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MIL MatchMaker MAR 2012 Cover:MatchMaker Summer Cover 2004

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UK ASIAN MATRIMONIAL INTRODUCTIONS & BUSINESS PUBLICATION

M.I.L. MatchMaker U.K. £2.00

®

Apr’12-Jul’12 Edition

Wedding Special Gujarati Weddings Wedding Planner Wedding Resorts Wedding Services Holidays & Honeymoons

Matrimonial Services


MIL MatchMaker Summer_2011 Cover:MatchMaker Summer Cover 2004

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M.I.L. MatchMaker® Editors Note ®

M.I.L. MatchMaker is published with support from the Asian community. We are pleased to release April-July’12 edition. Adverts and articles are published without responsibility on part of the publishers, whilst every reasonable care is taken, M.I.L. MatchMaker® cannot be held responsible as a result of any loss occasioned by any persons. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any way, shape or form without the prior consent of the publisher.

DISCLAIMER M.I.L. MatchMaker ® is not responsible in any way for the goods and services rendered by its advertisers as all advertisements are accepted in good faith.

COVER MODEL Dia Mirza

ADVERTISING CONTACT Hema Bharat Bina Naik

07903 046 838 020 8868 1879 07737 008 717

PUBLISHED BY MatchMaker International Ltd. P.O. Box 430, Pinner, Middlesex, HA5 2TW (U.K.) Tel: 020 8868 1879 Printed By: K.Printers • 07957 152 065 Designed By: Dipesh Soni • dipesh@soni.cc UK Asian Trade Distribution: Europa Enterprises - Mr Suresh Chandarana Leicester. 0116 241 5234 / 07970-192576 U.K. Distribution: Matchmaker International Ltd. Advertising Representative (India) Mr T.S. Ramchandran Mobile: 91 9920864754 Email: tr2789@gmail.com Website Hosting: Mr Murphy John Indsoft Systems Pvt Ltd www.indsoft.net Website Maintenance/SEO: Kanak Modi /Arupa Pathare www.services-india.com ISSN: 1750-4260

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The April to July edition focuses mainly on weddings as special feature for those bride and grooms who may be planning to get married in 2012 or are recently engaged.

The edition outlines some of the various aspects to marriages taking place these days and explains some of the main rituals conducted in Gujarati wedding ceremonies. The wedding planner guide and budget expense sheets in the magazine are surely going to come in handy as a planning tool and plan your own modern wedding to suit your own budget.

A trend also emerging these days amongst young couples is holding a wedding at some exotic location and India is fast becoming an attraction as a wedding resort in places like Gujarat or Goa. Islands like the Bahamas are also starting to offer wedding packages. Places like these can be very appealing to get away from UK and celebrate the special day with close members of the family and friends at a wedding resort.

Candidates who are still in search for their partner to get married can look through a selection of various confidential matrimonial listings in the magazine as well as log on to Perfect-Partner.com Internet service to browse and search for profiles and make that initial contact. Gujarati candidates can also place confidential listings in Gujarat Samachar Matchmaker matrimonial column from time to time by contacting us or enquire about other matchmaking services which may help them make progress.

We thank all the advertisers with their wedding contributions and advertisements to support the magazine which is now in its 15th year. The magazine has been used as a resource over the years and produced as a social initiative to help the Asian community. These modern times are getting increasing difficult for the young generation to find suitable partners and we hope candidates can rely on print mediums such as this to initiate first contact and make progress towards establishing a successful matrimonial alliance. Bharat Raithatha Business Editor bharat@perfect-partner.com

Contents

Wedding Resorts Wedding Planner & Budget Gujarati wedding rituals Marriages- time for change? Wedding Services Diamond Jewellery Jewel of Romance -Bahamas Beach Holidays in Goa Ayurveda Domestic Violence Matrimonial Services Classified Matrimonials -Male Classified Matrimonials -Female Diabetes Awareness

Harsha Raithatha Client Relations harsha@perfect-partner.com

Pages

1-3 6-9 10-11 12-13 14-26 27-30 33 34 36-37 38 39-41 42-45 47-51 54-55

For Internet Matrimonial & Advertising your Business online, simply visit


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The

1-3

YEARS AHEAD

6-8

MONTHS AHEAD

Wedding

Planner

The wedding dates have been decided and you don’t have a clue where to begin is quite a common feeling. Therefore organising well in advance and planning is so essential to make your event not only special but successful as well. Wedding planners in the market are there to assist you every step of the way with choice of wedding providers who can take the stress away and get the work done for you. START SAVING Planning to finance your own wedding? A parent planning a child’s wedding? Either way, start planning at least one to three years in advance. Invest some money to get a decent return or start saving and keep it aside for the wedding from the pay packet you bring home each month. Begin buying jewellery one piece at a time. You can always trade in designs later. START LOOKING If it’s to be a semi-arranged marriage or otherwise, set aside at least a year to find a match. Not only can you do it calmly, it gives all options. It allows the couple and families to meet many times before deciding that the alliance is suitable to each other. SET A DATE Fix a date that gives enough time for preparations. Schedule within public holidays or weekends. Factor in exams, jobs, religious concerns and weather. Organise time for temple visits, native village trips and so on. MAKE GUEST LIST The number of guests will largely decide your wedding budget, venue, catering and more. Get an indicative list from both families well ahead, and follow up later with a detailed list of addresses and e-mail IDs. SET VENUE Decide first on city, so that travel tickets can be booked in advance and save money. Find a venue that suits the weather, crowd size and nature of ceremonies. Ask for referrals and visit personally to check facilities, car parking etc. Book at least six months if not more in advance. ENGAGEMENT PARTY Do you want a formal engagement? About six months before the wedding is a good time. You could keep it small with a party at home, or hire a banquet hall. Either way, plan well ahead and book venue, send out invites, buy rings, and get the outfits ready.

4-6

MONTHS AHEAD

FITNESS AND BEAUTY REGIME Start beauty regimes like skin and hair programmes in good time so on the day you are radiant looking. BUDGET It’s time to draw up a budget. Decide how much you want to spend in total. Draw up a list of what and when you want to withdraw investments or savings. Prioritise expenditure, so that it helps you decide which service provider to select. Do you want to splash on the entertainment or the food or five star venues? Use the Budget sheets to get a grip on where your money is going. It will help you plan expenditure. WEDDING DRESS Decide your wedding outfits. Pick a tailor, shop or designer and place the orders, including for accessories. INVITES Design or select cards. Sometimes it works to have multiple cards; one `religious’ set; one sent out by families, and one sent out by the couple. Decide on the printer, ask for samples, and always read proofs. Don’t ignore envelopes and try to include a location map. Print extra copies as back-up. Mail invites to out-station guests now or at least two months in advance. ACCOMODATION FOR GUESTS STAYING OVER Book rooms for your guests or arrange for stays with friends and relatives. Ask if anybody has a vacant flat that you can temporarily use. Serviced apartments are a good idea. Hire or borrow extra mattresses, linen, crockery etc. You might need to hire maids, cooks and drivers for the wedding week, so start looking now. SERVICE PROVIDERS Most important: it’s time to start making a list of all service providers for the wedding. This includes: Caterers,

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MONTHS AHEAD

2

MONTHS AHEAD

Confectioners, Florists, Trousseau Packers, Decorators and Lighting, Ushers, Parking Valets, Photographers, Hair and Make-up Artists, Saree Drapists, Mehendi Artist, Priest and Registrars, Car Rentals, and DJs and Entertainment artists. Ask for recommendations, look at providers in the magazines, go online to check credentials, visit personally, and ask for samples and quotes. Always inspect services and equipment beforehand. For eg, check out cutlery, crockery, and linen the caterer provides; or websites and albums of photographers. Start separate files for each service and add visiting cards, quotes etc to this, so that nothing gets lost. Discuss themes thoroughly, if the theme is orange flowers and décor, approve the selections, and ensure availability on the date in adequate numbers. Place orders and book service providers with written receipts and bills so that you can get refunds in case of defaults. Pay advance amounts and settle fully only after the ceremony. Assign one person to one responsibility, which they can see through completely till the wedding day and after. This way, you control quality till the very end. For example, assign one person for the photographer-to book dates, ensure he’s in place during each ceremony, and follow up on album delivery and payment. GIFTING List and buy all gifts needed for family, in-laws’ family, return gifts, and for all those who helped with wedding arrangements. Wherever possible, buy in bulk to save costs; for eg, you can get great deals at wholesale saree shops. MEDICAL CHECK-UP Take a thorough physical examination. Make sure you are healthy and take supplements if needed. Consult a gynaecologist for safe contraception and to control the menstrual cycle for the wedding. LEGAL CONSULTATION Talk to a lawyer if both of you want a pre-nuptial contract. If the parents of the bride are giving her gifts and property, it’s a good idea to register these in her name for future security. Such issues are particularly important if it’s an arranged marriage with someone who lives abroad, or for marriages arranged too quickly between unknown families. NEW ROOM/HOUSE The newly-weds will move into a new home or a new room in family home. Get the place ready and stock essentials well in time. SPRING CLEANING Give your house a lick of paint and clean-up so that you’re ready for the thousand teas you will be serving soon. HONEYMOON Discuss and find a destination, decide how you will finance it, and book flight and hotels. Get your honeymoon wardrobe ready. Apply for passports and visas. JEWELLERY Finish all jewellery purchases like mangalsutra by now. Buy from reputed dealers and insist on receipts and purity certificates. Try on wedding rings for size and alter if needed. WEDDING APPAREL The couple should have by now tried on their outfits, given them in for alterations, and purchased all accessories like bags, shoes, culf links or tie-pins. WEDDING FUNCTIONS Sign up for dance lessons if you plan to have a choreographed Sangeet session. Decide on the song and dress code. Decide which friend will arrange the Bridal Shower. Invite the people you want for the Sangeet, Mehendi or Bridal Shower, and organise transport and catering for these days.

Last MONTH

Last WEEK

ON THE

Day

Time for the last-minute checks on caterers, florists, decorations, and so on! Ensure it’s all going to plan. Re-confirm all bookings and give final guest lists and numbers to the caterers. Call the DJ/musicians and reconfirm dates, music and programmes. The guests will soon start pouring in, so hire extra hands. Make sure the house is never left unguarded, because a wedding house is ripe temptation for burglars. Indulge in a spa and massage session-whether bride, groom or parents. It’s a much-needed break from the pressure and for general sanity. Be prepared for the bachelor/hen party, and give yourself plenty of time to recover from all excesses. You don’t want baggy eyes on D-Day. List all guest arrival times and ensure transportation to take them to their accommodation. Make sure they are comfortable, and that food and entertainment like sightseeing trips are organised for them. Decide how you want to deal with leftover food. Arrange with organisations beforehand if you want it picked up and used rather than thrown away. Reconfirm bookings with the wedding registrar. Get the dressing room at the venue cleaned and prepared. Stock it with iron and sewing kit for emergency repair jobs, as well as with water, fruit juices, snacks and tissues. Keep a first-aid kit handy. The cars that bring families and friends to the venue should be in place, with all car numbers and driver contacts handy. Put ushers at the entrance to show guests in and organise valet parking. Set up a gift table and assign someone to handle all gifts. Make sure the bidaii or farewell car is decorated and ready for the couple to leave the venue for their bridal suite. Make sure all the gifts and personal belongings are transported back to the homes.

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Wedding £ Budget £

£

£

£

£

£

£

Here is a detailed budget table to help you plan your wedding f inances. Fill in the columns that apply to you and keep track of expenses. If you are systematic, you can juggle f inances and the money over-spent under one head can be saved elsewhere, or vice-versa. Creating and sticking to a budget is one of the best ways to control expenditure. BUDGET HEADS PLANNING Online Site Matchmaker Matrimonial Ad ENGAGEMENT Rings Apparel Gifts Venue Catering Cars & Miscellaneous PREPARATION TROUSSEAU Clothes and Accessories Jewellery Footwear Linen Kitchenware Furniture APPAREL Clothes, Shoes, Accessories Clothes for Family Clothes for Bridesmaids/Bestman JEWELLERY For Bride For Groom For Siblings/In-laws/Family 8

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ESTIMATE

ACTUAL

DIFFERENCE


BUDGET HEADS GIFTS Bridal Couple Family Extended/In-laws’ Family INVITES Printing Costs Mailing Costs FITNESS/BEAUTY Spa/Gym Beautician/Cosmetologist Doctor WEDDING GUESTS Air/Train Tickets Accommodation VENUE Hire Table/Chairs Corkage SERVICE PROVIDERS Wedding Planner Caterers/Confectioners/Liquor Florists/Bouquets/Corsages Photographers/Videographers Decorators/Lighting/DJ etc Car Rentals/Users/Parking Hair/Make-up/Stylist Priest/Registrar Fees Religious Ceremony Essentials OTHER FUNCTIONS Sangeet Mehendi Hen’s/Bachelor’s Night Reception/Entertainment FIRST NIGHT/HONEYMOON First Night Suite/Car Rental Honeymoon Hotel Travel Tickets Wardrobe & Luggage Passports & Visas Travel Cash BRIDAL HOUSE/ROOM Flat Purchase/Create Room New Home/Room Décor

ESTIMATE

ACTUAL

DIFFERENCE

TOTAL M.I.L. MatchMaker® •

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Gujarati

Weddings

MARRIAGE T H RO UGH T H E AGES Gujarati Rituals

The Gujarati community are a lively lot who celebrate all festivities with magnificent splendour and glamour. All over the world they take pride in celebrating their festivals such as Navaratri and dance the night away in Raas Garbha… So when it comes to weddings, the Gujarati celebration can go beyond imagination! The article below briefly highlights some of the traditions and customs observed and in modern time fine tuned to suit the occasion.

The Wedding Prelude Chandlo Maatli-Acceptance of Alliance The chandlo is the announcement of the acceptance of the alliance between the two families and the consent of the bride and groom to come together in matrimony. Like most of the other Indian communities, the father of the girl starts looking for a husband for his daughter, as soon they are in their twenties (Olden times even younger!). Chandlo is the tika and maatli is the clay container in which sweets were packed in the olden days. The bride’s father and four other male members visit the groom’s and give him a shagun (a blessing symbolised by a token sum of money). This is when an astrologer normally fixes the wedding date but these days many do not look at these aspects and the date is often decided between the two families.

Mehendi, Garbha & Dandia-The Henna Ceremony This is an intimate gathering of the bride’s female relatives and close friends few days before the wedding. Mehendi (henna) applied in the fine patterns on the palms and feet of the bride. Songs specific to the occasion are sung. On the evening of the mehendi family and friends gather together dressed in the traditional finery and sing and dance the graceful garbha and the men join in later for the energetic dandia raas.

Just Before the Wedding Mandva Mahurat-Constructing the canopy for Wedding Rites A day before the wedding, the blessings of Lord Ganesha are sought on the ground on which, the wedding canopy will be installed. Though family and close friends attend the mandva mahurat, only the women of the household observe the puja. The pujari performs a brief puja at the shrine inside the house then puts tika on the foreheads of five men from the family. He goes on to give them a small stick with nada Chari (red thread) wrapped around it. The men link their hands and carry this to site of the mandva and embed it into the earth. This stick is symbolic of one poles of the mandva, which will support the canopy. In modern times, the venue or wedding provider will take care of the stage setting and décor aspects for the bride quite easily.

Pithi-Beautification Rituals A shrine is arranged with a picture of Lord Ganesha. The bride sits on a bajat (low stool), palms upturned. It is prerogative of the kaaki (paternal uncle’s wife) to mix the pithi (a paste sandalwood powder, herbs, rosewater and German mogro (a type of perfume). She then arranges the pithi on a decorated platter and has it blessed by the priest. The women of the household apply the pithi on the bride’s skin.

On The Wedding Day Mameru – Bride being led by her Maternal Uncle The bride receives gifts from her mama (maternal uncle). The custom of mameru originated centuries ago when there were no legal rights existed for daughters. When the girl grows up and gets married, the mama/family members comes with the mameru consisting of clothes, jewellery and other gifts items including the traditional paanetar (silk wedding sari-usually white with red border) and choodo (ivory banglenow replaced with acrylic or plastic). The mameru ceremony takes place one day before the wedding but these days held on wedding day itself for convenience prior to other guests arriving. Once all the guests are seated -the maternal uncle escorts the bride to the Mandap often with a grand entrance and music played as a theme.

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Varghodo-The Groom’s Procession On the wedding day, the groom, dressed in all his finery, carrying a katar (small dagger) prepares to leave for the venue was an old custom. The priest gives the groom’s sister a small bowl wrapped in cloth and containing coins, on which the Hindu Swastika has been etched. She rattles this over her brother’s head to ward off the evil eye and to warn him that though he is getting married, he must not forget his sister. The groom’s father’s sister-in-law (chachi) garlands him and gives him cluster of flowers. After being blessed by all he mounts a richly caparisoned mare and leaves for the wedding venue accompanied by his relatives and close friends. In UK, the groom arrives by a procession with many family cars following to the venue.

Jaan or Phokhvu-Gesture of Understanding Var Ponke-Welcoming the Groom The bride’s mother receives the groom and the procession at the entrance of the wedding venue. She performs the traditional aarti, applies the kumkum and rice on his forehead. The clusters of flowers given him earlier by his aunt are now exchanged for a coconut decorated with red thread. This interesting ritual involves the groom with their relatives arriving at wedding venue with grand entry often with Dhol players. Before the groom enters the venue, there is little ceremony of laganya –one or two little boys related to the groom taken to the Mandap to welcome them and give gifts. Next the much awaited Groom makes his entry! The groom’s prospective mother-in-law blesses the groom and performs a small ritual to ward off the evil eye before he steps into the entrance of the venue hall. She also tries to pinch his nose as she reminds him that he is the taker since he will be taking her daughter away and they are the givers. The Best man here attempts to block mother-in-law and this ritual is a little mischief played in a fun-way.

Kanya Agamana The bride is led to the Mandap once the priest announces for Kanya to be present. She will make her grand entry accompanied by maternal uncle (mama) and other family members. In the Mandap there is an antarpat (curtain) which separates her from the groom. Traditionally this concept was applied in arranged marriages as the groom would be meeting the girl for the first time! These days, not the case at all but custom is still carried on.

Kanyadaan & Hastamelap-Entrusting the daughter One of the most important wedding rituals is kanyadaan. It is ceremony, in which the bride’s parents washes the groom’s feet and gives his daughter’s hand to him in the hope that he will take good care of her. The bride is considered to be a form of Goddess Laxmi and the bridegroom is considered to be Lord Narayana. Kanyadaan is performed in front of the sacred fire, facilitating the pious union of the boy and girl as the curtain is lowered. Hastamelap ceremony involves joining of hands and blessing the couple and the tying of the groom’s shawl to the bride’s saree to indicate union of two souls. This ritual is Chheda-Chhedi.

Conforming the Wedding Vows Varmala & Madhuparka-The Couple Exchange Garlands Varmala involves the exchange of garlands between the bride and the groom twice. First time, the groom is on a higher platform than the bride, while, the second time, they are at an equal level. In the madhuparka ceremony, groom’s feet are washed. Also, he is given honey and milk to drink. While this ceremony is going on, the bride’s sister tries to steal the groom’s shoes, known as Juta Churai and in return get gift back. These days this little ritual has become a contest between two families as to who gets the shoes!

Mangal Pheras & Saptapadi – Circumventions around the Sacred Fire Pheras are rounds that the couple takes around the sacred fire, as the priest chant mantras by the groom that expresses his genuine and heartiest desire to seek his wife’s loving support. In a Gujarati marriage, there are four mangal pheras, which represent Dharma (righteousness), Artha (monetary accomplishment), Kama (energy and passion in life) and Moksha (liberation from everything in life). Saptapadi are the seven steps that the couple walks together and takes vows which each step indicating true companionship and life-long partners. As they go around the sacred fire, the couple are showered with rose petals from close family members. The bride and groom garland each other signalling acceptance of this partnership Once the main rituals are conducted, other relatives and friends offer blessings to the couple and wish them for their new future followed by photo sessions and lunch or dinner that has been laid out.

Vadava Vanu-Bridal Send Off In the Vidaai ceremony, the bride bids farewell to her parents and relatives. She boards a specially decorated car along with her husband. Then both move towards their home, with a new life awaiting them.

Reception-Post Wedding Celebrations This is an event borrowed from the West and is not mandatory. The reception can be as simple or as elaborate an affair as desired. The purpose is to introduce the newly wedded couple to all relatives and the social circle. It is an occasion of merriment, when all the near and dear ones come to bless the newly wedded couple and give them gifts. M.I.L. MatchMaker® •

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Hindu Marriages T I ME F OR CHANGE? The Hindu wedding ceremony requires a lot of preparations. In olden days many months was spent on preparations. It was a communal occasion of grand proportions and a great deal of time, money and energy was necessary. In modern times, all those leisurely preparations have become an occasion to remember and some things to be proud of using the various wedding services that are hand these days to make the occasion that more special. However in this era of professionalism and importance of material comforts, marriages in the western world end up in separation –mutual or otherwise.

A question often asked now by younger generation: Is marriage necessary? Such a question was hardly raised in the past because there was nothing like consent marriage in the Hindu community as a whole. All details including the choice of a suitable bride or both partners were decided beforehand by their elders! The engaged couple’s opinion meant little in those days. By and large such marriages simply left to chance, did remarkably well so far. Women suffered more than men in such marriages and the stability of our society was largely achieved by denying many choices to women. The need for change has been realized by both youngsters and their parents. Forced marriages are far and few between these days. There is little room for such marriages in the changing social patterns which we see today in the Asian community. Parents and other relations involved have to take a generous attitude towards the wishes of the young because social and educational and cultural forces have greatly affected the ancient thinking. The marriage ceremonies and rituals in any community differ but all entail various stages and with passage of time, from matchmaking to marriages have all undergone many changes. Parents and guardians used to find a match for their children and most still try to do but with the spread of education and social liberalization, this choice is very much left to the boy or girl and parents do not impose their will and decisions on the children anymore. All these shifts are a welcome change but it is also increasingly difficult to find a suitable match these days which can sustain after marriage and the services of match-makers-marriage bureaus and their modern online version of matchmaking websites are increasingly coming to use.

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But there are also men and women who do actually opt out of the marriage system in growing numbers too and marriage is not inevitable as it used to be.

One burning question which remains to be answered is – Will Hindu marriage survive in its present form? The answer perhaps is that it ought to last with modest modifications in the same form. There is no alternative. There is a great deal of suffering and social disintegration as a result of increasing number of divorces. Husband and wife have got to work together as a team in order to achieve their own material goals in life these days. There cannot be love without responsibility. This is a fact of life and must be accepted as such. The Asian social and cultural continuity must be preserved in the western world. Asian society today has accepted divorces as a sad reality in tiny minority of cases, although this is increasing now. Divorce cannot be allowed to be fashionable or common. Even in ancient times, divorce was possible on certain grounds, but it was rarely possible to divorce a marriage partner on some flimsy grounds, as it is the case today. Indeed marriage was considered an endurance test in our social life. It is sometimes hard to see how irreconcilable differences cannot be ironed out. But efforts must be made NOT to magnify small differences. Forces which have no direct bearing on an otherwise successful marriage often interfere with the personal matters of the married couple.

So what does the future hold? A well thought out system of social check and balance must be worked out so that the society can be assured of a bright social and cultural future. It is possible to preserve some desirable traditions together with the modern ways of life and infact the younger generation are already doing this today. The Hindu way of life offers a great variety of experiences and opportunities. The Asian society has pinned its hopes on a stable and fruitful married life. Our marriage system is part of the destiny and distinctive culture and community in general and there can be no future without our marriage system. In tune with changing times, the community must make adjustments, as a whole so that new ideas and ideals cherished by the younger generation can be accomodated. Our ancient views and attitudes need to be changed in the western world of different social and cultural dimensions. There is no doubt about the need for widening our social horizons – Caste system can never survive like the ancient times. The world is very wide indeed. If we do not allow young men and women to widen their social vision within the Hindu community, a social disaster may occur. We must therefore preserve our social and cultural identity without risking stubborn adherence to aloofness – this multi-cultural society we live in today offers ample freedom to justify our existence as a social and cultural group. This part of Hindu life has stood the test of time. M.I.L. MatchMaker® •

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asmi

Priyanka Chopra Brand Ambassador for

D i a m o n d Je w e l l e r y For the woman of spirit

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M.I.L MatchMaker Magazine with confidential matrimonial listing

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MATRIMONIAL LISTING ORDER FORM MatchMaker International Ltd. P.O. Box 430, Pinner, Middlesex, HA5 2TW (U.K.)Tel: 020 8868 1879

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Bhaarat Welfare Trust Leicester For my smile credit goes to you... Bhaarat Welfare Trust collect funds for cancer projects, natural disasters and other humanitarian causes and donations can be made to any charity of your choice. Feedback will always be given. Other Projects: For a small donation, Bhaarat Welfare Trust also provide a comprehensive service on all aspects of India Visa or PIO/OCI application process. Contact Kantibhai or Rashmiben on 0116 266 7050 or email bhaarattrust@yahoo.co.uk

Amount £5 £10 £20 £20 £20 £30 £66 £250

Cause Gauchara Monthly Widow support Satya Narayan ni Katha One cataract operation Annadan Yearly Education for a Child One Polio operation For Eye/Medical Camp

Please complete the Donation Form below: Ref: MIL/India Aid I/We enclose cheque/cash/P.O. of _______________________for_________________________________________________ Name:_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________Post Code_______________________________________ Tel:_____________________ Mobile:_____________________ Email________________________________________________ Do you pay tax: YES/NO Please treat my donation as Gift Aid. You may reclaim tax on my donation. Signed:_______________________________________________________________ FOR OFFICE USE ONLY: Ref:____________________________ Receipt No:____________________________ Date:____________________________ Please send completed Form to: Bhaarat Welfare Trust Administration Office, 55 Loughborough Road, Leicester LE4 5LJ Tel: 0116 266 7050 / 233 9536 • Fax: 0870 135 3072 • Charity Registration Number: 1077821 52

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MIL MatchMaker Summer_2011 Cover:MatchMaker Summer Cover 2004

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MIL MatchMaker Summer_2011 Cover:MatchMaker Summer Cover 2004

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M.I.L MATCHMAKER