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Milly Brown

Venture Organisational context for the Congregation Project


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PGECP301 Project​ ​Conclusion MA​ ​Entrepreneurship​ ​ for​ ​Creative​ ​Practice Milly Brown

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Market Report Methodology .............................................................................................Page 7 The Art Market .........................................................................................Page 7 Global Trends..... .......................................................................................Page 7 The UK Art Market ................................................................................Page 8 Multiple & Editions ...............................................................................Page 8 Print Publishing........................................................................................Page 10 Global Trends...........................................................................................Page 10 The UK Magazine Market........................................................................Page 10 Independent Publishing............................................................................Page 11 Market leaders..........................................................................................Page 12 Market Innovators....................................................................................Page 16 Audience.. ...............................................................................................Page 24 Brexit footnote... ......................................................................................Page 26

Contents

Business Framework

Executive Summary ..................................................................................Page 30 Products and Services ...............................................................................Page 30 Production .................................................................................................Page 32 Legal Compliance .....................................................................................Page 32 Ethics ........................................................................................................Page 32 Congregation Stakeholders .....................................................................Page 34 Market Analysis Summary .........................................................................Page 34 Strategy and Implementation Summary.....................................................Page 35 Marketing Strategy......................................................................................Page 35 Distribution Strategies................................................................................Page 35 Strategic Alliances......................................................................................Page 36 Pricing Strategy..........................................................................................Page 36 Costings.......................................................................................................Page 36 Routes to Market...........................................................................................Page 38 Sales Strategy..............................................................................................Page 39 Management Summary................................................................................Page 39 4


Promotional Strategy

Methodology............................................................................................Page 41 Key messages...........................................................................................Page 41 Key Communication Channels.................................................................Page 42 Press & PR Plan........................................................................................Page44 Packaging & Branding.............................................................................Page 45

Bibliography and Appendices

Bibliography..............................................................................................Page 48 Appendix A(Market Report).....................................................................Page 54 Appendix B (Business Frameworks).......................................................Page 62 Appendix C (Promotional Strategy).........................................................Page 70 5


Market Report

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Methodology The purpose of this report is to investigate relevant market segments for the retail aspect of the Congregation project. This report looks at two sectors relevant to the advancement of the project; those of independent publishing, and fine art sales, with a focus on entry level and lower priced art, particularly multiples and editions. Both quantitative and qualitative data has been collated and analysed to give an informed, and timely, overview of both sectors. The report has been compiled using government and industry reports and statistics, alongside informed opinions and insights from experts working in academic research and with commercial organisations. When looking at market leaders and innovators, contemporary art and innovative publishing tiles have been examined.

The Art Market Global Trends Last year, the global art market saw a 12% increase in sales after two years of declining figures. The United States remains the largest market followed by China, which surpassed the United Kingdom in 2017 to become the second largest global buyer of art (McAndrew, 2018). Galleries increased sales by 4%, with art fairs accounting for just under half of their sales (McAndrew, 2018). Online art sales reached an all-time high of USD 5.4 billion and now accounts for 8% of the global art market transactions (McAndrew, 2018). This figure is up 12% on last year, but the growth of online sales is slowing down compared to growth in the four years preceding (Hiscox, 2018). As Millennials’ incomes grew with their advancing careers, we see 7


increasing numbers enter the market, with 41.9% of Millennials regarding art buying as a good investment (Forbes, 2017). The UK Art Market The UK is the third largest marketplace in the world for Art across all price sectors and generally follows the global trends in the market, however the UK does tend to generate higher volumes of sales at lower values than the US (McAndrew, 2018). The most commonly sold types of art in the UK are Post War & Contemporary. Defined as works by artists born after 1910, these artworks outsell all other genres (British Art Market Federation, 2017). A general interest in engaging with art and culture is growing in the UK despite the lasting effects of austerity and the economic uncertainty of Brexit. This is evidenced by a 9.3% rise in visits to galleries and museums recorded between June 2017 and June 2018 (Department for Culture Media and Sport, 2018). Multiples & Editions In 2016 the largest portion of all art sales in the UK was at the relatively low value of USD 1000 or under. These works accounted for 36.8% of total sales, and was by far the biggest price sector, including many artists multiples, editions and prints (British Art Market Federation, 2017). Globally, Millennials are even more likely to but art at this price point, as Appendix A shows, 40.1% of all art bought by this group is in this price bracket (Hiscox, 2018). Although online sales in this sector are important, 49% of Millennials still prefer to buy in person from a gallery or store (with 29% choosing online and 22% no preference), and a huge 71% of the whole market still likes to buy art in a physical rather than digital space. It should be noted though, that the use of mobile devices to buy art is increasing rapidly with sales from mobile platforms up 20% in 2018 from 2017 (Hiscox, 2018).

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Symposium by Stephen Felmingham. Photography by Megan Hemsworth


Print Publishing Global Trends As online media has continued to replace printed news, consumer and celebrity focused publications with digital content, global sales of printed newspaper and magazines have shrunk 4.9% over the last 5 years. The worst hit areas are men’s and women’s fashion and lifestyle publications, down respectively 1% and 3%, and popular culture and entertainments magazines which are down 4% in 2017 alone (Global Market Research Report, 2017). However, some sectors have reported rising circulation; Science and Technical magazines are up 9% and Regional Interest was up 8% in 2017 (Global Market Research Report, 2017). The UK Magazine Market The UK sales figures for print based publications are published every six months by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, or ABC, although it must be noted that the ABC report is compiled primarily for advertisers and takes only member publications into account. The figures covering the last six months of 2017 ‘showed that overall print circulation across the entire market fell by 5%, There were large declines for international news and current affairs titles, which fell by 15% year-on-year.’ (Pondsford, 2017). However, luxury publishing held its circulation figures steady, with titles such as Condé Nast’s Vogue up 2.3% and Hearst’s Esquire up 10.9% (Audit Bureau of Circulations, 2017). Perhaps this is because of what Nicholas Coleridge, Chairman of Condé Nast Britain and Chairman of the Victoria and Albert Museum, calls “The Magazine Moment..[It is] something to do with the sheen of the paper, the way that the ink sits on the page, the smell of money and desire that wafts off the page...’ The most successful mainstream magazine of the last half of the year was The Nation Trust Magazine whose circulation grew 4%, evidencing the UK’s appetite for culture and heritage related titles (Audit Bureau of Circulations, 2017). 10


Independent Publishing The UK independent publishing sector though, in contrast, is thriving. Stack, the online subscription service for independent print magazines, reported a growth of 78% in revenue and 76% in subscribers in 2016 (Severs, 2016), while the plethora of new titles available from a growing number of physical stores specialising in print such Artwords, Magalleria and Magculture evidence an explosion of self-publishers, printers and ‘Ziners’. “High end is what seems to work...” Says Tim Holmes, associate director for the Centre for Journalism at Cardiff University. “…The lure of print on paper is strong and deeply engrained.” (Severs, 2016) As can be seen in Appendix A, events and exhibitions around print culture are also increasing; from the Somerset House show, Print: Tearing It Up in London, to Raw Print’s monthly live events in Nottingham, to the annual artists’ book and zine fare, Counter, in Plymouth. Magazines such as Mushpit, It’s Nice That’s Printed Pages and Riposte run regular events themed around editorial content and Magculture’s annual Modmag symposium was even exported to New York last year. More targeted and individual titles are driving new customers to print and collecting small, but highly engaged readerships. Of niche publishing, John Leslie from Magculture says, ‘...we got to the stage where there were too many magazines. There were just too many magazines, too many, too often, too alike, too familiar. I think we’re optimistic about the near future, in terms of we’ll see a return to better quality, better made things.’ (Husni, 2018). Also, luxury brands and those with specialist offers are finding new and effective partners within independent magazines. Alison Branch Managing Director of Park Communications says, “…the independent publisher has become adept over time at identifying niche markets and gathering data and so to an advertiser this represents good value as they are targeting a pre-defined known demographic and getting good hit rates” (Severs, 2016). 11


Market leaders, Art Art Monthly published by the Art Monthly Foundation registered charity, is the UK’s leading magazine of contemporary visual art. Frieze magazine was set up in 1991 and is the leading magazine of contemporary art and culture. Creative Review. ‘We celebrate the work that matters. And we dig into how and why it gets made. We challenge and champion the industry we love.’ Elephant. Since its inception in 2009, the magazine has been dedicated to capturing the sensual pleasure of art and offers readers an ideal platform to experience it in print, pairing arresting images with original and independent research in award-winning design. Aesthetica Magazine covers photography, visual art, music, film and theatre. It has a readership of over 311,000 and national and international distribution. Apollo is one of the world’s oldest and most respected magazines on the visual arts. It covers everything from antiquities to contemporary work, as well as providing in-depth discussion of the latest art news and debates.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Market leaders, Independents Oh Comely is a curious, honest and playful independent magazine. It’s a place to meet strangers, hear their stories and look at life a little differently – where our readers are our writers and our models, too. Mushpit After nine issues and five years, the Mushpit has made a name for itself as London’s most-loved satirical fashion/political/feminist magazine Kinfolk. Delving deeply into home, work, style and culture, Kinfolk promotes quality of life and connects a global community of creative professionals from London to Tokyo. Since 2011 The Gourmand is an award winning, biannual food and culture journal. Each issue features 120 pages of specially commissioned words and images- The Gourmand's content is creative, timeless and exclusive. Cereal is a biannual, travel & style magazine based in the United Kingdom. Each issue focusses on a select number of destinations, alongside engaging interviews and stories on unique design, art, and fashion. Riposte We profile bold and fascinating women whose achievements speak for themselves.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Market Innovators SEASON is an independent platform that champions female fashion and football fans first. Launched in London in 2016, it's a cross between a football zine and a fashion magazine that spans biannual print issues, events, online content and merchandise. Sabat. Witch is an identity. It is an individual who has embraced their connection with the Earth and with the Goddess.— Fay Nowitz Buffellozine. A radical and subversive trip through the joy of magazines. Each issue rips apart the fabric of magazines and re-imagines them for a brave new world; mixing together black humour and an irreverent sense of beauty. Wrap is a London-based design and publishing brand working with some of today’s most talented illustrators and designers to create a collection of contemporary stationery products, alongside publishing our magazine Wrap. Gratuitous Type is an occasional pamphlet of typographic smut. Celebrating the letter in all its forms, the magazine highlights exciting contemporary design.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Market Innovators (continued) Posterzine. A gorgeous A1 (594x841mm) format poster which folds down into an A4 monograph, lithographically printed by Pressision Ltd onto quality G.F.Smith Naturalis papers, using two (or more) special Pantone ink colours. Put A Egg On It is an irreverent digest-sized art and literary magazine printed on green paper out of New York City. It’s about food, cooking and the communal joys of eating with friends and family. Delayed Gratification We invest in the best long-form, in-depth journalism in the world, accompanied by stunning images and photo features. PUSS PUSS is an international, bi-annual magazine and online platform for culture, fashion, music and cat lovers.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Market Innovators (continued) The Thing Quarterly is an "object-based publication" that sends useful objects designed by contributors including artists David Shrigley and Tauba Auerbach. The-Art-Form is a limited-edition publication about art and artists. ... "WHAT A GOOD IDEA: AN ART MAGAZINE WHERE THE ARTISTS RESPOND TO THE FORM” Container. Established to create books which aren’t, in the quotidian sense, books at all. Working with text to determine alternate approaches to the traditional book form, we aim to free artists from being “boxed in” by forms, roles, abilities, or identities. mono.kultur is a quarterly magazine publishing interviews with creatives in the arts and culture in a wider sense. Each issue features a single indepth interview and dedicates the entire issue to the interviewee.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Market Innovators (continued) Sculptorvox. This 8 volume series goes beyond seeing sculpture as ‘object’ and delves into the world, work, inspiration, processes, influences, ideas, journeys and careers of artists, writers, photographers who all work directly or indirectly with notions of three dimensions. Chroma. Colour plays a huge part in our everyday perceptions and creative expressions; It often stimulates a particular emotion in the viewer. Each colour has come to be associated with a vast array of different social and political concepts.

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Images from title’s own websites

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Audience ‘Art collectors are a disparate group, representing individuals and institutions from a very broad range of goals, backgrounds and regions’ Dr Clare McAndrew Founder of Arts Economics, Art Basel & UBS Report, (2017) The Art Market 2017. The above statement may not be particularly helpful when it comes to defining audience for the retail aspect of the project, however when analysing the demographic data for those engaged in the market sectors that have been investigated, i.e. Art and Publishing/ Magazines, it is evident there is little correlation in gender and age between those sector audiences (Yougov, 2018). However, there are commonalities in their social profile, habited regions and professions. Therefore, if we cannot define our market by gender or age we can say that they are likely to be of an A,B,or C1 social grade, (occupation and income marker), live in London or central Scotland work in marketing, media or advertising, have a monthly disposable income of up to £1000 and be slightly more likely to vote to the left, (Survey Samples sizes: 4769-27205) (Yougov, 2018). This broad group are also likely to be interest in the economy and current affairs as well as environmental and social justice issues. LSN from The Future Laboratory, describes them as ‘entering a period of late-stage materialism… still participating in mass consumption, yet they care much more about how their purchases reflect their world view (Smith and Firth, 2018). LSN also describes them as moving from ‘a society driven by individualism to one that embraces collectivism’ (McGregor and Stott, 2018). So, we are dealing with socially conscious and discerning markets who have access to cultural networks. Thinking of our diverse a yet media savvy, metropolitan and reasonable affluent audience, we can look again at the data from our markets to see who is already active within them. 24


In the art market, the Baby Boomer generation has the most disposable income but at sales below USD 1000 buyers are more likely to be Gen Xers or Millennials, 45% are new customers and buy via digital platforms, more willing to take risk with buying cheaper items online and discovering through social media. (Hiscox, 2018). Within independent publishing, Gen Xers are nostalgically connected with the DIY aesthetics and activist causes revived by many current print magazines and zines. Millennials, are discovering these publications for the first time as mediums for self-identification or rebellion, particularly around issues of gender and sexuality. They are also at the forefront of their creation, embracing the slower, analogue processes and interactions as an antidote to digital overload. It is additionally true that while both generations are more likely to curate and display their lives over Instagram, they see print as a haven from the fake news and spam that is so prevalent on Social Media networks. ‘We are seeing the pendulum swing back [to print] because of two things: trust and context,� says James Wildman, the UK chief executive of Hearst (Severs, 2016).

Offering by Mark Jessett. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

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In summary, our target audience: Professional and metropolitan. Socially conscious, and not fans of fake news Gender is not an issue, although gender equality is Seekers of real-life experiences...Probably discovered and exhibited online. Risk takers, and champions of the new, but not with disposable income to burn. Generation X and Millennials ‌ unite! (Baby Boomers: born 1946-64/Gen X: born 1965-1985/ Millennials: born 1986-96/Gen Z: born 1997- 2012)

Brexit footnote People are feeling less confident about the general economic position of the UK, and our audience will continue to feel uncertain about their own personal financial situation over the next 12 months. At time of going to press the consumer confidence index is at -10 (GFK, 2018).

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Wondering and Wandering by Milly Brown. Photography by Megan Hemsworth


Business Framework

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Executive Summary Congregation is a Not for Profit Organisation that was established with the intention of disseminating high value culture to a wider audience benefiting artists, writers and community groups. The main activities of the business will be initiating location specific art projects, the resulting artworks will then be disseminated to wider audiences via a print publishing platform. The concept was formulated by Milly Brown, who is an experienced designer, trend forecaster and educator working in the art, fashion, media and marketing sectors. Congregation will have exclusive rights for all print media, electronic media (Internet home page, Social Media, Interactive Publications, etc.), and possible seminars and workshops devoted to the delivery of the projects.

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Products and Services The organisation will initiate location specific art projects, working with local communities and partners, and publish the resulting work in a publication called ‘Congregation’. This is a multifaceted and innovative printed volume that will house artists’ original editions, along with high quality essays and articles. It will be limited to 100 copies per project and 20% of these will be distributed for free. Its objective is to benefit communities, artists and writers through the dissemination of these projects to a wider audience, whilst fostering innovative approaches to printed formats and distribution models. The publication will be partly distributed for retail to allow our target audience to purchase contemporary art at an affordable price, but a proportion will be distributed free of charge to participating artists and groups who would gain from this form of cultural and artistic exchange. Both forms of distribution would allow currently underrepresented groups to engage with contemporary art. Congregation will not be funded by advertising as this would compromise its independence and aesthetics. Finance will be solely reliant on the cover charge of the retail issues; however, some community based activities may attract sponsorship or public and private funding. The publication and its packaging will be of the highest quality digital print and use GF Smith FSC Certified paper. Printing is trusted to a fine art reproduction service rather than a commercial printer to ensure a high level of finish.

There is no other publication available that has the same intent, function and aesthetic appeal.

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Dinner, Ladies by Janey F Schmidt. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

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Production Production of the publication will be managed in-house and by Reproart, Fine Art Printer and Finisher, Newton Abbot (http://www.reproart. co.uk/). The publication and its packaging will be of the highest quality and use GF Smith paper, selecting FSC Certified stock when possible. (https://www.gfsmith.com/). See Appendix B for details.

Legal Compliance A copy of the publication will be sent to The British Library for formal classification and the first issue of Congregation will have its own ISBN number. From issue two, Congregation will have its own ISSN number. Currently there is no finance for this, but budgeting for it for the next issue would allow artists to claim yearly royalties on their artworks they published. This would be an attractive benefit for contributors to the publication. This scheme is called Payback and it is managed by DACS, the Designers and Artists Copyright Society. The publication will by 0% VAT rated (Vat Notice 701/10)

Ethics The organisation will treat all partners and contributors with respect and maintain an open and transparent dialogue with them We will work towards the inclusion of the unrepresented or marginalised within the field of contemporary art We will strive to maintain low levels of environmental impact

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Dinner, Ladies by Janey F Schmidt. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

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Congregation Stakeholders Management Artists Writers Retail customers

Contributing communities/locations Receiving communities and individuals Production partners Project partners

Market Analysis Summary The target market is distinctly two-fold. The first market is for the retail model of distribution; These are individuals who are interested in owning contemporary art but who cannot afford to do so in the existing marketplace. This segment is more fully explored within the ‘Audiences’ section of the Market Report and broadly consists of metropolitan Gen Xers and Millennials working in the creative and media industries, they are highly engaged with contemporary art and culture but they do not have the high levels of disposable income currently required to enter the contemporary art market. The second market is for the free model of distribution; As well as including those that have submitted content to the publication, this model targets groups that are currently unrepresented in contemporary art and not engaged in projects that are administrated by the Department for Culture Media and Sport. The ‘deficit’ model of high culture, currently employed by government, encourages disproportionate funding from the working classes, via the National Lottery, to art and culture projects that are mainly enjoyed by the most privileged in our society. By working to identify groups and individuals who would benefit from participation with location based and cultural exchanges, social change through art practices can be promoted (Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018).

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Strategy and Implementation Summary The following Strategies are based on delivering products and services to two markets. The two markets and the objectives for serving them are well defined, along with the benefits to stakeholders. Marketing Strategy Both retail and sales data will be monitored and analysed to inform future pricing and distribution models. Promotional activity will be assessed for effectiveness and reach by press monitoring and customer surveys. A multi-channel approach will reflect the diverse aims of the organisation. The promotional strategy is covered in a separate document. Retail Distribution Strategy Distribution for retail will be managed in-house and use three major routes to market both B-2-C, (Business to Customer), and B-2-C, (Business to Business). This is explained more fully in the section ‘Routes to Market’. Free Distribution Strategy 20% of each issue will be freely distributed. The exact channels of distribution will vary depending on the source location of the issue, as benefiting groups and individuals will be site dependant, although this would not mean all beneficiaries would need to be local to projects. 10 copies will go to the 10 artists or writers who have been selected to submit to the publication, the rest to individuals or groups who will be able to apply at launch events, workshops or over digital platforms, or, in some cases they may be directly approached by the management. They must all fill one the following criteria to qualify for a free copy of Congregation. Will they benefit from: An exchange of ideas? An exchange of culture? An exchange of place? 35


Strategic Alliances The strategic alliance will be sought with key community partners who share the organisation’s values such as Second Floor Studios & Arts, Anthology and Nudge Community Builders. Pricing Strategy The pricing strategy must account for the unique way in which the publishing industry prices its goods for retail; via a predetermined cover price (see Appendix B). ’Discounts’ are then given down the supply chain to those involved with bringing the product to market. As well as considering these parameters, the price of the publication must cover company overheads and production costs, including an extra 10% of cost price to cover the freely distributed copies, and a further 10% to cover the 10 artist’s copies. (20% in total). The Cover Price is set at £100. This is very expensive, (although not unheard of), for a magazine, but not for an artists edition, book or print. As the product straddles those marketplaces so does the price-point. Comparably priced artists’ books are available at retailers such as at Antenne and ArtData and much higher prices for editions, prints and multiples can be seen at Tate Online Shop and Fine Art Multiple. The price is excellent value, offering not one but 10 works of art for £100. Costings The production price is £16.50 per unit (see below): Paper (GF Smith) 9.60 Print (Reproart) 4.15 Total materials 13.75 20 % Free copies Production Cost 2.75 Total Production Cost 16.50 (per unit)

The wholesale price is £50 per unit (see below): Total Production Cost 16.50 203% Mark-up 33.50 Total Wholesale Price 50.00 (per unit)

This is a high percentage mark-up, on 80 units sold that equates to £2,600 after production cost to pay for all other business overheads per issue. 36


Continuum by Karen Pearson. Photography by Megan Hemsworth


Routes To Market Three major routes to our audience for the retail model have been identified and the impacts on the Pricing Strategy investigated. SOR is not a preferred option for sales terms and has not been factored in. Route 1: B-2-C Sales made directly to the public via our website, at our own events, (such as issue launches and site specific group exhibits), or at events held by external agencies (Art Fairs or Artist’s Book Fairs). This is the preferred and most profitable route to market for our publication. Breakdown from £100 cover price: Congregation £100 (Less expenses for hosting or exhibiting at an event and web-hosting)

Route 2: B-2-B Sales made to the public via a retail partner such as an online artists book store or gallery shop. This gives us ongoing presence and sales on other retail platforms and allows us to extend out network of audiences. We would sell direct to retailer. Breakdown from £100 cover price: Congregation £60 Retail Partner: £40

Route 3: B-2-B Sale made to the public via a retail partner and a distributor or wholesale. Our least profitable for retail partners, but this would be the most logical way to higher volume and international sales. Our wholesale price remains intact, but the retail and the distributor share the profit resulting from sales Breakdown from £100 cover price: Congregation £60 Retail Partner: £25 Distributor/ Wholesaler: £15

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Sales Strategy In addition to the organisation’s own online platform, the following retailers have been identified and as potential retail partners: Artwords Turbine Hall Shop at Tate Modern Tate Online Shop Rizzoli Bookshop at Somerset House MagCulture Fine Art Multiple Grey Area The Gagosian Shop Magalleria

Stack DSM Goodhood The Village Bookshop and Gallery Arnolfini Store Baltic Shop The Design Museum Store Golden Hare Books Good Press

New Religions by Robert Manners. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

Management Summary With production services outsourced to Reproart, Congregation currently has need for general management, editorial, artistic, sales & marketing, and financial expertise. These roles will be managed by Milly Brown. 39


Promotional Strategy

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Methodology To formulate the most effective promotional strategies, findings from the Marketing Report have been aligned with the objectives of business proposal.

Key Messages We are a Not for Profit Organisation that was established with the intention of disseminating high value culture to a wider audience. We believe that high culture should be accessible to all. We will act as advocates for those who are underrepresented in contemporary art. Brand Essence

We make, we exchange, we listen, we change Brand Voice

...Is many. We are Congregation.

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Key Communication Channels We need to communicate with participants, partners, communities and customers, so it important that we use the correct media and content to communicate with them effectively. Our primary medium is print, so it is essential that anything we do in this format is innovative, high quality and ethical. Social media and digital channels allow us to directly address both contributors and customers so we must be open to both types of conversation and promote the cyclic aspects of the projects over this media; A call out for artists can generate excitement in customers about forthcoming publications, and a publishing announcement is validating for participating artists, so these channels should be seen as highly visible and open-ended tools for communications. As champions of innovative print formats, we will maintain a useful but minimal web presence. Our digital site will consist of selective evocative imagery of the current issue’s site and artworks in situ, a link to a sales platform (such as Big Cartel, see Appendix C), stockists and links and call-outs for community groups and artists. The site will also feature a look at the contents of the Congregation publication; this will be a short animation showing how the publication unfolds and the editions can be accessed . Social Media communications are posted via Instagram, our target market’s preferred and growing channel, as evidenced in Appendix C. Posts will feature images of the work and location that is relevant to the current issue. Analysis of engagement will inform future content and posting schedules.

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Prayer by Jane Caberera. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

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Press & PR Plan As a high quality and boundary breaking print publication, it is important to be visible to those who are renowned for championing these qualities in publishing, art and retail. Complimentary copies of the first issue will be sent to Antenne Books and Magculture. As well as being two stockists, they are respected taste makers in the world of independent publishing and have large followings on social media (Magculture 31.4K /Antenne Books 24.1k, Appendix C). To increase the publication’s visibility within the publishing industry to targeted audiences, Congregation will be entered for the annual Stack Magazine awards next August in the hope of being short-listed for Launch of The Year, Best Original Non-fiction or Best Art Direction. Last year this event was covered by Magculture, Eye, Its Nice That, Made By Folk, YCN, Creative Review and Monocle, all publications that have industry credibility and target audience appeal. We will also target People of Print, Raw Print, It’s Nice That and selected arts and culture publications with a print based press release celebrating the projects launch. This is planned for the new year so that we can time issue two to come out in the last quarter, when art and high-end magazines sell in increased numbers. It is equally important that Congregation is promoted to our art buying audience and is covered in contemporary art magazines and journals. To stimulate interest in the publication, print based press releases celebrating the projects launch will be sent to magazines such as Elephant, Creative Review and Aesthetica, a more extensive list of targeted titles is included in the Market Report. In addition, news of events such as site-specific projects, launch exhibitions and projects run in partnership with community groups and artists will all provide content that will regularly be disseminated to the contemporary art press via digital press releases. 44


The artists and writers that are contributing to each publication will also act as advocates for the publication and will be encouraged to use their own networks to generate interest around specific issue launches. At present the artists that are contributing have smaller numbers of followers on Instagram, (from under 100 to 2.5K), but it is important to utilise these networks as the accounts are from authentic members of the arts community.

Photo-text Print by Dave Beech. Photography by Megan Hemsworth

Packaging & Branding Branding is very important as printed formats will differ from issue to issue of the publication. Typographic design will remain constant and act as the chief brand signifier. The publication and its packaging will be of the highest quality digital print and use GF Smith FSC Certified paper. Printing is trusted to a fine art reproduction service rather than a commercial printer to ensure a high level of finish. As the publication will be sold sealed, it is crucial that, at POS, there is a visual to help customers understand the content of the publication. This will take the form of digital visual online, with a QR code to guide customers to it and an printed insert on the back of the packaging showing photographs of all the artists editions housed in the publication.

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Bibliography

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Appendices

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Bibliography: For Market Report, Business Framework and Promotional Strategy Books Triggs, T., (1995) Communicating Design (1st ed.). London: B.T. Batsford Magazine or Journal Articles: Drinkfield, E., (2015) Mushpit. Metazine (2), pp.21 Busch, A., (2003) Magazine Watch. Print (57), pp28 Websites Anonymous, (2016). A Q&A with… Nicholas Sharp, director and cofounder of The Multiple Store. [online] London: a-n.co.uk. Available at https://www.a-n.co.uk/news/a-qa-with-nicholas-sharp-director-andco-founder-of-the-multiple-store/ Accessed on [10th August at 5.43pm 2018] Tongue, L., (2018). The Magazine Blueprint. [online] London: Made By Folk. Available at https://www.madebyfolk.com/featured/the-magazineblueprint/ Accessed on [18th June at 2.36pm 2018] Goldstein D., (2018). Putting the creative in “creative”: How agencies can handle today’s deconstructed customer journey. [online] London: Digiday. Available at https://digiday.com/sponsored/braze-brazesbl-putcreative-creative-agencies-can-handle-todays-deconstructed-customer journey/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=digidaydis&utm_ source=brands&utm_content=180618/ Accessed on [18th June at 2.56pm 2018] Leslie, J., (2015) This Golden Age. [online] Munich: Typographische Gesellschaft München. Available at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=JMceG_X_oIs/ Accessed on [18th June at 5.56pm 2018] Husni, S., It’s A Mag Mag Mag World & Mag Culture Is Bringing It To New York City: The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Jeremy Leslie, Owner & Curator, Mag Culture. [online] New York: Mr. Magazine. Available at https://mrmagazine.wordpress.com/2018/05/15/its-a-mag48


mag-mag-world-mag-culture-is-bringing-it-to-new-york-city-the-mrmagazine-interview-with-jeremy-leslie-owner-curator-mag-culture/ Accessed on [18th June at 2.50pm 2018] Pondsford, D., (2017) Magazine ABCs: Full breakdown of UK magazine sales figures for first half 2017.[online] London: Press Gazzetta. Available at https://www.pressgazette.co.uk/magazine-abcs-full-breakdown-ofuk-magazine-sales-figures-for-first-half-2017 Accessed on [18th June at 4.30pm 2018] McIntosh S., (2017) Magazines: How print is surviving the digital age. [online] London: BBC. Available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainmentarts-40897967/ Accessed on [18th May at 1.15pm 2018] Anonymous, (2018) Print magazines: sales volume in the United Kingdom (UK) 2011-2017. [online] London: Statista. Available at https:// www.statista.com/statistics/322476/magazine-print-sales-volume-uk/ Accessed on [18th May at 1.15pm 2018] Anonymous (2018) Demographics: Art. [online] London: YouGov. Available at https://yougov.co.uk/profileslite#/ Accessed on [18th JULY at 1.45pm 2018] McGregor, R. and Friend, H. (2018) MONEY MARKET: GENERATION Z.[online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/markets/ Accessed on [18th May at 1.35pm 2018] Smith, J. and Maciejowska, K. (2018) THE FOCUS FILTER. [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/macrotrends/ Accessed on [18th May at 1.50pm 2018] Friend, H. and Walker J. (2018) LUXURY STUDENT MARKET. [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/ markets/ Accessed on [20th May at 2.35pm 2018] 49


Bibliography (continued) Smith, J. and Firth, P. (2018) POST-GROWTH SOCIETY [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/macrotrends/ Accessed on [20th May at 4.50pm 2018] McGregor, R. and Stott, R. (2018) MORALITY RECODED. [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/macrotrends/ Accessed on [20th May at 6.52pm 2018] Anonymous (2018) Fineartmultiple™ is the Marketplace for Contemporary Art. [online] London: Fine Art Multiples. Available at https://fineartmultiple.com/about/ Accessed on [18th July at 1.15pm 2018] Anonymous (2018) The Multiple Store: editions by major contemporary artists (1998-2016). [online] London: The Multiple Store. Available at http://themultiplestore.org/about-us/ Accessed on [22nd May at 1.35pm 2018] Walters, J.L., (2018) New York State of Mag.[online] London: Eye Magazine. Available at http://www.eyemagazine.com/blog/post/new-york-state-of-mag/ Accessed on [22nd May at 2.15pm 2018] MutualArt (2013) The Artist Multiple: A Collector’s Source List [online] London: Huffington Post. Available at https://www.huffingtonpost.com/ mutualart/the-artist-multiple-a-col_b_4030040.html?guccounter=1/ Accessed on [22nd May at 2.55pm 2018] Wallace, J., (2015) Art Law on Consumer Protections for Purchasers of Prints and Multiples [online] New York: ArtNet. Available at https:// news.artnet.com/market/buying-and-selling-art-in-multiples-323824/ Accessed on [22nd May at 2.55pm 2018]

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Anonymous (2017) Stack Awards 2017 [online] London: Stack. Available at https://www.stackmagazines.com/awards/ Accessed on [22nd May at 3.55pm 2018] Anonymous (2017) 2017 Summary – The art market enters a new phase [online] London: Artprice. Available at https://www.artprice.com/ artprice-reports/the-art-market-in-2017/2017-summary-the-art-marketenters-a-new-phase/ Accessed on [22nd May at 4.35pm 2018] Converse Townsend, J.,(2014) A Better Way To ‘Buy One, Give One’[online] New York: Forbes (Ashoka). Available at https://www.forbes.com/sites/ ashoka/2014/10/08/a-better-way-to-buy-one-give-one/#2b9bd2b485ef Accessed on [10 August at 00.35pm 2018] Sweney, M., (2018) Out of print: NME’s demise shows pressure on consumer magazines [online].Available at https://www.theguardian.com/ media/2018/mar/12/nme-vogue-death-print-magazines/ Accessed on [10 August at 00.35pm 2018] Severs, J., (2016) Indies Set to Save Sagging Mag Sector [online]. Available at https://www.printweek.com/print-week/feature/1155416/ indies-set-to-revive-sagging-mag-sector Accessed on [13 August at 00.05pm 2018] Anonymous, (2017) Global Magazine Publishing - Global Market Research Report 2017 [online]. Available at https://www.ibisworld. com/industry-trends/global-industry-reports/manufacturing/magazinepublishing.html Accessed on [13 August at 00.05pm 2018]

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Bibliography (continued) Reports Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018) Understanding the relationship between taste and value in culture and sport. DCMS [viewed 26 March 2018]. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/understanding-the-relationship-between-taste-and-value-inculture-and-sport/ Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018) Monthly Museums and Galleries visits. DCMS [viewed 20 May 2018]. Available from: https:// www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/museums-and-galleriesmonthly-visits/ Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018) Culture is Digital. DCMS [viewed 20 July 2018]. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/culture-is-digital/ British Art Market Federation (2017) The British Art Market 2017. British Art Market Federation [viewed 20 April 2018]. Available from: http://artseconomics.com/project/the-british-art-market-2017/ Hiscox Ltd. Available from: (2018) Hiscox Online Art Trade Report 2018 [viewed 17 August 2018]. Available from: https://www.hiscox.co.uk/ sites/uk/files/documents/2018-04/Hiscox-online-art-trade-report--2018. pdf Art Basel & UBS Report, Prepared by Dr Clare McAndrew Founder of Arts Economics (2018) The Art Market 2018. Art Basel & UBS [viewed 17 August 2018]. Available from: https://d2u3kfwd92fzu7.cloudfront. net/Art%20Basel%20and%20UBS_The%20Art%20Market_2018_2.pdf

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Art Basel & UBS Report, Prepared by Dr Clare McAndrew Founder of Arts Economics (2017) The Art Market 2017. Art Basel & UBS [viewed 20 April 2018]. Available from: https://d33ipftjqrd91.cloudfront.net/ asset/cms/Art_Basel_and_UBS_The_Art_Market_2017.pdf/ The Behavioural Insights Team (2017) Update Report 2016-1. The Behavioural Insights Team [viewed 17 July 2018]. Available from: https://www.behaviouralinsights.co.uk/ Exhibitions Counter: Plymouth Art Book Fair: 4th Edition (2018) [Exhibition]. Ocean Studios, Plymouth. 17 March 2018 Print! Tearing It Up (2018) [Exhibition]. Somerset House, London 8 June-22 August 2018

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Appendix A: Marketing Report

Art Buying habits of millennials from Hiscox online art report

54


Art Market reports Art Basel/UBS

Smith, J. and Firth, P. (2018) POST-GROWTH SOCIETY [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/macro-trends/ McGregor, R. and Stott, R. (2018) MORALITY RECODED. [online] London: LSN Global. Available at https://www.lsnglobal.com/macro-trends/ 55


Anonymous, (2017) Global Magazine Publishing - Global Market Research Report 2017 [online]. Available at https://www.ibisworld.com/industry-trends/global-industry-reports/manufacturing/magazine-publishing.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zarastone/2017/09/19/how-a-26-year-old-artist-makes40-of-sales-through-instagram/#40cfc7e3192b

56


British Art Market Federation (2017) The British Art Market 2017. British Art Market Federation [viewed 20 April 2018]. Available from: http://artseconomics.com/project/the-british-art-market-2017/

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58


Publishing events are now common plac. https://www.itsnicethat.com/nicer-tuesdays http://www.counterplymouth.com/ https://magculture.com/events/ http://raw-print.com/what-we-do/

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Demographics for those interested in Magazines

Demographics for those interested in Art Anonymous (2018) Demographics: Art. [online] London: YouGov. Available at https://yougov.co.uk/profileslite#/ Accessed on [18th JULY at 1.45pm 2018]

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Demographics for those interested in Art

The consumer confidence index is at -10 https://www.gfk.com/en-gb/about-gfk/about-gfk/

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Appendix B: Business Framework

https://www.bigcartel.com/ Online sale hosting for free at Big Cartel

Quotes for Print and Paper

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Notes on pricing models in the publishing industry

Hi Milly There are no hard and fast rules and the more we go along the more I'm inclined to make up my own, so take this with a pinch of salt! Discounts range between 25% (off the cover price) and 50%. Discounts at the lower end (25-30%) apply to sale or return titles. SOR is generally offered by larger suppliers who have the capacity to deal with it, and I'm generally surprised to be offered SOR by smaller fry. When dealing directly with indies we look for 40%. In return we buy firm sale and we promote the title more than anyone else will. We prefer not to pay for delivery, but will as long as it's not extortionate. We refuse to pay delivery for firm sale under 35%. A couple of large suppliers also give us 40% for firm sale. The two main suppliers of art magazines similar to your project are Antenne (www.antennebooks.com) and Art Data (www.artdata.co.uk) who offer 40% and 35% respectively, SOR. As to whether you charge for delivery it's not really clear. I think it's easy to arrange fairly cheap transit so I would just build this into the cost of the magazine, rather than charge someone delivery on top. If they're returning stock they'll have to pay then, so don't levy them twice. We're roughly 75% firm sale which is rare, because most magazine retailers are fearful of being caught with unsold stock and stick to SOR or consignment. Consignment where the retailer takes on the stock without charge and only pays for what they sell; you ask the retailer for every few months or even after a year what's sold and bill them. It's not a bad system, but things can get sloppy and we try to avoid it because we like a quick, cleaner transaction

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Drinkfield, E., (2015) Mushpit. Metazine (2), pp.21

We Decided to go ad free so all of our content was very specific and we had complete control over it’ Charlotte Roberts pp22

Quote from Mushpit Editor, Char Roberts, on her decision not include advertising in her magazine.

Facing page: Potential community partners.

64


https://nudge.community/

https://anthology.london/developments/deptford-foundry

https://www.secondfloor.co.uk/ 65


Extract from: Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018) Understanding the relationship between taste and value in culture and sport. DCMS [viewed 26 March 2018]. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/understanding-the-relationship-between-taste-andvalue-in-culture-and-sport/ pp26 ‘All nations exhibit inequalities in participation in ‘high culture’ of the sort that is subsidised by the state (Ultee et. Al. 1993). This means that cultural policy 26 entails a redistribution of resources upwards, towards those who are already most privileged. This is particularly so in Britain, where the funding for cultural projects comes partly from the National Lottery, meaning that the money comes disproportionately from the working classes (Matheson and Summerfield eds. 2000)6 Part of the problem here is that many of those who count as being excluded on the basis of their lack of participation in high culture don’t themselves to be so. In this sense the ‘deficit’ model of culture employed by government is unhelpful, as what matters for health and well-being appears to be participation per se, rather than a particular set of tastes and practices. Department for Culture Media and Sport (2018) Understanding the relationship between taste and value in culture and sport. DCMS [viewed 26 March 2018]. ‘

66


Meeting with Daniel McCabe-owner Maggalleria, Bath 09/08/2018 Very importantly Daniel outlined the challenges of selling an item like this in store. It would need to come with a display copy (expensive and not the best way to use a limited edition!) or webpage that he could access that would show all the aspects and how it folds out, or a printed illustration to show contents. Cello is a must so that they can be collected or opened if being bought as a gift-‘first to read’ is important and with multiple elements it will ensure there is a complete set and no tampering has happened. Magculture would be a great champion as Jeremy Leslie loves boundary pushing print Antenne Books would be another great place and the sell B2B as well as B2C.Gallery shops would be interested. He introduced me to many magazines that could be comparable in some way, through format: The Last Magazine Gong £12 Dogger £10! Double £18 Carcy E18 Pan ?

Price points £25 and under sell well Some mags retail in £40s Most expensive is £75 In all mission statements you should be clear on what your magazine is-what’s the point? What’s it for? 67


Example of contributing artists Instagram

68


Independent publishers, Example Instagrams 69


Hiscox Ltd. Available from: (2018) Hiscox Online Art Trade Report 2018 [viewed 17 August 2018]. Available from: https://www.hiscox.co.uk/sites/uk/ files/documents/2018-04/Hiscox-online-art-trade-

Appendix C: Promotional Strategy

Number of followers on Instagram for major art galleries.

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Preferred SM channels for Galleries to reach customers

Demographics for Instagram users UK. Anonymous (2018) Demographics: Art. [online] London: YouGov. Available at https:// yougov.co.uk/profileslite#/ Accessed on [18th JULY at 1.45pm 2018]

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Congregation

askthecongregation@gmail.com jointhecongregation.com @congregation_magazine

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Market Report, Business Framework and Promotional Strategy

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Market Report, Business Framework and Promotional Strategy

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