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Milton Keynes University Hospital

Spring 2016

NHS Foundation Trust

up the check

The latest news from your hospital

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Take me. Read me. Share me. 04 Meet the volunteer

06 Long service awards

09 Celebrating our nurses and midwives


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In this issue... A warm welcome 04

The lighter nights and warmer weather are finally here and we leave behind a busy winter for the hospital and enter a very busy spring and summer! This edition of The Checkup is a real celebration of our wonderful staff as well as the services and facilities we are developing on the hospital site. The past two months have seen us celebrate long service with those staff who have worked at the hospital for 25 years or more. Such dedication to the hospital and the community we serve is really something to be proud of. You can spot those staff who have been with us for more than 25 years as they have special silver badges, with gold badges for those with more than 30 years’ service. We have also celebrated International Nurses’ Day and International Midwife Day. We held a fantastic bake-off style cake competition, with some fantastic entries from staff across the hospital. The cakes were enjoyed at a special afternoon tea celebration for nursing and midwifery staff. Spring also sees the start of some exciting building and development projects at the hospital, including a new main entrance. The new main entrance, which will be at the existing outpatients’ entrance (entrance six opposite the multi-storey car park) will provide a welcoming space with reception area, shops and refreshment facilities. Detailed plans are currently being drawn up and I look forward to sharing these with you in the near future.

Welcome

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CarersMK

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New ‘Bridging Clinic’

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How art is improving our hospital

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Meet the volunteer

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Introducing the Governers

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Muttley on patrol!

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Long service awards

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Introducing our Chief Nurse

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Celebrating our amazing nurses and midwives

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Milton Keynes Hospital Charity

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What our patients say

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Puzzle page

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Over the past few months the demand on the hospital’s emergency department has been phenomenal and we have seen some of the busiest days we have ever experienced. We are really fortunate to have great involvement in and support for the hospital from our local community. In early June we have been highlighting the work of our wonderful volunteers, who support staff and patients across the hospital. We are also heading towards elections for staff and public governors from our foundation trust membership. If you would like to find out more about becoming a member or standing for election as a governor, please do visit our website. I hope you enjoy this edition of The Checkup and if you have ideas for future features, comments or suggestions, please do let me know. With kind regards,

Chief Executive of Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

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Meet the Editorial Team

Nicola Dowlen

Jacob Prichard

Rachael Stirling

Role Communications Manager

Role Communications Manager

Role Communications Officer

Contact nicola.dowlen@mkuh.nhs.uk

Contact jacob.prichard@mkuh.nhs.uk

Contact rachael.stirling@mkuh.nhs.uk

Background Spent years doing public relations and stakeholder engagement before joining the NHS to do something worthwhile.

Background Recent Business Management graduate looking to progress in a career in marketing, design and communications.

Background Recent Art and Design graduate who has a passion for photography.

Fun fact Owns a horse called Titch!

Fun fact Has completed his Bronze and Silver Duke of Edinburgh awards with the Gold within touching distance.

Fun fact Once sung at the Royal Albert Hall!


The Check Up

The latest news from your hospital

Dedicated to supporting Milton Keynes’ unpaid workers There are over 23,500 carers living in Milton Keynes and every year more than 4,000 people in the area become a carer for the first time. Carers MK are a charity which delivers support and advice to unpaid carers in Milton Keynes who are providing care to a family member or friend; and due to illness, frailty or a disability, are unable to cope without their support.

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Spring 2016

How the use of art is helping to improve our hospital Arts for Health is an independent charity based here at Milton Keynes University Hospital. The aim of the charity is to use art to improve the health and wellbeing of the residents of Milton Keynes.

Over the past year, Carers MK has implemented some exciting services including a carers’ support service based at our hospital, which enables their support team to reach out to identify new carers, many of whom may not recognise themselves as a carer. The charity is also working closely with GP practices in MK, and has recently launched the Milton Keynes’ Investors in Carers GP Standard, which will recognise GP practices that are making good progress in their support of Carers. Another exciting development is the launch of Carers MK’s first Carers Discount Card for carers in Milton Keynes. The Carers Discount Card gives carers a range of great discounts across a number of local businesses including Lloyds Pharmacy and Haven Holidays. To find out more about the Carers Discount Card, visit www.carersmiltonkeynes.org.

New ‘Bridging Clinic’ for patients We are now running a new service to see patients who are taking blood-thinning medication, such as Warfarin, and assess their needs before they come to the hospital for surgery or a minor procedure. Deputy Chief Pharmacist, Jill McDonnald said, ‘We hope to see every patient who is taking blood-thinning meds so we can prescribe and supply the right type and levels of medication they need for an operation well before they are due to come in for surgery. It’s a sort of ‘bridge’ for patients that links the medicines they normally take and the medicine regime they will need in hospital’. The clinic is working in partnership with hospital consultants, GP surgeries and district and community nursing teams to ensure that all patients are referred to the new service. Led by a prescribing Pharmacist and supported by two specialist nurses, the clinics will be held in the hospital’s outpatient’s department on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. The clinic will run as a six-month pilot and if it proves effective, we aim to provide this service to our patients on a permanent basis. If you would like more information about this service, please contact bridging.clinic@mkuh.nhs.uk or call 07891 020 369.

A large part of their work is based around the role that art can play in enhancing the health care environment of the hospital. Hospitals are often very stressful places to be admitted to, to visit and to work in. They are unique environments, eliciting strong feelings and reactions ranging from nerve wracking to frightening and exciting to boring. Art in a hospital provides an opportunity to be distracted, soothed, cheered and engaged. The Art Collection at the hospital is the largest permanent art collection in Milton Keynes with approximately 400 artworks. It has a strong local element, comprising work that has been commissioned for various occasions from the very beginning of the building of the new town in the 1970’s. The collection is displayed in the hospital corridors, waiting rooms and consultation rooms. Current temporary exhibitions in the hospital include Recent Works by Gabrielle Radiguet, a series of paintings and prints which celebrate the awe and wonder of the English landscape displayed on the level 2 corridor and I Love Milton Keynes – an exhibition by local photographers showing hidden and surprising views of Milton Keynes. The other aspect of Arts for Health’s work focuses on improving health and wellbeing through doing art. They currently run art workshops for people who experience stress, anxiety or depression, people with dementia and their carers and also people who have had a stroke. Through these workshops, it is shown that doing art helps to build confidence, distracts people from their problems and enables participants to develop new skills. An exhibition from one of the art workshops can be seen in the Eaglestone Restaurant Please get in touch if you would like more information or know anyone who might benefit from coming along to workshops. It is also always wonderful to hear what you think of the artwork in the hospital. If you have any comments or suggestions, please email info@artsforhealthmk.org.uk or call the office on 01908 996 124.


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Introducing the Governors! Next year we will be celebrating 10 years since the hospital achieved Foundation Trust (FT) status in 2007.

Unsung heroes of the hospital

Meet the volunteer Meet Maggie Fraser – Maggie recently started volunteering in an administrative support role for the Diabetes Service team and they are incredibly grateful for the help she provides. Kelly Hodgson, Diabetes Advanced Nurse Practitioner, had this to say about Maggie: “Maggie Fraser is our volunteer for the diabetes inpatient service. Maggie started working with us one day a week several weeks ago now but before this we have never had any admin support directly. I feel that she is a fantastic addition to the team! “Maggie is professional, willing, reliable and always happy to help. Maggie has helped organise our filing, assisted with the stocktake for our new foot clinic, ferried dressings back and forth and helped unpack equipment. She has also provided admin support to one of our diabetes secretary’s when she has been snowed under. I am really pleased to have Maggie working with us and she is a delight to work with.” Voluntary Services currently has 164 volunteers across the Trust, helping out on many wards and departments. Maureen Packard, Voluntary Services Assistant, said “We are always looking for more volunteers, especially to help out on the wards. Whilst we continue to recruit each month, we also have volunteers who leave us, often to take up employment with the NHS. Working in my role is particularly rewarding as I can see the positive difference volunteering has on both the volunteers, patients and the staff they volunteer alongside.” If you are interested in volunteering in the hospital, please call 01908 996 059. Alternatively, if your department within the hospital would like the support that a volunteer can offer, please call 01908 996 060.

All FTs are required to have a Council of Governors. In Milton Keynes we have publically elected Governors, staff Governors and appointed Governors from stakeholder groups. It is a legal requirement that publically elected Governors must always be in the majority for any decision taken by the Council to be legally binding. The Council of Governors acts as an essential link between the public membership of the hospital, and the Trust Board. It promotes active membership, represents local views and stands as a ‘critical friend’ to the trust. The legal responsibilities of the Council include holding the Board to account for the performance of the hospital and appointing the Chair and Non-Executives of the Trust. It is also required to approve the appointment of the Chief Executive. Lesley Bell has been a Governor since the hospital became a Foundation Trust, and has been lead Governor for the past two years. “Governors aim to give people who use the hospital and the general public of Milton Keynes a bigger say in its running,” says Lesley. “It’s rewarding to be involved with the hospital and to feel that we can contribute to making a difference. Everybody wants their local hospital to be the best it can be. Our Governors and members help to make the hospital a successful trust by ensuring that we meet the needs and expectations of our patients, their family and friends. We do that through partnership working and maintaining NHS values and principles.” There are no specific qualifications required for the role of Governor, apart from a passion for ensuring that the services the hospital provides are the best they can be and a commitment to the NHS.

ensure the hospital achieves its objectives. As Governors, we’re not here to get too involved in the details but assess the bigger picture of where we want to be.” Our Governors all come from diverse backgrounds, bringing a wealth of experience and viewpoints. Lesley has an extensive career in social services nationally behind her whereas others have business, engineering and nursing backgrounds, to name but a few. Several Governors also have disabilities. “Just learning about some of the difficulties they encounter has been an eye-opener. It makes you look at things in a different way. As one of our Governors said to me - if we as a hospital can get it right for people with disabilities, we get it right for everyone.’ The Council meets every six weeks in public and in addition there are regular informal meetings with the Baroness Wall. An Annual Members’ Meeting is held in September when the Annual Report is presented. In addition, Governors are represented on a number of committees and participate in reviews and inspections (e.g. PLACE and 15 Steps). Lesley adds, “It’s a very exciting time to be a Governor here at Milton Keynes. There is so much happening – including the development of a new main entrance, the building of an academic centre, the future cancer unit and a growing portfolio of research.” Anyone can attend the formal Council of Governors meetings and anyone over the age of 18 can become a member of the Trust. For more information, please see the members section of our website or email membership@mkuh.nhs.uk.

Lesley was involved in the appointment of Baroness Margaret Wall as the hospital’s Chair. “Margaret has made a real difference since she joined us two years ago. We were very lucky to get her as she has previous experience as Chair of a hospital and has many years of working within the NHS. She offers great guidance and is very supportive. It’s also very rewarding working with the non-executive directors to

Lesley Bell and Baroness Margaret Wall


The Check Up

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Spring 2016

Muttley on patrol! A two year old Harris Hawk called Muttley is tackling the hospital’s nuisance pigeon problem the only way he knows how – with some magnificent acrobatics and a serious pair of talons! The beauty of Muttley’s approach is that he doesn’t kill the birds to get rid of them because the mere presence of a top-flight predator is enough to persuade them to move on. Working with Ecolab, Falconer Martin Smith, who has trained Muttley since he was a hatchling of twenty weeks, says the essence of their work is simply prevention. “Muttley frightens the pigeons and disrupts them from roosting and nesting. Because he’s flying around the site regularly for a couple of hours each week, with eyesight nine times more powerful than humans, he’s pretty effective at spotting them and keeping them away”. Pigeons breed all year and the damage their droppings can cause to the hospital’s buildings is considerable. A particular favourite roosting spot has proved to be the multi-story car park which brings additional problems. “As the droppings are acidic” says Martin, “they cause a lot of corrosive damage not only to the building, but they also eat into car paintwork”. “But the biggest problem is that pigeons can carry a range of diseases, some of which may be transmitted to humans. These include Histoplasmosis, Candidiasis and Salmonellosis. Muttley’s helping prevent contamination from nests or mess on the ground getting into the hospital.”

Perhaps the most effective manoeuvre that Muttley performs is to sit very still in the girders of the multi-story and suddenly take off to skim over the cars – from one end of the car park to the other. “Sometimes you can see the sheer surprise and wonder as people see him fly over their car. I get tremendous satisfaction when they then come over to say hello and see him up close – and to ask why there’s a hawk with a wingspan of 120cm/45inches diving through the car park!” The bond between Martin and Muttley has taken time and perseverance to reach the point they now work together as a highly effective team. “You have to remember Muttley is a wild bird even with our training or ‘manning’. He’s likely to live up to about 15 to 25 years, which is around twice as long as his life expectancy would be in the wild. You need to gain his trust from as early an age as possible. I’ve spent hours and hours with him teaching basic tasks like sitting on my arm, jumping up onto a perch to build up his muscles and of course learning to trust me and to rely on me for his food. You basically

need to befriend him and I get a great deal of pleasure from doing it.” “Although Muttley won’t do anything without the promise of food, he’s incredibly intelligent and cheeky enough to try and help himself to some scraps if he thinks I’m not looking!” Martin became a Falconer after working in the Royal Air Force and then running his own businesses for over 30 years, so the move to work with birds of prey was a radical change of direction. “I wanted to do something completely different. Every bird is different and we have half a dozen hawks and falcons that we take to show schoolchildren or to exhibitions and show people just how beautiful these creatures are. Muttley’s still a young bird, he’s really smart and I’m enjoying seeing him develop. And to be perfectly frank, I just love working outdoors in the fresh air and being with the birds”. Muttley and Martin’s next assignment was looking at ‘bird proofing’ the Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-on-Avon, but that won’t stop him patrolling the hospital – like a hawk!


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Long service awards It was the people of Milton Keynes’ campaign ‘Milton Keynes is Dying for a Hospital’ which helped get this hospital built in 1984, and it has been the people here on site that has helped it go from strength to strength in the subsequent years. Hundreds of thousands of patients have come through our doors during that time but some of our staff have been ever-present, helping to provide the experience and continuity that has meant we can continually improve the care we provide.

Over 120 clinical and non-clinical staff attended afternoon tea and then a special ceremony, where we looked back at how the hospital has changed over the years and recognised their contributions with a commemorative certificate and badge.

We celebrated the amazing achievements of staff who have worked for the trust for 25 years or more at the Long Service Wards earlier this spring.

We would like to say a huge thank you to each and every one of the individuals for their continued support and loyalty towards the hospital. Such events are a fantastic occasion to mark and we look forward to many similar celebrations in the future.


The Check Up

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Spring 2016

Introducing our Chief Nurse In light of International Nurses Day, we thought that we would catch-up with our Chief Nurse Lisa Knight to find out a bit more about her role and what inspired her to pursue a career in nursing.

What did you enjoy most about your training? Undoubtedly my favourite allocation was working in the Emergency Department (ED) and actually that was what I wanted to do when I qualified. When I managed ED, although clinically I didn’t work in the department, I just loved the variety, the pace and learning lots of new things. I trained 30 years ago this summer and I’ve stayed in contact with a lot of my friends from my training. Keeping those friends is probably one of the best things about my life – I definitely have made friends for life. I am just in the process of arranging our 30 year reunion!

Who inspired you at different points in your career and for what reasons? As a student I was inspired by a Sister called Jerry Watts who was the Sister in the ED. I still think about her now as the outstanding nurse that I worked with as a student. She was calm, funny, always in control and really looked after me. She was my inspiration as a student to go on and become a Sister. There was one other nurse who inspired me as well. I worked as an Interim Deputy Chief Nurse in Epsom and St Helier working for a Chief Nurse called Pippa Heart who’s now a Senior Nurse for NHS England. Pippa was always the voice of reason, took things very calmly, weighed things up and always took a measured view on things. I suppose she is what I would like to be like. She was the person who inspired me to go on to be a Chief Nurse.

What would your advice be to newly qualified nurses now? My advice to a newly qualified staff nurse now would be to get a really good grounding in the basics such as medicine or surgery. The other thing I would say is pick a team that you really love being with because nursing is a team sport, so you have to be really comfortable with the quality of the nurses around you, particularly your ward sister. The best way you can grow is to grow as a team. You learn things individually but you need to have a team around that will support you, look after you and make sure you get the right teaching, training and education.

For the staff out there wanting to get into leadership positions, what have you learned that you could share? I never really planned any leadership position changes; I always went into a role to do my best. I think people will spot you if you do a brilliant job in the role that you are in. The most important thing to do is concentrate on the role you’re in now, develop yourself to be the best you can possibly be and when you think you’ve got to a position, then you can look outwards and see what other opportunities there are for you.

What do you think are the biggest political challenges to nursing currently? I think there are several. We know there is a shortage of about 25,000 nurses in the UK and I think politically there is a desire to fill the posts at any cost. However budgets are always reducing which is a huge challenge for the nursing profession. Also in light of the Junior Doctors strike, the issue of pay in the NHS has also become a concern to people and the reality is nurses haven’t had big pay rises over the last few years along with a lot of other colleagues in the NHS. I think pay is going to continue to be an ongoing political challenge for us going forward.

How can you see technology helping nurses in the future? We are heading into a very exciting time. We’re in the process of developing our Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system and nursing documentation is going to be at the heart of that. This year we bought all the observation machines that everyone is currently using that will talk to our EPR system when it arrives. This could be very exciting for us for identifying deteriorating patients and helping us to map out their care. I think the one thing that nurses have to remember is that technology is not a replacement for care so making sure we still provide compassionate care, getting hands on with the patient and seeing how they feel are vital components to nursing. It is the heart of nursing and it shouldn’t be forgotten.

Where do you think the future of nursing will be in the next 5-10 years? I think there are going to be some exciting changes. One of the things we know we’ve got to do is to significantly train more nurses to fill the care gaps. We are already looking at different ways of training nurses and I think the old model can’t stay. I think there will be apprenticeships for people throughout their lives that will bring them into a nursing career that they will dip in and out of. We know we can’t provide enough GPs nationally and I think there’s a massive opportunity for nurses to step in to those gaps, particularly in primary care. I personally try never to see my GP unless I have to; I always go and see the nurse. I get absolutely brilliant care and I think it’s a better way of taking things forward. I think the future of nursing in the next 5-10 years is going to be about the shift from nursing out of acute hospitals into primary care and into the community.

What’s your favourite shop? Stanfords Bookshop in Covent Garden. Stanfords is a travel book shop full of maps and travel books. Three storeys of complete heaven!

Where’s your favourite holiday destination? My favourite thing to do on holiday is go on safari so probably Uganda. You can do a traditional safari in the East African savannah; on the west side you can track chimpanzees in the forest and mountain gorillas on the border with Rwanda. One of the most interesting things I have ever done.

If you could have any animal, what would it be and why? I already have the ultimate pet – my cat Biscuit. He is a bit of an old man now at 20 but I have had Biscuit longer than I have been with my husband!


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Every day our nurses and midwives go the extra mile for our patients. To celebrate and thank every single one MKUH’s nursing and midwifery staff members, we have marked both International Midwife Day (5 May) and International Nurses Day (12 May) with special events and social media campaigns.


The Check Up

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Spring 2016

“It’s a privilege to be a midwife and to be part of an amazing journey.”

Celebrating our amazing nurses and midwives

International Midwife Day Our midwives help to deliver nearly 5,000 babies each year at the hospital, playing an intimate and joyous part in a family’s history. To help celebrate, we asked some of our midwives why they became a midwife and what makes a good midwife. Consultant midwife, Carolyn Rooth, said: “A good midwife needs to be able to look at the woman as a whole, balancing the science and the art of midwifery to deliver great care. They also need to be good at building relationships in a short space of time, which allows for each woman to have an individual experience – tailored to them and their needs. “It’s a privilege to be a midwife and to be part of an amazing journey.” Our first baby born on International Midwife Day was Alfie who was born at 04:49 weighing 7lbs 15oz to mum Tori. Tori and Alfie left MKUH later that day with the baby clothes cake which was made especially for the first born baby.

International Nurses Day International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world every May 12, the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth. Here at the hospital, we celebrated the day with a special Bake-Off competition for all staff to take part along with a social media campaign. Over 20 staff members entered cakes into the Bake-Off Competition and the winner was our sexual health team with their cake ‘Sexual Health – Past, Present and Future’. In second place was Becky Twilley and Stacey Ackerman with ‘The Changing Faces of Time’ and third was Sue McBirney with ‘Nursing is not a piece of cake’. Our staff nurse Jeannie kicked off our social campaign commenting that she became a nurse because she has a ‘great passion to care for patients’. And clearly her passion is appreciated by many who have received her care with several people describing her as an ‘amazing nurse.’

Florence Nightingale (1820 -1910) Florence was born in 1820 to a wealthy upper class family. She came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during the Crimean War, where she organised the tending to wounded soldiers. She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of ‘The Lady with the Lamp’ making rounds of wounded soldiers at night. After the war, Florence Nightingale returned to the UK and in 1860, laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of her nursing school at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. It was the first secular nursing school in the world, now part of King’s College London. The Nightingale Pledge, named in her honour, is still taken today by new nurses. Florence is also credited with making hospitals cleaner places which, alongside trained nurses, helped more of the sick recover.


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Hello from Milton Keynes Hospital Charity The charity’s fundraising team has had a busy few months raising money for all of the wards and departments at the hospital. Read what they have been up to here.

Recycle your old clothes! Did you know we have a clothes bank here at the hospital? We accept any adult’s and children’s clothing, shoes and handbags. Our clothes bank is located just opposite our multi-storey car park and all the proceeds go to Milton Keynes Hospital Charity. Wear it Blue Day We held our annual Wear it Blue event in aid of Leo’s Appeal which supports our children’s ward. This year’s event had various participants with over nine organisations signed up including ID Medical, Santander, Cineworld Milton

Keynes, Safari MK, Dentons, Greenleys First School, and Howe Park First School. Keep up to date on our Facebook page and find out how much we raised on the day! Curry Night We held the first series of our food nights at Mastee Restaurant & Bar which was a great night in aid of Leo’s Appeal. With about 50 guests we had a fun night, great food and raised £600 to help enhance care on our children’s ward. Keep an eye out for any upcoming events and food nights.

We need your donations! You can support us in the following ways: • Cash • Cheque – made payable to Milton Keynes Hospital • Online – visit www.justgiving.com/ mkhcharity • Over the phone – call 01908 996220 • Text - MKHC20 £3 to 70070 If you’re thinking of supporting us we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch if you’d like to raise money for a particular item, or for a ward that is close to your heart. We can provide information and advice on how to get your activity started, then what to do once it’s up and running.


The Check Up

Pharmacy Team

I want to express my deep gratitude to the staff in your Pharmacy who provided compassionate care for my Father. All of the staff members I met were very understanding Ravi Chal, Martin Cusick and Abbey Skillington - and went out of their way to help my father at a difficult time.

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Spring 2016

Dr Aturia and theatres team

I wanted to say thank you to Dr Aturia, her theatre team, and DSU nurses (who I cannot remember all the names) for looking after me very well when I had radiofrequency injections. I cannot fault her care and attention that she has given me over this time, the professionalism of the nursing and theatre staff that were all involved in my care. I feel that she has given me a new lease of life and being pain free for the first time in a long time.

What patients say

Urology Department

I brought my mother in for a cystoscopy to the endoscopy unit. The experience was fairly daunting for a lady of her mature years. However, the staff were all so kind and caring and helpful from reception to the consultant and all in between. She said that although she won’t be asking for a repeat session, it was made much easier by the staff that looked after her.

We get so many amazing compliments from our patients that we thought we would share some of our favourites with you!

DoCC

Staff could not have done more and the dignity afforded to our late father and us was excellent. Milton Keynes Hospital really gets this right. Thank you all.

Colposcopy Department

Everyone in this department are some of the loveliest people you will meet. From appointments, the nurses and all who are with you throughout your treatment they are so kind and genuine and a credit to our high standards of professionalism in the medical industry. Thank you for making me feel at ease and for such fabulous care.

Neonatal and Ward 10

Every single staff member that I encountered from the cleaning and support staff to the nurses and consultants showed care, kindness and empathy that went far above professional dedication. When I was unable to be with my daughter at the most vulnerable time of her life, your staff gave her the love and care that I was unable to and for this I shall forever be grateful. I am not going to pick out individual staff for praise as they were all wonderful but there are many individuals whose names and kindness I will never forget.

A&E and Fracture Clinic

After falling down the stairs, I had to attend the A&E department. The receptionists were kind and caring, especially when I said my close friend had recently died. In addition, nurses Ashley and Sharon were so caring and kind. I also had to attend the fracture clinic and was greeted by one of your volunteers. Again your staff were very friendly and kind. I cannot thank your staff enough for the excellent care given to me.

Hugh Robinson

Hugh is a tremendous help to the imaging department and has given us a lot of assistance since the closure of the main entrance near to main x-ray and assisting with directions for the patients and visitors. He does a fantastic job as a patient advocate and collates information to improve our services for patients and visitors.

Danielle Loftus

Danielle, patient tracker for ED, is fabulous at her role. She is always on top of everything, nothing is too much for her, she always wears a lovely smile, and is efficient and organised.

Paediatric A&E

I would like to take the time to praise the staff in A&E. My nephew broke his leg and was seen very quickly, the care and compassion that was given to my family was outstanding. I would particularly like to thank Dr May and Sarah (Nurse) for their professionalism and also their kind words.

Ward 3

To the entire medical, nursing and other MDT on Ward 3. Your kindness, care, respect and hard work has been noted with much gratitude beyond a simple ‘thank you’. As a nurse myself, I had the opportunity to see the hospital, patients and the care we render tirelessly in another dimension. Well done all – my family appreciate you all!

The Check Up - Spring 2016 - Issue 3  
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