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December 7, 2006,Volume 72, No. 12

In this Honor society Issue: celebrates 80th Sports anniversary Becky Lasoski Editor-in-Chief

Majors open SCAC play. Pages 9-10

The Life

The Millsaps chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa, the first national honor society recognizing outstanding leadership, service and scholarship, is celebrating its 80th anniversary on campus. “The honor society was founded in 1914, and we established our circle in 1926,” says Janet Langley, Millsaps’ ODK advisor. “There are now over 300 ODK circles in the nation but ours is the 16th to be established.” Pi Circle, as the Millsaps chapter is known, plans to celebrate the anniversary during its Dec. 10 ceremony for new initiates. The circle’s officers, under the guidance of Langley, have planned to make some additions to the

traditional ritual. “The ceremony is going to take on a more prestigious and formal appearance this year to celebrate the anniversary,” explains ODK President Jessica Sanford, a senior. “Dr. Don Fortenberry and Dr. Charles Sallis, our emeritus secretaries, will be with us for the initiation ceremony and will talk with us about the history of Pi Circle,” says Langley. “There have been college presidents, bishops of the United Methodist Church, pastors of many faiths, civil rights activities and strong leaders in business and the public sector who began their lives of servant leadership at Millsaps and were members of the Pi Circle.”

A Winter Wonderland!

Photo by Gabby Kelly Chef Dave Woodward helped students get into the holiday spirit by providing his annual Chrismas feast.

ODK continues - page 8

Biology professor wins state-wide honor Kathleen Morrison Contributor

Come see the Nutcracker transformed! Pages 6-7

Features

Millsapians’ unorthodox traditions inside! Pages 4-5

Opinions

Do students leave enough time for God? Page 2-3

Dr. Sarah Lea McGuire of Millsaps was recently named the 2006 Mississippi Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Established in 1981 to recognize and raise awareness of outstanding undergraduate professors at higher learning institutions, the US Professors of the Year program chooses one professor from each of the 50 states, as well as Washington D.C., Guam, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. It was founded by CASE and shortly thereafter the

Carnegie Foundation became identifying, cloning and about McGuire. a partner and sponsor. characterizing. In addition, “[She] is a marvel. She McGuire is “honored McGuire is influential in appears to be one of those and humbled beyond words developing new classes for rare individuals who can and inspired do it all. She is to improve a superb teacher [her] teaching and a nationally and the recognized experiences scholar.” s t u d e n t s McGuire says have in [her] the best part courses.” She about teaching has been at at Millsaps is Millsaps for 12 “interacting with of her 16-year our students, in teaching career, class and out of and teaches class and having many levels meaningful Photo courtesy of Dr. Sarah McGuire of biology as a c a d e m i c The distinguished biology professor was well as Liberal discussions that honored recently with a national accolade. Studies. impact all of us. She is The same is true also a scholar, focusing Millsaps’ curriculum. for faculty interactions - these her research on genes and Dr. Richard Smith, dean are extremely rewarding.” cell division, especially of Millsaps College, raves “Dr. McGuire makes the

class feel so at ease from the first day,” says freshman Katherine Negrotto. “She definitely tries to get down on our level and really work with us so that we understand.” McGuire says, however, that the “unexpected and most wonderful part of the award has been the many, many letters of congratulations, phone calls and words of support I’ve received from students (current and former), faculty and staff at Millsaps. It helped me understand the support I have here, and solidified in my mind that I am truly in my appropriate vocation.”

Plans drawn for new Christian Center Cree Cantrell

Contributor

Millsaps officials have created a campus plan designed to upgrade the campus’s facilities, bringing the college into the future. Included in the plan is the design for a new Christian Center. For 55 years, the Christian Center has been one of the trademarks of this campus. Countless theater, history, philosophy and religious studies students have roamed the halls of the Christian Center. The well-loved building, however, has not stood the test of time very well. “At the time it was built, the Christian Center used the best technology available,” says Dean Todd Rose, vice president of campus programs and alumni, “but, because of the Yazoo clay that the building is built on, it has begun to shift and it is time for it to go.” Indeed, many have noted that the damage present in the Christian Center is quite evident.

Image courtesy of Todd Rose The new Christian Center will feature a stand-alone theater and chapel in addition to classrooms and faculty offices. The new building promises to be a significant addition to the campus’ profile. Located south of the football stadium along the West Street fence, the new Christian Center will be essentially three buildings in one. Each building, connected in some manner, will serve a distinct purpose. The first of these buildings

is an improved chapel. “The idea is to create a chapel that is free standing rather than a room in another building,” comments Rose. “The chapel could be used for anything from worship services to alumni marriages.” With its steeple filling the

skyline over Crepe Myrtle Walk (the sidewalk between the Academic Complex and Sullivan Harrell Hall) the new chapel promises to be a notable addition to the campus. Following the building of the chapel, a performing arts building will be erected. The

building will accommodate the theater program. It has yet to be decided whether the building will take the form of a traditional theater or that of a black box theater. Plans continues - page 8


Opinions

Page 2 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Miriam Gray grayme@millsaps.edu

Profanity is detrimental to social commentary an important rap artist of national stature who was kind enough to appear on campus for a panel discussion and performance in relation to sexual awareness week.  During the performance, either Mr. Kamikaze or some members of the audience suggested that Mr. Bush, currently President of the United States, “forget” himself, or something of that nature.  Brad Yakots, Dr. Michael Reinhard currently president of the Columnist Millsaps College Student I remember catching Body Association, then fired Al Pacino in the movie off a letter, written on that stationary, “Scarface” on TV.  organization’s taking exception to Mr. Unfortunately Oliver Stone’s Kamikaze’s obscene and artistic vision clashed with “blasphemous” remarks FCC standards on profanity, necessitating passages, and assuring him that “Forget me? No, forget further performances by you, you mother-forgetting the artist in question would mother forgetter, you!.... not be supported by the When you forget with me SBA.  In an op-ed latter you are forgetting with the published in the P&W, the vocalist—the term singer best!”   Such artistic does seem inappropriate that Mr. compromises are enough to here—denied Bush is a proper object turn one against standards of civility in speech.  Still, of religious veneration, in the great debate over the that artists have a right to use of the word “forget” express themselves, that he in relation to certain speaking truth to power and political figures that has that someone else said used been occasioned by the the bad words anyway.  Leaving aside the “who appearance of Mr. Kamikaze said what to whom and on on campus, I favor the old what stationary and on what fashioned standards of theological grounds?” set of civility.  There are certain questions, this controversy words that do not belong in raises an important public discourse.  question: what kind of rules  For those who are should govern discourse in unaware, Mr. Kamikaze is

our community?  Many people argue that if we care about ideas, we should favor freedom of expression over the enforcement of staid rules of civility that arbitrarily rule out the use of certain bad words.  I believe the opposite.  If we really care about ideas we should be all the more determined to exclude inflammatory and insulting language from discourse.  By restricting the form of discourse we broaden the range of ideas we are forced to grapple with in our community.    The quality of certain words that makes them so satisfying for expressing anger is precisely what makes the useless for reasoned argument and so unsuitable for public discourse.    If a man confronts me with an argument showing me how my preferred policies conflict with my professed principles he forces me to confront my own ideas.  If he does so and tacks on a “and forget you and whoever you voted for,” he doesn’t injure me so much as let me off the hook.  Use of such language gives me an excuse to not confront the substance of his argument.  Such language doesn’t force anyone to confront new ideas; it gives them an excuse to ignore them.   Expression is about

getting ideas out of ourselves; discourse is about getting our ideas into other people.  We don’t change the world by expressing how we think; we do it by changing how others think.  The young people that worked for Eugene McCarthy in his campaign for the 1968 democratic presidential nomination on a platform of ending the Vietnam War were unfailingly polite and courteous.  They aimed to persuade others; they ended the Presidency of Lyndon Johnson.  The war protesters that took to the streets to against the war in the general election went out of their way to mock outmoded mores.  They aimed to express their contempt for bourgeois morality; they elected Richard Nixon.    When I ask people about the performance, people seem to go on in great detail about stationary and the propriety of criticizing and criticizing an invited guest, etc., and no one seems to have remember the content of Mr. Kamikaze’s argument or his ideas.  Of course, as one for whom the phrase, “important rap artist” carries about as much weight as “important creation scientist,”  I am willing to entertain the possibility that no one recalls the content of his argument because he voiced none worth recalling.  Still, even if we grant that

he had something to say, his way of saying it has brought a lot of attention to himself and none, so far as I can discern, to his ideas. That is why art that aims to offend has always struck me as being much more about the needs of the artists than the issues they claim to care about.  Profanity may satisfy the needs of the artists to express themselves, but it does nothing to change anyone’s mind.  If we are serious about the problems in the world, then political discourse should be more than a form of therapy.   Like many people that come here from the North, I am constantly struck by how polite people are here.  I can remember attracting some rather pointed looks from people in restaurants back when I still had my Chicago vocabulary and thinking, “how small minded of these people, getting so uptight over a couple of little words.”  But I have come to appreciate the wisdom of such restraints on public conduct.  It allows us to air and confront our disagreements without losing our dignity.  Excluding a few little words may cost us a little in our ability to express our feelings, but we gain in far more in ability to share our ideas.  And as for rap—forget it.

Editor’s Note: During the edtiing process, a large portioin of Lesia Nixon’s opinion was inadvertently omitted. Therefore, her complete opinion is being ran in this week’s issue of the Purple and White.

Rebuttals Only Scratched the Surface

The

Purple & White Editor-in-Chief... Becky Lasoski Managing Editor... Ashley Wilbourn Layout Manager... Brent McCarty Layout Editor... Mark Surber Photo Manager... Anna Smith Graphics Editor... Bjorn Carlsson Business Manager.. Philip Cortese Copy Editor... Ace Madjlesi News Editor... Kyle Doherty Opinions Editor... Miriam Gray Features Editor... Catherine Schmidt The Life Editor... Jacob C. White Sports Editor... Ben Cain Advisor... Woody Woodrick Columnists... Dr. Michael Reinhard Lesia Nixon Staff Writers... Russell Turley Meagan Malone Tyler O’Hara Contributors... Cree Cantrell Nell Knox Kathleen Morrison Roxann Jackson Sital Sanjanwala

E-mail corrections to Editor-in-Chief Becky Lasoski,

Lesia Nixon Contributor

As a transfer student, I had heard some disgruntled students offer low-toned whispers about certain issues of the Purple and White. Over the last couple of weeks, because of the Rachel Joe article and the rebuttals, more people have raised their voices. Many thoughts have been insightful. Others have

been, well, shortsighted. The micro-criticizing rebuttals inflamed this campus more than Rachel’s article. Please allow me to return the favor. I found it odd that the respected editor in chief spoke about bias, yet she noted the situation between Yakots and Kamikaze as “The Kamikaze ordeal.” I found it odd that the copy editor deemed the racial tensions at Millsaps College as unacceptable. I humbly submit that not only do I find the racial tensions that I have lived with throughout my life unacceptable, but I am quite sure that the tensions that she has felt on campus would never equal the tensions I feel everywhere I go. I found it odd that the opinions editor spoke about her experiences with the fraternity row on campus. I do respect her; however I believe that her lifestyle and persona are comparable

only to a minute fraction of blacks on campus. I also found it odd that, like many opinions that I heard on campus, her thoughts were based on Rachel’s plantation metaphor. Yet, the metaphor did something for all of us that opinions should do: spark a dialogue. Like or dislike what Rachel said, she made you talk. Thankfully, not only did she make you talk, she opened the opportunity for dialogue between students and administration and brought attention to the racial elephant in the room. I have been told that meetings conducted between the administration and students were productive. I am looking forward to seeing the requests made by students be completed by administration. It is true; one cannot start a fire without a flame. However exaggerated, the spark of Rachel’s article did accomplish its goal. Rachel, for those who understood

the underlying purpose, thank you. On an aside, I would like to mention a profound thought that I have heard said by several people. I just need to put this out there. Of race, creed, religion, and sexual orientation, only race is the most immediate defining characteristic. A person’s skin color, especially if it is dramatically different than one’s own, is seen first and reflexively lends itself to certain stereotypes. Those stereotypes can lead to prejudices. Tensions are created when what defines each of us opens our prejudices to discrimination, when we act on what we think based on preconceived notions. Rarely does anything surge preconceived notions to one’s mind faster than appearance. I have gained relationships with people on campus that have been memorable. I have seen the color of their skin, but only

for a moment. The friends that I have made here have gone beyond that. They have added a positive facet to my life that I hope has been reciprocated. I have also seen the typical body language of discrimination. Of course, they could be gestures that are indiscriminant; maybe some people avoid eye contact or enlarge their personal space with everyone they see. Who am I to presume? I am just a person who has seen the subtleties, the blatancy, and the irony of racism over the years. I hope that Rachel’s article will do more than ruffle a few feathers. I hope that this issue will not fade away without resolution. Unlike Black History Month, the issues and celebrations of black people are year long and constant. Unfortunately, so is racism.

lasosrc@millsaps.edu. The Purple & White is published weekly by The Purple & White. Disclaimer:

Views

ex-

pressed in articles, letters to the Editor and cartoons printed in the Purple & White do not necessarily reflect those of the editors, Publications Board, Millsaps College, The United Methodist Church or the student body. Complaints should be addressed to the Millsaps College Publications Board. Contact Rachel Fonteno or Dr. Priscilla Fermon. Advertising rates available upon request. Call (601) 974-1211 or E-mail Philip Cortese at cortepm@millsaps.edu. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the Editorin-Chief.

Editor-in-Chief bids farewell As my position as editor-in-chief of The Purple & White draws to a close, I am happy to announce that Kyle Doherty will be taking over the publication in 2007. Having spent four years on staff, it is hard to believe that I will no longer be attending the Monday afternoon P&W meetings or participating in the Tuesday night layout parties. Although I will be relieved to finish my term as editor, I will always be thankful of the experiences I garnered from my time on the newspaper staff. Many thanks goes to my advisors Woody Woodrick and Stan McGee, the P&W Editorial Board and all the writers that have contributed to the paper in the past year.

Letters to the Editor Submit letters to the editor to the Purple and White at Box 150847 or e-mail Becky Lasoski at lasosrc@millsaps.edu.

Letters

should be turned in before 12 p.m. on Sunday prior to the Thursday publication. Anonymous

letters

not be published.

will


Opinions

Page 3 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Miriam Gray, grayme@millsaps.edu

Millsaps, it’s about time we give God some time

Isreal Scott Contributor

After coming from church one Sunday, I saw one of my friends in the parking lot near my residence hall. Seeing it was past 3 p.m. but neglecting to see the few bags filled with groceries that dangled from my hand, they quizzically asked “Are you just now getting back from church?” I was taken back for a split second, but I simply answered “No, I got out of church a while ago and then I went to the store.” Once clarity was reached, the person smiled and said “Oh, okay.” As I walked up the stairs to my room, I had

a thought of disappointment due to the quick exchange I just had with a friend. This was similar to me friend like me, who grew up in the church and came from a family who did not and does not put time restraints on worshipping God, yet they quizzed me as if it was taboo to be in God’s house any longer than the usual 2 hours; and even less than that for some. This incident caused me to think about time and how each person, no matter what sex, creed, or color spends the time they are allotted on earth. It would be a falsehood if I said that I was not bothered by the fact that someone seemed to be in disbelief that I could stay in a church service so long. After all it was Sunday, the weekend, and I had the right to spend it the way I wanted. I have been in night revivals that have lasted up to four hours and I did not have a problem with it. Conversely, there are times that I get a little antsy for the door when my pastor goes past his usual ending time and I have errands to run and school work to

do before the sun rises on Monday. Nevertheless, I often make the sacrifice because worshipping God in His house is where my treasure lies now and forever. There were times, that I had no problem being at various social venues all day and all night. There is a scripture in Matthew 6:21 that states: “For where your treasure lies, there will your heart be also.” There is another in Ezekiel 33:12-13 that reads: Therefore, thou son of man, say unto the children of thy people, the righteousness of the righteous shall not deliver him in the day of his transgression:.. if he trust in his own righteousness, and commit iniquity, all his righteousness shall not be remembered; but for his iniquity that he hath committed, he shall die for it.” I have to rest on these scriptures because there were days in my past that I was not giving God all the time that I was able while willfully sinning. In my younger years, I found myself having more than enough time to participate

in activities that were time consuming and or detrimental to my spiritual life. To be brutally honest, days often passed without me having given God the amount of time it takes to smoke a cigarette. I soon found truth in my Mom’s refrigerator magnet that states, “Seven days without prayer, makes one weak.” It was not until I got saved that I realized how weak I was. From fourth grade until my junior year in high school, I attended taekwondo lessons four and five times a week. I would win trophies and medals at regional and national championships because I put time into the sport I loved. I can even recall a time that I broke my toe in class the night before a tournament, yet the next morning I wrapped that toe and went on to place third in my division. Conversely, there were times that I stayed at home from church due to a toothache. I drank and danced on Saturday nights so long that I barely had enough time to make it home to get dressed

for church on Sunday morning. I smoked and sold weed by night and used a scale identical to mine in chemistry class by day. It was not until a van crashed into the driver’s side and totaled the car that had enough marijuana in it to send me to jail, that I heard the voice of God say (after so many warnings) “Isreal, I need your time.” I walked away from the totaled car knowing that I had to get my life together. From that day forward, my life has never been the same. It was not easy at first, but there were some friends who I had to let go, some activities that had to cease, in order to give God the time that is due to Him. In case anyone (especially college students) is wondering where devotional time will be pulled from, start with the equal balance of going to church/campus bible study and school. Then take an inventory to see if outside activities can be cut down a bit or all together as you strive to grow stronger in God. Are you one of the

thousands that are seen at the Battle of the Bands for six or more hours on a Sunday? Are you one of the hundreds shopping at the mall all day, every weekend and days off from classes? This one really convinced me to become a better manager of my time: Ask ourself how much time do you spend on facebook and myspace? Now that you have the idea, run with it. This is not to condemn anyone, but to show others as God showed me what I needed to do to improve my walk with Him. Has my life been all roses? No, of course not. Have there been some stumbling blocks along the way that I have had to overcome? Yes, even up until this year but I am keeping my eye on the prize of eternal life in heaven. Over this winter break, truly take time to reflect on what God has done for you, even when you didn’t deserve it. If you are not saved, I urge you to make Christ the head of your life and walk in the newness of life. I love you with the love of Christ, and remember to be blessed beyond belief!


Features

Page 4 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Catherine Schmidt schmica@millsaps.edu

Rudolph and sweater vests: Students offer their holiday traditions, worst gifts Nell Knox Contributor

Christmas for college students is a wonderful time full of late nights and perpetually clean laundry. It is a time to lounge around in bed until three in the afternoon and a time to eat more than usual. It is a time to receive gifts - both the good and the unusual - and a time to once again celebrate (or endure) family traditions. It is a time full of carols and classic movies and drinking festive beverages with old friends. “We’re kicking off our fun, old fashioned family Christmas by heading out into the country in the old front-wheel drive sleigh to embrace the frosty majesty of the winter landscape and select that most important of Christmas symbols.” –Clark from “Christmas Vacation” Although most people claim that decorations or the end of Thanksgiving holidays really remind them that it’s Christmas time again, some Millsaps students look to other indicators. Mary Mitchell Williams, a freshman, explains, “During Christmas time it always smells like hotdogs or barbeque outside. To me, that’s what it’s all about.” Mary Rogers Sorey, a sophomore, says that for her to get in the Christmas mood, “Cold weather is always a must, but particularly good cheesy Christmas music such as Mariah Carey’s ‘All I Want for Christmas’ or a good showing of the original ‘Home Alone’ also make me start feeling the holiday spirit.” Freshman Brandon Mong claims that for him, the

holidays start the day after Thanksgiving. Junior Drew Maddox asserts that he starts to

Being with family and friends is an important part of the holidays, and almost everyone has some kind of

reindeer kind of make or break it, you know?” Sorey’s family holds what they call a “Christmas

Photo by Catherine Schmidt The worst Christmas gift junior Drew Maddox ever received was a spatula from his eighth-grade girlfriend. Maddox still grills but hopes to not receive more spatulas.

realize its Christmas time when it gets cold outside while senior T Rueff sums up the general sentiment explaining that he is ready for Christmas “When it is December.” “I realized that Christmas is the time to be with the people you love.” – Billy Mack, “Love Actually”

family Christmas tradition. Williams fondly recalls her family’s tradition of making what they call “Reindeer Food.” This concoction composed primarily of oatmeal and glitter was sprinkled on the front lawn every Christmas Eve in hopes of attracting the reindeer. Says Williams, “The

Fiesta” every year on Christmas night.  Family and friends gather and eat Mexican food to celebrate the holidays and, as Sorey puts it, “People eat, drink and are merry.” Reuff’s family also celebrates with a yearly Christmas party some time before Christmas Day. Maddox fondly explains

his family’s traditions, saying, “We go to church, and we decorate the tree together. I always pick out the tree, and I’m always the first one to wake up on Christmas Day. We do Christmas card pictures; we include our dogs.” Mong’s family has many traditions. “We generally play Monopoly on Christmas Eve, go to midnight mass and then go either fishing or hunting the day after Christmas,” Mong explains. “This is extremely important. Will you please tell Santa that instead of presents this year, I just want my family back?”Kevin, “Home Alone” “My best Christmas present?” Sorey pauses for a moment, then responds, “Well, I guess that’s going to have to be a three-waytie. When I was four I got a big green dinosaur named Dinosaur Bob. I liked him a lot. Then once I got an Elvis Presley clock that sways as it keeps time. And then I got this waterproof watch that glowed in the dark, and you could drop it off a building, and it still worked, and it was the kind with a Velcro wristband, which was awesome.” Maddox asserts that a pair of boots was his best present as of late, while Rueff says his best present was, “A puppy named Buddy. We got him last Christmas. He’s a black lab. He lives at my parent’s house.” For Williams, it is not about the quality of gifts so much as the number of gifts. “Usually every Christmas I like to have the most presents under the tree,” Williams explains, “So if I know that someone is giving me two presents but

wrapping them together, I ask them to wrap them separately. Also sometimes I take the tags off my sister’s presents so that I will be able to claim them and be like, ‘Oh look I have the most.’ Sometimes I replace her tags with tags that have my name on them. That’s a good trick.” “I have been extra good this year, so I have a long list of presents that I want. If it seems too complicated, make it easy on yourself: just send money. How about tens and twenties?” – Sally Brown, “A Charlie Brown Christmas” Everyone has their favorite “Worst Christmas Present Ever” story, and most of the time the gift giver is someone you really are not supposed to make fun of. For Maddox, it came from his girlfriend in eighth grade. “It was a spatula,” says Maddox, “I liked to grill. It was kind of clever, but I didn’t want a spatula.” Rueff claims his worst present was “A sweater vest. One of my dad’s friends gave it to me. It was green and it was ugly. I mean, it was a sweater vest. Of course I have never worn it.” Mong says his worst present was “a goldfish from my grandparents. I named it Bob … maybe Jim, something like that. I was really young but I remember being really disappointed.” Sorey’s worst present came from a family friend. “[My worst gift] was from this lady named Miss Casey who I loved but was not related to. One year she gave me and my two sisters matching pairs of blue suede shoes. They were knock-off Wallabies.”

Holiday guide: Go here, do that, try not to make breaking news Can’t get into the holiday spirit yet? Now that the cold weather is here, there is no excuse to be a grinch. Here is your 5-stop guide for a festive, college-student’sbudget December. 1. Fondren ARTMixDec. 7, 5-8 p.m.: Get in the holiday spirit as you walk around Fondren. Revel in lights and commune with our Fondren neighbors as you get some shopping done at the swanky stores. If the season has already made you broke, you can still window shop and enjoy free food! 2. 2nd Annual Smith Park Celebration of Lights and Free Winter Film Festival: Go to the heart of downtown Jackson to see some holiday classics (free!), enjoy hot

chocolate and hear holiday music. Blankets and chairs will not be provided, so bring your own. Friday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m.: Enjoy a free showing of the classic holiday movie “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Come early at 6 p.m. for musical entertainment Friday, Dec. 15, 7:00 p.m.: Watch “The Polar Express” and enjoy holiday music once again at 6 p.m. 3. Light-gazing drive: Remember when you were little and your parents drove you around town to look at Christmas lights? Revive family traditions and take a drive around Jackson with new friends as you listen to cheesy Christmas music. 4. Dorm party: Invite friends over to your room for some eggnog, hot

Photo by Catherine Schmidt Get some shopping done Thursday night at the Fondren ARTMix or just get into the holiday spirit and window shop. Pictured above: Treehouse Boutique

chocolate or hot cider. You can watch your favorite holiday movies or just chat and take a break from the hectic end-of-the-semestercrunch. 5. Help others: Helping others and celebrating what we have is what the season is really about, right? Volunteer your time at Stewpot or another philanthropy organization or simply help a friend study for an exam. Opportunities to get involved on campus include participating in the stocking stuffer party Friday, Dec. 8 at noon. You can also participate in the Circle K Angel Tree. You can get more information on volunteering at Stewpot by calling 601353-2759.


Features

Page 5 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Catherine Schmidt schmica@millsaps.edu

Singers hail the season, help others Roxann Jackson Contributor

The joyous sounds of Christmas may have been in the air since Thanksgiving, but Dr. Timothy Coker and the Millsaps Singers formally announced that Christmas time is here again. On Friday, December 1, 2006 at 7:30 the Millsaps Singers with the Mississippi School of the Arts Chorale presented Hodie!, a Christmas carol concert benefiting The University of Mississippi Medical Center Rehab Center. This is the second time that the Singers have had a benefit concert as two years ago Tri-Delta and Singers held a concert benefiting the Blair E. Batson children’s hospital. Coker decided to support the UMMC Rehab Center for this year’s holiday concert after talking to Dr. Blunt about the lack of money and support for people who come out of surgery and cannot afford rehab. “ I said, ‘Gee whiz, we can help out,’” says Coker. “I hope we can have a (benefit concert) annually. It’s a great way to begin the season.” Coker estimates that between $2,500 and $3,000 were raised at Friday’s concert. Such a sum is not surprising considering the large crowd that came for the show. The Academic Complex’s recital hall was

Photo by Anthony Schmidt Millsaps Singers filled the Academic Complex auditorium for their holiday concert Friday, December 1. The Singers also presented their annual advent service with the Campus Ministry Team on Dec. 5 (pictured above). completely full. “It’s nice to have standing room only,” says Coker with a grin. “It feels good to fill the auditorium.” Friends, family and

colleagues who packed the recital hall were immediately treated to a visual fest of the yuletide season as poinsettias flanked the grand piano at the center

of the stage, and the walls were bedecked with green garlands and red festive ribbons. The concert began with the Singers singing “Of the

Father’s Love Begotten” in the lobby outside of the recital hall. Handbells sounded through the halls as the Mississippi School of the Arts Chorale joined the

Singers, walking down the aisles singing “Holy God We Praise Your Name.” The Singers presented 12 pieces, and the Mississippi School of the Arts Chorale presented seven pieces. Brass players from the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra accompanied several of the pieces along with the organ. The pinnacle and the namesake of the concert, “Hodie!” was presented by both choirs and the brass as the jubilant sounds echoed through the hall. The concert culminated in the audience’s invitation to join the choirs in a rendition of “Silent Night.” The audience assisted with the first verse of “Silent Night” before the choir sang the song in German and then an arrangement. A reception held afterward allowed the audience to meet members of Singers, to congratulate them and to grab a cookie and some frozen punch. The concert allowed not only the Millsaps community to say to the greater Jackson area that we are ready for Christmas but also to benefit the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s Rehabilitation Center and through song, lift the spirits of those in need.

Hindu student celebrates Christmas, family traditions Meagan Malone Staff Writer

Positioned right in the heart of what some would call the Bible Belt, Jackson could be considered a difficult place to live for those belonging to religions outside of the Christian tradition. Sophomore Neha Solanki proves that during the holiday season, even in Jackson, there is plenty of room for religious diversity. Solanki, who was born in New Jersey but has spent the majority of her life in Mississippi, says, “I am a practicing Hindu.” Solanki admits that as a first generation IndianAmerican, it is sometimes hard to know how to handle the two different cultures. “It’s difficult trying to balance your Indian views because you’re trying to assimilate,” explains Solanki. “I have to ask myself, ‘What’s my identity as a first generation IndianAmerican?’” That question means considering what part of her Indian heritage she should preserve as well as what American attributes she should take on. “Lots of pressures accompany those questions,” Solanki confesses. Surprisingly, however, the issue of religion is much less of a cultural pressure thanks

in part to her mother. “The way my mom raised us was very helpful,” says Solanki. “My mother says that all religions lead to God. So we love all religions, and we accept all religions.” Jackson’s Hindu community is not vastly unlike other religious communities in this area: “They usually have Sunday services. A lot of these people have left their countries, so when other people are worshipping, they worship too.” They are able to observe traditional Hindu holidays such as Holi, which is in the spring, Diwali in the fall, and other smaller days of the religious nature such as Puja. However, they also accept other religions traditions such as the observance of Christmas. “We pretty much do the Christmas tree thing and the presents,” says Solanki. But for Solanki and her family, Christmas is not just a commercial experience. “Hinduism is a very encompassing religion, so we like Christmas too. We take part in it as much as other families,” says Solanki. “It all comes down to a celebration of religion, a celebration of being with family.” Solanki says that, as Hindus, her family can both appreciate and observe the concept of Jesus’ birth.

Photo by Catherine Schmidt Sophomore Neha Solanki can embrace her Hindu beliefs while appreciating Christmas traditions. Solanki’s family annually puts up a tree and exchanges presents but focuses on the family values of the season.


The Life

Page 6 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Jacob C. White whitejc@millsaps.edu

The future of the Yearbook Becky Lasoski Editor-in-Chief

“It is wonderful knowing that what you help produce is a history book of the college year. Hopefully, Millsaps graduates may one day show this yearbook to their children and talk about all their wonderful experiences in college,” says Leah Strickland, co-editor of the Bobashela, Millsaps yearbook. Both co-editors, Strickland and Nancy Salloum, are looking forward to producing this year’s edition of the Bobashela. The production of college yearbooks, or annuals, is a far-reaching tradition which commemorates the events and people that made up the past year of school. The popularity of the traditional yearbook, which has been immortalized as the treasured volume for reminiscent alumni, may be declining in light of the younger more internet savvy generations.

“A physical yearbook is quickly becoming obsolete considering the widespread use of Facebook,” explains senior Andrew Harris. Facebook, an online networking web service, provides features for users that allow them to “friend” their fellow college peers. Not only does each user’s account list a current picture of the individual, but those with access to the account can view when users graduated, details such as their major and extracurricular activities and their current employment. “Facebook fits the niche that yearbooks previously held in that it allows students to connect faces with the names of people with whom you attended school, but it goes one step further. It allows you to see what your peers are doing in the present and, sometimes, their plans for the future,” explains Harris. Despite this view, many still value the yearbook as a necessary historic hardback

for school records. Efforts are being made by the coeditors of the Bobashela to keep the book as contemporary as possible.

the design software to create a more exciting design,” says Salloum. “We also plan to add a new section into the book by selling senior

[family, department, co worker, etc]. Senior or baby ads will be a new scope of the yearbook for our viewers to enjoy!”

Photo courtesy of Bobashela staff Co-editors Leah Strickland and Nancy Salloum chronicle the people and events of Millsaps college in the Bobashela. “This year we found new ways to make it more appealing and interesting We met with a professional designer and have updated

ads to parents, faculty and students. This ad will be in color and include pictures of the senior along with a message from the senders

Salloum, who has worked on the yearbook staff since her freshmen year, believes that the yearbook is not only important as a memento

for graduates but also as a valuable experience for those interested in publications. Salloum clarifies, “I love more than anything the time I put into this publication. Generating a yearbook is not just about creating designs and adding them together to form a book. There are many additional business and marketing objectives that must be met to successfully publish the book. These objectives have helped connect me to the business world. “Additionally, the relationships that I have made with the student and faculty, staff, printing companies and design artists have been a great contribution to my interpersonal growth and communication skills.” The projected 2006-2007 Bobashela publish date will be during the summer of 2007 and can be purchased for $60 when ordered this semester.

New mural soon to appear on AC third floor John Yargo Contributor

The third floor of the Academic Complex has finally seceded from the other two floors of the building. Within feet of both the eastern stairwell and the elevator, bold flashes of cobalt, auburn, silver, crimson, flesh and midnight lie just outside the Lewis Art Gallery. From week to week, these colors are being pulled together into a harmonious piece of mural work. By far one of the most ambitious works that the Millsaps Art Club has taken on, the mural will articulate over 700 years of art history in just four 8 feet by 4 feet panels. The project has been gestating since the concept was introduced and approved by the club last fall. In September, junior Michelle Allen composed

the foundational sketch - from the suggestions of the other dozen members— which progresses from right to left. The first panel is in imitation of traditional Chinese painting with a combination of dark browns and light grays with a wispy blue sky overlooking. The next panel is a Renaissance-esque rendering of a pre-Lapserian Adam and Eve walking through Eden, being observed ominously by both God and the trickster snake. Both the impressionist and pop art movements are represented, respectively, in the last two panels. When Allen presented her sketch at a club meeting, a few changes were suggested which she incorporated into the master copy, and the design was amplified to fit the larger canvas. The dozen members were divided into groups to sketch and paint the panels.

MILLSAPS COLLEGE

SBA WEEKLY REPORT WEEK OF December 4th

Along the way, the members of the group have attempted to make decisions based directly on popular sentiment. Consequently, several major choices are made at and during any given work shift. “Are the skies supposed to blend together?” junior Petra Vackova asked aloud, as her paint brush casually painted over the image of God in the Renaissance section. As sophomore Lorene Dodd began mixing a bowl of green pigments, someone mentioned that the group had decided not to paint the shrubbery in the foreground and so Dodd acquiesced, putting the bowl on the oblong table opposite the wall. Uniquely, this project has been founded on a sense of communal artistry with each individual’s skills yielding to their construction of progress in the history of global art.

Student Senate • The Senate convened for the last time this semester last Monday at 9 p.m. in the Senate Chambers, Murrah Hall 200. Committees gave formal reports on their accomplishments for the semester. For detailed information on these items read the Senate Minutes every week.

Executive Board • The Senior Staff of the College has unanimously agreed to accept the SBA’s and Communications’ design for the new undergraduate diploma. Discussions are now underway concerning paper size, material, coloring and the presentation to the graduating senior. • Officers Holly Dickens and Ashley McPhail are the point students working the Vice President Todd Rose to design, create and open Major

Photo by Courtney Maxson Members of the Millsaps Art Club work painstakingly to produce a mural that will adorn the third floor of the Academic Complex. “Everyone is coming to the project with a unique vision,” says junior Holly

Harmon. “But everyone is just very willing to compromise so there

Spirits, an on campus Coffee House that will be located in the cottage, next to the Writing Center. A Kiefer’s style deck along with food items such as sweet potato fries are to be expected. Estimated completion date is March 2007.

Judicial Council • The 2006-2007 Judicial Council under the leadership of Chairwoman Jenny Blount, Vice Chairwoman Becky Lasoski and Secretary Jonathan Giurintano have been trained and meet every other week. However, no cases have been referred to the Council yet. John Conway, Director of Campus Life, is the staff advisor to the Council.

SAPS • Tuesday, December 12, Bowling at10 p.m.

haven’t been—and I don’t forsee—any problems.”

Miscellaneous Items • For a copy of our newsletter, “Whats Cooking in the Bowl,” contact Secretary West. • Contact your Senator with your comments or questions, a list of representatives can be found at www.millsaps.edu/senate

Congratulations fo the new SBA Executive Board • President, Drew McDowell • 1st Vice President, Ace Madjlesi • 2nd Vice President, Christie Kokel • Treasurer, Alli Mattalino • Secretary, Brittany Hickman


Page 7

The Life

December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Jacob C. White, whitejc@millsaps.edu

Bring that back: George Street Grocery Ace Madjlesi Copy Editor

George Street Grocery was the only option for going out my freshman year. Unfortunately, the late-night staple closed at the end of the 2004 - 2005 school year, so probably only juniors and seniors remember it. But I’m sure the rest of y’all have heard stories. Stories? I meant legends. Located at 416 George St. right next to the Mississippi governmental sector, George Street is housed by an old brick two-story. Being so close to the capital, their spectacular plate lunches are really popular with the downtown politicos.

But it is the night life that Millsaps most values. A large number of students agree that, out of all the surrounding bars, George Street hosted the best bands. Senior Danielle Mayer says that she appreciated the fact that, “the atmosphere they created was so different because they brought in such an eclectic group of bands.” But those awesome bands are usually coupled with a cover charge. However, it’s a small price to pay for a ‘real’ night out. George Street is admittedly for the older crowd, as it is one of those 21 and up clubs. But there always seems to

be enough upperclassmen and freshman with fake id’s (I am in no way condoning the use of fake i.d.’s, incidentally) to pack the place. Kate Anderson, a senior, claims that she was a “local” for Thursday nights. Louise Chandler, a Millsaps alumna who frequented the bar, says that she remembers being scared that the floors would fall through. At the end of my freshman year George Street closed amid controversy. In true Millsaps fashion, rumors flew around like dust in the wind. (A little too melodramatic? Eh, you get the point.) The most popular, and

probably the most plausible as well, theory is that the actuall ownership of the tavern got a little sketchy when the previously joint owners went their separate ways. But George Street is back. They reopened their doors during the week of Nov. 27 and Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes played on that following Thurs. night, with Taylor Hildebrand (nothing less than a Millsaps alum) playing the night after. Thursday night parties? Tearing down goalposts? George Street? Wow. Millsaps is actually cool again.

Contributed Photo George Street Grocery finally opens its doors, to the delight of Millsaps students, after being closed for over a year.

Puppets animate holiday classic Sital Sanjanwala

Shannon James. With field trips planned for many Jackson area Many people are familiar elementary schools, the with the famous play children will be fully “The Nutcracker Suite,” captivated in the fantasy featuring ballet dancers world of “The in elaborate costumes Nutcracker Suite.” set to music by “The ballet itself Tchaikovsky. is beautiful and Next week, however, moving to the music the Mississippi Puppetry by Tchaikovsky. This Guild is joining performance is spruced with the Millsaps up for the children, with College Department more colors and more of Performing Arts to dynamic characters show “The Nutcracker in each puppet,” Suite” in puppet form. continues James. The play follows With over 30 years the idea of the classic of experience, the story and music but puppeteers move the has a twist to it. It is puppets effortlessly designed for a younger with almost complete audience, specifically freedom in range of pre-kindergarten to movement. fourth grade. Using the black Contributed Photo However, with the theatre technique The puppet version of “The Nutfun style of almost lifedeveloped by Czech cracker Suite” adds a new dimensize puppets and the puppeteers in the 1960s, sion to the well known ballet. impeccable technique the puppeteers are able of presentation, the to stand directly behind performance is for both Guild,” says third grade the puppets without being Madison Avenue Upper seen. young and old alike. The performace, “Many of the puppetry Elementary School teacher directed by Peter Zapletal, Contributor

shows I’ve seen have involved backdrops and puppets with strings. This play is held as an extremely innovative performance by the Mississippi Puppetry

utilizes puppets designed by Jarmila Zapletal. “I used to watch ‘the Nutcracker’ as a child and love all the costumes and imaginative characters. This performance is really going to be an interesting twist on the classic play,” says freshman Lauren Jenkins. “It’ll be fun and magical, and we can all become kids

again.” “Millsaps has great opportunities for new events. You can get a feel for everything Jackson has to offer, like this experienced puppet version of the Nutcracker. Everyone should see this play to add to their repertoire,” says senior Matt Burch. “The Nutcracker Suite,”

performed by the Mississippi Puppetry Guild will be performing on Dec. 7, 8, 13 and 15. It will play at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. in the Christian Center at a cost of $6 per person. For more information, please visit http://www.mspuppetry. com/.


Sports

Page 10 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Ben Cain, cainbg@millsaps.edu

P&W Interview: Head Coach Mary Bolton Ben Cain

Sports Editor

The P&W speaks with first-year head coach Mary Bolton. P&W: You served as the mayor of McLain from 2001-2004. What brought you back to coaching after spending time as a government leader? Bolton: I was an assistant coach at the University of Southern Mississippi and the head coach at Perry Central High School before I went into public service, and I simply decided to return to basketball. P&W: What differences have you noticed between coaching at a Division I institution like USM and coaching here at Millsaps? Bolton: The biggest change is that at the Division I level, there is much more of a focus on athletics. There, you are able to spend a lot more time in the gym. In Division III, the focus is on academics, so you must recruit scholar-athletes who can succeed in the classroom

as well as on the court. P&W: What are your impressions of Millsaps so far? Bolton: I think Millsaps is a great college, especially because of the academic reputation it carries. The first thing that comes up in conversation when I mention Millsaps is its high academic standards. The women’s basketball program has an opportunity to earn recognition here as well. DePauw is getting into the NCAA tournament with the same type of scholarathletes. I’m excited about getting us to that next level. P&W: How has our team developed since you have been here? Bolton: My point of emphasis tends to be on fundamentals and conditioning. Our workouts focus on quickness, speed and the fundamentals. Once you establish a good foundation in the fundamentals, you can build from there. We want our players to do the fundamentals well, to pass and dribble well, and then we will build from there.

P&W: What can fans watch for as they watch the Lady

for us. Currently, we are working on establishing a transition game so that we

about the team’s play so far this season? Bolton: Naturally, every

Photo by Frank Ezelle First-year head coach Mary Bolton has led the Lady Majors basketball team since the departure of previous head coach Robin Jeffries after the 2005 season. Majors play? Bolton: One thing been successful implementing our Fans can see that

we have with is offense. working

can push the floor quickly and take advantage of fastbreak situations. P&W: How do you feel

coach wants to win each ballgame, but you have to be realistic. Two of our toughest opponents have been from our conference.

We are focusing more on our girls and developing our own game. If we can see improvement in the game-to-game play of each individual player, we will get better as a team as all of the individual efforts come together. P&W: How will the road trip to the South Padre Island Shootout over the upcoming winter break prepare you for conference games next semester? Bolton: The teams we will face over the break are very competitive Division III schools which have made several appearances in the NCAA tournament. The experience of playing against them can only help us get better for our conference opponents. Playing against that tough defense will help us improve offensively, and the tournament will also be good for our team conditioning. Being involved with the game over the holidays will keep us active and help us get ready for coming back to our conference schedule in January.

Majors earn SCAC gridiron accolades Ashley Wilbourn

Managing Editor

Since finishing the season, the Majors football team has accumulated a multitude of awards. Among them are Dubose’s Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Coach of the Year award, sophomore quarterback Juan Joseph’s honor of SCAC Offensive Player of the Year and the SCAC Special Teams Player of the Year title claimed by senior kick returner Chris Jackson. A total of seven Millsaps players were selected to the all-conference first team roster, while eight were named to the second team and five received honorable mention recognition. “Anytime you have a year like we’ve had, individuals get awards…It’s rewarding to see them benefit. There are just not enough awards to go around for everyone who deserves to be recognized,” commends Dubose. Reflecting on his Coach of the Year honor, Dubose gives praise to his staff and players. “It’s not me. It’s an honor to our program, players, and staff. I’m fortunate to be associated

with this group and this college. It’s about the players winning the games on Saturday,” he asserts. Majors quarterback Juan Joseph set school records throughout the year throwing for 2,265 yards this season with 200 completions out of 337 attempts. He also threw

good game plan developed by our coaches, so I owe a lot to other people,” says Joseph. Jackson also was honored to receive recognition from the conference. “It wasn’t expected at all,” he remarks. Jackson led the league

in a single game. Jackson has been receiving attention from the NFL, and various teams have sent scouts to Millsaps to see him play. “Hopefully I can pursue the NFL,” Jackson says. “My dad played in the league, and I just signed my agent

Majors record for the season to 7-4, a vast improvement following the 2005 2-8 campaign. “It was a good year. We started slow against tough competition, but it prepared us for conference play. We were frustrated in the beginning, but we renewed

Photo by Frank Ezelle Quarterback Juan Joseph (11), return specialist Chris Jackson (8) and head coach Mike DuBose all earned top awards for their performances during the Majors’ undefeated run in SCAC play this season. for 21 touchdowns while leading the SCAC in passing yards with 251.7 per game and total offense with 256.1 per game. “I couldn’t have done what I did without the rest of the team – the offensive line, the receivers and the

in kick returns this season, averaging 22.7 yards per return. During the championship game against Trinity, Jackson had two first-half punt returns for touchdowns, becoming just the second player in league history to achieve this feat

this week. He says that I am high on a few teams’ radar.” The Majors football team finished their season on Nov. 18, losing to Carnegie Mellon in the first round of the Division III playoffs 21-0. The loss brought the

Major Basketball Athlete

Major Calendar Men’s Basketball 12/8 Millsaps at Pensacola Christian, Pensacola, Fla., 7:30 p.m. 12/20 Millsaps at Southeastern Louisiana, Hammond, La., 7:45 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at LaGrange College, LaGrange, Ga., 7 p.m. 12/30 Millsaps at Huntingdon College, LaGrange, Ga., 2 p.m. 1/6 Millsaps at Rhodes, Memphis, Tenn., 5 p.m. 1/8 Millsaps at Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss., 7 p.m. 1/12 Millsaps vs. Oglethorpe, Hangar Dome, 8 p.m. 1/14 Millsaps vs. Sewanee, Hangar Dome, 1 p.m.

Women’s Basketball 12/9 Millsaps at Mississippi College, Clinton, Miss., 1 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at Howard Payne, South Padre, Texas 7 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at Simmons or Ramapo, South Padre, Texas, 7 p.m. 1/6 Millsaps at Rhodes, Memphis, Tenn., 3 p.m. 1/8 Millsaps at Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss., 5 p.m. 1/10 Millsaps vs. University of Dallas, Hangar Dome, 5 p.m. 1/12 Millsaps vs. Oglethorpe, Hangar Dome, 5 p.m. 1/14 Millsaps vs. Sewanee, Hangar Dome, 3 p.m.

our confidence when we picked up our first win against Lincoln University,” remarks defensive backs coach Marcus Woodson. In regards to the Majors’ loss in the first round of the playoffs, Woodson comments, “It was a good

game, very competitive defensively on both sides. They were just the better team on that day.” Mike DuBose, the first year head coach for Millsaps enjoyed having the experience of taking his young team to the playoffs for the first time since 1975. “It was a wonderful experience to travel to Pittsburgh and to see a team of Carnegie Mellon’s reputation,” he says. “Our expectation this year was to win conference and get in the playoffs. Now we have to raise the bar so we can win in the playoffs.” The 2006 season for the Majors was a remarkable year for the players and coaches. Now the team is focusing on recruiting for next year and putting together another winning season. “We’ll get everybody’s best performance next year. We’re used to being the team they play for their Homecoming. Now, we’re going to get their very best. It’s great to be a champion, but there are responsibilities that go along with it,” predicts Dubose.

LaReina Adams

Hometown: Ridgeland Major: Psychology Future Plans: To become a Neonatal Surgeon Number: 23 Position: Small forward Nickname on the team: Re Favorite Musical Artist: Sam Cook Favorite Pre- game Music: Anything crunk Favorite Food: My grandmother’s sweet potato pie and ribs Favorite Caf food: Baked potatoes

Favorite Drink: Hi-C Fruit Punch Favorite Restaurant: Bonsai and Red Lobster Favorite Professor: Professor Cori Ciaccio Favorite Book: “2nd Chance” by James Patterson Favorite Movie: “The Little Mermaid” Favorite TV Show: “The Cosby Show” Favorite Musical Artist: Lil Wayne Favorite Millsaps team to watch: Football


Page 9 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White

Sports

Contact Ben Cain, cainbg@millsaps.edu

In the bleachers...

Rookie stars on the rise

Russell Turley Columnist

It has been argued that the NFL Draft class of 2006 featured the future elite of the league. Most notably, the top three Heisman trophy vote-getters from the 2005 season, Reggie Bush, Vince Young and Matt Leinart, were dubbed “saviors” for their respective teams well before they ever stepped on an NFL field. All three teams were coming off a losing season, uncertain about the future and filled with optimism that their draft selections would prove fruitful. None of the players knew what their roles would be during their rookie years. Well into the second half of the season, however, each player’s path has proven to be quite unique. 2004 Heisman Trophy winner Leinart was considered the steal of the draft. Originally projected by experts to be one of the first three players chosen in the draft, Leinart was eventually selected by the Arizona Cardinals at the 11th spot. Leinart began the season as the understudy to veteran quarterback and former league MVP Kurt Warner, but was given the starting job after Warner and the rest of the team struggled. Since taking over, Leinart has led the Cardinals to a couple of victories and has shown signs that have given the Arizona faithful hope. Although Leinart has seen some success, 2005 Heisman Trophy winner Bush and former University of Texas standout Young have shown flashes of brilliance. Bush walked into New Orleans one year after Hurricane Katrina. The Saints were displaced and the city needing something to cheer about. The hype surrounding Bush during the preseason seemed unfair. Saints fans were hoping for Superman. While Bush may not be Superman or even a Pro-Bowler (at this point in his career), he has made opposing teams tweak their defensive schemes when the Saints are in town. Currently, Bush leads the league in receptions, splits time with Deuce McCallister at running back and mustered up a game winning punt return. However, he has perhaps been most effective as a decoy. Bush’s mere presence in the backfield, in the slot or even as a wide-out makes defensive coordinators across the league wary. The Saints and their fans just hope that once Bush fine-tunes his skills he will spend more time as a playmaker than a decoy. Finally, Young made a mockery out of the college football season one year ago. He was given the reins of an 04 Tennessee Titans team in October. Since then the Titans have improved to 5-7. Most recently, Young led his team to a thrilling 20-17 victory versus the Indianapolis Colts last Sunday. All of the critics who questioned Young’s unorthodox throwing motion and whether it would be effective have had their concerns alleviated with the play of Tennessee’s scaryathletic man-child. Who knows what the future holds for these young standouts? It seems that Bush’s team is the only one of the three with playoff possibilities. However, as these three players blossom into team leaders, future success for their squads might not be far off.

Lacrosse Club prepares for season Ben Cain

Sports Editor

The women’s lacrosse club, founded in the spring of 2005, is on the brink of its first season of competitive league play. “Last fall, we were invited to join the Southeastern Women’s Lacrosse League beginning this spring and received a vote of approval from the league,” explains junior Jessica Sampson, the club’s founder. The club will face teams from much larger schools in the league, which includes squads from the University of Florida, the University of Georgia, the University of Central Florida, the University of Tennessee, the University of Miami, Florida State University, Georgia Tech, the University of South Carolina, Auburn University, Clemson, Emory, Furman University and the Savannah College of Art and Design. While the competition from the large universities will certainly challenge the

Millsaps club, Sampson points to a strong showing during a recent scrimmage against the club from Tulane as evidence that Millsaps will be able to compete. “We played Tulane on Nov. 19 and did pretty well. We had the lead in the first half and were tied at halftime. They eventually took the lead and won in the second half, but I think that was mostly because we need to do more work on conditioning,” says Sampson, who serves as a playing coach for the club. “To be honest, we’re all a little intimidated because the big schools have so many girls to choose from. We do have a lot of really aggressive girls, however. Tulane has had winning seasons, and we held our own against them,” she comments. “Tulane’s coach said she was impressed with the way we played, especially since this was our first scrimmage ever. They didn’t have enough girls to play, so they had to borrow a couple of our players. Hopefully, after improving our

conditioning and getting all of our players on our side, we can have a winning season in the spring,” she remarks. The club has relied on funding from the Student Body Association and recent fundraisers to cover its expenses. Sampson explains that while the Athletic Department’s budget was already set for this year, she hopes that the club will be included in next year’s budget so that it can pay for travel expenses as it represents the college. “The SBA has been very supportive, and our advisor, Kendrick Schetter, has also been very helpful,” Sampson states. The team generally holds four practices a week, each lasting between one and two hours. Freshman Jane Fuller says that getting involved with the club was easy for her even though she had no background in lacrosse before coming to Millsaps. “I had never played lacrosse, since I’m from south Mississippi, but the girls in the

club taught me. It is an easy sport to pick up or to teach to someone else,” she explains. Sampson says that the team welcomes new players regardless of their level of experience or schedule. “We’re flexible, and our practices have a good atmosphere,” she says. Freshman Heather Chapman affirms Sampson’s statement, saying, “It’s always ok to miss a practice if you have to write a paper.” Because the club currently has limited financial resources, Sampson praises the support of the Millsaps community, stating, “We are very appreciative of everyone who bought doughnuts, since the money will help us travel to our games this spring.” The club plans to hold another fundraiser, “Cup Night,” during the first weekend after winter break. The event will be an open party with free food at a local bar, where supporters of legal age will be able to purchase reusable cups for drinks during the evening.

Men’s basketball splits games in Texas Ben Cain

Sports Editor

The Majors opened Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference basketball play last weekend, traveling to Texas to face Southwestern University and Trinity University. The Majors returned home with a 1-1 conference record after both games were decided in the final seconds. On Dec. 1, Lorenzo Bailey drained a three-point shot with five seconds left to steal a 70-68 victory from Southwestern. Two days later, the Millsaps was once again in need of late-game heroics, but the team was unable to create a scoring opportunity on its last possession, falling to a 57-53 defeat. “Both of those teams have been at the top of our conference for the last few years, so normally you would say that a split on the road is a pretty good thing, but we were very fortunate to get that win against Southwestern. They led the game for 39 minutes and 55 seconds, but if you’re only going to get the lead once,

that was the time to do it,” says head coach Tim Wise. Trinity held the Majors to fewer than 60 points, the first an opponent has done so all season. The Tigers broke the game open after halftime, leading by as many as 11 points, but the Majors refused to give up on the game. The team cut Trinity’s lead to 55-53 in the final minute, but Trinity sophomore guard B.J. Moon knocked down a pair of free throws with 25 seconds left to put the game out of reach for the Majors. “Trinity played defense and were very physical, and we didn’t respond to that well,” explains Wise. “In all three of our losses, we have shot worse than 35 percent from the field. When your shooting percentage is that low, you have a slim chance of tasting victory,” he continues. The poor shooting night against Trinity stood in stark contrast to the team’s performance against Southwestern, when the team posted a 67 percent

Photos by Frank Ezelle Sophomore guard Ross James puts up a shot during the Majors 79-69 win over Rust College. shooting percentage. Wise cites this as an example of the inconsistency which has hampered the team so far this season. “We need to be more consistent in all aspects of

the game. Our players have to learn to find a way to win in any situation. We have to develop a team mentality which places great value on every possession.”

Recent Major Scores Men’s Basketball 11/17 Millsaps vs. Pensacola Christian 93-62 W 11/18 Millsaps vs. Rust College 79-69 W 11/21 Millsaps vs. Belhaven 60-69 L 11/24 Millsaps vs. Wesley 70-57 W 11/25 Millsaps vs. University of Dallas 64-73 L 12/1 Millsaps vs. Southwestern 70-68 W 12/3 Millsaps vs. Trinity 53-57 L Women’s Basketball 11/17 Millsaps vs. LaGrange College 40-42 L 11/18 Millsaps vs. Rust College 78-55 W 11/21 Millsaps vs. University of Dallas 56-62 L 12/1 Millsaps vs. Southwestern 45-73 L 12/3 Millsaps vs. Trinity 51-90 L


Sports

Page 10 December 7, 2006 • The Purple & White Contact Ben Cain, cainbg@millsaps.edu

P&W Interview: Head Coach Mary Bolton Ben Cain

Sports Editor

The P&W speaks with first-year head coach Mary Bolton. P&W: You served as the mayor of McLain from 2001-2004. What brought you back to coaching after spending time as a government leader? Bolton: I was an assistant coach at the University of Southern Mississippi and the head coach at Perry Central High School before I went into public service, and I simply decided to return to basketball. P&W: What differences have you noticed between coaching at a Division I institution like USM and coaching here at Millsaps? Bolton: The biggest change is that at the Division I level, there is much more of a focus on athletics. There, you are able to spend a lot more time in the gym. In Division III, the focus is on academics, so you must recruit scholar-athletes who can succeed in the classroom

as well as on the court. P&W: What are your impressions of Millsaps so far? Bolton: I think Millsaps is a great college, especially because of the academic reputation it carries. The first thing that comes up in conversation when I mention Millsaps is its high academic standards. The women’s basketball program has an opportunity to earn recognition here as well. DePauw is getting into the NCAA tournament with the same type of scholarathletes. I’m excited about getting us to that next level. P&W: How has our team developed since you have been here? Bolton: My point of emphasis tends to be on fundamentals and conditioning. Our workouts focus on quickness, speed and the fundamentals. Once you establish a good foundation in the fundamentals, you can build from there. We want our players to do the fundamentals well, to pass and dribble well, and then we will build from there.

P&W: What can fans watch for as they watch the Lady

for us. Currently, we are working on establishing a transition game so that we

about the team’s play so far this season? Bolton: Naturally, every

Photo by Frank Ezelle First-year head coach Mary Bolton has led the Lady Majors basketball team since the departure of previous head coach Robin Jeffries after the 2005 season. Majors play? Bolton: One thing been successful implementing our Fans can see that

we have with is offense. working

can push the floor quickly and take advantage of fastbreak situations. P&W: How do you feel

coach wants to win each ballgame, but you have to be realistic. Two of our toughest opponents have been from our conference.

We are focusing more on our girls and developing our own game. If we can see improvement in the game-to-game play of each individual player, we will get better as a team as all of the individual efforts come together. P&W: How will the road trip to the South Padre Island Shootout over the upcoming winter break prepare you for conference games next semester? Bolton: The teams we will face over the break are very competitive Division III schools which have made several appearances in the NCAA tournament. The experience of playing against them can only help us get better for our conference opponents. Playing against that tough defense will help us improve offensively, and the tournament will also be good for our team conditioning. Being involved with the game over the holidays will keep us active and help us get ready for coming back to our conference schedule in January.

Majors earn SCAC gridiron accolades Ashley Wilbourn Managing Editor

Since finishing the season, the Majors football team has accumulated a multitude of awards. Among them are Dubose’s Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Coach of the Year award, sophomore quarterback Juan Joseph’s honor of SCAC Offensive Player of the Year and the SCAC Special Teams Player of the Year title claimed by senior kick returner Chris Jackson. A total of seven Millsaps players were selected to the all-conference first team roster, while eight were named to the second team and five received honorable mention recognition. “Anytime you have a year like we’ve had, individuals get awards…It’s rewarding to see them benefit. There are just not enough awards to go around for everyone who deserves to be recognized,” commends Dubose. Reflecting on his Coach of the Year honor, Dubose gives praise to his staff and players. “It’s not me. It’s an honor to our program, players, and staff. I’m fortunate to be associated

with this group and this college. It’s about the players winning the games on Saturday,” he asserts. Majors quarterback Juan Joseph set school records throughout the year throwing for 2,265 yards this season with 200 completions out of 337 attempts. He also threw

good game plan developed by our coaches, so I owe a lot to other people,” says Joseph. Jackson also was honored to receive recognition from the conference. “It wasn’t expected at all,” he remarks. Jackson led the league

in a single game. Jackson has been receiving attention from the NFL, and various teams have sent scouts to Millsaps to see him play. “Hopefully I can pursue the NFL,” Jackson says. “My dad played in the league, and I just signed my agent

Majors record for the season to 7-4, a vast improvement following the 2005 2-8 campaign. “It was a good year. We started slow against tough competition, but it prepared us for conference play. We were frustrated in the beginning, but we renewed

Photo by Frank Ezelle Quarterback Juan Joseph (11), return specialist Chris Jackson (8) and head coach Mike DuBose all earned top awards for their performances during the Majors’ undefeated run in SCAC play this season. for 21 touchdowns while leading the SCAC in passing yards with 251.7 per game and total offense with 256.1 per game. “I couldn’t have done what I did without the rest of the team – the offensive line, the receivers and the

in kick returns this season, averaging 22.7 yards per return. During the championship game against Trinity, Jackson had two first-half punt returns for touchdowns, becoming just the second player in league history to achieve this feat

this week. He says that I am high on a few teams’ radar.” The Majors football team finished their season on Nov. 18, losing to Carnegie Mellon in the first round of the Division III playoffs 21-0. The loss brought the

Major Basketball Athlete

Major Calendar Men’s Basketball 12/8 Millsaps at Pensacola Christian, Pensacola, Fla., 7:30 p.m. 12/20 Millsaps at Southeastern Louisiana, Hammond, La., 7:45 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at LaGrange College, LaGrange, Ga., 7 p.m. 12/30 Millsaps at Huntingdon College, LaGrange, Ga., 2 p.m. 1/6 Millsaps at Rhodes, Memphis, Tenn., 5 p.m. 1/8 Millsaps at Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss., 7 p.m. 1/12 Millsaps vs. Oglethorpe, Hangar Dome, 8 p.m. 1/14 Millsaps vs. Sewanee, Hangar Dome, 1 p.m.

Women’s Basketball 12/9 Millsaps at Mississippi College, Clinton, Miss., 1 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at Howard Payne, South Padre, Texas 7 p.m. 12/29 Millsaps at Simmons or Ramapo, South Padre, Texas, 7 p.m. 1/6 Millsaps at Rhodes, Memphis, Tenn., 3 p.m. 1/8 Millsaps at Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss., 5 p.m. 1/10 Millsaps vs. University of Dallas, Hangar Dome, 5 p.m. 1/12 Millsaps vs. Oglethorpe, Hangar Dome, 5 p.m. 1/14 Millsaps vs. Sewanee, Hangar Dome, 3 p.m.

our confidence when we picked up our first win against Lincoln University,” remarks defensive backs coach Marcus Woodson. In regards to the Majors’ loss in the first round of the playoffs, Woodson comments, “It was a good

game, very competitive defensively on both sides. They were just the better team on that day.” Mike DuBose, the first year head coach for Millsaps enjoyed having the experience of taking his young team to the playoffs for the first time since 1975. “It was a wonderful experience to travel to Pittsburgh and to see a team of Carnegie Mellon’s reputation,” he says. “Our expectation this year was to win conference and get in the playoffs. Now we have to raise the bar so we can win in the playoffs.” The 2006 season for the Majors was a remarkable year for the players and coaches. Now the team is focusing on recruiting for next year and putting together another winning season. “We’ll get everybody’s best performance next year. We’re used to being the team they play for their Homecoming. Now, we’re going to get their very best. It’s great to be a champion, but there are responsibilities that go along with it,” predicts Dubose.

LaReina Adams

Hometown: Ridgeland Major: Psychology Future Plans: To become a Neonatal Surgeon Number: 23 Position: Small forward Nickname on the team: Re Favorite Musical Artist: Sam Cook Favorite Pre- game Music: Anything crunk Favorite Food: My grandmother’s sweet potato pie and ribs Favorite Caf food: Baked potatoes

Favorite Drink: Hi-C Fruit Punch Favorite Restaurant: Bonsai and Red Lobster Favorite Professor: Professor Cori Ciaccio Favorite Book: “2nd Chance” by James Patterson Favorite Movie: “The Little Mermaid” Favorite TV Show: “The Cosby Show” Favorite Musical Artist: Lil Wayne Favorite Millsaps team to watch: Football


7 Dec. 2006