dream team, from left: chefs alvin cailan, isa fabro, and chad valencia at unit 120

Pro tips for arranging tulips

@irene_sunset | readerletters@sunset.com

Write to us, tweet us, or tag us on your Instagram; we promise we read each and every one of your comments. @sunsetmag on Instagram

@Sunset on Twitter

Set sail for spring break with our top 40 cruises. Whether you’re looking for a lavish wineand-dine to Baja, family fun with Disney, or just a scenic islandferry ride, we’ve got you covered: sunset.com/cruises.

pinterest.com/ SunsetMag

Romantically ruffled or classically bright, the spring bloom is popping up all over. Snip a bunch of backyard tulips or stop by the florist, then watch our quick video for trimming and styling advice: sunset.com/tulipvideo.

LEFT: THOMAS J. STORY; TOP RIGHT: ERIN KUNKEL

IRENE EDWARDS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF |

Spring flavors are around the corner


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BEST WEST OF THE

W H AT W E’ R E T R AC K I N G T H I S M O N T H

BEST BEACH BUDDY

SWING TIME

Meet Layback Co., a new hammock company from Vancouver, B.C., whose eye-catching prints—palm fronds, feathers, stylized waves—pack into a matching knapsack for easy transport and look even cooler on the sand. “The idea started in a friend’s backyard in Venice Beach,” says founder and owner Adam Cook. “What sets ours apart from the rest is the lifestyle we’re branding. Hammocks have been around forever; we’re not trying to re-create the wheel, just make it that much more fun.” From $79; layback.co.

SUNSET

MARCH 2017

7


BEST MIXER

SHISHITO SOUR

“I didn’t come from the beverage industry, but I’ve always been fond of eating and drinking,” says Ann Soh Woods, founder of Soh Spirits. The Los Angeles entrepreneur channeled her love for Japan into a smooth-drinking whiskey called Kikori, made of 100 percent rice that is sourced, distilled, and bottled on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu. With its delicate, light-bodied style, the unconventional spirit has become a popular ingredient for cocktails such as the Shishito Sour (at right). Woods also recommends using it to spike an oyster mignonette sauce or pairing a Kikori Old-Fashioned with mild cheeses and smoked salmon. “The key word,” she says, “is balance.” $46 for 750 ml.; kikoriwhiskey.com.

PLANT LIKE A PRO

What’s stopping you from having the garden of your dreams? If the answer is lack of time or expertise, you’re not alone. “Here in America, gardens can bring more frustration than fulfillment,” says award-winning landscape designer and author Kate Frey. A twotime gold medal winner of London’s BEST CRASH COURSE

8

MARCH 2017 ❖

SUNSET

prestigious Chelsea Flower Show, the California-based Frey looks across the pond for horticultural inspiration. “In England, garden culture is ubiquitous— there are even programs on primetime TV.” This spring, she and fellow designer Christa Moné are launching the American Garden School, with weekend classes at Healdsburg Shed and (in partnership

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: THOMAS J. STORY; LISA CORSON (2); WILLIE KESSEL/SLOWTIDE

Your new favorite cocktail

In a mixing glass, muddle 1 sliced shishito pepper with 3/4 oz. lemon juice and 3/4 oz. simple syrup. In a cocktail shaker (without ice), shake 1/2 egg white* until frothy, about 20 seconds. Add muddled mixture, 2 oz. Kikori whiskey, and ice and vigorously shake again. Pour through two strainers into a coupe, then garnish with a shishito pepper (preferably charred) and a sprinkling of black sesame seeds. *Note: The egg white is easier to divide if whisked with a fork. Better yet, double the recipe and mix two drinks at once.


Rebirth of a midcentury gem With its low-slung architecture, palm-fringed pool, and dramatic Camelback views, the 1959 Mountain Shadows resort once supposedly drew Rat Pack–era stars such as Sammy Davis Jr. and Elizabeth Taylor. “You went through those doors and were transported,” says Scottsdale architect Mark Philp of the swinging Paradise Valley retreat. But over the years, the party faded; the resort was shuttered, then demolished. Now the team behind downtown Scottsdale’s Hotel Valley Ho is resurrecting the spirit of the original property, commissioning Philp to create a 183-room resort with two cabana-lined swimming pools, a butterfly roof, and a sunken living room with a 24-foot bar. The new Mountain Shadows opens this month—in-room martini setups included. From $339; mountainshadows.com. —Megan McCrea BEST THROWBACK

ART ON THE SAND Thanks to Slowtide, the ultimate beach necessity—the towel—is finally getting the attention it deserves. “We couldn’t find any with an interesting story behind them,” says cofounder Kyle Spencer, “so we decided to make one ourselves.” Based in Hawaii and Orange County, the trio of creative professionals (whose backgrounds include stints at Quiksilver, Nike, and DC Shoes) collaborated with partners such as Takashi Murakami for their custom-dyed and digitally manipulated designs. The spring/summer 2017 collection features the Pistol—Costa Mesa photographer Mark Oblow’s street-cool take on florals—and the geometric Push, named for the acclaimed L.A. graffiti artist who created it. From $30; slowtide.co. —Nena Farrell

C IRC A 1960

BEST CANVAS

2017 REDESIGN

with Sunset’s Test Gardens) at Cornerstone Sonoma. Frey, who’s known for the organic landscapes she created for Fetzer Vineyards in Hopland and Lynmar Estate in Sebastopol, California, aims to educate everyone from homeowners to small farmers about design and maintenance. And amid nitty-gritty topics like soil fertility and irrigation, a good dose of fun is guaranteed—all courses at Shed, for example, end with a cocktail. From $135; full schedule at americangardenschool.com. —Johanna Silver SUNSET

MARCH 2017

9


“WE GROW ALMONDS— AND A WHOLE LOT MORE.”

bluebells, from $110; www.mt washington pottery.com

Almond farmers in California grow more than a food that’s rich in nutrition. our inspiration: fish house at the four seasons oahu

They’re also growing jobs, water efficiency, environmental research and more. Grow what you know about almonds at almondsustainability.org

lido isle baskets, from $38; serena andlily.com

indigo pillows, from $145; shop.stfrank . com

waves no. 2 print, from $35; maxwangerprintshop.com

BEST ISLAND MOOD

Kendall, A., Marvinney, E., Brodt, S. and Zhu, W. (2015), Life Cycle–based Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Almond Production, Part I: Analytical Framework and Baseline Results. Journal of Industrial Ecology, 19: 1008–1018. doi: 10.1111/jiec.12332. University of California Agricultural Issues Center. The Economic Impacts of the California Almond Industry. December 2014. © 2017 Almond Board of California. All rights reserved.

GET THE MODERN COASTAL LOOK

When Santa Monica interiors firm Studio Collective set out to design Fish House, the oceanfront seafood restaurant at the Four Seasons Resort Oahu, a stay-all-day ambience was the firm’s main priority. “We wanted to create more of a relaxed beach atmosphere, a sense of place that feels more like a home than a restaurant,” says Studio Collective cofounder Christian Schulz. Inspiration from Hawaii’s fishing traditions (carved wooden boats, hand-knotted nets) joins tactile, natural materials like jute and teak; a custom chandelier made of netted rope and glass buoys and a bar tiled in a fish-scale mosaic are understated nods to the nautical vibe. The sum: a refined seaside setting that might just kick-start your next makeover. Dinner for two $150; fishhouseoahu.com. —Catherine Dash 10

MARCH 2017

SUNSET

TOP RIGHT: CHRISTIAN HORAN; BOTTOM RIGHT: MAX WANGER

distressed rococo wool rug, from $199; westelm.com


ntific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated nd cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. A one-ounce handful has 13g of unsaturated fat and only 1g of saturated fat. f

POWER TO KEEP YOU

ROLLING RIGHT ALONG Energize your day with the crunch of almonds. Get 6g of energy-giving protein, 4g of hunger-slaying fiber and essential nutrients in every heart-healthy handful, ready whenever you need it most. L

l

d

.

© 2017 Almond Board of California. All rights reserved.

CRUNCH ON


More Luxury. More Destinations.

MOANA SURFRIDER, A WESTIN RESORT & SPA, WAIKĪKĪ BEACH, O‘AHU

Location, location, location

From Princeville and Waikīkī to Ka‘anapali and Kona, you’ll find the perfect destination for your next Hawaiian getaway. Choose from our collection of 12 distinctive resorts on the islands of Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island and book our Ocean Promotion Plus Package to enjoy daily breakfast for two and savings on nightly rates, including premium Ocean View rooms. TO LEARN MORE, VISIT OCEANPROMOTIONHAWAII.COM OR CALL 866-716-8140 AND MENTION OCEAN PROMOTION.

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LEFT TO RIGHT: THE ST. REGIS PRINCEVILLE RESORT; SHERATON WAIKIKI; SHERATON MAUI RESORT & SPA; SHERATON KONA RESORT & SPA AT KEAUHOU BAY

©2017 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Starpoints, SPG, Preferred Guest, Sheraton, Westin, St. Regis, The Luxury Collection, W, Le Meridien, Design Hotels, Tribute Portfolio, Element, Aloft, Four Points and their respective logos are trademarks of Marriott International, Inc., or its affiliates.


Travel GUIDEBOOK

STRANDED . .. AND LOVING IT

Seven spectacular Pacific islands—and how to explore them should you wash up on their shores. By Rachel Levin

JOSÉ MANDOJANA

Learn to live off the land and sea on Salt Spring Island (page 19).

SUNSET

❖ MARCH 2017

13


Travel

ACREAGE

53,195 Rough it among the animals on

SANTA ROSA ISLAND, CA Terrain Just three native terrestrial mammals live on California’s secondlargest island—and humans aren’t one of them. The mountains on this patch of land, 40 nautical miles from Ventura, are also home to almost a hundred species of birds, including the recently reestablished population of bald eagles. Add to that the turquoise waters and white sand beaches, and you’ll see why this is a prime daytripping spot.

Shelter BYO, preferably a windproofed tent. On Santa Rosa Island, 30knot winds are not uncommon. A 11/2-mile hike from the ferry landing will bring you to Water Canyon Campground (from $15; nps.gov/chis), in Becher’s Bay, which has 15 basic sites with pit toilets and picnic tables. (Beach camping is also permitted at sites across the island.)

Set Sail

Unless you eat island fox, pack all your own food and water; there are zero services on Santa Rosa Island. Water Canyon does have potable water, but for refills while you’re out hiking and exploring, bring an H₂0 treatment method (iodine tablets, pump ...) to the creek.

Island Packers (islandpackers.

com) operates all of the boats to the Channel Islands. Three-hour rides to Santa Rosa Island depart approximately every other morning from Ventura. Along the way, you may see dolphins and humpbacks, so bring the binocs or a sizable zoom lens.

Skill

14

MARCH 2017 ❖ SUNSET

Supplies

«

Spend your days bird-watching, hiking, and exploring marine life, and your nights stargazing. But the waters here can be dangerous, so kayaking, snorkeling, and tidepooling are at your own risk. If you’re a seasoned kayaker, paddle to your own stretch of sand, avoiding areas closed off to protect nesting snowy plovers. But even Becher’s Bay should be entered only by experienced boaters.

bring it: camera with gps

“The scenery and views on Santa Rosa are incredible, but there are still discoveries of wildlife to document using a good camera with a GPS unit. Hiking boots and a windbreaker wouldn’t hurt either.” —Gregory B. Pauly, curator, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

ONLY PROS SHOULD ENTER THE WATER AT BECHER’S BAY (ABOVE), BUT ANYONE CAN TAKE A SHORT HIKE FROM THE FERRY LANDING TO SPOT WILDFLOWERS (BELOW).

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: IAN SHIVE/TANDEM STOCK, JAMES SHIVE/TANDEM STOCK

Hunt + Gather


620 SWITCHBACKS ON THE ROAD TO HANA

Avoid the crowds of

MAUI, HI Terrain With 2.5 million visitors a year, Maui isn’t exactly deserted. But if you navigate through the twists and turns on the road to Hana along the rugged eastern tip, you’ll find one of the state’s most popular islands the way it’s meant to be: remote, lush, and oh-so quiet.

Shelter Far away from the condo complexes and golf courses is a lanai with a sunrise view, freshly baked banana bread, and your own oceanside bungalow. Hana’s Travaasa (from $450; travaasa. com) is the kind of place any castaway would dream of, especially after its recent $12 million renovation. The mostly inclusive resort encourages guests to get out and explore with their robust schedule of free activities, whether you’re looking for adventure, culinary experiences, workouts, or an immersion in Hawaiian culture. Surrounded by swaying palms overlooking Hana Bay, Travaasa’s Preserve Kitchen + Bar is quickly becoming legendary for its lobstercrab cakes and Hokkaido scallops. Need a break from fish? Order the wood-fired pizza topped with local veggies at Clay Oven at Hana Farms (hanafarmsonline.com), which is BYOB. (Our tip: Bring a bottle of island-made rum to spike the housemade hibiscus soda.) For burgers in between, go to Hana Ranch (hanaranch.com) and look for the truck serving up organic patties raised on the land. And to stock up on snacks, hit the Hasegawa General Store (808/ 248-8231): Its narrow aisles are crammed with Hawaiian canned foods, camping gear, and islandgrown chocolate from Hana Gold.

Park (dlnr.hawaii.gov). It’s a short loop trail to the entrances, where the water is crystal clear (though cold!) and a treat to explore, especially with a flashlight in tow.

ON MAUI, YOU CAN FIND SOLITUDE—AT KAHANU GARDEN IN HANA (ABOVE)—AND STELLAR FOOD, LIKE TOGARASHI SCALLOPS FROM PRESERVE KITCHEN (BELOW).

Set Sail In addition to the nonstop flights to Kahului Airport from Seattle and Las Vegas, a new route from Virgin America/Alaska (virgin america.com) now flies to Maui from L.A. and San Francisco. And yes, you’ll want to rent a car.

Supplies Skill Hana is all about snorkeling and lounging on the black-and-white sand. But to rough it like a real Hawaiian, wander the freshwater caves at Wai‘anapanapa State

«

TOP: ALEX MESSENGER/TANDEM STOCK

Hunt + Gather

bring it: stand-up paddleboard

“I grew up on the water and love finding quiet spaces in nature, so I’d bring a stand-up paddleboard to do yoga with the wild dolphins, turtles, and whales.” —Shiva Rea, yoga teacher SUNSET

❖ MARCH 2017

15


Travel

THE BEST WAY TO EXPLORE NATURE ON GRAHAM AND THE OTHER HAIDA GWAII ISLANDS IS BY KAYAK SO AS NOT TO DISTURB WILDLIFE HABITATS .

Soak in style on

VASHON ISLAND, WA Terrain Crunchy types commingle with Seattle’s tech workers, who are building high-design dream homes using reclaimed materials on this side of Puget Sound. The result is an island that feels increasingly like a cool extension of the Emerald City, just a stone’s throw away.

Shelter Consider the new Lodges on Vashon (from $185; lodgeson vashon.com) your own little island

Navigate the unspoiled beauty of

Between Alaska and Vancouver Island lies the Haida Gwaii archipelago, a cluster of more than 200 islands where, no joke, you really could get stranded. Think thick cedar forests largely untouched by humans and foggy beaches that can be reached only by kayak. The most accessible is Graham Island, where you’ll find a thriving First Nations community operating inns, restaurants, and bakeries.

asparagus and octopus balls at Keenawaii’s Kitchen (250/ 559-8347) in Skidegate, or panseared halibut at Charters (250/ 626-3377) in Masset, where the chef renovated his restaurant by hand using reclaimed island cedar.

Skill At the top of the short, steep trek to Tow Hill, in Naikoon Provincial Park (env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks), are far-reaching coastal views and peregrine falcons. At the bottom is the Blowhole, where an ocean spray comes up strong enough to soak you. (Bring a poncho.)

Shelter Haida House (from $2,675 U.S. ;

Set Sail

haidahouse.com) sits between the rushing Tlell River and a beach on the Hecate Strait. Complete with totem-carving demos, weaving workshops, and an amazing art collection from the Haida, this 10-room cedar lodge among the trees offers an intimate dive into a 15,000-year-old culture.

BC Ferries (bcferries.com) sails

Hunt + Gather Eating like a true local means sea 16

MARCH 2017 ❖ SUNSET

22

bring it: waterproof bag

several days a week from Prince Rupert, B.C. It’s seven hours and $165 U.S. each way, but it’s a beautiful whale- and wildlifefilled ride.

Supplies “For any kayaking trip, it’s mandatory to have some bomber waterproof bags to keep all your stuff dry!” —Rush Sturges, pro kayaker

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DAVID HANSEN, MICHAEL HANSON, JIM HENKENS, ANDREW GIAMMARCO

Terrain

«

GRAHAM ISLAND, B.C.

MINUTES FROM SEATTLE


WOODSY SHORES (LEFT) AND THE DESIGN-SAVVY LODGES ON VASHON (BELOW).

FISHING HUT ON LEGOE BAY, WHERE LOCALS GO TO REEFNET FOR WILD SALMON.

village, with 16 freestanding prefab rooms that have communal courtyards, fireplaces, and an ecosleek Scandinavian look.

Hunt + Gather Vashon’s proximity to the city plays out in its diversity of food options, from Thai green curry at May Kitchen (maykitchen.com) to fried game hen at the new FrenchSouthern mash-up Gravy (gravy vashon.com) . Across the street, Giraffe (giraffehome.com) brings home goods from near and far, sourcing block-print pillows from India and Guatemalan ceramics. Nearby Hinge Gallery (hinge gallery.com) has an eclectic selection of hand-drawn prints and birch-tree wall hangings. Bike around country roads lined with dairy farms and art studios. And don’t miss the sparkly new Vashon Center for the Arts

(vashoncenterforthearts.org) , with its 1,000-square-foot gallery space, art-history talks, and occasional free sunset-yoga classes.

Set Sail Catch a 25-minute King County water taxi (kingcounty.gov) from Seattle to Vashon throughout the morning and afternoon.

Supplies ”I would bring my Best Made Co. Dehen sweater and stuff for s’mores.” —Chris Pardo, architect

LUMMI ISLAND, WA Terrain Fewer than a thousand people live on this rugged island, a 10-minute ferry ride from Washington’s northern coast. Driving along its 9 square miles, you won’t encounter many tourists—just a scattering of second-home owners in tie-dye and fishermen netting wild salmon. In spring, you might spot whales migrating up the coast—or the occasional skinny-dipper.

Shelter Take your pick between Willows Inn (from $205; willows-inn.com) , which offers a contemporary set of whitewashed rooms, or a scattering of oceanview Airbnbs. If you want to cook, make a reservation at Nettles Farm (from $185; net tlesfarm.com), where the rustic suites come with porches and fully stocked kitchens.

« bring it: best made co. dehen sweater

Hunt + Gather You won’t go hungry on Lummi, not with spring truffle hunts led

«

Skill

Search for signs of life on bring it: fly rod

by local Alana McGee, or blowout feasts at Willows Inn’s restaurant, where chef Blaine Wetzel uses island-farmed, fished, and foraged ingredients. To eat like a local, head to The SauseBurger Stand (sauseburger.com) , a fishermen’s hangout where sliders, sausage dogs, and ribs are grilled outside.

Skill Bring binoculars to the west side of the island just before sunset, the best time to catch orcas swimming by. Or get picked up from the dock by Outer Island Excursions (out erislandx.com) for a midday tour.

Set Sail Whatcom Chief Ferry (whatcom county.us) , a 10-minute ride from Bellingham, runs about once an hour until midnight. Bring a car to get around once there.

Supplies “I would have a fly rod with me to do some catch-and-release on wild coho salmon until my arms gave out.” —Paul Greenberg, author of American Catch SUNSET

❖ MARCH 2017

17


Travel

150+ ISLAND BISON

Embrace the wild side of

CATALINA ISLAND, CA Terrain Hollywood icons (and their yachts) have been converging on this Mediterranean-esque island off the coast of Orange County for decades. While tourists tend to stick to the bars and boutiques of Avalon, those craving a more outdoorsy experience head north to Two Harbors, a narrow strip of land where bison still roam and Angelenos actually sleep in tents.

Shelter You could hike 7 miles to Parsons Landing (from $17; visitcatalina island.com) for secluded beachside camping—complete with a bundle of firewood. The less hardcore version can be found at Isthmus Cove’s campy-cozy 12-room Banning House Lodge (from $150; visitcatalinaisland.com). Two Harbors’ Catalina Cabins

indulge in a glass of island-grown Zinfandel from Rusack at the Avalon Grille (310/510-7494) .

Hunt + Gather Food isn’t really Catalina’s forte. One exception, though, is Harbor Reef Restaurant (310/510-4215) in Two Harbors, which provides an excellent break from camp food with a menu of buffalo burgers, deep-fried calamari, and occasional live music on the patio.

Set Sail Several one-hour Catalina Express (catalinaexpress.com) ferries from Long Beach and Dana Point depart for Avalon every day. You can also ferry directly to Two Harbors from San Pedro. Car permits are hard to come by on Catalina ; instead, the preferred mode of transport here is golf carts (available to rent for $43/hour) .

Skill

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Supplies

«

Two Harbors’ clear, clean water makes for some of the best snorkeling around, with visibility up to 100 feet. Tip: Rent gear from Two Harbors Dive & Rec Center (310/ 510-4272) . After all the adventure of snorkeling and camping, it’s time to reward yourself. So when you’re about to get back on the ferry,

bring it: a cozy throw for the night

“All I would take is a cotton caftan, a warm throw blanket, and maybe of bottle of wine. Who needs more on this idyllic island?” —Erica Tanov, textile designer

WITH HARDLY A CAR IN SIGHT AND TRAILS WELL WITHIN REACH (ABOVE), CATALINA IS A WELCOME FERRY-HIKE-IN AND HIKEFERRY-OUT (BELOW) FOR CALIFORNIANS .

FROM TOP: LISA CORSON (2)

(from $50; visitcatalinaisland. com) are the happy medium: Each comes with a decent bed and access to the community outdoor kitchen and showers.


HIGHEST ELEVATION

2,326

Get caught in the counterculture of

FEET (AT BRUCE PEAK)

SALT SPRING ISLAND, B.C. Terrain This Southern Gulf island has always been a bike- and hitchhikingfriendly haven for New Age artists who prefer a slower pace of life. Most of the 10,000-plus people here live around Ganges Village in the central part of the island. You could spend the better part of a day popping by the island’s farmstands (there are about 50) and sampling local cheese, but you’ll want to leave time to hike too: The best climb is up Bruce Peak in Mt. Maxwell Provincial Park (env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks).

Shelter Hastings House (from $240 U.S.;

hastingshouse.com) is hardly a thatched hut. Built in 1939 as an ode to 11th-century English manors, the property includes a scattering of cottages, a renovated barn overlooking the garden, and a 22-acre lawn stretching down to Ganges Harbour, where fishing boats bob for halibut.

Hunt + Gather bring your catch back to the Hastings House kitchen for dinner. Otherwise, on the boardwalk, you’ll find Auntie Pesto’s Café (auntie pestos.com) , which sources ingredients from its garden to sauce its pasta platters. And be sure to make goat-cheese sampling at the family-run Salt Spring Island Cheese Co. (saltspringcheese. com) one of your stops on a selfguided Salt Spring Studio Tour (saltspringstudiotour.com) of 28 artist homes, including that of sculptors Paul Burke and Anna Gustafson, whose 8-acre property is like an outdoor gallery.

of Foxglove Farm (foxglovefarm bc.ca) , who leads farming retreats and cheesemaking workshops.

Set Sail

Supplies

Skill Hunt mushrooms with Bill Jones of Deerholme Farm (deerholme. com) . Then take a class with a backto-the-lander like Michael Ableman

WINDING DOWN ON SALT SPRING STARTS WITH THE FERRY RIDE IN (BELOW) AND CONTINUES WITH A WALK AROUND THE IDYLLIC GANGES HARBOUR (ABOVE).

A ride on one of the BC Ferries (bcferries.com) takes 35 minutes and runs every two hours or so from Swartz Bay in Victoria, B.C. Bring your bike and ride off to start exploring. Otherwise, a taxi will be waiting.

«

FROM TOP: JOSÉ MANDOJANA (2)

If you go out with Silver Spoon Charters (fishsaltspring.com) ,

bring it: jacobsen salt

“I’d be thrilled to get stranded here if I had flaky Jacobsen Salt from the Oregon Coast to cook and season with; a delicious Katz Farm olive oil from the Bay Area ; and as many lemons and limes as I could possibly slip into my pockets.” —Samin Nosrat, chef SUNSET

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Travel

MILE M A R KER

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

Four days in the wilderness with no food, shelter, or human contact can cause a person to see things. Beautiful things. By Chris Colin THE OTHER DAY, having put in a solid six consecutive minutes of work, I rewarded myself with some random Internet reading, an article about the world’s smallest inhabited island. At around 18 by 50 yards, Bishop Rock is a jagged pinprick of desolation in the Atlantic, where, in the Middle Ages, criminals were abandoned to their fates. I gathered this tiny island was somehow meant to impress me. But take note, Internet clickbait: I’ve lived on smaller. It was another era, and I was a different person, awash in idle time and hungry to push unspecified boundaries. That’s my best stab at explaining why one fall morning, in the company of a shaman, I wandered out into the California wilderness and spent four days within an 8-foot-wide circle of stones. No tent, human contact, or food, only water. No comfort or distractions whatsoever—this was a traditional vision quest, and my only entertainment would be whatever spiritual clarity happened to rain down on me. Google “vision quest” and you get Vision Quest, the 1985 movie that gave us “Crazy for You.” And then you have Madonna in your head and soon you’re YouTubing through an ’80s nostalgia jag. Now you’re behind on your work and voilà, you’re back to the reason you were questing for a vision in the first place. Overloaded, overworked, and overwhelmed, I saw the chance to fast alone

Illustration by

J U L I E N PA C A U D

in the woods as refreshing as a week at the Four Seasons, as a ritualistic rejoinder to all the emails and tweets and Dexter binges and whatever else simultaneously clogs and empties life. It would be a spiritual slap upside my head, plunging me into the same wilderness solitude that drew everyone from Moses to the Plains Indians. BUILD THE WHEEL

It was a bright, hot morning when I arrived with my sleeping bag at Henry W. Coe State Park, Northern California’s largest, a vast realm of wispy pines and parched yellow grass. My shaman’s name was Catriona, an unblinking woman with a kind face, and my first hit when I Googled for guided vision quests. At the park, we hashed out spiritual goals and wilderness logistics. Along with another quester who’d be stationed a couple of miles away, I did one last round of prep with Catriona, attempting to zero in on a spirit animal. Then she smiled and abandoned us to our fates. Per her instructions I began building my medicine wheel, the circle of stones that would define my island and contain me but for bathroom breaks. With little to do once inside my circle, the tiniest decisions were inflated to epic dilemmas. Should I put on a sweater? It’s getting cool. Then again it’s not that cool. But maybe it’ll get cool soon? I also sang. After singing, I whittled. After whittling, I paced. Along the medicine wheel’s


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33-foot circumference, I paced 160 muttering revolutions until I had walked a mile. As the hours passed, I developed intense feelings about my surroundings. I came to love the henna-colored manzanita 10 yards north of my island, its trunk and branches python-smooth. I was less disposed toward the live oak beside it. Gnarly and bare in spots, it was straight out of central casting’s spooky-tree division. Needless to say, I thought about these trees a lot. After all, I’d essentially washed up on a deserted swath of land, minus the ocean part, and there was little else to ponder. But I bring good news about such places: No need to worry about food, a scam obviously cooked up by the eating-industrial complex, I told myself. Yes, I experienced excruciating boredom—but the rumbling in my stomach oddly diminished over time. Away from the refrigerator, one’s thoughts have a longer leash. Alone, “one’s inner voices

become audible,” Wendell Berry wrote. Nietzsche chose isolation “so as not to drink out of everybody’s cistern.” To Keats, solitude was simply sublime. But I wasn’t feeling sublime. A starry night brought with it a careful review of all the mountain lion attack stories I had collected in advance. (If these animals were indeed as scared of me as I was of them, I truly pity them.) Eventually, I dozed off, only to be awakened by a rustle near the gully. As everyone knows from horror films, a frantic sweep of the flashlight merely throws a note of desperation into the darkness. But apparently mine worked, because the next time I noticed, the sun was rising over a distant ridge. I was uneaten, and all manner of birds were trilling and chirping and whirring from tree to tree, discussing what a baby I was. Indeed, nature does a nice job switching out the menacing night surroundings with a benign daytime set.

To underscore the harmlessness of it all, a group of turkeys strutted mindlessly by, just beyond my manzanita. They so absorbed me that somehow I didn’t hear the large coyote step into my medicine wheel. I turned to find myself staring right into its eyes. He was rust-colored, with a delicate, crocodilian snout. No more than 2 feet separated us. It didn’t occur to me to be afraid. He seemed curious, even playful, but I’ll always regret what happened next. LEAVE THE CIRCLE

I reached for my camera, something I’d smuggled in because I wanted to document my flight from civilization and presumably because on some level I wished to limit it. Maybe I wasn’t vision quest material. The camera clicked and with a betrayed cock of the head, my new friend backed away from the circle. I sat there in my sleeping bag, watching him trot off. The photo lives in a


file on my computer that I never open. Three days later, I trotted off myself and got back on the road home. Everyone should see the American highway on a deeply empty stomach, and not just for its strange, flickering qualities. My usual lenses for observing modern civilization had vanished, and the outposts of commerce all around me appeared human, poignant even. A McDonald’s billboard loomed over some trees, and I felt a jolt of empathy for it. Sure, it was selling me hamburgers. But on another plane, I felt, it just wanted to communicate, to create an excuse for us all to stand in the same room for a few minutes. Deep in our DNA are memories of loneliness in the woods, the gloom of facing darkness alone for another night. The famished and half-hallucinating probably shouldn’t speed, but I remember punching the gas a little harder. I had a vision of getting home.

HEAD TRIPS

From sweat lodges to cleanses, three ways to go deep on your own around the West.

Heat up When Mayans wanted to hit the reset button, they turned to temazcal, the ancient sweat-lodge ceremony. The practice is still going strong at Xinalani, a wellness retreat south of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. A shaman leads you into a stone dome where a pit of hot volcanic rocks are stoked with water and herbs, turning it into a potpourri steam bath. After 90 minutes of chanting, you’ll emerge sweaty and ready to rinse off in the

cool Pacific waters or the beach club’s freshwater shower. From $175 U.S.; xinalaniretreat.com.

the 14,000-foot mountains. Dorms from $80, expeditions from $795; crestoneretreats.org.

Get high

Clean out

At 8,400 feet, Colorado’s

Detoxing yogi-style means looking to the 5,000-yearold Ayurvedic practice of panchakarma. Typically, the process begins weeks before by cutting out coffee and alcohol prior to arriving at a spot like the Chopra Center in Carlsbad, California. Once there, you spend 6 to 10 days eating very simple foods, like lentil soup; abstaining from the phone, TV, and Internet; talking with your fellow detoxers; and getting spa treatments. You’ll likely come away from the retreat with a refreshed outlook— not to mention a few pounds lighter. $5,175/ 10 days; chopra.com.

Crestone Mountain Zen Center can help you check

out of your fast-moving life and in with yourself. The Buddhist monastery, set in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, has private cabins and dorm-style lodgings where you can recharge in the company of Zen monks. Guests enjoy an all-vegetarian diet, daily silent meditation, and regular dharma talks. If you’re looking to up your om, sign on for the four-night backpacking expedition, with guided walking meditation, mindfulness practice, and wilderness education across

ROUGHLY SIX RESIDENTS PER SQUARE MILE. Su r rou n d y ou r s e l f w it h t h e r u s h i n g of a s t re a m , t h e bi s on i n t h e d i s t a n c e , t h e s u bt l e t i e of t h e f l y. A n d a b s o lut e l y n ot h i n g e l s e . E x c e pt m ay b e a Ye l l ow s t on e c utt h ro at . In Wy om i n g , t h e m i d d l e of n ow h e re b e c om e s t h e c e nt e r of e v e r y t h i n g .


Travel

WA N D E R LUS T

GONE FOR A RIDE

Nature photographer Morgan Lee Alain has logged thousands of miles shooting the West’s untouched wilderness. Her travel companion? A husky-wolf mix named Luna

I’VE ALWAYS BEEN A DOG PERSON, but no animal has ever captivated me like Luna. A friend gave her to me after college when I was going through a hard time, and the bond was instant. She has a pack mentality and always has to know where I am, so I began taking her with me on road trips around the Sierra, Cascades, and Canadian Rockies. She’s pretty low-maintenance and happiest when we’re going somewhere for a hike or camping. I’ll park the car and open the door, and she immediately jumps out, ready to explore. But even if Luna’s off-leash, she stays by my side as we seek out hidden

waterfalls and climb hard-to-reach peaks. When I get lost, I let her lead the way; when I’m tired, she uses body language to remind me to slow down. Once, I was getting ready to go back into the truck after a rainy hike at Coquihalla Summit in B.C. when Luna decided to roll in dead salmon. I was annoyed as I rinsed her off in the freezing river, and then suddenly the light broke through the clouds, shining on everything that had just been kissed by the rain. It was as if she knew I wouldn’t want to miss capturing this moment. It was pure instinct, and it was perfect. As told to Stephanie Granada

DIGITAL BONUS The best places to get away with your pet in tow: sunset.com/dogvacations.

MORGAN LEE ALAIN, @MORGANLEEALAIN

Garibaldi Provincial Park in British Columbia


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Travel

pro tip: set up a camera with a timer nearby and sit next to your dog for a selfie

1 ▯ CANADIAN ROCKIES

2 ▯ BUGABOO PROVINCIAL PARK, B.C.

pro tip: use your pup as a point of focus to convey scale

4 ▯ MORAINE LAKE, ALBERTA

1 ▯ RIDING ALONG THE CANADIAN ROCKIES

3 ▯ CHASING THE LIGHT IN MT. RAINIER

Luna is pretty adaptable. The longest day we ever had in the car was 18 hours, going from B.C. to California. She doesn’t like riding shotgun, though— she’ll usually sit right behind me in the backseat, chewing on sticks or a treat if it’s a longer drive. In summer, the windows are always rolled down, but when it’s cold, she’ll put her nose on my shoulder if she wants me to open the window.

This kind of photograph is hard to get because if you’re in the mountains capturing the magic hour— the day’s last 60 minutes or so of sunlight—you know you’re going to be hiking back in the dark. I’m pretty bad about keeping up with the time when I’m shooting, but luckily that night there was a full moon. The extra light helped us find our way back to the truck.

2 ▯ PEAK EXPERIENCE IN THE BUGABOOS

4 ▯ BEFORE THE STORM AT MORAINE LAKE

When we reached the top of the steep set of peaks known as the Bugaboos, Luna was exhausted (though snacking on lightweight jerky always helps keep her going). I wouldn’t necessarily recommend that people take dogs on this hike—it’s cold, and there are ladders to maneuver. But this was a special moment. We just connected under these stormy clouds that brought so much character and contrast to the photo. It’s raw and sweet at the same time.

You don’t have to go very far to find beauty here in Banff; Luna and I just went a little off the dog-friendly and mostly flat Moraine Lake Highline Trail and then climbed some rocks to find a good vantage point. I love this view of the lake because a storm was about to set in and there was a lot of mist and fog in the air. That gave the lake water, which is normally a glittering turquoise, a soft blue hue.

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Call of the Wild Alain’s advice for hitting the road with your pooch If car rides make your dog nervous, bring a favorite toy or outfit her with an anxiety-quelling thunder jacket (thundershirt.com). GEAR

FIND Many national parks, restaurants, and hotels don’t allow dogs. To learn where your pup is welcome, check Bring Fido (bringfido.com). GO Start with a two-hour excursion close to home and progress from there. If your dog is trailing behind, she may be tired or scared.

MORGAN LEE ALAIN, @MORGANLEEALAIN (4)

3 ▯ MT. RAINIER NATIONAL PARK, WA


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Home & Garden S T E A L T H I S LO O K

TREASURE ISLAND

A designer outfits a waterfront cabin with a trove of lost and found objects. By Jess Chamberlain

Take it outside ELEMENTS OF A PRETTY PORCH p. 34

Photographs by T H O M A S

J. S T O RY

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Home & Garden

L

ast spring, Tim Pfeiffer was doing some routine cleanup on the beach outside his cabin in Vashon Island, Washington, when he made a serendipitous discovery. Amid the washed-up fishing floats and tangles of seaweed, he turned up a tiny wood-mounted illustration of a seaside village. “It reminded me of both the San Juan Islands and Cape Cod, which was funny because these places were the inspiration for our home,” says the Seattle-based interior designer. He wiped off the relic, marched it inside the house, and displayed it on a living room shelf. That inclination to see past chipped, decayed façades is what captured Pfeiffer’s imagination when he and his partner, Matt Carvalho, stumbled upon the 1890s house after years of searching for a vacation home on the island. A former shipbuilder’s cabin, the place had become, in Pfeiffer’s words, a “barnacle colony”: A hodgepodge of decorative eras, with peeling linoleum flooring, shag carpeting, multiple roofs, chipped paint, and pink plywood walls. “When we first saw the house, I was like, ‘Really?’ ” says Carvalho, an attorney and writer. “But Tim had the vision.” Over the course of a year, Pfeiffer spearheaded a gut renovation of the roughly 1,900-square-foot home. Even though the remodel was extensive, he didn’t bother with architectural drawings. “There were too many weird parts,” he says. “So I just sat and talked to my builders and carpenters and then trusted them.” The result is a design that’s timeless and—at last—cohesive. White cedar-paneled walls, Douglas fir floors, and salvaged doors and fixtures form the design’s backbone. “We’re giving the place back its historic character that’s been stripped away,” notes Pfeiffer. That character comes through in the pieces Pfeiffer chose for the spaces too—a mix of primitive nautical objects and well-loved antiques that are casual enough for sandy feet. “I’ve always been a treasure hunter,” says Pfeiffer, who grew up in Tacoma antiquing with his grandmother and later spent years scouting Europe’s flea markets as the vice president of store design at Ralph Lauren. “I learned to dig for the good stuff, to appreciate the craftsmanship of things.” For decades, he’s been holding on to “the good stuff” with one goal in mind. “Yes, I had some things collected,” says Pfeiffer, laughing. “The joke had been, ‘What are you going to do with that?’ And I’d say, ‘It’d be great for a beach house.’ It only took me about 20 years to find it.” 30

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S T E AL THIS LOO K

white planks add a breezy feel

a nautical theme runs through the artwork

T R U S T YO U R TA S T E

Designer Tim Pfeiffer (left, with partner Matt) mixes furnishings from various eras with ease in the living room (far left). The clean lines of the pieces tie the eclectic look together. As well as housing books, built-in shelves display nautical treasures ranging from sculptural pieces of driftwood to naval tea cups. “For me, it has always been about layering,” says Pfeiffer. “If you like something, live with it.” MAKE IT PERSONAL

Pfeiffer built the extra-long dining table (above) with his father 17 years ago out of salvaged barn wood. Today it serves as the spot for family gatherings. The EAT sign, found at Kirk Albert Vintage Furnishings in Seattle, echoes SUNSET

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Home & Garden

“We’re giving the place back its historic character that’s been stripped away.” —TIM PFEIFFER

F I N D YO U R N I C H E

RIFF OFF A THEME

In the kitchen (above) Pfeiffer retained the cabinets that were installed in the 1950s, painting them a gray-blue hue that felt nautical and true to their midcentury roots. Aged brass hardware plays up the sea-captain vibe. For the new countertops, he opted for Formica, a nostalgic nod to old beach cottages. 32

MARCH 2017

The designer carved out display space everywhere for his collections. He added shelves, for example, above the entryway to the kitchen (above) and a window in the room. “Beach-house design is often like shipbuilding, using every nook and cranny to create space,” says Pfeiffer. S TA R T F R O M S C R AT C H

Used as a fishing shack for years, the

❖ SUNSET

cottage had an awkward layout full of dead ends and even lacked private sleeping quarters. By tearing down almost all the walls and rethinking the layout, Pfeiffer and Carvalho gained three separate bedrooms, including the master, (above right). S OA K U P YO U R SURROUNDINGS

The master bathroom (right), which previously included a pink tub and a plywood-paneled

PROP STYLING: JANNA LUFKIN

the table’s weathered look while adding personality.


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shower, was completely transformed. A soaking tub was a must-have for Pfeiffer, who likes to warm up after boating and paddleboarding. He unearthed the circa1920s tub at Second Use in Seattle, which was also the source for the reclaimed doors and fir floors throughout the home. A pair of

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signal flags found in Provincetown serves as drapery. SIT IT OUT

What was once the home’s covered front porch (page 29) now serves as a cozy window seat. The couple added a window to guard against the elements, and had the original bench rehabbed and outfitted with a

SUNSET

custom cushion. “It’s the best view on the property,” says Pfeiffer. “We can lounge here in summer or winter, getting the best of both shelter and sea air.” BRING THE PA R T Y O U T S I D E

Growing up, Pfeiffer’s family regularly celebrated holidays at his grandparents’ beach house. Now

his and Carvalho’s home has become that destination. During the Fourth of July, their families gather to barbecue outside and watch the fireworks over the water. DIGITAL BONUS Bring a touch of the coast into your home: sunset.com/ beachstyle.


I believe in helping every pet parent find the right formula for their dogs, just like I did for my Riley. — JENNIFER FREEMAN, Natural Balance ® Registered Veterinary Technician and her

© Natural Balance Pet Foods, Inc.

German Shorthaired Pointer, Riley

That’s why Jennifer and her team are here to help you find the perfect option for your pet’s unique needs. Chat live with our Veterinary Technicians on NaturalBalanceInc.com


Home & Garden

M AKE OV ER

Garden in motion A suburban front yard gets a free-flowing new look. By Elizabeth Jardina Not only was it an uninspiring match for the Mediterranean-style home— which is located in the Bay Area town of Atherton— but it was thirsty as well. Parched, in fact: During the summer, the homeowner had to truck in water to keep it green. Tasked with replacing the grass, landscape designer Chris Jacobson was encouraged to get creative. Spurred by the client, a gardener herself, Jacobson looked to the work of Dutch landscape master Piet Oudolf, who is perhaps best known for the plantings on New York City’s High Line. “He does these invented prairie gardens with large drifts of perennials,” says Jacobson. “The challenge was to ‘Californicate’ that look.” Out went the flat, water-guzzling lawn, and in came curving paths and gently sloping berms. To create naturalistic swaths, Jacobson pulled together a collection of California-friendly plants: Purple-leafed ‘Forest Pansy’ Eastern redbud trees, bright green grassy Lomandra ‘Breeze’, neat clumps of heuchera, sculptural asparagus fern, and bronzy dwarf phormium are showy nearly yearround. Not all are natives, but they’re all drought-tolerant and fit together aesthetically. “Plants have a way of getting along,” Jacobson says. “They don’t know what zone they’re supposed to be in.” Spring is when the magic really starts, as bracts of ‘Big Red’ anigozanthos bloom alongside the soft pink plumes of Muhlenbergia capillaris. The overall effect is a garden without hard edges, one that brings to mind an Impressionist work of art.

THE FRONT LAWN HAD TO GO.

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MARCH 2017 ❖ SUNSET

Jacobson planted a more formal grouping of plants by the entryway (above), to ease the transition between the home’s traditional architecture and the prairie-inspired design that prevails in most of the front yard. The tidy-looking lineup includes round dwarf pittosporum, santolina, and asparagus ferns, all in shades of silver and green, underneath the existing queen palms.

DREAM SCENE

Along a winding path (right), echoes of red and green in the plantings help lead the eye through the garden. The brick-colored blooms of ‘Big Red’ anigozanthos and red-bronzy ‘Jack Spratt’ dwarf phormium complement the gray-green of woolly thyme, clumps of green Lomandra, and a screen of large conifers. Sprays of pink ‘Santa Ana Cardinal’ heuchera add a layer of softness.

CAITLIN ATKINSON (2)

DIGITAL BONUS Lose the lawn! For more water-wise front-yard ideas, go to sunset.com/lawnfree.

WELCOMING COMMITTEE


Home & Garden

In the SUNSET GARDEN

T I PS FROM OUR TEAM

Pretty enough to eat Come spring, we’re hungry for color—in our gardens and on our plates. Edible flowers deliver on both fronts. Here are our favorite blooms to plant now, and how to use them in the kitchen.

Place ‘Red Gem’ marigold at the base of your tomato plants to attract beneficial insects like ladybugs and butterflies. Harvest petals, which taste of citrus and spice, as needed.

A robust plant (reaching 3 feet tall ), Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ has blooms with a hint of anise flavor. Grow toward the rear of a flower bed to give the plot some height.

FLOWER and HERB BUTTER

SERVES 6 / 20 MINUTES

While edible flowers make great additions to salads or cocktails, you can also get creative using butter as your canvas. This recipe is adapted from chef Josh McFadden’s book Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables (Artisan Books, May 2017; $35).

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On a platter, thinly smear 1⁄ 2 cup roomtemperature unsalted butter. Scatter with edible petals; herbs such as dill, parsley, tarragon, and thyme; sliced green onion; flake sea salt; and freshly ground pepper. If you like, add cracked coriander seeds and red chile flakes.

Three-inch-wide orange flowers of heirloom ‘Radio’ calendula are in bloom nearly year-round along the coast, offering a steady supply of peppery-tasting petals. DIGITAL BONUS Use flowers in salads, herbal teas, and more recipes: sunset.com/edibleflowers.

Photographs by

D AV I D F E N T O N


Home & Garden NORTHERN C A LIF O R NIA

CHECKLIST

“It’s go time for natives. Get out there and enjoy nature’s big show.” JOHANNA SILVER, GARDEN EDITOR

PLANT

Start snap, snow, or shelling peas from seed early this month. Make sure they have something to climb (tomato cages work in a pinch). Expect to harvest in about two months.

Grow green garlic (similar to spring onions) by planting cloves of garlic from the kitchen (those fiddly, too-small cloves from the center of the head are perfect) and letting them sprout for four to six weeks. Harvest and use as you would chives or green onions. Start tomato seeds in a warm, sunny indoor spot, such as a south-facing window or under fluorescent under-counter lights. After three to four weeks of growth, bring them outside for increasingly long periods of time (also called “hardening off” ),

IDEA WE LOVE

Surprise factor For too long, people have regarded native plants as being a little like health food: virtuous but boring. One look at this exuberant perennial shrub bed explodes that stereotype. The combination of white ‘Howard McMinn’ manzanita, blue-purple ceanothus, and pink-violet Western redbud (Cercis occidentalis) at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, California, is not only spectacular, but waterwise and environmentally friendly too. All three plants attract beneficial insects, make nectar to feed butterflies and hummingbirds, and produce seeds and fruit for birds during winter. For more native inspiration, the 86-acre garden is open to the public ($8; rsabg.org).

but don’t plant until nighttime temperatures are in the mid-50s. Sow seeds for summer bloomers such as cosmos, rudbeckia, statice, sunflowers, and zinnias. PROTECT

Although they are not usually noticeable pests until summer, yellow jackets are best controlled now. Set out

pheromone traps (typically they look like yellow cylinders) this month to catch queens and prevent them from laying eggs. Replace the pheromone every two to three weeks. Set out traps for codling moth on apple trees while blossoms are still present. Two traps are usually enough for a standardsize tree.

MAINTAIN

Trim off old, tattered fronds of native ferns such as western sword fern (Polystichum munitum) and giant chain fern (Woodwardia fimbriata), taking care to not damage the plants’ hearts. Grasses begin growing this month. Feed lawns with an organic fertilizer according to package instructions.

Learn what to plant when with our year-round checklists : sunset.com/checklists.

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E L I ZA B E T H JA R D I NA

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Choose vegetable starts at the nursery. The best plants have at least five or six leaves, should not look leggy and stretched out, and have not yet started forming fruit. Make sure the roots aren’t heavily matted at the edge of the pot.


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On this lush Hawaiian island, ohana— family —comes first, whether on the beach or on the job. Meet the clans who are bringing local surf schools, shave ice, and more into a new era.

BY C H L O E R O T H

P H O T O G R A P H S BY E R I N K U N K E L


THE CREW

Brittney and Evan Valiere with daughter Jaya Moon


“ I ’ V E S E E N T H E G RO U C H I E S T P ERS O N TURN IN TO A C O M P L E T E LY D I F F E R E N T HUM AN AF TER SURFIN G, AND IT CARRIES WITH T H E M T H RO U G H O U T T H E I R W H O L E T R I P.” —BRIT TNE Y VALIERE

BABY ’S FIRST RIDE

HANALEI SURF SCHOOL According to pro surfer Evan Valiere, it’s never too late to start surfing. Or too early. Evan took his daughter, Jaya Moon, surfing when she was just two days old. Of course, a few in-utero lessons may have helped. “I surfed my entire pregnancy, so she had no choice,” says Evan’s wife, Brittney. “Luckily, she loves the ocean.” Clearly, surfing is in her blood. Brittney first picked up a board at age 12 in Waikiki. Evan, who was born on the Big Island and raised on Kauai, has been surfing his entire life and competing professionally since 1999. To supplement the income from Evan’s sponsorship with Lululemon Athletica, the couple launched Hanalei Surf School, right in Evan’s childhood stomping grounds on the North Shore, in 2011. The beach break, warm water, and sound bottom make Hanalei Bay the ultimate place to learn how to surf, but it’s the personalized approach that sets the Valieres’ school apart. “Everyone is stoked after a surf lesson,” says Brittney, who also teaches private yoga and stand-up paddleboarding lessons through the school. “People think it’s a big mountain to climb. But when they TRY IT FOR YOURSELF get proper instruction, and they see that they can Hanalei Surf School do it, they are really happy. For us, sharing the offers beginner, interaloha lifestyle is what’s really fulfilling.” mediate, and adThe fact that the teacher is a pro doesn’t hurt. vanced lessons to students on the quiet “I can guarantee most will get up riding on their bay (right). $160/2very first lesson,” says Evan. If you had any hour private lesson, doubt about his teaching skills: Jaya Moon stood including gear; hanalei surfschool.com. up on a wave for the first time at age 21/2.

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GENE POOL

Eddi Henry and son Mychael on The Palmwood’s deck


PAR ADISE , FOUND

T H E PA L MWO O D Dusty rooms and doilies? Not a chance. “This isn’t like staying in your aunt’s guest room,” says Eddi Henry, the proprietor of this modern bedand-breakfast—and “Auntie” (as matriarchs are often called in Hawaii) to all who stay here. After 25 years in banking, Eddi and her husband, Steven, decided to pursue a longtime dream of running a B&B. They found a 5-acre property in the hidden valley of Moloa‘a, gave the three-bedroom house an understated makeover, and opened The Palmwood in 2006. A few years later, Eddi’s son, Mychael, returned from Buenos Aires, where he was working as a chef, and helped take his mom’s vision even further. “She had built the website herself, but it wasn’t selling all that she had done,” he says. Mychael amped up The Palmwood’s social-media presence, attracting a whole new set of travelers, and began splitting cooking duties with his mother. “It wasn’t my intent for people to be coming for the food, but they are,” says Eddi, who maintains an open-door policy for anyone who wants to come in for a meal. “Neighbors see smoke from the barbecue and next thing I know I’ll be feeding 12 people.” An Auntie Eddi menu might include an upside-down almond cake with caramelized apples and bananas, plus a tropical-fruit salad served in a papaya bowl. Or, if you’re there on a morning when Mychael is wearing the apron, you might get crabcakes with lemon aioli and a French omelet, plated with seasonal fruit and local greens. Avid travelers, the Henrys share a love of EXPERIENCE IT meeting strangers. “The table is always lively, FOR YOURSELF with interesting conversation between people The Palmwood’s from all over the globe,” says Eddi. She and furniture (top left) is made with susMychael make a point of showing guests how to tainable materials. experience the best of Kauai on and off their Auntie Eddi Henry property. Whether they’re recommending local and son Mychael take turns cooking jogging trails, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or a breakfast for guests hidden beach, the Henrys send visitors in the (bottom left). From right direction—which, on Kauai, is pretty much $295/night; thepalm wood.com. any direction you choose.

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FRUIT OF THE LOOM

Daniel and Priscilla SoulĂŠ, and children Kahlo and Tamayo


“C HO OS IN G TO BE O RGA N I C S U P P O R T S T H E FA R M E R S A N D P RO D U C E R S W H O L I V E F O R T H E SA M E T H I N GS W E D O — G O O D H E A LT H A N D S U S TA I N A B L E H A B I T S .” —PRISCILLA SOULÉ

COOL IN THE TROPICS

F R E S H S H AV E It was a pregnancy craving that launched an obsession: Forty weeks along with her second son, Priscilla Soulé had a sudden hunger for shave ice. So she and her husband, Daniel, drove to the Fresh Shave food truck, where icy treats were made with fresh fruit and organic ingredients. They returned a week later with their newborn son, and over the next year, the Soulés developed a close friendship with the owners. When Daniel and Priscilla’s friends decided to sell the trailer—a 1961 Aristocrat Lil Loafer—they asked the Soulés if they’d like to take over. Never mind that the couple, former schoolteachers, had no experience running a food business. They said yes. “Honestly, the most difficult thing for me to master was the art of manually carving the ice,” says Daniel. “It took time to understand the physical finesse.” The Soulés kept up the original mission of using top-quality ingredients in their shave ice—think flakes of coconut, chunks of fresh fruit, and chia seeds—serving up cups with playful mustache straws. “We saw the business as a chance to teach our kids not only where their food comes from but also how to take TASTE IT care of the ‘aina [land],” says Priscilla. In that FOR YOURSELF spirit, they involve Kahlo, 4, and Tamayo, 2, in the The Fresh Shave is whole process, from taking them on harvesting parked at Warehouse trips to letting them play inside the trailer during 3540, a vibrant community space featurbusiness hours. ing local vendors With a sweet location about 10 miles west of the and food trucks. For airport, the whole enterprise makes for the perthose stuck on the Mainland, the couple fect first stop for just-arriving visitors. “Because of just opened an outInstagram, people know about our vision, they post in Long Beach, know our kids,” says Daniel, “and they already California. thefresh shave.com. know what flavor they’re going to order.”

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BOYS CLUB

From left: Byron Barth, S. Morris Wise, Chris Spinosa, and David Schwartz in the kitchen at Ko


SWEET DREAMS

KO B A K E R Y In 2007, Chris Spinosa quit his job at Washington, D.C.’s CakeLove, the bakery credited with starting the cupcake craze, to live the island dream: He moved to Kauai with his husband, David Schwartz, and quickly became one of the most sought-after custom-wedding-cake makers in Hawaii. A few years later, the couple met S. Morris Wise and his husband, Byron Barth, at a party. The two self-taught bakers had recently moved from Glendale, California, and had launched a small biscotti business. The quartet joined forces to create Ko Bakery on the eastern-shore town of Lihue. There they churn out Spinosa’s layered cakes and an array of tropical offerings: lilikoi-cranberry biscotti, coconut crisp cookies, Hawaiian ginger granola, and pineapple-coconut scones, plus coffee that is 100 percent Kauai-grown. “The four of us determined that with our various skill sets, working together gave us the best chance of success,” says Wise. “Our philosophy is that it is always better to ‘hui up,’ or work together, rather than go it alone.” Barth heads up design and branding, Wise oversees sales and operations, and Schwartz manages accounting and legal. As head baker, Spinosa begins his day in the kitchen at 3 a.m., using as many local ingredients as possible. There is a simple elegance to his cakes, oftentimes adorned with fresh island flowers. INDULGE IN IT “Our primary focus is and always will be the taste,” FOR YOURSELF Wise says. “Flavor is the driving force behind Ko Bakery is at the everything we do.” weekly Saturday That and the sweet work-life balance that Ko afKauai Community Market, the firstfords this makeshift family. “We came here because Saturday Kapa‘a Art of the lifestyle, where family and community come Walk every month, first and jobs come second,” says Spinosa. “People and stores across the island. kobakery.com. here work to live.”

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“LI V I N G A S C LOS E TO T H E L A N D A S P OS S I B L E J U S T F E E L S R I G H T.” —GENNA WOLKON

F A M I LY P L O T

Doug and Genna Wolkon with their daughter on the grounds. Opposite, bottom right: Doug Wolkon


SECRET GARDEN

K AUAI FAR M AC Y Located on the north shore in the town of Kilauea, the Kauai Farmacy is made up of 4 acres, 70 medicinal herbs, seven loose-leaf teas—and one family behind it all. The farm is a far cry from the bustle of New York City, where Doug and Genna Wolkon were working as a partner in a private equity firm and an industrial designer, respectively. They moved to Kauai in 2007 after the birth of their first child and began using herbal remedies to help Doug lose weight and Genna recover post-baby. “We felt a responsibility to share what we were experiencing from this simple plant medicine,” Doug says. “Kauai empowered us with the ability to self-heal.” Since buying the property six years ago, the couple have taught themselves how to hand-harvest their crops, cure plants with solar dehydrators, and chop and blend everything into tea, culinary spices, superfood elixir powders, salves, and hydrosol sprays. The Wolkons run the farm with a team of TOUR IT 10 gardeners and herbalists, all the while raising FOR YOURSELF their three children. The farmers grow Although the family sells most of the herbal 70 medicinal herbs elixers and teas at the local farmers’ market and and make seven loose-leaf teas, five at restaurants and health food stores, they also herbal culinary tea offer immersive farm tours. As visitors stroll the powders, two healing grounds and learn about the Wolkons’ permasalves, and seasonal hydrosol sprays. culture techniques, they’re encouraged to taste Make reservations samples straight from the garden, from the exploto visit the garden sively sweet fresh stevia leaf to the mouth-tingling at kauaifarmacy.com. They also have a spilanthes herb. Just as fascinating as (and much stand at the Anaina more delicious than) a helicopter tour, it’s a Hou Farmers Marchance to experience the island’s legendary flora ket in Kilauea every Saturday. from the ground up.

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S VEPT

ON A TINY WOODED ISLAND OFF THE COAST OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, A RESTAURANT LURES DINERS WITH A MEAL THAT’S NOTHING SHORT OF MAGICAL. By M ARGO

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TRUE

Photographs by G R A N T

HARDER


A VA Y

Chef Jesse McCleery harvests bull kelp off Galiano Island. Pilgrimme restaurant, opposite.


I’M

ON THE FERRY from the British Columbia mainland, churning across the sparkling water. I should probably be at the bow with the other tourists, watching for whales. Instead, I’m hunched over my phone, scrolling through the menu of a restaurant that lies ahead, deep in the woods of Galiano Island. I’d been wanting to visit Pilgrimme ever since I saw pictures of the place, a wooden cottage glowing among the cedar and fir, like something out of a fairy tale. Its chef had spent time at Noma, the world-famous Danish restaurant, and was conjuring meals from strange, wonderful ingredients gathered from the beach and forest. Now I’d made the thousand-mile trek from San Francisco to try it for myself. When we disembark, I discover I’m the only foot passenger off the ferry, dragging my ridiculously huge suitcase onto the shore. That’s because here on Galiano—an 8-mile-long island where the deer are said to outnumber the people—there’s no bus, no taxi, no Uber. After panting a few hilly blocks up to the Galiano Inn, I’m relieved to find I can rent one of its Smartcars. Following a map that looks like a guide to buried treasure, I scoot past the little downtown and the island’s lone gas station, toward Pilgrimme. Fir and spruce rise high on both sides of the road, a canyon of green. Funky carved-wood signs point the way to potters and painters, knifemakers and glassblowers. And then, above a bay on the island’s south side, there it is—the cottage from the photos, awash in sunlight. Leanne Lalonde, Pilgrimme’s apple-cheeked co-owner, welcomes me inside. The eight-table dining room is all thick wooden beams and coziness, with bits of the island—antlers, pinecones—on display. In the small, neat kitchen, chef Jesse McCleery and his cooks work in focused silence, darting between the pots and counters to a spillover outdoor space with a couple of grills, a rudimentary smoker, and a beat-up freezer. Everywhere, there are pickles: housemade ferments like green strawberry and sea asparagus stacked behind the bar, more

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A PILGRIMME FEAST Leanne Lalonde and Jesse McCleery, co-owners of Pilgrimme. Right: Cured albacore with ovals of smoked eggplant, a veil of dried onion purée, and oxeye daisy leaves.

jars up the outside wall, and vacuum-sealed bags of vegetables, ballooned with their gases, in a storage nook. It might seem a bit lofty to name a restaurant Pilgrimme, to imply high moral purpose, but McCleery is hardly pretentious. In his mid-30s, he’s wiry and shy, with alert, dark eyes and a bare murmur of a voice. As we sit down for coffee on the restaurant’s porch, he tells me


FROM THE START, McCLEERY HAS USED GALIANO’S TERRAIN AS A KIND OF GROCERY STORE, HARVESTING NETTLES AND PINE TIPS, SEEKING THE HIDDEN FLAVORS OF PLACE.

that for him the name simply describes a traveler, an explorer: “Everyone is searching for something, whether they know it or not.” started in his hometown of Winnipeg, on the Canadian Prairies, where he was cooking by the age of 15. Later, while working at the Clayoquot Wilderness Resort in Tofino, on Vancouver Island, he had a food awakening: “There was a woman on the other side of the bay who would forage and bring us sea plantains and sea arrowgrass,” he says. “It was super interesting to work with those flavors. There was nothing like them on the prairie.” Those three years in Tofino began to shape the way McCleery cooks. “It was the first time I saw the limitlessness of cooking, where everything around you could play a part in your food,” he says. As he went on to work in restaurants all over the province, including the King Pacific Lodge in the Great Bear Rainforest (where he met Lalonde), he spent his downtime teaching himself from cookbooks, especially René Redzepi’s Noma. Then in 2013, he landed the culinary equivalent of a spot at Yale: a position as an intern at Noma in Denmark, whose championing of Scandinavian ingredients—especially foraged foods—has prompted chefs around the world to scour their own terrain for overlooked edibles. “At Noma, I saw someone on the other side of the world using ingredients I’d known years before, but doing way cooler stuff with them,” says McCleery. Fried reindeer moss. Duck cured in dried kelp. Fermented plum skins. The cooks at Noma applied old-fashioned techniques in new ways to explore how far ingredients could be pushed. After his stint at Noma, McCleery returned to B.C. and was cooking at a resort on Galiano when he and Lalonde learned that a former French restaurant there was up for lease. “We were not at all ready,” he says. “We had no financial backing.” But there was something irresistible about the idea of opening his own place on the island. “Its farms, the abundance of food, the people, the energy—and also to just cook away from the politics of city restaurants—that all appealed to me,” he says. “I felt like Galiano could give me the freedom I needed.” So the couple maxed out their credit cards and took the plunge. They moved onto the second floor of the restaurant (along with two of their

M c CLEERY’S OWN QUE ST

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THE FLAVORS OF THE ISLAND Galiano’s Montague Harbour, below the restaurant, where McCleery often forages for ingredients. Opposite: Pickles and other ferments at Pilgrimme.

cooks), raising funds for the much-needed renovation by selling tacos off the patio. But what tacos! They were filled with things like albacore tuna, leeks, and poppy-seed ash. “The locals totally got what we were doing,” says Lalonde, “because everyone cooks here. They all know about fermenting and preserving. And it was an easy way to meet people.” As the restaurant unfolded, the


locals cheered the couple on, congratulating them each time a new wall was painted and bringing ingredients from their gardens for McCleery to try. From the start, McCleery used the island itself as a kind of grocery store, harvesting nettles and pine tips from the forest and wading out into Montague Harbour for kelp. In his search for the hidden flavors of a place, McCleery isn’t alone: Seventy-five miles to the south on Lummi Island, at the Willows Inn, chef Blaine Wetzel— who also worked at Noma—shares the same modus operandi. But Pilgrimme’s menu is much simpler than the multicourse prix fixe at the Willows Inn and exponentially more affordable than Noma’s. At Pilgrimme, the average main dish costs less than $20 U.S. Given the craft involved, that’s a bargain. In the kitchen before dinner service, I watch as one of Pilgrimme’s cooks lays thin slices of potato in a vacuum bag and squirts them with bright green kelp oil. Later, he’ll seal them in a Cryovac machine under high pressure, forcing the oil into the potato so it flavors every cell. On the stove, rinds of local cheese simmer in a pot with fronds of kelp—a natural thickener—along with herbs and spices to produce stock; McCleery will use this to cook fermented barley grits into a flavorful porridge. The menu changes a little every day, and as part of the restaurant’s commitment to sustainability, it’s mostly made up of plants. “The idea is that you can have an amazing vegetable-based meal and not miss anything,” Lalonde tells me. “What’s great is to watch the transformation when people come in the door and say, ‘There’s no steak on the menu?’ I’ll try to get them excited. I’ll say, ‘You can cook steak at home, but you can’t cook like this at home.’”

SETTING THE SCENE than culinary wizardry, though; it’s an expression of a community. Lalonde takes me in her car to meet the growers that make Pilgrimme possible. At Cable Bay Farm, we meet a former ferry captain turned farmer, Thomas Schnare, and his wife, Henny, who eat at Pilgrimme often. Thomas yanks up fat organic echalion shallots for Lalonde to take back, as well as some gigantic Hakurei salad turnips. I bite into one right then and there, and it’s as juicy and crunchy as a good apple. “Jesse does amazing things with these,” he says. From there, we go to Galiano Sunshine Farm, a terraced hillside operation run by Roger and Lisa Pettit. A former ag-chemical salesman, Roger now prefers the power of manure and microbes. His greenhouses burst with heirloom tomatoes and chiles, and he grows lettuces so tight and pristine that they look like bridal bouquets.

THE RESTAURANT IS ABOUT MORE

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The chef works in the outdoor overflow kitchen. Pilgrimme’s tiny dining room, opposite, serves as an understated backdrop for the mind-boggling meal.

Lalonde is due back at the restaurant, so I keep exploring Pilgrimme’s sources on my own. At the Galiano Conservancy Association, an 188-acre wooded expanse halfway up the island, I get a glimpse of a year-old “food forest,” an experimental permaculture project modeled after natural ecosystems. Surrounded by a deer fence, it’s about a half-acre, growing not in neat rows but in


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BEAUTIFULLY COMPOSED Galiano-grown potatoes compressed with kelp oil, topped with salmon roe, wisps of pickled bull kelp, and sheep sorrel.

tiers of shrubs, vines, trees, and fungus that together restore nutrients to the soil. “The cooks at the restaurant are interested in crops you don’t find in a grocery store,” says Cedana Bourne, the caretaker. That includes things like sweet-leafed oxeye daisy and sheep sorrel, wild foods that have been encouraged to flourish here. Galiano’s residents embrace this bounty, says Keith Erikson, the conservation’s acting executive director. “You have the solid old-hippie generation, some of whom have had kids here, and retirees from Vancouver—lots of people who appreciate these things.” Toward dusk, I walk the half-mile down to the beach below Pilgrimme, snacking on blackberries from the tangle of bushes that line the road. Along the shore, I spot some sea asparagus and take a nibble; they’re crunchy, like snap peas, only saltier. It’s so quiet I can hear the clacking of mussel shells.

IT TAKES AN ISLAND

At Bodega Gallery, artist Kasumi Lampitoc makes the elegant bowls that adorn Pilgrimme’s tables.

GALIANO’S ARTISTS AND FARMERS CREATE AND GROW FOR PILGRIMME AND ARE DEEPLY PART OF ITS SUCCESS. THEY’RE CUSTOMERS TOO.

around the cottage. Dinner service is about to begin, an orchestration of the wild and the farm-grown. By the golden light of paper lanterns, I tear open a warm loaf of potato bread dusted with leek ash, realizing that my blackened fingers are exactly what the chef intends—a reminder of the earth. Olives spritzed with woodsy-sweet pine oil follow. The couple at the table next to mine are raptly chewing, nodding, and Cedana Bourne of the Galiano Captain Thomas Schnare at Conservancy Association’s food Cable Bay Farm with his prized looking into each other’s eyes as they savor cured albaforest, harvesting borage. echalion shallots. core tuna with oxeye daisy leaves, served in a huge white bowl that looks like a full moon. It’s an elegant dish, and judging by the fact that they’re now kissing, irresistibly romantic. Over several more courses, the island crosses my plate: Sunshine Farm toma- here. By the time we arrived, everyday life had receded. toes dusted with tomato-skin powder; the tender potatoes compressed with We’d quieted down and were ready to receive what Pilkelp oil, salmon caviar spooned on top; the Cable Bay Farm Hakurei turnips, grimme had to offer: a destination that is both a journey and a revelation. charred and paired with chunks of bacon. Finally, dessert arrives—two brandied cherries and a A woman in the center of the room gets the smoked brisket. I’ve just tasted mine, draped with sticky duck jus and topped with sweet onion, parsnip, and chocolate truffle laid on a bay leaf like a small edible spicy watercress. “This is the winner!” she exclaims. “Oh! That is incredible.” poem. I close my eyes and take a bite. Every bite she takes brings a new eruption of joy. My neighbors decide to get the Pilgrimme: $$$; 2806 Montague Rd., Galiano Island, brisket too—which ignites more kissing. I learn that my amorous neighbors live in different countries: He’s from Cali- B.C.; pilgrimme.ca; hours vary seasonally, so call (250) fornia, she’s from Sweden. A snafu involving her immigration papers have kept 539-5392 for reservations. them apart for months. They’d probably be smooching even over cold pizza, but this restaurant has clearly had an effect—as it probably has on most of us toDIGITAL BONUS Find McCleery’s recipe for cheese broth at sunset.com. night, we who left our cities to cross the sea and drive through the woods to get

THE FOREST DARKENS

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CERCIS CANADENSIS ‘FOREST PANSY’

ST YR A X OBASSIA

WILD AT HEART

NASSELL A TENUISSIMA

MISCANTHUS SINENSIS ‘MORNING LIGHT’

ACHILLEA ‘MOONSHINE ’

SEDUM ALBUM CHLOROTICUM ‘BABY TEARS’

SESLERIA AUTUMNALIS

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SALVIA NEMOROSA ‘CAR ADONNA’


A GARDEN DESIGNER CREATES A BREEZ Y, BEACHY OASIS BY LET TING NATURE DO ITS THING. by ELIZABETH JARDINA photographs by THOMAS J. STORY

EUPHORBIA MYRSINITES


BAINBRIDGE Island, Washington, is woodsy, peaceful, full of wildlife—and after seven years, garden designer Tish Treherne was at the end of her rope with it. She and her husband, Adam Michel, had built their dream house, a contemporary labor of love, deep in the forest. As it turns out: too deep in the forest. “We lost the little sun we got about 2 p.m.,” she says. “We hit the wall. We were considering moving to a sunnier climate.” And then, on a lark, Treherne went to see a house that had just come on the market. The previous owners had remodeled it from a 1920s beach cottage to a chic ranch house. Best of all, it was flooded with light. “I fell in love with it,” says Treherne, who scooped up the house after it fell out of escrow with another buyer. As a designer, she was especially excited about the western-facing front yard. Sunny and situated a mere 120 feet from the waters of Puget Sound, the space was planted with a lawn at the time, but Treherne knew it had far more interesting potential. But first, she watched. Unlike her projects for clients, Treherne wasn’t up against a deadline with her own yard. “I had the luxury of waiting, to watch the landscape through the seasons,” she says. After nine months, she was ready to put a plan in motion. The free-flowing design that emerged fits right in with the waterfront setting. “Not all the gardens I design for clients are as natural-looking, but in my own garden I prefer things to be slightly wild,” says Treherne. In the front yard, she achieved that by loosely layering unfussy perennials—including tufts of grassylooking orange-streaked Anemanthele lessoniana; ‘Walker’s Low’ nepeta for purple contrast; clumps of Santa Barbara daisies, which die down in winter and reseed themselves; and feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’). 68

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SPHAER ALCEA ‘NEWLEA ZE COR AL’


SALIX PURPUREA ‘NANA’

ROSA RUGOSA

CAL AMAGROSTIS x ACUTIFLOR A ‘K ARL FOERSTER’

SALVIA NEMOROSA ‘CAR ADONNA’

PEEKABOO In the front yard, Tish Treherne (top left) combined tall grasses with perennials to create privacy. The plants can also handle being occasionally run over by her two dogs. BR ACHYGLOT TIS GREYI


SALIX ALBA VITELLINA CAL AMAGROSTIS x ACUTIFLOR A ‘K ARL FOERSTER’

NEPETA R ACEMOSA ‘ WALKER’S LOW ’

ANEMANTHELE LESSONIANA CALLUNA VULGARIS ‘FIREFLY’

THYMUS SERPYLLUM ‘ELFIN’

SEDUM ALBUM CHLOROTICUM ‘BABY TEARS’

IN LIVING COLOR Treherne replaced the front lawn with a mix of purple, orange, and green plants—a soft palette that doesn’t take away from the blue waters of Puget Sound.

BOUTELOUA GR ACILIS ‘BLOND AMBITION’

EUPHORBIA MYRSINITES ERIGERON K ARVINSKIANUS SEDUM RUPESTRE ‘ANGELINA’


“ YOU’RE SET TING THE STAGE AS A DESIGNER, BUT YOU DON’T HAVE TOTAL CONTROL OVER WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN.” —TISH TREHERNE BRUNNER A MACROPHYLL A ‘JACK FROST’

The plants nestle into one another like puzzle pieces to create a seemingly effortless whole. They also play up the landscape. “The grasses are so luminescent when the light hits them,” says Treherne. “Everything glows all afternoon.” The wild and loose theme continues along the side of the house and in the backyard, where Treherne lined gravel paths with deep purple spikes of Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’ and yellow ‘Moonshine’ yarrow. In an interior courtyard, which is warmed by corrugated walls, Treherne went in a slightly different direction, planting a small garden of succulents, which would normally succumb to the cold. It was an ode to Southern California, where she lived as a teenager and young adult. “I was so homesick for sunny places by the time we moved in here,” she says. Four years after moving in, Treherne says she and her husband are still basking in the light. “Moving here was a game changer for us.” Even on the darkest days, she says the plants bring much-needed cheer: “You feel like there’s sun in the landscape even when you haven’t seen it for weeks.” L ANDSCAPE DESIGN

Bliss Garden Design; blissgarden

design.com. DIGITAL BONUS Get a coastal look in your garden

with these planting and landscaping ideas: sunset. com/beachygarden. SUNSET

MARCH 2017

71


Just a few hours of your time can make a big difference. Together, with our nationwide community of volunteers, you can help the Feeding America network of food banks end hunger. Pledge to volunteer at your local food bank. FeedingAmerica.org/Pledge


Food & Drink From top right: Calamansi and Green Onion Pancit, Chicken Inasal, Roasted Cauliflower with Pickled Onion and Yogurt Sauce, and jasmine rice

GAT H E R

FILIPINO FOOD’S MOMENT

PROP STYLING: MERISA LIBBY

A new generation of chefs is putting a fresh spin on the country’s cuisine. By Elaine Johnson

Photographs by

T H O M A S J. S T O RY

SUNSET

❖ MARCH 2017

73


Food & Drink

I

n a strip mall in L.A.’s Chinatown, Alvin Cailan is grilling chicken and slathering it with a citrusy annatto baste. He’s at Unit 120, his restaurant incubator, though he’s better known as chef-owner of the West’s wildly popular Eggslut restaurants. Unit 120 is closed to the public today, but rap music thrums inside the kitchen while Chad Valencia of Lasa restaurant seasons pancit noodles and Isa Fabro layers a mango dessert. The chefs, all Filipino Americans, are creating an off-themenu dinner for family and friends that highlights some of their projects at Unit 120—and the new direction of Filipino cooking. “It’s like a clubhouse for chefs, with a mission,” Cailan explains about the small space. Here, cooks can try out long-term residencies, pop-ups, even a single dish— without committing to a brick-and-mortar business. Since Unit 120 opened last year, Cailan has experimented with a barbecue concept, while Fabro has been working on Filipino-style pastries and pies. After launching Lasa (“taste” in Tagalog), Chad and his brother, Chase, are expanding with a full-time restaurant next door. “There are so many Filipinos in the food industry in America,” says Chad, “but we felt Filipino cooking was lacking in mainstream culture.” All of the chefs, who come from a fine-dining background, tend to call their cooking “Filipino inspired.” They experiment with new techniques and ingredients, while keeping the bold flavors of the cuisine—the funk of fish sauce, the fat, and acid—front and center. And that’s true of the feast today, served up to a special group of friends they call their barkada (or clique). “Now all we need is a grandma,” says Cailan, as they sit to eat.

CALAMANSI and GREEN ONION PANCIT SERVES 8 (MAKES 8 CUPS) / 35 MINUTES

Take the comfort of buttered noodles, add the tang of citrus and the saltiness of fish sauce, and you have Chad Valencia’s totally addictive pancit. The chef loosely modeled the dish after the Italian classic spaghetti aglio e olio. 74

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chefs alvin cailan, isa fabro, and chad valencia

About 2 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. kosher salt 1 cup unsalted butter 6 tbsp. fresh calamansi juice, bottled pure calamansi*, or calamansi substitute (see page 76) 2 tbsp. Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce, such as Megachef or Red Boat 2 pkg. (14 oz. each) fresh pancit egg noodles* (also called Canton noodles) or fresh chow mein noodles 1 cup green onions thinly sliced on a diagonal

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add about 2 tbsp. salt (the water should be as salty as the sea).

2. Meanwhile, melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat and stir in calamansi juice, fish sauce, and 1 tsp. salt. 3. Cook noodles in boiling water until barely tender, 1 minute. Drain and return to pot. 4. Toss noodles with calamansi butter. Transfer half to a serving bowl and scatter with half of green onions. Pile in remaining noodles and scatter remaining onions on top. *Find Sun Tropics pure calamansi at amazon. com. Find fresh pancit egg noodles and chow mein noodles at Asian markets. PER SERVING 674 Cal., 53% (358 Cal.) from fat; 11 g protein; 40 g fat (19 g sat.); 70 g carbo (3.9 g fiber); 1,474 mg sodium; 60 mg chol.


CHICKEN INASAL

SERVES 8 / 3 HOURS, PLUS 1 DAY TO BRINE

Meet this year’s go-to grilling recipe. Alvin Cailan, who grew up in East L.A. and learned to grill alongside his dad, brines chicken for 1 to 2 days to deeply infuse the meat with garlic, lemongrass, and citrus. Then he slathers it with an earthy annatto baste for extra juiciness, and finishes with tangy toyomansi—a table sauce typical in Filipino households. Feel free to serve a big bowl of jasmine rice on the side. BR IN E AN D C H I C KE N

1 cup each kosher salt and packed light brown sugar 2 ⁄ 3 cup chopped garlic (2 heads) 6 large stalks lemongrass, thinly sliced crosswise (use a heavy knife or cleaver) 1⁄4 cup chopped fresh ginger 2 tsp. coarsely and freshly ground pepper 1⁄4 cup fresh calamansi juice, bottled pure calamansi*, or calamansi substitute (see page 76) 2 chickens, each 31⁄ 2 to 4 lbs., backbones removed, opened up flat*; or 4 bone-in breast halves, 4 wings, and 4 whole legs BA S T I N G SAU C E

chase valencia

1 cup canola oil 1⁄ 2 cup annatto seeds* or 11⁄ 2 tbsp. ground annatto Zest of 5 lemons 1⁄ 2 tsp. kosher salt 1⁄4 tsp. freshly ground pepper  TOYO M AN S I SAUC E

3 tbsp. each soy sauce and fresh calamansi juice, bottled pure calamansi, or calamansi substitute 1 tsp. Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce, such as Megachef or Red Boat 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1. Make brine: In a large stockpot, bring 4 qts. water to a boil with salt, brown sugar, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and pepper, stirring often. Set pot in a sink of ice water and cool to room temperature. Stir in calamansi juice, then add chicken (or transfer to a large bowl if pot is too small). Set a plate on chicken

to keep it submerged. Chill, covered, 1 to 2 days. 2. Meanwhile, make basting sauce: Heat oil with annatto in a small saucepan over low heat, stirring often, until oil is deep orange and flavorful, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in lemon zest, salt, and pepper. Let cool, then chill, covered. 3. Make toyomansi sauce: Combine all ingredients in a squeeze bottle or small bowl; chill, covered, until used. 4. Prepare a grill for indirect medium heat (350° to 450°). For charcoal: Ignite a full chimney of briquets (about 90) on firegrate. When coals are dotted with ash, in 20 minutes, bank evenly on opposite sides of firegrate and if needed, let burn to medium. Set a 9- by 13-in. foil drip pan in center and set cooking grate in place. For gas: Remove cooking grates. Turn all burners to high, close lid, and heat 10 minutes. Turn off center burner(s) and reduce heat for others to medium. Set a 9- by 13-in. foil drip pan on turnedoff burner. Set cooking grates in place (if drip pan sticks up, push on grates to flatten pan a bit). 5. Pour basting sauce through a fine strainer. Lift chicken from brine (discard brine) and set over indirect heat. Brush all over with about one-third of basting sauce. Grill, covered, 20 minutes. Baste chicken, then turn over and baste other side. Grill, covered, basting one more time, until no longer pink in thickest part, 20 to 30 minutes more (10 minutes for any separate wing pieces); during last 10 minutes, move chicken to direct heat to brown more. 6. Squeeze or brush toyomansi sauce all over chicken. Transfer chicken to a cutting board. Cut off legs and wings and quarter each whole breast through bones. *Find Sun Tropics pure calamansi at amazon.com. Ask a butcher to prep whole chickens, or do it yourself. Find annatto at Latino markets and at worldspice.com. PER SERVING 1,047 Cal., 69% (722 Cal.) from fat; 74 g protein; 81 g fat (19 g sat.); 4.7 g carbo (0.7 g fiber); 2,340 mg sodium; 297 mg chol.

SUNSET

MARCH 2017

75


Food & Drink

anthony cailan (left) serves chicken inasal to his brother, alvin

Filipino pantry Annatto These red seeds of the achiote tree add color and a deep earthy flavor to chicken-basting sauce (page 75). Find at Asian and Latino markets and worldspice.com. Ataulfo mangoes Also called Champagne mangoes, these satiny fruits have almost no fibers. Find at well-stocked grocery stores, Asian markets, and melissas.com. Calamansi (calamondin) Unless you have a tree, you’re unlikely to find this citrus that tastes like a cross between lime and kumquat. Check amazon.com for bottled Sun Tropics calamansi juice—or use our fresh calamansi substitute: Combine 3 tbsp. lime juice, 1 tbsp. Meyer lemon juice, and 1 tbsp. orange juice.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER with PICKLED ONION and YOGURT SAUCE

SERVES 8 / 2 HOURS

Chad Valencia brings Filipino flair to the roasted-cauliflower-with-yogurt combo that’s become so popular these days. His tangy pickled onion and currants are based on a sweet-and-sour condiment called atchara. The vinegar with the yogurt is inspired by tart sawsawan dipping sauces. PICKLED ONION AND CURRANTS

1 cup each sugar and unseasoned rice vinegar Pinch of kosher salt 13⁄4 cups red onion sliced into very thin rounds (use a handheld slicer) 1⁄ 2 cup dried currants CAULIFLOWER

2 large heads cauliflower (each 2 lbs.) 1⁄4 cup grapeseed oil About 1 tsp. kosher salt YOGURT AND SERVING

1 cup whole-milk Greek yogurt 1⁄ 3 cup sugarcane vinegar* or 1⁄4 cup Champagne vinegar 1⁄ 2 tsp. grated garlic (use a Microplane) About 3⁄4 tsp. kosher salt 1⁄ 2 cup cilantro leaves 1. Make pickled onion: In a medium saucepan, heat sugar, rice vinegar, 1 cup 76

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water, and the salt, stirring occasionally, until sugar dissolves and mixture is steaming. Put onion and currants in a nonreactive bowl and pour liquid on top. Let stand at least 2 hours (chill, covered, if longer than that, up to 1 day). 2. Make cauliflower: Preheat oven to 350°. Break cauliflower into small florets and set on a rimmed baking sheet. Toss with oil and season with salt (pan will be full). Roast until golden, 45 to 50 minutes. 3. Make yogurt: In a medium bowl, whisk yogurt, vinegar, garlic, and salt to taste. 4. Spoon yogurt onto one or two platters and spread thin. Arrange cauliflower on top. Using a slotted spoon, lift onion and currants from liquid and scatter over cauliflower. Sprinkle with cilantro. *Find at Asian markets and amazon.com. PER SERVING 191 Cal., 42% (80 Cal.) from fat; 7.7 g protein; 9 g fat (1.7 g sat.); 24 g carbo (5.4 g fiber); 543 mg sodium; 4.1 mg chol. GF/LC/V

Fish sauce Unlike brands with fish extract and caramel coloring, umamirich Megachef Premium Fish Sauce is made with anchovies and salt and fermented two years. Find at amazon. com. Red Boat is a good alternative; find in well-stocked grocery stores. Lemongrass Buy heavy, freshlooking stalks. To use in marinades, no need to trim the tough outer layers. Pancit Both the name of the noodles and a dish, pancit comes in many variations and can be made from wheat or rice. Find at Asian markets. Sugarcane vinegar A mild, sweettasting vinegar. Find brands such as Datu Puti at Asian markets and amazon.com. You can also substitute a bit less of Champagne vinegar. Sweetened condensed milk Popular in many Filipino desserts.


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MARCH17

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Food & Drink

Wine pairings Anthony Cailan, beverage director of Proper Residences in Hollywood, and Alvin’s brother, poured these wines with dinner.

Domaine de la Pepière 2015 Muscadet Sèvre et Maine sur lie (Muscadet Sèvre et Maine,

isa fabro with her mango royale and an afterdinner sparkler

white Loire wine; $12)

Occhipinti “SP68” 2015 Nero d’Avola e Frappato IGT Terre Siciliane (Sicilian red wine; $25) La Dilettante Vouvray brut (French sparkling dry Chenin Blanc; $25)

MANGO ROYALE

SERVES 10 / 1 HOUR, PLUS 6 HOURS TO FREEZE

American icebox cake meets Filipino crema de fruta (a layered cake often made with canned fruit cocktail) in Isa Fabro’s fresh, creamy dessert. “It’s American and Filipino at the same time—like me!” she says. You’ll need a 9-in. springform pan, and a small offset spatula is helpful for spreading. Mangoes may need a few days to ripen in a paper bag. 2 sleeves (91⁄ 2 oz. total) graham crackers 10 tbsp. salted butter Cooking-oil spray 1 pt. heavy whipping cream 1⁄ 2 cup sweetened condensed milk 6 to 8 soft-ripe Ataulfo (Champagne) mangoes (21⁄ 2 lbs. total) or 3 soft-ripe large mangoes (21⁄ 2 lbs. total), such as Haden or Kent 1 to 2 tbsp. lime juice (optional) 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Break up crackers and whirl half at a time in a food processor until finely ground. Spread 78

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evenly on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake, stirring every 4 to 5 minutes, until golden brown throughout, 8 to 10 minutes total. Pour into a bowl. 2. Meanwhile, heat butter in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat until melted and deep golden, swirling pan often, 12 to 15 minutes. Drizzle crumbs with butter and toss to coat. Let cool. 3. Spray a 9-in. round, 21/2- to 3-in.-deep springform pan with cooking-oil spray. Line pan bottom with a 9-in. circle of parchment paper. Line sides with 3-in.wide strips of parchment; spray again. 4. Pour cream into a large bowl. Beating with a mixer on medium speed, slowly drizzle in sweetened condensed milk, then beat to stiff peaks. (Beating on medium speed takes longer, but helps build a stable structure.) Set aside, chilled. 5. Cut cheeks from mangoes parallel to center pits. Scoop out flesh from cheeks with a spoon and slice flesh from pits. Coarsely purée fruit in a clean food processor. Measure 2 cups (save extra for other uses). If you like, add lime juice so purée tastes sweet-tart. 6. Evenly sprinkle bottom of lined pan with 1/2 cup graham-cracker crumbs and spread in an even layer using a small offset spatula. Dollop half of whipped cream on top. Carefully spread cream

level without stirring up crumbs. Spoon 1 cup mango purée on top and spread level. Sprinkle 1 cup crumbs on top. Repeat cream and mango layers. Sprinkle top with remaining crumbs but don’t smooth down. 7. Wrap dessert with plastic wrap and freeze until firm but still sliceable, about 6 hours. Remove pan rim and parchment and cut into wedges. MAKE AHEAD Up to 2 weeks, frozen; to serve, let stand at room temperature until just soft enough to slice, 45 minutes to 1 hour (dessert will hold at room temperature another hour or so).

PER SERVING 508 Cal., 59% (298 Cal.) from fat; 4.6 g protein; 33 g fat (20 g sat.); 50 g carbo (2 g fiber); 298 mg sodium; 89 mg chol. LS/V

Unit 120: $$$$; for pop-ups, follow @unit1twenty on Instagram; unit120.com. Lasa: $$$$; lasa-la.com.


Homework in backpack, backpack on kid, kid on bus. Gold star.      

                    

        


Food & Drink

FA S T & F R E S H

WEEKNIGHT COOKING CORNED BEEF SALAD

SERVES 4 / 25 MINUTES

This salad is a light but still festive way to serve corned beef on St. Patrick’s Day—or to use up leftovers the next day.

W I N E PA AIRING

L Benessere Vineyards 2014 Estate Sangiovese f (St. Helena; $32)

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1. Preheat oven to 375°. Toss together bread, butter, 1/2 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. pepper, and the caraway seeds. Spread on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until lightly toasted, 12 to 14 minutes. 2. Whisk together oil, vinegar, mustards, shallot, honey, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/8 tsp. pepper in a large bowl. Add lettuces; toss gently to coat. 3. Spread dressed lettuces on a large platter. Top with rye croutons and torn corned beef. PER SERVING 500 Cal., 72% (360 Cal.) from fat; 19 g protein; 40 g fat (13 g sat.); 16 g carbo (2.3 g fiber); 1,567 mg sodium; 106 mg chol.

FOOD STYLING: KAREN SHINTO; PROP STYLING: EMMA STAR JENSEN

2 cups rye bread, torn into 1-in. pieces (about 3 oz.) 3 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted 3⁄4 tsp. kosher salt, divided 1⁄4 tsp. freshly ground pepper, divided 1⁄ 2 tsp. caraway seeds 1⁄4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 tbsp. each white wine vinegar and whole-grain mustard 1 tbsp. each Dijon mustard and chopped shallot 1 tsp. honey 1 qt. loosely packed torn butter lettuce (about 3 oz.) 3 cups each torn romaine lettuce and green-leaf lettuce (about 4 oz. total) 12 oz. cooked corned beef, torn into large shreds and warmed


4 slices gruyère cheese (about 3 oz.) 6 cups thinly sliced yellow onions (from about 11⁄4 lbs. onions) 1⁄4 tsp. kosher salt 1⁄ 8 tsp. baking soda 8 small butter lettuce leaves 4 brioche hamburger buns, toasted 1⁄4 cup spicy brown or hot Chinese mustard W N A NG W LI N E PAdI R I N G

2La Crema h p 2014p Chardonnay f

(Sonoma Coast; $23)

BUTTERNUT SQUASH POSOLE

SERVES 4 / 45 MINUTES

Although this posole tastes like it’s been simmering all day long, it takes less than an hour to cook. For shorter prep time, buy bagged cut squash and sub in coleslaw mix for the garnish. 1⁄4

cup canola oil About 1 qt. butternut squash cubes (29 oz.) 1⁄ 2 cup diced onion About 3⁄4 tsp. kosher salt 2 tbsp. tomato paste 1 tbsp. each finely chopped garlic and chili seasoning powder 11⁄ 2 tsp. ground cumin 1⁄ 2 tsp. dried oregano 1 qt. reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth 1 can (25 oz.) hominy, drained 1⁄ 2 cup finely shredded green cabbage 1 lime, cut into wedges 1 avocado, peeled and thinly sliced 2 or 3 radishes, thinly sliced Warm corn tortillas 1. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a large heavy-bottomed pot. Add squash, onion, and 3/4 tsp. salt. Cook, stirring

occasionally, until vegetables begin to soften, 7 to 8 minutes. Add tomato paste, garlic, chili seasoning, cumin, and oregano and cook 1 minute, stirring often. Add broth and hominy and bring to a simmer. Simmer, uncovered, until squash is tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Season to taste with salt. 2. Spoon into bowls and serve with cabbage, lime, avocado, radishes, and a basket of warm tortillas. —Charlotte March PER SERVING 428 Cal., 44% (190 Cal.) from fat; 9 g protein; 22 g fat (2.1 g sat.); 53 g carbo (12 g fiber); 1,662 mg sodium; 0 mg chol. LC/VG (with vegetable broth)

THE “HAM” BURGER

1. Pulse ham steak and prosciutto in a food processor until very finely chopped, about 12 times. Transfer to a large bowl. Add ground pork, egg yolk, garlic, and thyme; gently mix together, then shape into four 41/2-in.-wide patties. Sprinkle both sides of patties with pepper. 2. Heat oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add patties and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted in centers registers 140°, about 3 minutes per side, topping with cheese during last minute of cooking. Transfer patties to a platter and tent with foil. 3. Add onions, 1 tbsp. water, the salt, and baking soda to skillet. Stir to combine, scraping up browned bits. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are tender and golden, about 10 minutes. Uncover and cook, stirring often, until liquid has evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes. 4. Arrange 2 lettuce leaves on each bottom bun half. Top with burgers and caramelized onions. Spread mustard on top halves and place on burgers. PER BURGER 953 Cal., 51% (490 Cal.) from fat; 49 g protein; 55 g fat (22 g sat.); 63 g carbo (6.5 g fiber); 1,803 mg sodium; 250 mg chol.

SERVES 4 / 40 MINUTES

This burger is inspired by one on the menu at San Francisco’s Cockscomb restaurant. The chef there, Chris Cosentino, came up with it after his son asked him, “Why doesn’t a hamburger have ham in it?” 3 oz. each boneless ham steak and prosciutto, roughly chopped 11⁄4 lbs. ground pork (not extra-lean) 1 large egg yolk, lightly beaten 1 garlic clove, minced 2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme 1⁄ 2 tsp. freshly ground pepper 1 tbsp. canola oil Photographs by

ANNABELLE BREAKEY


Food & Drink

In the SUNSET KITCHEN Spring cooking Right now, it’s not just the favas and morels that have us racing to the kitchen—it’s the new cookbooks too. Here are snippets from some favorites.

TIPS FROM OUR TEAM

SALAD SEASON

Simpler, more straightforward food, straight from her garden—that’s what vegetarian cooking pioneer Deborah Madison is drawn to these days. One delicious example from In My Kitchen (Ten Speed Press, Mar 2017; $33) is this salad, made with fat, juicy asparagus and spicy arugula blossoms.

BALANCING ACT

Master the four elements that are the focus of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat (Simon & Schuster, Apr 2017; $35) and you’ll make consistently delicious food and be more comfortable improvising, says Samin Nosrat, a former Chez Panisse cook—and cooking teacher to everyone from middle schoolers to Michael Pollan. With acid, for instance, she recommends adding different kinds at different stages. Add mellow acids like red wine at the beginning of cooking—for instance, when starting a beef stew—and sharp ones like lime juice to add a bright finish to avocado salad.

MEYER LEMON CRUSH

MAKES 3 1⁄ 2 CUPS / 10 MINUTES

BETTER BISCUITS

Inventive flavors (Mexican chocolate! Buckwheat-gruyère!) and attention to the basics help you up your baking game with Muffins and Biscuits

(Chronicle Books, Mar 2017; $20) by Heidi Gibson. A few tips for tall, flaky biscuit perfection: Keep ingredients cold, use a light hand when mixing, and cut dough straight down without twisting.

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Roasted Asparagus with Arugula SERVES 4 / 25 MINUTES

1. In a large, shallow baking dish, toss 1 lb. thick asparagus with olive oil and pinches of sea salt and pepper. Bake at

425° until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer to a platter. 2. In a small bowl, combine 2 tbsp. finely diced shallot, 11⁄2 tbsp. interesting vinegar such as sherry, and 1⁄4 tsp. sea salt. Let stand a few minutes, then whisk in 31⁄2 tbsp. roasted walnut oil or good olive oil. 3. In a bowl, toss 3 generous handfuls small arugula leaves

with dressing to coat. Heap over asparagus. Tuck in 2 hard-cooked large eggs, quartered, and 1⁄4 cup roasted walnuts. Add more dressing and salt to taste, and scatter arugula blossoms (optional) on top.

FROM LEFT: JEFFERY CROSS (4; FOOD STYLING: JEFFREY LARSEN; PROP STYLING: EMMA STAR JENSEN); ERIN SCOTT

Limonana, or mint lemonade, the national drink of Israel, gets a Western spin in Mad about Meyer Lemons (Alfred Cort Sinnes, 2016; $20) by Napa author-illustrator A. Cort Sinnes. In a blender, whirl 1 cup Meyer lemon juice, 1/2 cup roughly torn fresh mint, 1 cup water, 1/4 cup sugar, and 2 cups ice cubes until ice is well crushed. Pour into tall glasses and top with mint sprigs.


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Food & Drink

PEAK SEASON

WARM SHIITAKE and CELERY SALAD

SERVES 4 (MAKES 1 1⁄ 2 QTS.) / 35 MINUTES

This salad goes all-in with the mushroom flavor, while salty pecorino and crunchy celery provide balance. Tearing the shiitakes into pieces makes for easier prep, and the jagged edges get nicely brown when sautéed.

5 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 tbsp. plus 2 tsp. red wine vinegar About 1 tsp. kosher salt, divided About 1⁄4 tsp. freshly ground pepper 1⁄ 2 cup celery leaves, torn into pieces 21⁄ 2 cups thinly sliced celery, cut on a diagonal 11⁄ 2 cups baby spinach leaves 3⁄4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves 12 oz. fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems Photograph by

ANNABELLE BREAKEY

removed, caps torn into 1-in. pieces cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 11⁄ 2 oz. pecorino cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler 1⁄ 3

1. In a small bowl, whisk together 4 tbsp. oil, the vinegar, 3/4 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper and set aside. 2. Put celery leaves, celery, spinach, and parsley in a salad bowl.

3. Heat remaining tbsp. oil in a 12-in. frying pan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add mushrooms and cook undisturbed until browned on underside, 1 to 2 minutes. Season with 1/4 tsp. salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned and tender but not too soft, 2 to 3 minutes. 4. Transfer mushrooms to bowl with celery, add vinaigrette and hazelnuts, and toss to coat. Scatter cheese over salad, season to taste with more salt and pepper, and toss again. —Charlotte March PER 11⁄ 2-CUP SERVING 303 Cal., 78% (237 Cal.) from fat; 6.7 g protein; 27 g fat (5.1 g sat.); 12 g carbo (5 g fiber); 655 mg sodium; 11 mg chol. GF/V

DIGITAL BONUS Find a bounty of flavorful recipes at sunset.com/mushrooms.

FOOD STYLING: KAREN SHINTO; PROP STYLING: KELLY ALLEN

In the SUNSET KITCHEN


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Food & Drink

CALIFORNIA’S BEST-KEPT SECRETS

SIP

Look beyond the most-hyped wine regions to get more bang for your buck. By Sara Schneider IT’S NO SECRET that a great bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon is easy to come by in Napa Valley. Or a good bottle of almost anything in Sonoma County. As appealing as those wines are, however, they come with the price of fame. In Napa, for example, there’s a swath along the Mayacamas Mountains that produces wines I especially love—and that command big bucks. But a recent flyover revealed what should have been obvious: The Mayacamas Range doesn’t stop at the Napa County line! It drops down into Lake County, where, along the slopes of the Red Hills subregion, vineyards experience similar growing conditions to those on the Napa Valley side. The resulting wines boast all the elements—muscular mountain tannins, beautiful aromatics, lively acidity—that make Napa’s bottles stars. That’s especially true of the Cabernets coming out of Red Hills Lake County. “Even though Cab is farmed in many places, if you draw your eye around the West Coast, there are very few places where it’s great,” says Peter Molnar, co-owner of Obsidian Ridge in Red Hills Lake County. Because of the region’s latitude and altitude, he says, “we can make not just powerful Cabernets but pretty Cabernets.” A reality check on the price of grapes makes the final case for Red Hills mountain Cabs: Fruit prices there average $2,500 to $3,000 a ton versus $8,000 to $12,000 a ton in Napa (in fact, some Napa producers use this lower-cost fruit in their own wines—up to 15 percent is allowed—to boost profit margins). “For the consumer, that’s the difference between $30 a bottle and $70, $80, $100 a bottle,” says Molnar. Red Hills Lake County isn’t the only Northern California wine region that’s still under the radar, though. Here are two more areas that overdeliver on their reputation—as well as price.

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From left: Partners Arpad Molnar, Peter Molnar, Michael Terrien—and Scooter—of Obsidian Ridge, on boulders in their new Eli’s Block that give the original vineyard its name.


love napa’s mountain cabs? try...

1

Red Hills lake county, ca

With the majority of vineyard elevations above 2,000 feet, Red Hills— on the south side of Clear Lake— offers optimal mountain conditions for standout Cabs. Large shifts between daytime and nighttime temperatures allow the grapes to retain their acidity, so vintners can let them hang on the vine longer. More exposure to UV light creates thicker skins, resulting in bold flavors, aromatics, and color.

3 great bottles Obsidian Ridge 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon (Red Hills Lake County; $30). Stony underpinnings, vibrant blackberry and mint, and firm tannins.

Robledo 2010 “El Rey” Cabernet Sauvignon (Red Hills Lake County; $40). Juicy mixed berries and black cherries with floral notes, dark chocolate, and chewy tannins.

Steele 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon

LEFT: DAVID FENTON; BOTTLES: JEFFERY CROSS; LODI: SUPERSTOCK/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

(Red Hills Lake County; $26). Intense black fruit seasoned with pepper, in lively, grippy balance.

love sonoma’s old-vine zinfandels? try …

2 Lodi northern california 3 great bottles Concrete 2012 Old Vine Zinfandel (Lodi; $20). Luscious plum and berry fruit spiked with pepper; mouth-filling textures.

Respect has eluded Lodi, largely because of the misconception that it’s a blazing hot place. But in fact, the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, just to the west, provides breezes that bring down nighttime temps, giving wine an appealing combination of ripe fruit and freshness. Increasingly, this balance is showing up in wines from Lodi’s historic Zinfandel vineyards, many of which date back to the late 1800s. These vineyards are now producing deeply flavored wines in a range of styles, from medium-bodied to powerful.

Harney Lane 2013 Zinfandel (Lodi; $24). Inky, with gorgeous briary berries, mocha, and spice.

Stellina 2012 Estate Old Vine Zinfandel (Lodi; $32). Lighter-styled, with elegant red fruit and lovely balance.

love west sonoma’s pinot noirs? try …

Valley 3 Anderson mendocino, ca 3 great bottles Balo Vineyards 2013 Pinot Noir (Anderson Valley; $45). Generous mixed berry fruit, hints of violets, and supple, silky textures.

Trust the French to know a little about growing Pinot Noir (one of the main grapes in Champagne): When Champagne house Louis Roederer launched an American sparkling wine branch, it chose Anderson Valley. The remote stretch funnels fog from the Pacific, the chilly climate nourishing a delicate, nuanced style of Pinot. Bottles here start under $40, a relative value compared to West Sonoma. But this is a last-chance deal—prices are on the move.

FEL 2014 Pinot Noir (Anderson Valley; $38). Aromatic with mint, cherry, coriander, and earthy mushroom notes.

Navarro 2014 Pinot Noir (Anderson Valley; $35). Perfumed with florals, red fruit (strawberry, cranberry), and spice. SUNSET

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April showers bring May flowers—and shrubs, and ornamental grasses, and every other plant in the Sunset Western Garden Collection (sunsetwesterngarden collection.com ). We’re prepping for our spring planting extravaganza in the upcoming April issue, so to one lucky reader we’re giving away $1,000 worth of SWGC plants that have been custom-selected for that reader’s specific Sunset climate zone. Whether you live in the mountains of Colorado, the deserts of Arizona, coastal Oregon, or elsewhere in the West, a Sunset Western Garden Collection representative will work with you to tailor a new look for your yard. For more details on this Facebook contest, visit sunset. com/plantcontest—and stay tuned for our gardenlovers’ guide next month.

Next month’s front-yard makeover, featuring ‘Amistad’ salvia and (at bottom) Purple Pixie loropetalum from the Sunset Western Garden Collection.

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