Page 1

Milton Keynes University Hospital

Autumn 2015

NHS Foundation Trust

up the check

03 Meet our Chief Executive

07 Focus on education

The latest news from your hospital

02

06

09

12 Win a session at a golf simulator


02

The Check Up

A warm welcome

As it’s the first issue, we thought it best to start with our Chief Executive Joe Harrison. We get to know a little more about the man himself and what his vision is for our hospital.

06

The aim of ‘the check up’ is threefold – to entertain, educate and inspire you with a diverse range of articles about our hospital, the amazing staff that work here and the experiences of the patients we treat. Whether you are reading this while waiting for your appointment, on your break or sat at your desk, I hope you will find something to enjoy. Many of you probably know that there is a lot happening here at the hospital as we continue to grow and develop to serve the people of Milton Keynes. Our aim is, of course, to provide the best quality care to everyone in the town.

We’d love to know what you think of ‘the check up’ and of any ideas for future articles, so don’t hesitate to contact the Communications team. Enjoy the first issue! With sincere best wishes Baroness Margaret Wall of New Barnet Chairman of Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

08

Welcome

02

Meet the chief

03

A time for change

04

A quick cuppa with...

05

A patient’s story

05

Milton Keynes Hospital charity

06 07/08

Focus on education A decade of making a difference

09

Work experience at MKUH

10

What patients say

11

Competition time

12

To do that, we do our best to ensure that we have some of the most dedicated and experienced staff. It is the people who work here that make Milton Keynes Hospital a truly inspiring place. You can read about some of them inside, from our ambitious young doctors, nurses and midwives, to specialists who do their utmost to ensure that every patient and visitor has a positive experience.

Autumn 2015

Meet the chief

In this issue...

It gives me enormous pleasure to introduce the first edition of our hospital newspaper.

03

Alison Marlow

Jacob Prichard

• Acting Head of Communications and Fundraising

• Communications Officer

• alison.marlow@mkhospital.nhs.uk

• Recent Business Management graduate looking to progress in a career in marketing, design and communications

• Fun fact: Owns a sock-stealing dog called Melba

I started as a medical records clerk in London back in 1988, and that really did give me an insight into how an organisation runs! From there – and I don’t disclose this often – I went and trained in finance for a couple of years before I saw the light and moved into operations management. I spent 20 years in London in acute hospitals, everything from small district generals to big organisations like Barts and the London and UCLH where I was a director. Then I moved out to Bedford as chief executive in 2011 before coming to MK in February 2013.

Meet the Editorial Team

• Background: Many years’ experience in journalism, copywriting, editing, press and public relations

Hello Joe. Have you always been in healthcare or have you come from another industry?

• jacob.prichard@mkhospital.nhs.uk

• Fun fact: As a youngster played county football for Bucks, Beds and Herts, including 2 years in the MK Dons academy

Huge thanks to Peter Handford, without whose invaluable contribution this newspaper would not have been possible.

So how would you characterise your style of leadership? Having started as a medical records clerk and worked my way through an organisation, you really get to see all the internal mechanics of how hospitals work. My experience of dealing with managers and clinicians is that I have always been much more respectful of those who listen to their teams and listen to people,

whoever they are and whatever they do in the hospital, because they have just as many bright ideas as people who sit in offices all day.

“We’ve done some great things here over the last few years, and there is more we can do to make the hospital even better. Improving the hospital never stops and we will continue to make it better for the people of Milton Keynes and beyond.”

I’ve got just over 3000 people in this organisation who I believe have great ideas about how to make this a better place to look after patients and a better place to work. So if someone wants to come up to me in the restaurant and say “I’ve got a great idea” and I have a style that is standoff-ish, they are not going to do that. If they feel happy to talk to me, other directors or their managers about their ideas then we have a much better chance of capturing and acting upon these suggestions. I also think it makes it a nicer place to work! Why wouldn’t a chief executive say hello to everyone in the organisation? I find chief execs who take a very authoritarian style one that I can’t agree with.

Are there any key people or managers you’ve had that have inspired you? One of my first managers said ‘I live by three things: do what is safe, do what is legal and do what is right’, and if you follow those three then you won’t go far wrong.


02

The Check Up

A warm welcome

As it’s the first issue, we thought it best to start with our Chief Executive Joe Harrison. We get to know a little more about the man himself and what his vision is for our hospital.

06

The aim of ‘the check up’ is threefold – to entertain, educate and inspire you with a diverse range of articles about our hospital, the amazing staff that work here and the experiences of the patients we treat. Whether you are reading this while waiting for your appointment, on your break or sat at your desk, I hope you will find something to enjoy. Many of you probably know that there is a lot happening here at the hospital as we continue to grow and develop to serve the people of Milton Keynes. Our aim is, of course, to provide the best quality care to everyone in the town.

We’d love to know what you think of ‘the check up’ and of any ideas for future articles, so don’t hesitate to contact the Communications team. Enjoy the first issue! With sincere best wishes Baroness Margaret Wall of New Barnet Chairman of Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

08

Welcome

02

Meet the chief

03

A time for change

04

A quick cuppa with...

05

A patient’s story

05

Milton Keynes Hospital charity

06 07/08

Focus on education A decade of making a difference

09

Work experience at MKUH

10

What patients say

11

Competition time

12

To do that, we do our best to ensure that we have some of the most dedicated and experienced staff. It is the people who work here that make Milton Keynes Hospital a truly inspiring place. You can read about some of them inside, from our ambitious young doctors, nurses and midwives, to specialists who do their utmost to ensure that every patient and visitor has a positive experience.

Autumn 2015

Meet the chief

In this issue...

It gives me enormous pleasure to introduce the first edition of our hospital newspaper.

03

Alison Marlow

Jacob Prichard

• Acting Head of Communications and Fundraising

• Communications Officer

• alison.marlow@mkhospital.nhs.uk

• Recent Business Management graduate looking to progress in a career in marketing, design and communications

• Fun fact: Owns a sock-stealing dog called Melba

I started as a medical records clerk in London back in 1988, and that really did give me an insight into how an organisation runs! From there – and I don’t disclose this often – I went and trained in finance for a couple of years before I saw the light and moved into operations management. I spent 20 years in London in acute hospitals, everything from small district generals to big organisations like Barts and the London and UCLH where I was a director. Then I moved out to Bedford as chief executive in 2011 before coming to MK in February 2013.

Meet the Editorial Team

• Background: Many years’ experience in journalism, copywriting, editing, press and public relations

Hello Joe. Have you always been in healthcare or have you come from another industry?

• jacob.prichard@mkhospital.nhs.uk

• Fun fact: As a youngster played county football for Bucks, Beds and Herts, including 2 years in the MK Dons academy

Huge thanks to Peter Handford, without whose invaluable contribution this newspaper would not have been possible.

So how would you characterise your style of leadership? Having started as a medical records clerk and worked my way through an organisation, you really get to see all the internal mechanics of how hospitals work. My experience of dealing with managers and clinicians is that I have always been much more respectful of those who listen to their teams and listen to people,

whoever they are and whatever they do in the hospital, because they have just as many bright ideas as people who sit in offices all day.

“We’ve done some great things here over the last few years, and there is more we can do to make the hospital even better. Improving the hospital never stops and we will continue to make it better for the people of Milton Keynes and beyond.”

I’ve got just over 3000 people in this organisation who I believe have great ideas about how to make this a better place to look after patients and a better place to work. So if someone wants to come up to me in the restaurant and say “I’ve got a great idea” and I have a style that is standoff-ish, they are not going to do that. If they feel happy to talk to me, other directors or their managers about their ideas then we have a much better chance of capturing and acting upon these suggestions. I also think it makes it a nicer place to work! Why wouldn’t a chief executive say hello to everyone in the organisation? I find chief execs who take a very authoritarian style one that I can’t agree with.

Are there any key people or managers you’ve had that have inspired you? One of my first managers said ‘I live by three things: do what is safe, do what is legal and do what is right’, and if you follow those three then you won’t go far wrong.


04

The Check Up

Meet the chief

A time for change

A series of building works are happening over the next few years to improve the hospital for now and tomorrow. New main entrance We will be building a modern, welcoming space in front of the outpatients department, with a wide range of conveniences. Due to open Summer 2016.

Academic centre A co-venture with the University of Buckingham to train the doctors of tomorrow. Due to open Spring 2017.

Common front door Which will bring urgent and emergency care together under one roof. Due to open in 2019.

Car Park We are also working to increase car park spaces, firstly by adding an extra floor to the existing multi-storey and secondly by building a new multi-storey car park.

The academic centre

What are you hoping to achieve here in your time as chief executive? Three things: I want people living in Milton Keynes to see this hospital as the place they come to when they need hospital care. For the staff of the hospital, I want people to be able to say with pride that they work at Milton Keynes University Hospital. We are very British and don’t often shout when things are good, I want to work somewhere where we do recognise when things are good and be proud of being excellent. Lastly, I want us to provide excellent healthcare for our patients not just for today but for tomorrow as well. We need to get things right today and make sure they are sustainable for tomorrow.

What do you see as the biggest challenges facing the hospital in the next few years and how do you plan to address them? I think everyone is expecting me to say money and I am not going to do that! That’s a problem that every single hospital in England faces, so I am not going to dwell on it. The first challenge is to continue to deliver the pace of change that we’ve seen in the last few years. We’ve taken some amazing steps to improve care for our patients and the challenge is making sure that everyone – including myself – maintains that energy, drive and enthusiasm for new ideas and new ways of doing things. The second is that we want to improve our patient experience here; whilst I think it is widely recognised that the clinical care has improved significantly, we still have some way to go to make sure that our patients and their families and carers are well looked after in the non-clinical aspects of the services that we provide. A good example of that is I can book a flight, a hotel and a car rental on my computer or tablet at home, but I have to sit in a queue when I phone the hospital to change an outpatient appointment because I can’t do that online. That’s not a good patient experience. I know not everyone has access to the internet, but I know that if we could allow those that do have access to do things like that online then it would free up the staff and services to better help those who can’t do it online.

05

Autumn 2015

Introducing a patient story...

...from a different perspective

Third is how we work more closely with community and social care to prevent patients from falling between organisational boundaries. Patients don’t care whether they are being looked after by a hospital, community care or social carethey just want to be looked after. We haven’t yet cracked the ability to manage patient pathways without considering organisations, and that is certainly one of our biggest challenges.

What is your vision for the hospital? Say 20 years from now… I would like to see first rate services being provided here, across the whole range of acute care. Right now we have patients who have to travel some distance to other hospitals inappropriately for their treatment and I want that to change. These services must be supported by training the doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals of tomorrow, and to have a thriving research and development (R&D) arm so that our population can access the latest techniques and medicines for the best clinical outcomes. Those three are the basis of our strategy now and in the future. Finally to help to deliver all that we need to make sure we have the right buildings and facilities to support that vision, which you will observe is already happening here at the hospital (see ‘a time for change’)

What do you want your legacy here to be? A hospital at the heart of the community, and by that I don’t only mean people choosing us for acute care, I mean at the heart of delivering health and social care within Milton Keynes. I want this to be a place where people are really fighting over job vacancies to come and work here. I want Milton Keynes Hospital to be one of those places in the NHS that is seen as innovative, exciting and a great place to work, and if we get to that it would be an amazing place for the hospital to be. It’s not about me; it’s about securing the future of really good healthcare in MK.

Any last words for our readers? We’ve done some great things here over the last few years, and there is more we can do to make the hospital even better. Improving the hospital never stops and we will continue to make it better for the people of Milton Keynes and beyond.

Our patients tell us that their experience is as important to them as the safety and effectiveness of their treatments. We collect patient feedback through things like the Friends and Family Test, and the Picker Survey. However, this only tells us so much, especially about how our youngest patients feel about their time in hospital. We want to make sure that children feel safe, cared for, and that they understand (as far as is possible) what is happening to them while they are in our care – and to tell us about it in a way that is relevant to them. As part of this, we are beginning to ask them to take photos of their time with us. It is an excellent way of seeing through a child’s eyes what is important to them.

Our first photographic patient experience is Shane’s story. Six-year -old Shane came to the hospital for an operation. He was pleased to be able to wear his own pyjamas. Shane brought his tablet with him so he could watch TV while he waited patiently, and he also played card games with his Mum. Most importantly to Shane, he was able to bring his T-Rex to hospital with him! Before the operation, the anaesthetist came to see Shane. They talked lots to him and his mum about what would happen in theatre. The anaesthetist put some special cream on his hand so that it wouldn’t hurt when the cannula was put in. When it was time for Shane’s operation, he put on his dressing gown and walked with

his mum, his nurse, and the T-Rex to the theatre. Mum was able to wait next to his bed so she could be there when Shane woke up. When Shane woke up he had a drink and something to eat. Once he had all his checks to make sure he was ok to leave, he went home a happy boy. Children’s services are going to continue this innovative way of capturing children’s experiences by doing a photographic patient story every month. They will display the images on the ward as a way of making sure they engage with their patients, and their parents and carers in a way that is relevant to them. Many thanks to Shane and his mum Natalie who kindly agreed to take photos and tell us about their experience.

A quick cuppa with... Nicola Bonwick Medical Education and Medical School Manager

So what do you do? I’m responsible for the quality assurance of medical education, which means making sure our education is happening, that it is legal and fit for purpose. I also now manage the medical school here and arrange the clinical placements of the students when they come to learn and be trained on our wards.

What does a regular working week look like for you? I start work around 8.30, checking emails, signing off study leave applications, making sure all is well in the Education centre and catching up with the team which we do at least once a week, sometimes twice. I go off to the medical school in Buckingham to work over there and once a month spend a day at the Oxford Deanery. However most of my time is spent at the office or in HR liaising with colleagues.

What’s your favourite part of your job?

Favourite shop?

The interaction with people - I enjoy working with my team and liaising with colleagues in other departments. It feels like I am making a real contribution to the organisation!

Zara.

What’s your least favourite part of the job?

The Godfather Part I

The amount of meetings! They can have a big knock on effect to my work load, especially when they are off-site in Buckingham or Oxford, which means the work can pile up pretty quickly.

The Island by Victoria Hislop.

What do you like to do when you are not in work?

Whilst watching First Dates on channel 4. I felt really sorry for a guy on there who was having zero luck with the ladies!

I like to keep fit so I go to the gym two or three times a week. I like to read, love going to the cinema and I love to shop.

Good shop. What’s your favourite film? Favourite book? Not read that one, will add it to our reading list. When was the last time you cried?

Thank you Nicola. We’ll let you get back to work now.


04

The Check Up

Meet the chief

A time for change

A series of building works are happening over the next few years to improve the hospital for now and tomorrow. New main entrance We will be building a modern, welcoming space in front of the outpatients department, with a wide range of conveniences. Due to open Summer 2016.

Academic centre A co-venture with the University of Buckingham to train the doctors of tomorrow. Due to open Spring 2017.

Common front door Which will bring urgent and emergency care together under one roof. Due to open in 2019.

Car Park We are also working to increase car park spaces, firstly by adding an extra floor to the existing multi-storey and secondly by building a new multi-storey car park.

The academic centre

What are you hoping to achieve here in your time as chief executive? Three things: I want people living in Milton Keynes to see this hospital as the place they come to when they need hospital care. For the staff of the hospital, I want people to be able to say with pride that they work at Milton Keynes University Hospital. We are very British and don’t often shout when things are good, I want to work somewhere where we do recognise when things are good and be proud of being excellent. Lastly, I want us to provide excellent healthcare for our patients not just for today but for tomorrow as well. We need to get things right today and make sure they are sustainable for tomorrow.

What do you see as the biggest challenges facing the hospital in the next few years and how do you plan to address them? I think everyone is expecting me to say money and I am not going to do that! That’s a problem that every single hospital in England faces, so I am not going to dwell on it. The first challenge is to continue to deliver the pace of change that we’ve seen in the last few years. We’ve taken some amazing steps to improve care for our patients and the challenge is making sure that everyone – including myself – maintains that energy, drive and enthusiasm for new ideas and new ways of doing things. The second is that we want to improve our patient experience here; whilst I think it is widely recognised that the clinical care has improved significantly, we still have some way to go to make sure that our patients and their families and carers are well looked after in the non-clinical aspects of the services that we provide. A good example of that is I can book a flight, a hotel and a car rental on my computer or tablet at home, but I have to sit in a queue when I phone the hospital to change an outpatient appointment because I can’t do that online. That’s not a good patient experience. I know not everyone has access to the internet, but I know that if we could allow those that do have access to do things like that online then it would free up the staff and services to better help those who can’t do it online.

05

Autumn 2015

Introducing a patient story...

...from a different perspective

Third is how we work more closely with community and social care to prevent patients from falling between organisational boundaries. Patients don’t care whether they are being looked after by a hospital, community care or social carethey just want to be looked after. We haven’t yet cracked the ability to manage patient pathways without considering organisations, and that is certainly one of our biggest challenges.

What is your vision for the hospital? Say 20 years from now… I would like to see first rate services being provided here, across the whole range of acute care. Right now we have patients who have to travel some distance to other hospitals inappropriately for their treatment and I want that to change. These services must be supported by training the doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals of tomorrow, and to have a thriving research and development (R&D) arm so that our population can access the latest techniques and medicines for the best clinical outcomes. Those three are the basis of our strategy now and in the future. Finally to help to deliver all that we need to make sure we have the right buildings and facilities to support that vision, which you will observe is already happening here at the hospital (see ‘a time for change’)

What do you want your legacy here to be? A hospital at the heart of the community, and by that I don’t only mean people choosing us for acute care, I mean at the heart of delivering health and social care within Milton Keynes. I want this to be a place where people are really fighting over job vacancies to come and work here. I want Milton Keynes Hospital to be one of those places in the NHS that is seen as innovative, exciting and a great place to work, and if we get to that it would be an amazing place for the hospital to be. It’s not about me; it’s about securing the future of really good healthcare in MK.

Any last words for our readers? We’ve done some great things here over the last few years, and there is more we can do to make the hospital even better. Improving the hospital never stops and we will continue to make it better for the people of Milton Keynes and beyond.

Our patients tell us that their experience is as important to them as the safety and effectiveness of their treatments. We collect patient feedback through things like the Friends and Family Test, and the Picker Survey. However, this only tells us so much, especially about how our youngest patients feel about their time in hospital. We want to make sure that children feel safe, cared for, and that they understand (as far as is possible) what is happening to them while they are in our care – and to tell us about it in a way that is relevant to them. As part of this, we are beginning to ask them to take photos of their time with us. It is an excellent way of seeing through a child’s eyes what is important to them.

Our first photographic patient experience is Shane’s story. Six-year -old Shane came to the hospital for an operation. He was pleased to be able to wear his own pyjamas. Shane brought his tablet with him so he could watch TV while he waited patiently, and he also played card games with his Mum. Most importantly to Shane, he was able to bring his T-Rex to hospital with him! Before the operation, the anaesthetist came to see Shane. They talked lots to him and his mum about what would happen in theatre. The anaesthetist put some special cream on his hand so that it wouldn’t hurt when the cannula was put in. When it was time for Shane’s operation, he put on his dressing gown and walked with

his mum, his nurse, and the T-Rex to the theatre. Mum was able to wait next to his bed so she could be there when Shane woke up. When Shane woke up he had a drink and something to eat. Once he had all his checks to make sure he was ok to leave, he went home a happy boy. Children’s services are going to continue this innovative way of capturing children’s experiences by doing a photographic patient story every month. They will display the images on the ward as a way of making sure they engage with their patients, and their parents and carers in a way that is relevant to them. Many thanks to Shane and his mum Natalie who kindly agreed to take photos and tell us about their experience.

A quick cuppa with... Nicola Bonwick Medical Education and Medical School Manager

So what do you do? I’m responsible for the quality assurance of medical education, which means making sure our education is happening, that it is legal and fit for purpose. I also now manage the medical school here and arrange the clinical placements of the students when they come to learn and be trained on our wards.

What does a regular working week look like for you? I start work around 8.30, checking emails, signing off study leave applications, making sure all is well in the Education centre and catching up with the team which we do at least once a week, sometimes twice. I go off to the medical school in Buckingham to work over there and once a month spend a day at the Oxford Deanery. However most of my time is spent at the office or in HR liaising with colleagues.

What’s your favourite part of your job?

Favourite shop?

The interaction with people - I enjoy working with my team and liaising with colleagues in other departments. It feels like I am making a real contribution to the organisation!

Zara.

What’s your least favourite part of the job?

The Godfather Part I

The amount of meetings! They can have a big knock on effect to my work load, especially when they are off-site in Buckingham or Oxford, which means the work can pile up pretty quickly.

The Island by Victoria Hislop.

What do you like to do when you are not in work?

Whilst watching First Dates on channel 4. I felt really sorry for a guy on there who was having zero luck with the ladies!

I like to keep fit so I go to the gym two or three times a week. I like to read, love going to the cinema and I love to shop.

Good shop. What’s your favourite film? Favourite book? Not read that one, will add it to our reading list. When was the last time you cried?

Thank you Nicola. We’ll let you get back to work now.


06

The Check Up

07

Autumn 2015

Focus on Education

Hello from Milton Keynes Hospital Charity

We catch up with one of our junior doctors and a midwifery student to understand why they chose Milton Keynes hospital.

We’d like to take this opportunity to introduce you to our fundraising team here at Milton Keynes Hospital Charity – here to raise money for all wards and departments at Milton Keynes Hospital. Our fundraising enables wards and departments to go over and above what the NHS provides – funding items such as state of the art equipment and comfort items for patients. Our fundraising plays a significant part in adding to resources provided by the NHS. We have had a great year so far, receiving very generous support from locally-based schools and companies, hospital staff members, hospital patients and the local community. We also have an exciting calendar of events leading up to Christmas which will keep us very busy! Here’s a snippet of what we have been up to during 2015 so far… Thanks, Alison, Jenny, and Sharon Fundraising team at Milton Keynes Hospital.

Junior Team Leo We were delighted to hear from Alfie Humphreys, aged 8, and Tristan Hargreaves, aged 7, who took on a 100 mile bike ride in just five days with the help from their dads. They were inspired to fundraise for our children’s ward after their young friend became ill and was subsequently looked after on the ward. The dynamic duo raised an incredible £1,340 for Leo’s Appeal – what an amazing job!

Sainsbury’s Charity of the year Back in the summer, staff and customers from Sainsbury’s in central Milton Keynes were given the opportunity to vote for their favourite cause, and following a unanimous vote, our Little Lives Appeal, which raises money for the neonatal unit, was chosen!

Sainsbury’s Charity & PR Ambassador Natalie Doyle said: “We’re really happy to be supporting Little Lives this year. It is a cause that means a lot to many of our staff and we are delighted to be able to make a difference. We can’t wait to hold events in store and look forward to seeing the changes our fundraising efforts will make to the hospital and the families they help.”

Come along and meet the stars of the film Anna and Elsa, have a go in our photo-booth, and try your luck at our lucky dip. Fancy dress (any theme you like) is encouraged - and there will be a prize for the best costume. Tickets cost £5 per person, with all proceeds going towards our children’s wards. All the fun starts at 10am followed by the sing-along version of the film at 11.15am.

Fundraising brings sensory experience to our children’s wards!

To purchase tickets please call Jenny on 01908 996219 or email fundraising@mkhospital.nhs.uk

Young patients have been benefitting from a fantastic addition to the children’s wards over the past few months - in the form of a new Sensory Voyager. This piece of equipment, which is used by children with complex needs, was made possible thanks to a special grant to our charity from Milton Keynes Community Foundation. The Voyager has a bubble column, colour controller, fibre optics, tactile panels, mirror ball, and a solar projector, and helps to bring a calming and entertaining effect for anyone using it. This is of real benefit to patients like fiveyear-old Scott Walters (pictured) who has been diagnosed with mitochondrial disease – a terminal illness which affects every cell in the body and causes debilitating physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities.

Coming up next: Frozen sing-along family fun morning We are hosting a special family fun morning, followed by a charity screening of Disney’s Frozen which includes a sing-along at Cineworld Milton Keynes on Saturday 5th December.

Megan Banks

We need your donations!

Second year Midwifery Student at Northampton

You can support us in the following ways: • • • • •

Cash Cheque - made payable to Milton Keynes Hospital Online - visit www.justgiving.com/mkhcharity Over the phone – call 01908 996220 Text MKHC20 £3 to 70070

If you’re thinking of supporting us we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch if you’d like to raise money for a particular item, or for a ward close to your heart. We can provide information and advice on how to get your activity started, then what to do once it’s up and running. You can contact us by: Email: fundraising@mkhospital.nhs.uk Website: www.mkhospital.nhs.uk/mkhcharity Twitter: @mkhcharity Facebook: mkhcharity

Why Midwifery?

Why did you choose MKUH?

Would you work here?

I have always been interested in the subject because I am fascinated with pregnancy and birth and how amazing the human body is. I got speaking to one of my mum’s friends - who is a midwife – and as she was explaining the job to me. I could see how passionate she was and how much she loved what she did.

Geography mainly! I live in Hemel Hempstead so MKUH was the best located.

I would love to work here. It’s a little bit far from home but because it is such a well-run unit and the midwives are so fantastic, I would be happy to go that distance. Eventually I hope to be a community midwife.

That really inspired me, and from then on I knew what I wanted to do.

Is the reality what you expected? Like all jobs, the reality isn’t what you first expect it to be, because the department is so busy and it can be very tiring, but it is still amazing. Seeing the other midwives being so passionate and caring for the women in such a vulnerable time for them, that makes me carry on and inspires me to succeed.

What has your experience been of the hospital? Maternity is a well-run unit, and the midwives – despite their workloads being huge – cope with the stress very well and are very willing to make time to teach and help you. Seeing them makes me want to be a midwife - they set an amazing example. I feel supported by the hospital, everyone is so welcoming and supportive of students, even the obstetrics and gynaecology doctors, who have their own junior doctors, are so willing to teach and help you.

What would you say to someone thinking of studying at MKUH? I think speaking to someone in the profession is so important, it gives you a clear view of what the job is and you know what you are getting into, because the media presentation of midwifery (in programmes like Call the Midwife) is very different! Get work experience, even in a mother and baby centre, to understand if it is for you.


06

The Check Up

07

Autumn 2015

Focus on Education

Hello from Milton Keynes Hospital Charity

We catch up with one of our junior doctors and a midwifery student to understand why they chose Milton Keynes hospital.

We’d like to take this opportunity to introduce you to our fundraising team here at Milton Keynes Hospital Charity – here to raise money for all wards and departments at Milton Keynes Hospital. Our fundraising enables wards and departments to go over and above what the NHS provides – funding items such as state of the art equipment and comfort items for patients. Our fundraising plays a significant part in adding to resources provided by the NHS. We have had a great year so far, receiving very generous support from locally-based schools and companies, hospital staff members, hospital patients and the local community. We also have an exciting calendar of events leading up to Christmas which will keep us very busy! Here’s a snippet of what we have been up to during 2015 so far… Thanks, Alison, Jenny, and Sharon Fundraising team at Milton Keynes Hospital.

Junior Team Leo We were delighted to hear from Alfie Humphreys, aged 8, and Tristan Hargreaves, aged 7, who took on a 100 mile bike ride in just five days with the help from their dads. They were inspired to fundraise for our children’s ward after their young friend became ill and was subsequently looked after on the ward. The dynamic duo raised an incredible £1,340 for Leo’s Appeal – what an amazing job!

Sainsbury’s Charity of the year Back in the summer, staff and customers from Sainsbury’s in central Milton Keynes were given the opportunity to vote for their favourite cause, and following a unanimous vote, our Little Lives Appeal, which raises money for the neonatal unit, was chosen!

Sainsbury’s Charity & PR Ambassador Natalie Doyle said: “We’re really happy to be supporting Little Lives this year. It is a cause that means a lot to many of our staff and we are delighted to be able to make a difference. We can’t wait to hold events in store and look forward to seeing the changes our fundraising efforts will make to the hospital and the families they help.”

Come along and meet the stars of the film Anna and Elsa, have a go in our photo-booth, and try your luck at our lucky dip. Fancy dress (any theme you like) is encouraged - and there will be a prize for the best costume. Tickets cost £5 per person, with all proceeds going towards our children’s wards. All the fun starts at 10am followed by the sing-along version of the film at 11.15am.

Fundraising brings sensory experience to our children’s wards!

To purchase tickets please call Jenny on 01908 996219 or email fundraising@mkhospital.nhs.uk

Young patients have been benefitting from a fantastic addition to the children’s wards over the past few months - in the form of a new Sensory Voyager. This piece of equipment, which is used by children with complex needs, was made possible thanks to a special grant to our charity from Milton Keynes Community Foundation. The Voyager has a bubble column, colour controller, fibre optics, tactile panels, mirror ball, and a solar projector, and helps to bring a calming and entertaining effect for anyone using it. This is of real benefit to patients like fiveyear-old Scott Walters (pictured) who has been diagnosed with mitochondrial disease – a terminal illness which affects every cell in the body and causes debilitating physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities.

Coming up next: Frozen sing-along family fun morning We are hosting a special family fun morning, followed by a charity screening of Disney’s Frozen which includes a sing-along at Cineworld Milton Keynes on Saturday 5th December.

Megan Banks

We need your donations!

Second year Midwifery Student at Northampton

You can support us in the following ways: • • • • •

Cash Cheque - made payable to Milton Keynes Hospital Online - visit www.justgiving.com/mkhcharity Over the phone – call 01908 996220 Text MKHC20 £3 to 70070

If you’re thinking of supporting us we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch if you’d like to raise money for a particular item, or for a ward close to your heart. We can provide information and advice on how to get your activity started, then what to do once it’s up and running. You can contact us by: Email: fundraising@mkhospital.nhs.uk Website: www.mkhospital.nhs.uk/mkhcharity Twitter: @mkhcharity Facebook: mkhcharity

Why Midwifery?

Why did you choose MKUH?

Would you work here?

I have always been interested in the subject because I am fascinated with pregnancy and birth and how amazing the human body is. I got speaking to one of my mum’s friends - who is a midwife – and as she was explaining the job to me. I could see how passionate she was and how much she loved what she did.

Geography mainly! I live in Hemel Hempstead so MKUH was the best located.

I would love to work here. It’s a little bit far from home but because it is such a well-run unit and the midwives are so fantastic, I would be happy to go that distance. Eventually I hope to be a community midwife.

That really inspired me, and from then on I knew what I wanted to do.

Is the reality what you expected? Like all jobs, the reality isn’t what you first expect it to be, because the department is so busy and it can be very tiring, but it is still amazing. Seeing the other midwives being so passionate and caring for the women in such a vulnerable time for them, that makes me carry on and inspires me to succeed.

What has your experience been of the hospital? Maternity is a well-run unit, and the midwives – despite their workloads being huge – cope with the stress very well and are very willing to make time to teach and help you. Seeing them makes me want to be a midwife - they set an amazing example. I feel supported by the hospital, everyone is so welcoming and supportive of students, even the obstetrics and gynaecology doctors, who have their own junior doctors, are so willing to teach and help you.

What would you say to someone thinking of studying at MKUH? I think speaking to someone in the profession is so important, it gives you a clear view of what the job is and you know what you are getting into, because the media presentation of midwifery (in programmes like Call the Midwife) is very different! Get work experience, even in a mother and baby centre, to understand if it is for you.


08

The Check Up

09

Autumn 2015

A Decade of Making a Difference

Focus on Education

“Working in a smaller hospital has definitely been a positive experience and something which has accelerated my learning.” Josh Brewin Junior doctor

As one of her many duties, Tracy Day is responsible for making sure all of our staff look after themselves at work when are they doing what we call ‘manual handling’ (which covers a wide variety of activities including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling and carrying). Manual handling causes over a third of all workplace injuries, so it is Tracy’s work that is crucial to maintaining a healthy workforce!

What is your role here at MKUH?

What are you plans for when you become fully qualified? Is there an area of speciality you want to go into? Are you considering staying at MKUH?

I have recently graduated from Leicester Medical School and am in my first year as a junior doctor. My job title is Foundation Year 1 doctor and I am currently working in respiratory with the majority of my work spent on the wards. During my second year, I will be studying and working at Oxford University Hospital. I have already found that respiratory is one of the busier areas of the hospital!

Why did you choose to become a doctor? Is it something you wanted to do from a young age? I have always had an interest in science and in particular medicine. I chose to become a doctor as I wanted to be working directly with people on the front line. Physically helping people has always been something I was keen on doing.

Why did you choose to work at MKUH? What was important to me when finding an appropriate hospital to work in was really being involved in the work and gaining responsibility quickly. I therefore was keen on working in a district hospital such as Milton Keynes as although it is smaller, there are many more opportunities available.

You also build up closer relationships with patients and staff which is something I am already experiencing. Milton Keynes really appealed to me due to its ambition to grow and to become bigger and better. Something I have a real passion for is increasing opportunities for medical education and through the partnership with the University of Bucks and the new medical school, Milton Keynes is doing just that!

What is it like to work at MKUH? It is fantastic and there are so many opportunities and projects to get involved in. Working in a smaller hospital has definitely been a positive experience and something which has accelerated my learning.

This is my first of two years so I will be spending my second year working in Oxford. My experience of Milton Keynes Hospital to date has been extremely positive. My future plans are by no means set in stone but after the experience I have had here and all the exciting developments happening over the next few years, I would definitely not rule out coming back.

What advice would you give to anyone thinking of a career as a doctor? The biggest piece of advice I would give anyone thinking about a career as a doctor is to go out and get some experience with someone already working in the profession. The job is a huge commitment both in terms of learning and time so it is vitally important that you understand what the role really entails. Further from completing a work experience placement will you really understand whether or not this is a career for you.

On her 10th anniversary working at the hospital, we caught up with Tracy to see how things have changed for her in the last ten years… “When I first arrived, the training records were poor and I was tasked with trying to boost these figures up,” Tracy explained. “I remember my first task was being handed £10,000 and I was asked to invest this into suitable training equipment which would encourage staff to take their manual handling course. “There was also a period of great instability within the team I had come into where each colleague’s responsibilities were unclear and there were no set job descriptions. Trying to resolve these issues first were important to building sustainable success. “To make the sessions more interesting, I began to look for ways to improve the overall experience from staff. In 2007 I made the best purchase in my whole ten years at the trust – simulation glasses! These brought the session to life to all those who attended and I started to get some excellent feedback from those who came along. “Fast-forward to 2015 and the biggest challenge I have now is still just the same as when I started – staff do not understand why manual handling applies to them. This is a difficult task to overcome and

I am continuously looking for different and innovative ways in which I can make sessions more interesting. I believe to date this has been extremely successful as in 2012, load compliance across the trust was 53%. This year, we are on track to reach 95% which, in three years, is a fantastic achievement!”

Tracy Day Back Care Advisor

“I absolutely adore the team I work in. I always told myself that when I wake up and feel like I don’t want to come into work was the day I no longer wanted to be in that role but I have to say in my whole time here I have never once felt like that.”

What do you love most about working at MKUH? Before I started this role at Milton Keynes Hospital, I worked in a variety of different positions but for each, I never stayed more than two years (for a long time anyway). While I have been here, I have been offered three different positions with other organisations, many of which proposing a much more lucrative offering. However, I love it here and I can only see myself wanting to continue being here for years to come. I am a local person so to work in your local hospital, the only one in the area, is fantastic as you directly affect the care of the local population. I want to see patients being treated well and working here, I can help to influence that. You can also feel the community spirit here and in particular I absolutely adore the team I work in. I always told myself that when I wake up and feel like I don’t want to come into work was the day I no longer wanted to be in that role but I have to say in my whole time here I have never once felt like that. Furthermore I love getting involved with the hospital charity, in particular Leo’s Appeal. They do great work and to be able to support that is very satisfying.

Summarise life here in less than 10 words Exciting at first and has improved over time.


08

The Check Up

09

Autumn 2015

A Decade of Making a Difference

Focus on Education

“Working in a smaller hospital has definitely been a positive experience and something which has accelerated my learning.” Josh Brewin Junior doctor

As one of her many duties, Tracy Day is responsible for making sure all of our staff look after themselves at work when are they doing what we call ‘manual handling’ (which covers a wide variety of activities including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling and carrying). Manual handling causes over a third of all workplace injuries, so it is Tracy’s work that is crucial to maintaining a healthy workforce!

What is your role here at MKUH?

What are you plans for when you become fully qualified? Is there an area of speciality you want to go into? Are you considering staying at MKUH?

I have recently graduated from Leicester Medical School and am in my first year as a junior doctor. My job title is Foundation Year 1 doctor and I am currently working in respiratory with the majority of my work spent on the wards. During my second year, I will be studying and working at Oxford University Hospital. I have already found that respiratory is one of the busier areas of the hospital!

Why did you choose to become a doctor? Is it something you wanted to do from a young age? I have always had an interest in science and in particular medicine. I chose to become a doctor as I wanted to be working directly with people on the front line. Physically helping people has always been something I was keen on doing.

Why did you choose to work at MKUH? What was important to me when finding an appropriate hospital to work in was really being involved in the work and gaining responsibility quickly. I therefore was keen on working in a district hospital such as Milton Keynes as although it is smaller, there are many more opportunities available.

You also build up closer relationships with patients and staff which is something I am already experiencing. Milton Keynes really appealed to me due to its ambition to grow and to become bigger and better. Something I have a real passion for is increasing opportunities for medical education and through the partnership with the University of Bucks and the new medical school, Milton Keynes is doing just that!

What is it like to work at MKUH? It is fantastic and there are so many opportunities and projects to get involved in. Working in a smaller hospital has definitely been a positive experience and something which has accelerated my learning.

This is my first of two years so I will be spending my second year working in Oxford. My experience of Milton Keynes Hospital to date has been extremely positive. My future plans are by no means set in stone but after the experience I have had here and all the exciting developments happening over the next few years, I would definitely not rule out coming back.

What advice would you give to anyone thinking of a career as a doctor? The biggest piece of advice I would give anyone thinking about a career as a doctor is to go out and get some experience with someone already working in the profession. The job is a huge commitment both in terms of learning and time so it is vitally important that you understand what the role really entails. Further from completing a work experience placement will you really understand whether or not this is a career for you.

On her 10th anniversary working at the hospital, we caught up with Tracy to see how things have changed for her in the last ten years… “When I first arrived, the training records were poor and I was tasked with trying to boost these figures up,” Tracy explained. “I remember my first task was being handed £10,000 and I was asked to invest this into suitable training equipment which would encourage staff to take their manual handling course. “There was also a period of great instability within the team I had come into where each colleague’s responsibilities were unclear and there were no set job descriptions. Trying to resolve these issues first were important to building sustainable success. “To make the sessions more interesting, I began to look for ways to improve the overall experience from staff. In 2007 I made the best purchase in my whole ten years at the trust – simulation glasses! These brought the session to life to all those who attended and I started to get some excellent feedback from those who came along. “Fast-forward to 2015 and the biggest challenge I have now is still just the same as when I started – staff do not understand why manual handling applies to them. This is a difficult task to overcome and

I am continuously looking for different and innovative ways in which I can make sessions more interesting. I believe to date this has been extremely successful as in 2012, load compliance across the trust was 53%. This year, we are on track to reach 95% which, in three years, is a fantastic achievement!”

Tracy Day Back Care Advisor

“I absolutely adore the team I work in. I always told myself that when I wake up and feel like I don’t want to come into work was the day I no longer wanted to be in that role but I have to say in my whole time here I have never once felt like that.”

What do you love most about working at MKUH? Before I started this role at Milton Keynes Hospital, I worked in a variety of different positions but for each, I never stayed more than two years (for a long time anyway). While I have been here, I have been offered three different positions with other organisations, many of which proposing a much more lucrative offering. However, I love it here and I can only see myself wanting to continue being here for years to come. I am a local person so to work in your local hospital, the only one in the area, is fantastic as you directly affect the care of the local population. I want to see patients being treated well and working here, I can help to influence that. You can also feel the community spirit here and in particular I absolutely adore the team I work in. I always told myself that when I wake up and feel like I don’t want to come into work was the day I no longer wanted to be in that role but I have to say in my whole time here I have never once felt like that. Furthermore I love getting involved with the hospital charity, in particular Leo’s Appeal. They do great work and to be able to support that is very satisfying.

Summarise life here in less than 10 words Exciting at first and has improved over time.


10

The Check Up

Work Experience at MKUH

Hi Marie and thank you for taking the time to speak with us today! Can you tell me a little bit about your recent work experience week staged here at the hospital and what it involved? Something I really feel passionate about is providing opportunities for all, no matter what their academic background. I know from experience that sometimes not having the necessary qualifications can close doors and this may mean eliminating individuals who have a real passion for the NHS. Nursing is something I believe you have a passion for from a young age and these are the people who will be successful – a degree will only support this genuine interest. The work experience week began through my close relationships with the Health Education Thames Valley, who also support young people in their careers. The idea was to provide a structured week whereby the students would go away and talk about their experiences, hopefully in a positive light. We wanted to create a program that included clinical placements with teaching opportunities so the students could learn practically and academically. Students were also tasked with completing a mini workbook to create a portfolio of all the work they produced which they could then take with them for future job applications.

throughout their future careers in whatever they do. A further proposed benefit of this program was to begin to strengthen our relationships with the community as we are the only hospital in Milton Keynes and it is important our local society is involved and engaged. We have a responsibility as a large, corporate organisation and there are so many great people out there who we would love to encourage to work with our hospital. That is great – a really innovative way of retaining young talent as well as enhancing links with the community! In your opinion, how important is it to support young people in selecting their future careers? Speaking from experience, there are so many influencers on your decision making, especially at a young age. In many cases when you are young, you simply do not know what an individual career actually involves so through our work experience program, we are offering young people the chance to taste what it is like to work in the nursing profession. However, it is not only nursing careers we have on offer here at MKUH and there is a vast range of different areas which we want to open their eyes to.

What benefits do you believe this week will bring to the hospital?

There is so much choice out there nowadays and finding what you want to do can be difficult. If you were a young person, or someone who was thinking of a career in the NHS, what advice would you give to them and why should they choose to work at MKUH?

The ultimate dream is that the students who took part in the work experience week will come back and work for the hospital in the future; either as juniors or when they are fully trained. We can therefore begin to use these schemes as a form of recruitment to train and attract young people whilst also ensuring they are sufficiently qualified. However, we are looking to follow up with all of the participants

I think that if you are someone who has a genuine interest in nursing or a passion for the industry, you are going to be very successful in the profession. Some of the best nurses I know started purely from their love of the job and that is something that I would encourage anyone to follow. As a nurse it may sound a little biased but I really do believe that it is a fantastic profession to work in and I would

Autumn 2015

Ward 9 and Labour Ward

Community Links

Practice Development Sister Marie Draper is a keen advocate for supporting young people in pursuing a career in the NHS. Recently, a selection of local sixth form students were invited into the hospital to learn more about the nursing careers available in the NHS. To see what happened, read on.

11

recommend it to anyone. There are so many opportunities for progression and each day is different to the next. One of the greatest benefits from working as a nurse for me is that you are constantly learning new things each and every day, no matter how long you have worked. Choosing a career can be extremely difficult but the most important advice I could give is that you are working for a very long time so it is important you enjoy what you are doing. For me, my job satisfaction is huge from the role in which I do which is something you should hold onto when given the opportunity. What are your hopes for the future of Milton Keynes hospital? Are you looking to implement similar work experience weeks? I am definitely looking to implement the same program again next year as well as other similar programs for different specialties. Work experience opportunities is an area the trust in general is hoping to increase to encourage more people to come in and hopefully want to have a career here at Milton Keynes Hospital. Fingers crossed then! Finally Marie, if there is anyone reading who would love to get involved in these projects in the future, either as a student or a sponsor, what can they do? We are always looking at different ways in which we can strengthen community ties as well as increasing work experience opportunities. If there are any students out there who are thinking of pursuing a career in nursing, or a completely different profession within the NHS, please do get in contact with me. I am keen to find new and innovative ways in which we can increase the number of opportunities and through identifying possible students, we can then develop potential options. Alternatively if you are a business looking to get involved with such projects to provide other possible placements, again please do get in contact with me and we can find ways collaboratively to move forward. Marie Draper can be contacted directly via telephone on 01908 995806 or email at marie.draper@mkhospital.nhs.uk

Dental team Maria Wycoco

Can’t fault MK Hospital maternity staff; amazing people, doing amazing work. All friendly, helpful, kind, caring and generous with their time. The care they gave me and everyone else there during my stay was unbelievable. I’m very grateful for their love and support during a not so straight forward and early labour.

She is always willing to help and this was exemplified the other day when she had finished her clinic, was walking down the corridor to go home and saw me with a patient heading towards her room. She came back to the room, took her coat off, and outside of her working hours did the necessary to obtain the blood sample we were having difficulty getting, much to my relief and that of the patient.

A&E team

What patients say

We had a very smooth and speedy journey through the department and were “in and out” within 2 hours. I would like to thank each and every staff member involved in her speedy transit through the department.

Carol Wilson

Nurse Carol Wilson was extremely experienced, compassionate and supportive. She engaged me in friendly and humorous conversation and explained everything. She put me very much at ease as I was in a somewhat agitated state.

We get so many amazing compliments from our patients that we thought we would share some of our favourites with you!

Midwives, obstetricians, anaesthetists, maternity care assistants and the wider multidisciplinary teams and departments worked seamlessly to ensure our mother received the investigations and treatment she needed to save her life and give her the opportunity to get to know her baby. You were all brilliant!

Eaglestone Restaurant

Hands down the best hospital restaurant I’ve ever ate in! @RDEhospital learn some lessons @MKHospital

Haley Coetzee

Having spoken to Haley this week, on the telephone, about my father, she made us feel special, answered all our queries and helped us move forward. Haley even came round to my parents sheltered flat to offer help & support, I would guess well outside her contracted working hours.

Premila Thampi Breast care team

All the staff were kind and included me in decision making, explained procedures. Labour ward

Feeling a little less wise after having a tooth removed @ MKHospital, but received great treatment from super friendly staff. Go Team NHS!

I would like to thank the Breast Care nurses, the Radiologists, the staff on DSU, the Anaesthetic team who humoured me when I was nervous and the surgeons who so gently explained everything.

I just wanted to highlight the excellent service I received from Miss Thampi last week. The situation was dealt with in a professional, timely and courteous manner. I am impressed to say the least.

Ward 21 Paeds A&E

My son attended A&E very early and was treated extremely quickly and professionally with a great team of doctors and nurses who not only looked after him but constantly checked I was also ok too. They made the time spent there pleasant and very child friendly and I even came home with a new teddy that they had bandaged up for him to look after.

All wonderful staff nurses, OT’s physio’s and all other workers on the ward. Can’t praise them enough when they are obviously working under great pressure.


10

The Check Up

Work Experience at MKUH

Hi Marie and thank you for taking the time to speak with us today! Can you tell me a little bit about your recent work experience week staged here at the hospital and what it involved? Something I really feel passionate about is providing opportunities for all, no matter what their academic background. I know from experience that sometimes not having the necessary qualifications can close doors and this may mean eliminating individuals who have a real passion for the NHS. Nursing is something I believe you have a passion for from a young age and these are the people who will be successful – a degree will only support this genuine interest. The work experience week began through my close relationships with the Health Education Thames Valley, who also support young people in their careers. The idea was to provide a structured week whereby the students would go away and talk about their experiences, hopefully in a positive light. We wanted to create a program that included clinical placements with teaching opportunities so the students could learn practically and academically. Students were also tasked with completing a mini workbook to create a portfolio of all the work they produced which they could then take with them for future job applications.

throughout their future careers in whatever they do. A further proposed benefit of this program was to begin to strengthen our relationships with the community as we are the only hospital in Milton Keynes and it is important our local society is involved and engaged. We have a responsibility as a large, corporate organisation and there are so many great people out there who we would love to encourage to work with our hospital. That is great – a really innovative way of retaining young talent as well as enhancing links with the community! In your opinion, how important is it to support young people in selecting their future careers? Speaking from experience, there are so many influencers on your decision making, especially at a young age. In many cases when you are young, you simply do not know what an individual career actually involves so through our work experience program, we are offering young people the chance to taste what it is like to work in the nursing profession. However, it is not only nursing careers we have on offer here at MKUH and there is a vast range of different areas which we want to open their eyes to.

What benefits do you believe this week will bring to the hospital?

There is so much choice out there nowadays and finding what you want to do can be difficult. If you were a young person, or someone who was thinking of a career in the NHS, what advice would you give to them and why should they choose to work at MKUH?

The ultimate dream is that the students who took part in the work experience week will come back and work for the hospital in the future; either as juniors or when they are fully trained. We can therefore begin to use these schemes as a form of recruitment to train and attract young people whilst also ensuring they are sufficiently qualified. However, we are looking to follow up with all of the participants

I think that if you are someone who has a genuine interest in nursing or a passion for the industry, you are going to be very successful in the profession. Some of the best nurses I know started purely from their love of the job and that is something that I would encourage anyone to follow. As a nurse it may sound a little biased but I really do believe that it is a fantastic profession to work in and I would

Autumn 2015

Ward 9 and Labour Ward

Community Links

Practice Development Sister Marie Draper is a keen advocate for supporting young people in pursuing a career in the NHS. Recently, a selection of local sixth form students were invited into the hospital to learn more about the nursing careers available in the NHS. To see what happened, read on.

11

recommend it to anyone. There are so many opportunities for progression and each day is different to the next. One of the greatest benefits from working as a nurse for me is that you are constantly learning new things each and every day, no matter how long you have worked. Choosing a career can be extremely difficult but the most important advice I could give is that you are working for a very long time so it is important you enjoy what you are doing. For me, my job satisfaction is huge from the role in which I do which is something you should hold onto when given the opportunity. What are your hopes for the future of Milton Keynes hospital? Are you looking to implement similar work experience weeks? I am definitely looking to implement the same program again next year as well as other similar programs for different specialties. Work experience opportunities is an area the trust in general is hoping to increase to encourage more people to come in and hopefully want to have a career here at Milton Keynes Hospital. Fingers crossed then! Finally Marie, if there is anyone reading who would love to get involved in these projects in the future, either as a student or a sponsor, what can they do? We are always looking at different ways in which we can strengthen community ties as well as increasing work experience opportunities. If there are any students out there who are thinking of pursuing a career in nursing, or a completely different profession within the NHS, please do get in contact with me. I am keen to find new and innovative ways in which we can increase the number of opportunities and through identifying possible students, we can then develop potential options. Alternatively if you are a business looking to get involved with such projects to provide other possible placements, again please do get in contact with me and we can find ways collaboratively to move forward. Marie Draper can be contacted directly via telephone on 01908 995806 or email at marie.draper@mkhospital.nhs.uk

Dental team Maria Wycoco

Can’t fault MK Hospital maternity staff; amazing people, doing amazing work. All friendly, helpful, kind, caring and generous with their time. The care they gave me and everyone else there during my stay was unbelievable. I’m very grateful for their love and support during a not so straight forward and early labour.

She is always willing to help and this was exemplified the other day when she had finished her clinic, was walking down the corridor to go home and saw me with a patient heading towards her room. She came back to the room, took her coat off, and outside of her working hours did the necessary to obtain the blood sample we were having difficulty getting, much to my relief and that of the patient.

A&E team

What patients say

We had a very smooth and speedy journey through the department and were “in and out” within 2 hours. I would like to thank each and every staff member involved in her speedy transit through the department.

Carol Wilson

Nurse Carol Wilson was extremely experienced, compassionate and supportive. She engaged me in friendly and humorous conversation and explained everything. She put me very much at ease as I was in a somewhat agitated state.

We get so many amazing compliments from our patients that we thought we would share some of our favourites with you!

Midwives, obstetricians, anaesthetists, maternity care assistants and the wider multidisciplinary teams and departments worked seamlessly to ensure our mother received the investigations and treatment she needed to save her life and give her the opportunity to get to know her baby. You were all brilliant!

Eaglestone Restaurant

Hands down the best hospital restaurant I’ve ever ate in! @RDEhospital learn some lessons @MKHospital

Haley Coetzee

Having spoken to Haley this week, on the telephone, about my father, she made us feel special, answered all our queries and helped us move forward. Haley even came round to my parents sheltered flat to offer help & support, I would guess well outside her contracted working hours.

Premila Thampi Breast care team

All the staff were kind and included me in decision making, explained procedures. Labour ward

Feeling a little less wise after having a tooth removed @ MKHospital, but received great treatment from super friendly staff. Go Team NHS!

I would like to thank the Breast Care nurses, the Radiologists, the staff on DSU, the Anaesthetic team who humoured me when I was nervous and the surgeons who so gently explained everything.

I just wanted to highlight the excellent service I received from Miss Thampi last week. The situation was dealt with in a professional, timely and courteous manner. I am impressed to say the least.

Ward 21 Paeds A&E

My son attended A&E very early and was treated extremely quickly and professionally with a great team of doctors and nurses who not only looked after him but constantly checked I was also ok too. They made the time spent there pleasant and very child friendly and I even came home with a new teddy that they had bandaged up for him to look after.

All wonderful staff nurses, OT’s physio’s and all other workers on the ward. Can’t praise them enough when they are obviously working under great pressure.


12

The Check Up

Autumn 2015

Competition Time We have two fantastic prizes to give away 1) iPlayGolf have kindly donated a two hour session in their simulation suite for up to five people! iPlayGolfUK bring you a real golfing experience indoors where you can play on some of the most famous golf courses from across the world. This voucher is valid until 01/04/2016.

To be in with a chance of winning one of these great prizes, simply answer the question below: How many workplace injuries are caused by incorrect manual handling? a) A half

b) A third

c) Seven eighths

2) We also have an Arrive and Drive voucher for two at Daytona Karting kindly donated by Daytona Milton Keynes.

Want to tell us what you think of the Check up?

Or snail mail: Communications team, Oak House, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, H8 Standing Way, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK6 5LD. Competition closes on Friday 11 December 2015 and winners will be notified the following week. Good luck!

Sudoku

Got an idea for a story?

Send your answer, name, email address and/or phone number to: communications@mkhospital.nhs.uk

Doctor doctor, I’ve a strawberry stuck in my ear!

Don’t worry, I’ve some cream for that!

Get in touch! Email us at communications@mkhospital.nhs.uk And read the latest news at www.mkhospital.nhs.uk

Sudoku – How to play The rules are simple. Each row, column and square (9 spaces each) needs to be filled out with the numbers 1-9, without repeating any numbers within the row, column or square. Some squares are already filled in so you just need to do the rest!

The Checkup - Autumn 2015 - Issue 1  

Milton Keynes University Hospital presents its brand new quarterly magazine 'The Checkup'. In this first issue read about the hospital's fo...

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