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Delegate Programme 12th February 2014 Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel

Barts Neuroscience Symposium 2014


Organising Committee EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Joseph Masters

Richard Antbrig

Symposium co-Chair

Symposium Vice Chair

Gabriel Doctor

Anna Nagy

Symposium co-Chair

Symposium Vice Chair

Milo Kostusiak

Fariha Alauddin

QMBL NeuroSoc President

Publicity Officer

Chirag Haria

Ismail Uddin

QMBL NeuroSoc VP

Technical Officer

We would like to extend an extra special thanks to all the people who helped out on the day, without whom, the event would not have been possible.

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Contents Welcome

2

Queen Mary and Barts and The London Neuroscience Society

3

The Neurological Tradition at The Royal London

4

Neuroscience at Queen Mary

6

Programme

8

Workshops

10

Speakers

11

Prof. David Clayton

12

Prof. Nick Fox

13

Prof. David Nutt

14

Prof. Daniel Wolpert

15

Prof. Richard Frackowiak

16

Posters

19

Undergraduate students’ poster submissions

20

Postgraduate students’ poster submissions

24


Welcome “Think of the Soul; I swear to you that body of yours gives proportions to your Soul somehow to live in other spheres; I do not know how, but I know it is so.” Walt Whitman, Leaves Of Grass (1867) Welcome to the 2nd annual Barts Neuroscience Symposium. We want to share and extend the sense of mystery that surrounds the study of the brain. The rapid advances in neuroscience are opening new, unexplored vistas – even deeper mysteries, perhaps, or fresh territory for young researchers to make their mark. We are delighted to have more than 50 posters being presented by young researchers from all over the country. The scientists who will address you in the afternoon work at the interfaces between neuroscience and the cutting edge of related disciplines – pharmacology, radio-imaging, epigenetics, robotics, and supercomputing. However, they are not merely pre-eminent in their fields. Their work addresses important questions about humans and our interaction with the world around us. We hope you leave today enthused with wonder and excitement and with a burning desire to get more involved. We would like to thank the QMBL Neurosoc Committee, in particular Milo Kostusiak and Chirag Haria, the Blizard Institute for their continued support, and our generous sponsors without whom the day would not have been possible. Gabriel Doctor and Joseph Masters Symposium co-Chairs 2

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Queen Mary and Barts and The London Neuroscience Society Queen Mary and Barts and The London Neuroscience Society (QMBL NeuroSoc) was founded in 2009 with the hopes of creating a platform for both medical and science students where they could share their interest in the field of neurosciences. Our aim is to support students’ interest in all areas of the neurosciences, ranging from basic science to clinical and the translational aspects. In QMBL Neuroscience Society, we bring a variety of events to both Queen Mary and Barts students by inviting guest speakers for specialty talks, organising skills workshops and by holding monthly journal clubs. We invite patients with neurological disorders to speak about their experiences in order for students to develop a deeper understanding of the impact of chronic disorders. Our monthly journal clubs, which bring together students, researches and clinicans, are an excellent opportunity for students to critically review a primary research paper to their peers, followed by the debate and discussion. But we’re not all about work! Although we pride ourselves in being an established academic society, we realise the importance of living a university life in its full potential. NeuroSoc socials are a great way to meet students of differing ages and backgrounds who come together by their mutual passion for neurosciences. As one of the member universities in the recently launched London Students’ Neuroscience Network (LSNN), a collaborative project between King’s College London, Imperial College London, Queen Mary University and University College London, QMBL NeuroSoc aim to encourage communication between students interested in Neuroscience across the universities throughout London. For more details on joining NeuroSoc or how to get in touch please visit our website www.qmblneurosoc.com. We hope to see you at one of our events! Milo Kostusiak President QMBL Neuroscience Society 2013-2014 www.qmblneurosoc.com // www.lsneuron.org

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The Neurological Tradition at The Royal London The Royal London Hospital has distinguished history which has placed it at the forefront of research in clinical neurosciences. Amongst others it has been home to Lord Russell Brain after whom a named lecture has been inaugurated. The timeline below, drawn from a historical article written by Michael Swash (Emeritus Chair of Neurology) outlines the major figures who have worked here. We thank Professor Swash for his permission in using this material.

The Beginnings The London Hospital was founded in 1740 where there was a prominent focus on Neurology from its roots. John AndrÊe, one of the hospital’s first physicians, published a two-volume book on epilepsy and related diseases in 1753.

James Parkinson (1755-1824) A physician originating from The London first described paralysis agitans in 1817. Later, JeanMartin Charcot went on to provide a more complete schemata of clinical examination, including the observation of rigidity.

William John Little (1810-1894) A surgeon at the London with a special interest in orthopaedics, described cerebral palsy and recognised its association with birth trauma and hypoxia. He went on to found the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in London

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Warren Tay (1844-1927) Warren Tay, a surgeon and dermatologist, characterised the fundoscopic appearance of Tay-Sachs disease, outlining its familial inheritance.


Sir Jonathan Hutchinson (1828-1913) and Hughlings Jackson (1836-1911) Sir Jonathan Hutchinson founded the Neurological Society of London and contributed to the first edition of Brain, a journal founded by Lord Brain. Hutchinson encouraged Hughlings Jackson to join him and together they coded many clinical phenomena including disorders of motor control and right hemisphere functions.

Russell Brain (1895-1966) Russell Brain joined the Neurology staff at The London writing key texts on neurological topics, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. After which, Michael Swash was appointed as the third Chair of Neurology in 1972.

Hugh Cairns (1896-1952) The neurosurgical unit at the London was founded by Cairns (1896-1952). Cairns, an Australian Rhodes scholar, first spent a year in pathology with Turnbull, and then worked in general and renal surgery at the London. Prior to his taking up this appointment as Neurosurgeon, the hospital governors sent him to Boston in 1926 to work with Harvey Cushing, so that on his return he could introduce the innovative techniques pioneered by Cushing to Brtiain.

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Neuroscience at Queen Mary Barts and The London has a long and rich history in neurology (see page 6 for some highlights). Today, neuroscience at Queen Mary is a partnership between the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS), Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry and Barts Health NHS Trust. Barts and The London’s largest research institute, the Blizard Institute, is a centre of excellence in research: more than 80% of its output has been recognised as ‘world class’ in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Neuroscience at the Blizard focuses on medical themes: trauma, inflammation, stem cells, genomics and cancer. Researchers based at the SBCS focus on basic neurobiology – developmental neuroscience, sensory physiology, neuropeptide signalling and neuroethology – as well as experimental and behavioural psychology. Neuroscience research at the SBCS involves a unique range of model organisms, including insects, crustaceans, echinoderms, finches and zebra fish. Our collaborative spirit extends beyond East London. Last year Barts and The

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London joined UCL Partners, an innovative partnership that helps researchers unlock funding, accelerate research and work together. The goal is to translate cutting edge research and innovation into measurable health gains for patients and populations – in London, across the UK, and globally.

A Neuroscience MSc course is available both for intercalating medical students and as a postgraduate study option. Neuroscience PhD programmes exist at both the School of Medicine and Dentistry and SBCS.

more than 80% of its output has been recognised as ‘world class’

The New Life Sciences Initiative Recently, Queen Mary have announced an exciting new Life Sciences Initiative, which will encourage cross-disciplinary research in the natural, social and bio-medical sciences, and ultimately drive innovations in healthcare. This huge new investment will lead to the appointment of more than 100 extra academic staff, the creation of around 1,500 life sciences undergraduate courses, and at least 500 postgraduate places. Neuroscience research will form a key part of the initiative. Public engagement Queen Mary College was originally established to serve the population of East End of London. That mission continues today and is best exemplified by the award winning Centre for the Cell, an educational facility suspended above the open laboratories in the Blizard Institute. Thousands of local school children have visited and many have been inspired to pursue a scientific education. Researchers from the Blizard volunteer as guides.

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Programme Programme of the day for the Barts Neuroscience Symposium 2014.

Time

Activity

Venue

8:30 - 9:00

Registration and setting up of posters

Old Library

9:00 - 10:00

Coffee and poster viewing

Old Library

10:00 - 11:30

Workshops

Garrod Building

11:30 - 13:00

Lunch and poster viewing

Old Library

Welcome

Perrin Lecture Theatre

13:00-13:10

13:10- 14:00

14:00- 14:10

8

Professor Tom MacDonald The Genome and the Social Brain

Professor David Clayton

Results of the Poster Competition

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Perrin Lecture Theatre Perrin Lecture Theatre


Time

Activity

14:10 - 15:00

How, where and when does AD start? Implications for prevention studies

15:00 - 15:20

First afternoon coffee break

15:20 - 16:10

Putting neuroscience at the centre of drug and alcohol policy

Professor Nick Fox

Professor David Nutt

Venue Perrin Lecture Theatre

Perrin Foyer

Perrin Lecture Theatre

Professor Daniel Wolpert

Perrin Lecture Theatre

17:00- 17:10

Second afternoon coffee break

Perrin Foyer

17:10 - 18:00

Human Brain Project - implications for clinical neuroscience

18:00 - 19:30

Drinks reception

16:10 - 17:00

What’s a brain for: a moving story

Professor Richard Frackowiak

Perrin Lecture Theatre

Old Library

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Workshops Neurosurgery Workshop Mark Wilson Mark will give a presentation on the management of acute head injury and students will have the opportunity to perform a decompressive craniectomy on a model skull. Mark is an alumnus of Barts’ where he completed his pre-clinical years. He is a fully qualified HEMS doctor and Consultant Neurosurgeon. His research focuses on hypoxia and intracranial pressure. His career has seen him travel to South Africa, Nepal, India and Australia.

Clinical Applications of Neuromodulation Emma Horrocks Emma will give a presentation on the clinical applications of tibial nerve stimulation and give students the opportunity to perform and/or experience the technique. Emma is a surgical trainee in London undertaking a PhD at the Blizard Institute. Her main academic interests are in the area of clinical surgery and she is coordinating a UK wide multi-centre trial of a new treatment for faecal incontinence.

How does our brain represent and evaluate a new food item? Helen Barron Helen will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the evaluation of novel items, and use functional MRI data to demonstrate the important role of memory in allowing new experiences to be imagined.   Helen Barron is currently doing a PhD in Neuroscience at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL. She uses functional MRI (fMRI) in the healthy human brain to explore the neural representation of both familiar and unfamiliar items.

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Speakers Biographies of keynote speakers.

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Prof. David Clayton Professor of Neuroscience at Queen Mary, University of London Professor Clayton obtained his PhD with Prof. James E. Darnell Jr. (Rockefeller University, New York, NY) in 1985, and shortly after that launched the first investigations of how genes function in the brain of songbirds. His work led to the first functional characterization of a gene now known to be central to Parkinson’s Disease (alpha-synuclein), and the discovery of genes that play an active role in vocal communication. In 2003, he organized a broad set of international collaborations which led to the complete sequencing of the songbird (zebra finch) genome. He is a Fellow of both the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Professor Clayton has recently moved to Queen Mary’s, University of London, with the goal of strengthening the bridge between ethology (the study of natural behavior), neuroscience and human psychology. He will talk to us about how environment interacts with genes to determine how songbirds sing - and the implications of this for human behaviour.

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Prof. Nick Fox Professor of Neurology, MRC Senior Clinical Fellow Institute of Neurology, University College London, Hon. Consultant Neurologist, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London Professor Fox’s first degree was in Physics and Physiology from Cambridge.  He subsequently graduated with honours in medicine from the University of London and then specialised in cognitive neurology.  He is currently Professor of Neurology and MRC Senior Clinical Fellow at the Institute of Nerulogy, University College London. Since 1993, he has held Research Fellowships from the Alzheimer’s Society and the Medical Research Council (MRC). He co-chairs the Research Advisory Committee of the Alzheimer’s Society and is a member of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s Scientific Advisory Board. He has been an advisor to the NIH and an invited expert to the FDA and EMEA. He is the only non-US member of the MR imaging core of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). He will talk to us about the latest advances in neuroimaging in dementia patients, and how this can improve diagnosis and help us understand disease processes to lead to better treatments.

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Prof. David Nutt Edmond J. Safra Chair in Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College London. Professor Nutt completed his medical training at Guy’s Hospital London, continuing in neurology to MRCP.  After becoming a lecturer at Oxford and Wellcome Senior Fellow in psychiatry, he moved to the USA and spent two years as Chief of the Section of Clinical Science in the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism at the NIH. On returning to England in 1988 he set up the Psychopharmacology Unit in Bristol University, before moving to Imperial College London in December 2008 where he leads a similar group with a particular focus on brain imaging, especially PET.  Professor Nutt is currently Chair of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs (ISCD) and Vice-President of the European Brain Council. Previously he was President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), the British Neuroscience Association and British Association of Psychopharmacology. In addition he is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and of Psychiatrists and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He has edited the Journal of Psychopharmacology for over two decades and acts as the psychiatry drugs advisor to the British National Formulary. He has published over 400 original research papers, a similar number of reviews and books chapters, eight government reports on drugs and 27 books. He will talk about his group’s research into neuro-psychiatric disorders, which merges pharmacological approaches with state-of-the-art imaging techniques, with a particular emphasis on disorders such as addiction, dementia, schizophrenia and affective disorders.

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Prof. Daniel Wolpert Professor of Engineering (1875), University of Cambridge Professor Wolpert is an exceptionally distinguished neuroscientist. Having qualified as a medical doctor in 1989, he joined the Physiology Department of Oxford University where he received his D.Phil. in 1992. From there he moved to MIT where he worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Returning to the UK in 1995, he joined UCL’s Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience as a Lecturer. In 2005 he moved to the University of Cambridge where he is a Fellow of Trinity College and Professor of Engineering (1875). In 2013 he was appointed to the Royal Society Noreen Murray Research Professorship in Neurobiology.  Professor Wolpert was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2004 and a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2012.  He was awarded the Royal Society Francis Crick Prize Lecture (2005), the Minerva Foundation Golden Brain Award (2010) and gave the Fred Kavli Distinguished International Scientist Lecture at the Society for Neuroscience (2009).  He will talk to us about how the latest approaches to understanding how the brain controls movement, combining engineering, robotics, virtual reality interfaces and new understanding of basic physiology.

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Prof. Richard Frackowiak Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Université de Lausanne (UNIL) and the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV). Professor Frackowiak studied medicine at the University of Cambridge. He joined the Medical Research Council’s Cyclotron Unit at Hammersmith Hospital, London, in 1979, and worked with one of Britain’s first Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners. As a former professor at the Institute of Neurology, UCL, he established in 1995 what was to become the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging. Now based at the Universite de Lausanne, Switzerland, he is the lead for the medical application stream of the billion dollar Human Brain Project: a global, collaborative effort to pull together all our existing knowledge about the human brain and to reconstruct the brain in supercomputer-based models. His honorary academic appointments are many, including Adjunct Professor of Clinical Neurology, Cornell University Medical School, New York Hospital, New York, Rogowski Visiting Professor, Yale Medical School (2001), and Norman Geschwind Visiting Professor, Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School (1999). He is the fourth most highly cited British biomedical scientist of the decade 19902000. Professor Frackowiak will talk about the implications of the Human Brain Project for clinical neuroscience.

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Octagon, Queens Building


“And men ought to know that from nothing else but thence from the brain come joys, delights, laughter and sports, and sorrows, griefs, despondency, and lamentations... All these things we endure from the brain.� Hippocrates


Posters

List of poster titles and presenters.


Undergraduate students’ poster submissions 1

2

3

4

5

20

A psychophysical test of auditory contrast normalization. Abubakar Abioye

The Brain-gut Axis in Health and Disease Yasser Al Omran

High Resolution Tractography Based Parcellation of the Human Insula in vivo Annette Archie– Acheampong

Neuropeptide Characterisation and Expression in the Starfish Asterias rubens Yusef Badi

Using Synthetic Biology To Fight Alzheimer’s Disease Alexander Bates

Gliadel® 6 Does increase the infection rate after neurosurgery? Shiv Bhakta

7

8

Potential Effects of Bilingualism and Musical Education on Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease in Down’s Syndrome: Carer’s Opinions. Anjali Bhat

Actions and the Self: Deriving Confidence Judgements From Observing One’s Own Movements Anna Borissova

9 The Effect of

Movement Kinematics on Perceptual Inference: A study of patients with movement disorders Sumitha Bose

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effect of 10 The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on microglia/ macrophage responses in spinal cord contusion injury Amy Bowes

patients 11 Which should we have a higher index of suspicion for MRI scanning for cauda equina? Kerry Burke

Cortical 12 Altered Excitability of the Ipsilateral Hemisphere in Extratemporal Epilepsy Bryan Ceronie


Undergraduate students’ poster submissions

13

14

15

16

The sodium cycle: redefining the resting membrane potential in CNS axons and the potential for the use of bumetanide as a neuroprotective agent Charmilie Chandrakumar

Effect of Exercise on Brain Oxygenation at Altitude Raj Dattani

Annexin A1 as a regulator of Blood Brain Barrier physiology: translational potential Alexandra Downes

Role of Routine Biopsy and Improvement in Pain and Function Following Vertebroplasty for Vertebral Compression Fractures - a Tertiary Centre Experience Sophie Dunin

genomic 17 Regulatory regions active in immune cell types contribute to the genetic risk of multiple sclerosis Ramyiadarsini Elangovan robust clinical 18 Amodel of ongoing pain for neuroimaging in humans Jade Seidman of autonomic 19 Effect modulation on oesophageal hypersensitivity Ana Gavrila

20 Mechanisms of

visceral pain: A review Nithish Jayakumar

Investigation 21 An into the Effects of Inter-Individual Differences in the Expression Levels of Neurochemical Markers in the Orbitofrontal Cortex and Nucleus Accumbens on Reversal-Learning Melanie Jensen

22 Analysis of

recreational drug use from club amnesty bins in gay dance clubs Anusuya Kawsar

23 A characterization of white matter pathology following spinal cord compression injury in the rat. Milo Kostusiak

24 Prevalence and pharmacological treatment of depression in Multiple Sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sara Leddy

25 Discovery and functional characterisation of a vasopressin/ oxytocin-type neuropeptide in the starfish Asterias rubens. Natalia Martynyuk

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Undergraduate students’ poster submissions

26

27

28

29

30

22

Does post-operative bacterial infection improve prognosis in high-grade glioma? Brendan McKenna

NpSearch: A Tool to Identify Novel Neuropeptide Precursors Muhammad Ismail Moghul

31 Characterising the effect of substrate stiffness on macrophage behaviour Andrea Perera

32 Age-related differences in associative memory retrieval Drew Puxty

Feasibility of Quick, Self-Administered Online Cognitive Testing in a Parkinson’s Disease Risk Cohort Anna Nagy

of ageing 33 Effects on behavioural

Function of voltage-insensitive, background K+ leakage in primary sensory neurons, and its block by trapentylammonium (TPA) ions and quinidine Vishnu and Anushka Naidu and Engineer

34 Quantification of VAMP2 and

Cerebellar pathology in Niemann-Pick disease type C1 Katie Paul

performance and brain activity in associative memory. Shaun Kit Lung Quah

Monomeric AlphaSynuclein in the pre-frontal cortex of Lewy Body dementia and Alzheimer’s disease individuals. William Quelch

the 35 Simulating reading deficits found in posterior cortical atrophy in proficient readers Kishan Rajdev

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acute SDH or 36 Severe ICH in the elderly – “no neurosurgery” – but what is the prognosis? Christopher Record

deletion is 37 Disc1 present in Swissderived inbred mouse strains: implications for transgenic studies of learning and memory David Ritchie

of 38 Influence Personality Traits on Brain Activity During Rest, Pain Anticipation and Pain Perception James Ruffle

Conversion 39 MCI/VCI rates across Hackney - A retrospective study Taran Kaur Seehra

of 40 Characterisation the AJBQM2 mutant strain of zebrafish that displays increased nicotineseeking behaviour Juliet Foote


Undergraduate students’ poster submissions

41

42

43

Modelling the effects of ageing upon saccadic reaction time distributions Alexander Stevenson

Do prenatal and perinatal complications influence tic severity in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome Katherine Taylor

and 44 Designing testing a new genetic model of Alzheimer’s disease in Drosophila melanogaster Katarzyna Wasilewska

Potential Role for 45 AHypermetabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease Elizabeth Waters

Properties 47 Axonal of the Corpus Callosum Characterised using Anomalous Diffusion James Forrester

of the 48 Parcellation Human Thalamus in vivo using Anomalous Diffusion Henry Simon

receptor 46 Single imaging during Neuroprotection by hypothermia following ischaemic stroke: the role of oxidative stress Ross Thomson

LTP in living hippocampal neurons Elizabeth Whatling

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Postgraduate students’ poster submissions 49

50

51

24

Identifying novel genes associated with increased nicotine reinforcement in a zebrafish conditioned place preference model. Alistair Brock

The Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Agonist Pioglitazone may modulate functional expression of the glutamate transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2 in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells Jared Ching

The F-box only protein 7 mitochondrial role in Parkinson’s disease Marta Delgado

Smile: An 52 Pocket iPhone-based pilot therapy to increase happiness Javier Elkin

Grain Cortical 53 Fine Segmentation using Multiparametric Maps at 3T Christian Lambert

changes 56 Age-related in the functional connectivity during associative retrieval Gaby Pfeifer

57 Developing and validating automated assays for zebrafish behavioural analysis and drug discovery Ari Sudwarts

54 Genetics of

riboflavin channels Andreea Aura Manole

and 55 Expression electrophysiological characterization of a mutant Kv1.1 channel causing episodic ataxia type 1 Andreea Aura Manole

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DSEG: a 58 Introducing Novel Visualisation of Age-Related Brain Change Owen Williams


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Confirmed Speakers: Paton Memorial Lecturer, Morley Hollenberg University of Calgary, Canada Moritz Bünemann Philipps-University Marburg, Germany Arthur Christopoulos Monash University, Australia Kathryn DeFea University of California, USA Celine Galès Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, France Julia Gorelik Imperial College London, UK Vsevolod Gurevich Vanderbilt University, USA Ralf Jockers Institut Cochin, France Aashish Manglik Stanford University School of Medicine, USA Graeme Milligan University of Glasgow, UK Stuart Mundell University of Bristol, UK Martine Smit VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands For more information or to register please contact: t: +44 (0)207 239 0176 e: meetings@bps.ac.uk w: www.bps.ac.uk


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Barts Neuroscience Symposium 2014

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Barts Neuroscience Symposium 2014